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Cherry Blossom

‘Under a cherry tree’ is one of the most wanted destinations for marriage globally.

Cherry Blossoms are some of the most beautiful flowers, coming in bright colors. The Cherry Blossom tree in full bloom, during the arrival of spring, is one of the most beautiful sights to behold.

The Cherry Blossom is so popular that festivals are celebrated in its honor- the Cherry Blossom Festival, celebrated in the months of March and April.

Kingdom Plantae Division Magnoliophyta Class Magnoliopsida Order Rosales Family Rosaceae Subfamily Prunoideae Genus Prunus

The Cherry Blossom is Japan’s unofficial National Flower. Somei Yoshino is a favorite Cherry Blossom variety of the Japanese. The flowers are almost pure white, tinged with the palest pink, especially near the stem.

The Somei Yoshino Cherry Blossoms bloom, and usually fall within a week, before the leaves come out. The trees, thus look nearly white from top to bottom. Other Cherry Blossom varieties include yamazakura, yaezakura, and shidarezakura. The yaezakura Cherry Blossom have large flowers, thick with rich pink petals.

The shidarezakura Cherry Blossom, or weeping Cherry, has branches that fall like those of a weeping willow, bearing cascades of pink flowers.

The Japanese Cherry starts flowering profusely from the first warmer days in April, heralding the coming of spring. The pink or white flowers grow in racemose clusters at nodes on short spurs. They are past flowering early in May.

The Cherries can be divided into three groups – the European, the American, and the Oriental. In general, the Oriental types (Prunus serrulata) are less hardy. This genus – Prunus comprises over 400 species and numerous cultivars of trees and shrubs growing in temperate climates mostly in the Northern Hemisphere.

It includes evergreen shrubs, flowering fruit trees, and all the stone fruits – almonds, apricots, cherries, nectarines, peaches, plums, and prunes. They are also very ornamental.

The National Cherry Blossom Festival is an annual celebration in Washington, D.C., commemorating the March 27, 1912, gift to the city of 3,000 Japanese cherry trees from the Mayor of Tokyo to strengthen the growing friendship between the United States and Japan. Cherry Blossoms are rooted deep in the culture of Japan and were used in ancient Japan to forecast how crops for the coming year would do. Modern Japan still celebrates Hanami – gatherings of friends to picnic under a canopy of Cherry Blossoms, enjoying the brief burst of the beauty of nature and springtime. Through the centuries, the Japanese have developed many different varieties of the Cherry tree. All of these trees bloom for a short time with pink or white flowers. Cherries are part of the rose family and like roses, most cherry trees bloom during the spring. A few varieties are grown to flower later and actually show their blossoms in autumn or even during winter! Normally, it is just a week to ten days before all of the blossoms are carried away by the wind.

Growing Cherry Blossoms

Cherries are propagated by budding them on seedling stocks in the nursery and are sold for planting stock as one or two-year-old trees. Sweet and Sour Cherries are fairly easy to grow. Sour Cherries, which are smaller and more tolerant of cold and heat, are easier to grow than sweet Cherries.

Sour cherries are self-pollinating so you don’t have to plant two kinds. Sour Cherries also bloom later, which makes them less vulnerable to harm from late spring frosts.

  • Because of the fact that Cherry Blossom trees bloom early in spring and are susceptible to damage from late spring frosts, the site for growing Cherries should be slightly higher and sloped than the surrounding ground to prevent frosty air from settling in the low spots.
  • Cherry Blossom trees should be placed in a sheltered location with full sun, in soil that is deep, fertile and moist, but well drained.
  • Full sun exposure for Cherry Blossom trees is necessary to produce delicious Cherries and strong trees.
  • Cherry Blossom trees grown in shade will produce spindly branches and fewer cherries that are less sweet.
  • Sweet and sour Cherries are susceptible to most of the same problems.

Cherry Blossom Plant Care

  • Maintaining a clean surrounding is very important to keep pest and disease problems down for Cherry Blossom trees.
  • Bird problems on Cherry Blossom trees can be prevented by planting your trees near people or pets and by netting.
  • Diseased fruit, leaves, and prunings on Cherry Blossom trees should be removed immediately and either burned to kill insect larvae and disease spores or destroyed in a hot compost pile.
  • Some common problems seen in Cherry Blossom trees are Plum curculio, Brown rot, cherry fruit flies, cherry leaf spot and bacterial canker.

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Prunus ‘Kanzan’ Flowering Cherry

The beautiful Kanzan Japanese Flowering Cherry (Prunus serrulata ‘Kanzan’) is a double pink ornamental flowering cherry from Japan. It is also known as ‘Sekiyama’. This deciduous tree has a number of seasonal highlights and is one of the most popular flowering cherries for good reason. We have one in the centre of our rose garden and its clustered ruffled deep pink blossoms on long stalks are a sight to behold in spring (from mid October here on the farm). We enjoy it in the house in vases mixed with lilac, apple blossom, sweet peas and other spring flowers.

Strong branches have an upright habit and can grow to 12 m tall. The creased leaves with toothed edges emerge in spring as a bronze colour, form shady dark green foliage in summer and then turn lovely reds, oranges and hints of yellows in autumn. As the tree matures, it forms a broadening vase shape on a clear trunk.

• Uses: ornamental tree, shade tree, specimen tree, avenue tree, vase arrangements, tub tree, parks, gardens
• Size: 12 metres high depending on conditions
• Flowering: from mid October
• Tolerances: pruning if required
• Features: beautiful double pink cherry blossom, leaves with lovely reds, oranges and hints of yellows in autumn

Prunus ‘Amanogawa’ – Flowering Cherry

Description

Amanogawa Flowering Cherry – Semi-Double Pink

Prunus amanogawa

HEIGHT: 5.0m

WIDTH: 2.0m

*height & width at maturity

FORM: Narrow & columnar with an upright branching pattern

GROWTH RATE: Slow to moderate

FOLIAGE: Green serrated foliage, young leaves are copper coloured. Turning to rustic tones of gold & red in Autumn.

FLOWERS: Large, single to semi-double pale pink fragrant flowers. Blossoms appear in mid to late spring

DESCRIPTION: A distinctive flowering cherry, that produces a good display of semi-double soft pink flowers, on a very narrow, fastigiate framework. An ideal tree for small, narrow gardens and any position where lateral space is limited.

LANDSCAPE USES: Excellent flowering tree suitable for all size gardens. Ideal for small, narrow gardens & positions where lateral space is limited.

TOLERANCES: Adaptable to a variety of site conditions, but prefers moist, well drained fertile soils in a position receiving full sun to part shade. Flowers best in full sun.

TREE CARE: Plant in full sun in a well drained and well worked soil. Take care to plant the bud union above the soil level. Water in well and keep soil moist until tree is established. Fertilize when planting and again after new growth appears. Prune tree when planting to encourage new growth.

Prune after flowering finishes each season to promote new seasons growth.

Flowering cherries (Prunus)

There’s no doubt that if you want a tree with the wow factor in spring, then an ornamental or flowering cherry (Prunus) is the perfect choice. They are literally smothered in blossom and many provide excellent autumn foliage colours.

Many varieties are perfect for even small gardens and they come in a range of shapes – from columnar, spreading or weeping. And, of course, there are varieties of cherry that produce deliciously tasty cherry fruit.

How to grow flowering cherries

Cultivation

Flowering cherries prefer an open, sunny site, which isn’t too exposed – strong winds in spring will blow away much of the blossom, reducing the overall flowering display.

They prefer a good, well-drained soil enriched with lots of organic matter, which holds plenty of moisture in spring and summer, doesn’t dry out or become waterlogged. They will grow in most soils types, especially chalky and alkaline soils.

Flowering cherry varieties

There are numerous species and varieties, some being small or very slow growing making them suitable for all but the tiniest garden. Flower colours range from white through to deep pink, and they may be single or double – with lots of petals, which provide an even more spectacular display. Foliage colour can either be green or purple and many have beautiful autumn leaf colour too. One or too even have gorgeous mahogany or deep copper coloured bark.

The tree shape is an important consideration when choosing: columnar or flagpole cherries are perfect for small spaces; spreading cherries are suitable for larger spaces and to provide a focal point or centrepiece; weeping varieties don’t grow that tall and provide a waterfall of blossom.

The following are all excellent trees, suitable for small gardens.

  • Prunus Accolade has a spreading growth habit and is covered in masses of light pink, semi-double flowers in April. In autumn, the leaves turn a rich orange or red.
  • Prunus Amanogawa, the flagpole cherry, is thin and upright, bearing lots of semi-double, pale pink flowers. In autumn, the leaves turn orange and red.
  • Prunus Kiku-shidare-zakura, Cheal’s weeping cherry, is a small, compact weeping tree. The blousy, double flowers are rich pink. The leaves are a gorgeous bronze colour when young and turn a mellow orange in autumn.
  • Prunus Kojo-no-mai is a very small, slow growing and compact cherry – growing more like a shrub than a tree. It is perfect for growing in containers. Its branches have an attractive zig-zag pattern, which look good even in winter, which bear small, blush pink flowers.
  • Prunus Kursar is small, but spreading with single, vivid deep pink flowers. The leaves are coppery coloured when young, turning deep orange in autumn.
  • Prunus Pink Perfection bears drooping clusters of double pink flowers. The leaves are a bronze colour when young, and turn fiery red and orange in autumn.
  • Prunus serrula is a small, round-headed tree, with coppery-brown bark, white flowers and yellow autumn foliage colours.
  • Prunus x subhirtella Autumnalis produces white, semi-double flowers intermittently from autumn to spring depending on the weather. Leaves turn yellow in autumn.

Planting flowering cherries

Plant bare-root trees between November and March, and container-grown ones any time of year, but preferably in autumn, winter or spring. Dig a hole 60x60cm (2x2ft) and 30cm (12in) deep. Add a layer of organic matter – such as compost or well-rotted manure – to the base of the hole and dig in.

Place the roots in the planting hole and adjust the planting depth so that the tree is planted at the same depth as it was originally growing and the top of the roots are level with the soil surface.

Mix in more organic matter with the excavated soil and fill in the planting hole. Stake the tree with a rigid tree stake and two tree ties so that it is fully supported against the prevailing winds. Water in well, apply a granular general feed over the soil around the tree and add a 5-7.5cm (2-3in) deep mulch of well-rotted garden compost or bark chippings around the root area.

If planting in the lawn, create a turf-free circular bed around the tree with a minimum diameter of 60cm (2ft).

Suggested planting locations and garden types

Flower borders and beds, focal point, city and courtyard gardens.

How to care for flowering cherries

Once planted and properly established, flowering cherries need very little aftercare. They may need watering during prolonged dry periods in summer. Feed with a general granular plant food in spring.

Unless essential, it is best not to carry out any pruning. If pruning is needed, it should be carried out when the tree is actively growing – from May to August – to prevent problems with bacterial canker and silver leaf diseases.

Flowering season(s)

Spring, Autumn, Winter

Foliage season(s)

Spring, Summer, Autumn

Sunlight

Full sun

Soil type

Chalky, Clay, Loamy, Sandy

Soil pH

Neutral

Soil moisture

Moist but well-drained

Ultimate height

Up to 10m (33ft)

Ultimate spread

Up to 5m (16ft)

Time to ultimate height

10-15 years

Plant Care 101: Kwanzan Cherry Tree

So, we’ve talked a lot about flowering cherry trees since the start of spring but for good reason: Flowering cherries are the symbol of the season. And when it comes to this vibrant, brightly-hued collection of trees, the Kwanzan Cherry Tree is one-of-a-kind.

So, we’ve talked a lot about flowering cherry treessince the start of spring but for good reason: Floweringcherries are the symbol of the season. And when it comes to this vibrant, brightly-hued collection of trees, the Kwanzan Cherry Tree isone-of-a-kind.

For starters, it boasts a deep pink color that stands out amongst other flowering varieties. And it’s super easy to add to your landscape, from planting to care and beyond…especially with our tips and tricks.

Scouting the Area

First thing’s first: Selecting the perfect location. Thankfully, the Kwanzan Cherry Tree isn’t finicky or fussy. All it needs to really thrive is full sun and well-drained soil.

Full sun means about 6 to 8 hours of sunlight daily for this coveted tree. And it acclimates best in growing zones 5 through 9, with cold hardiness down to -10 degrees. Thattranslates to Kwanzan good looks from North to South and even out West.

Once you’ve scouted the area and are ready to plant, dig ahole that’s about twice the width of your tree’s root ball.From there, it’s as easy as 1-2-3. Place your Kwanzan Cherry Tree, backfill the soil and then water the area to settle your tree’s roots.

And the best time to plant?Both spring and fall are ideal – simply wait until the final frost has passed in spring and before the first frost hits for fall.

Ongoing Care

Planting is the hardest part. Seriously. Long-term care for the Kwanzan Cherry Tree is unbelievably straight-forward and effortless.

The most important part is watering, and the Kwanzan is so carefree that it doesn’t take much. We recommend watering about once or twice weekly, but if you’re really not sure when to give your Kwanzan a drink, simply check its surrounding soil.

When the top 2 inches of soil are dry, it’s time to water. A slow trickle with a garden hose for approximately 30 minutes is best. And the weather does play a part – you may have to water your Kwanzan Cherry twice a week during hot summers or just once every three weeks during fall.

Either way, checking your soil is a foolproof method for best results.

Pruning

Don’t be daunted – pruning for the Kwanzan Cherry Tree is easy!All you need to do isremove the current year’s old, faded flowersto promote healthful growth for the following season. Pruneyour Kwanzanduringdormancy and remove dead, damaged or diseased branches as well.

No serious pest or disease issues affect this variety, and any that do can be mediated by cleaning your leaves. Pruning is straight-forward too – thin out your young plants to three or four main branches for optimum fruiting, and after blooming in the spring, clip the tips of your branches. It’s that easy.

Tip:Sterilize your tools with rubbing alcohol to ensure a healthy cut during pruning.

Mulching and Fertilizing

Flowering Cherry Trees do not require fertilizer for the first two years – just keep any errant weeds in check. Mulching around the base of the tree is also a plus, since it protects and nurtures the soil while keeping roots moist.

When the third year rolls around,fertilizeyour Kwanzanwith a nitrogen blend. Apply it once in the spring, or spread the nitrogen amount into 2 to 4 equal applications over the spring and summer seasons.

Moreon Planting

Basically, our Kwanzan Cherry Tree is second to none when it comes to beauty and ease.But we do have acouple morebits of information to make yourKwanzan Cherry amazingly successful:

  • These cherry trees don’t produce edible fruit to maintain, but they do provide tons of ornate pink, purple, and white blooms – no fruit means even easier care.

  • The Kwanzandoesn’t have any serious pest or disease issues, so you won’t have to use harsh chemicals. And if you do encounter any issues,they’re easy to treat with a natural insecticidal soap or BioNeem solution.

So, if you’re looking for springtime color…without hassle,look no furtherbecause our Kwanzan Cherry Tree has it all. Check out more about this spring staple here!

Flowering Cherry Trees

Flowering Cherry Tree – Prunus Serrulata

When we think of a flowering cherry blossom tree, we see pink or white flowers covering the branches of these trees in the spring time. One of the first trees to bloom and one of the favorites of many, the quintessential cherry blossom is a sign that spring has arrived. The Japanese cherry blossom trees include varieties like, the double weeping cherry tree (Prunus Pendula Flora Plena), the Kwanzan cherry tree, Mount Fuji, Akebono, Sakura, Snow fountains, Angels Blush, Bing cherry tree and more. Most if not all are all ornamental and are grown for the flowers alone and for its beauty and form. Even when these trees are flowerless and have no leaves, they still make a statement in any yard. At SummerWinds Nursery, we offer many varieties of the cherry blossom tree for sale.

The Cherry blossom tree should be planted in a sunny location with good drainage, for best flowering and growth. These trees like full sun, at least 6-8 hours a day or more. Depending on variety and type these trees can grow anywhere from 15 to 20 feet, with a canopy just as wide. Trim back the tree for shaping, don’t hack the tree as this will take away its shape and form. This is especially true for the weeping cherry tree.

Plant Facts:

Type: Perennials
Height: Varies by type
Bloom Time: Spring
Sun-Shade: Full Sun
Zones: 4-7
Soil Condition: Light, Sandy
Flower / Accent: White pink blossoms

A cherry blossom tree is a beautiful addition to any landscape. Creating a Cherry Blossom Garden is simple. Take the time to investigate the different varieties and choose the ones you enjoy most. Be sure to pay attention to their size and select a variety that will fit in the space that you have. A Bing cherry tree will grow up to 35’ tall and 25’ wide at maturity, while a weeping cherry tree can be found in a dwarf variety that will grow only 10’-12’ tall. Cherry trees require space when planting and will do best if you do not crowd them. Space around the tree and between trees is very important for water absorption and proper root growth. Water stakes will also help roots grow deep instead of staying on the surface.

For more information on how to plant your cherry blossom tree, watch the video below.

Watch our “How to Plant Trees & Shrubs” video:

At SummerWinds Nursery, we have a wide variety of cherry blossom trees for sale. Stop in to your local SummerWinds Nursery today and let our Trusted Garden Advisors help you pick the best Japanese cherry blossom tree for your yard.

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At SummerWinds, We Guarantee Success!

Weeping Higan Cherry

The weeping Higan cherry is native to Japan, where it is called beni-shidare zakura (pink weeping cherry). The weeping Higan cherry is one of more than a dozen species of cherry blossom trees. These species of the genus Prunus are valued for the beauty of their flowers and do not produce fruit that is edible by humans. The weeping Higan cherry and other cherry blossom trees are culturally significant as symbols of spring both in Japan and in others regions where they have been introduced. In Japan, the springtime custom of hanami involves picnicking beneath cherry blossom trees in March and April in order to enjoy the flowers. This practice has been adapted by U.S. cities that host cherry blossom festivals. The National Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington, D.C. commemorates the city receiving a gift of cherry trees from the city of Tokyo in 1912. The festival events run throughout the month of April and include a large street festival. In New Haven, the Wooster Square Cherry Blossom Festival, now in its 43rd year, celebrates the 72 cherry blossom trees that were planted in the neighborhood in 1973.

The shape and flowers of the weeping Higan cherry have made it highly prized for its aesthetic value. Miharu Takizakura, a 1,000 year-old weeping Higan cherry in Fukushima Prefecture, is considered one of the three great cherry trees in Japan and was designated a national treasure in 1922. The tree flowers in mid to late April and is a tourist destination, attracting 300,000 visitors every year. One of the features of cherry blossoms that contribute to their symbolic significance is that they are only in full bloom for a short period of time (between a few days to two weeks, depending on weather conditions). The fleeting nature of the flowers embodies the concept of mono no aware, an appreciation for the impermanence of things. Cherry blossoms are a common motif in Japanese poetry and a kigo (seasonal word) that represents spring (they are often referred to simply as hana, which means flower).

In addition to their aesthetic value, cherry blossoms have practical uses. Kabazaiku is the craft of making tea boxes and other woodworks out of cherry wood. Both the flowers and leaves of cherry blossom trees are edible and have many culinary uses. Sakurayu is a herbal tea made from salt-pickled cherry blossoms in hot water, traditionally served at weddings instead of green tea. In Japanese, the expression “to make the tea cloudy” (ocha wo nigosu) means to be ambiguous. Because sakuraya is a clear drink, it symbolizes an auspicious beginning. Sakura mochi, a confection typically eaten in the spring, is a rice cake filled with red bean paste and wrapped in a cherry blossom leaf. Many other products, including lotions and candies, can be purchased that feature cherry blossom design motifs, scent, or taste.

Weeping Cherry Tree Stock Photos and Images

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  • Japanese weeping cherry tree
  • Shidarezakura (Weeping Cherry) Tree in full bloom at the entrance of Ueno Park in Tokyo, Japan
  • Weeping cherry tree in Nagano, Japan
  • Old weeping cherry tree, shidarezakura, lit up at night in Maruyama park, Gion, Kyoto, Japan 2014
  • Japanese Weeping Cherry Tree Blossoms
  • Cheal’s Weeping Cherry Tree blossom, Prunus kiku-shidare-zakura, England
  • Pink weeping Cherry tree in full bloom
  • Weeping cherry tree blossoms with a bee
  • Maruyama Park in Kyoto, Japan during the spring cherry blossom festival.
  • Prunus Subhirtella Pendula Plena Rosea. Weeping cherry tree with blossom at RHS Wisley gardens, Surrey, England
  • Kyoto, Japan – April 25, 2017: Illuminated path at dusk from Yasaka Shrine to the Gion weeping cherry tree in Maruyama Park. Gion Shrine is one of the most famous shrines in Kyoto, Japan .
  • Maruyama Park in Kyoto, Japan during the spring cherry blossom festival.
  • Prunus Pendula Pendula Rosea Ornamental Weeping Cherry Tree England
  • Prunus pendula ‘Pendula Rosea’ weeping Cherry tree flowers in blossom in April
  • Weeping Higan Cherry tree in full bloom (Prunus subhirtella) ‘Pendula’
  • Maruyama Park in Kyoto, Japan during the spring cherry blossom festival.
  • Large Weeping Cherry Tree in spring,Japan
  • Close up of weeping cherry tree
  • Maruyama Park in Kyoto, Japan during the spring cherry blossom festival.
  • Prunus pendula ‘Pendula Rosea’. Drooping Rosebud Cherry.
  • Shidarezakura (Weeping Cherry) Tree in full bloom at the entrance of Ueno Park in Tokyo, Japan
  • Weeping cherry tree and mustard flowers in Nagano, Japan
  • Kyoto, Japan at Philosopher’s Way in the Springtime.
  • Japanese weeping cherry tree
  • Cherry Trees in Kyoto, Japan.
  • Pink weeping Cherry tree in full bloom
  • Weeping cherry tree, shidarezakura, lit up at night in Maruyama park, Gion, Kyoto, Japan 2014
  • Japanese Weeping Cherry Tree Blossoms
  • Weeping cherry tree in the sunlight on a beautiful day in the spring.
  • A weeping cherry tree in bloom is lit up from below at dusk
  • Okkazuma weeping cherry tree at night Yamanashi Japan
  • weeping cherry tree blossoms
  • Japan, Kyoto, Maruyama Park during cherry blossom season in springtime. An ancient weeping cherry tree (shidaresakura) is floodlit each evening
  • Weeping cherry tree in full bloom contained in a planter, outside of an urban office building – USA
  • Prunus x subhirtella pendula rubra, Weeping Cherry tree. Westonbirt Arboretum, Gloucestershire, England
  • Large Weeping Cherry Tree in spring,Japan
  • Close up of weeping cherry tree blossoms, Prunus serulata.
  • Gion weeping cherry tree in Maruyama Park, Kyoto, Japan.
  • Japanese weeping cherry tree Pendula Rosea
  • Shidarezakura (Weeping Cherry) Tree in full bloom at the entrance of Ueno Park in Tokyo, Japan
  • Weeping cherry tree in Nagano, Japan
  • Weeping cherry tree at Kakunodate, Akita Prefecture
  • Japanese weeping cherry tree
  • Fresh green leaves on a Weeping Cherry Tree and City background during spring. Ueno Park, Tokyo
  • Pink weeping Cherry tree in full bloom
  • Weeping cherry tree in autumn colours, Christchurch, Canterbury, New Zealand
  • Weeping Cherry Tree
  • Weeping cherry tree in Downingtown PA
  • Kyoto, Japan – April 25, 2017: japanese lantern around large shidarezakura or weeping cherry tree at dusk. Maruyama Park, the Kyoto’s most famous cherry-blossom viewing hanami spot. Spring season.
  • Okkazuma weeping cherry tree at night Yamanashi Japan
  • Weeping cherry tree blossoms at springtime – Prunus subhirtella pink flowers on flowering trees against a blue sky – Easter flowers & spring blossom
  • Springtime in Kyoto, Japan. Cherry blossom (weeping cherry) in front of a paper screen
  • Weeping cherry tree in full bloom contained in a planter, outside of an urban office building – USA
  • Prunus Subhirtella Pendula Plena Rosea. Weeping cherry tree blossom
  • Large Weeping Cherry Tree in spring,Japan
  • Close up of Japanese weeping cherry tree blossoms, Prunus serulata.
  • Japanese cherry trees blooming at Brooklyn Botanic Garden New York City
  • Weeping cherry tree in full blossom in front garden with bungalow with dorma window behind
  • Prunus Pendula Pendula Rosea Ornamental Weeping Cherry Tree England
  • Weeping cherry tree, Kyoto Prefecture, Japan
  • Weeping Cherry Tree Niyodo,Kochi Prefecture
  • Japanese weeping cherry tree
  • Weeping cherry tree in Yoichino, Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan
  • weeping cherry tree blossom
  • Weeping Japanese Cherry Tree, Latin: Prunus Serrulata ‘Snow Fountains’ in spring
  • Ice clinging to a weeping Cherry tree. Britain,winter.
  • Cherry Trees in Kyoto, Japan.
  • Prunus pendula f. ascendens ‘Rosea weeping cherry tree in blossom in spring. AGM
  • Okkazuma weeping cherry tree at night Yamanashi Japan
  • Weeping cherry tree blossoms at springtime – Prunus subhirtella pink flowers on flowering trees against a blue sky – Easter flowers & spring blossom
  • Japan, Kyoto, Maruyama Park during cherry blossom season in springtime. Crowds gather to admire and photograph an ancient weeping cherry tree
  • Weeping cherry tree blossoms
  • Prunus Subhirtella Pendula Plena Rosea. Weeping cherry tree with blossom at RHS Wisley gardens, Surrey, England
  • Large Weeping Cherry Tree in spring,Japan
  • Close up full frame of weeping cherry tree blossoms, Prunus serulata.
  • Japanese cherry trees blooming at Brooklyn Botanic Garden New York City
  • pink weeping cherry (Prunus pendula, Pruznus subhirtella ‘Pendula’, Pruznus subhirtella Pendula), single tree in a park, Germany, Baden-Wuerttemberg
  • Weeping cherry tree branch and leaves on weathered wood in autumn
  • Weeping cherry tree and mustard flowers in Nagano, Japan
  • A beautiful vibrant close up photograph, shallow depth of field, of pink cherry blossom, weeping cherry tree, against a blue summer sky
  • Japanese weeping cherry tree
  • Weeping cherry tree in Yoichino, Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan
  • Prunus pendula ‘Pendula Rosea’ weeping Cherry tree flowers in blossom in April
  • Red Admiral butterfly and weeping cherry blossoms
  • Ice clinging to a weeping Cherry tree. Britain,winter.
  • American Robin perching in Weeping Cherry Tree Blossoms
  • Prunus pendula f. ascendens ‘Rosea weeping cherry tree in blossom in spring. AGM
  • Okkazuma weeping cherry tree at night Yamanashi Japan
  • Weeping cherry tree blossoms at springtime – Prunus subhirtella pink flowers on flowering trees against a blue sky – Easter flowers & spring blossom
  • The cherry Weeping cherry blossom of Asukayama park in Tokyo, Japan.
  • Crowd enjoying the Weeping Higan Cherry tree in full bloom
  • Prunus Subhirtella Pendula Plena Rosea. Weeping cherry tree with blossom at RHS Wisley gardens, Surrey, England
  • weeping cherry tree with a bee pollinating flowers
  • A flowering branch of a weeping higan cherry tree, Prunus subhirtella pendula.
  • Macro background of blooming pink Japanese Cherry Blossoms
  • Honeybee in flight, approaching flowers of a weeping cherry tree.
  • Wooden Japanese sliding window and beautiful weeping cherry tree outside
  • Bronx, New York – Ornamental weeping cherry tree at the New York Botanical Garden *
  • A beautiful vibrant close up photograph, shallow depth of field, of pink cherry blossom, weeping cherry tree, against a blue summer sky
  • Spring tulips and weeping cherry tree

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