White and orange flowers

Plants with orange flowers

Orange flowers are brilliant at bringing warmth and intensity to the garden.

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They comes in different shades, too, from more yellow tones of Berberis darwinii, to the reddish orange blooms of Mexican sunflowers.

Orange flowers aren’t exactly demure, so don’t be afraid to combine them with other intensely coloured blooms to provide daring combinations. Great Dixter’s Christopher Lloyd did just this, pairing up luminous oranges with purples, pinks, reds and yellows to dazzling effect.

Exotic borders are particularly accommodating to orange flowers, where the warm colours can echo the balmy origins of the plants.

Of course, this is far from all the plants with orange flowers you could grow – find plenty more on our Plant Finder.

Discover some of the best orange flowers to grow, below.

Reaching an impressive 1.5m in height, foxtail lilies are at home in a sunny spot, in well-drained soil.

Nasturtiums

Nasturtiums (tropaeolum) are vigorous, hardy annuals. In the case of Tropaeolum majus, all parts of the plant are edible and it can be grown as a companion plant alongside brassicas, helping to draw away small and large white butterflies.

Orange blooms and webbed-shaped leaves of nasturtium

Mexican sunflowers

Blazing hot Mexican sunflowers (Tithonia rotunidfolia) are free-flowering annuals, ideal for spicing up beds and borders. They’re also brilliant plants for polllinators and last well as cut flowers. Try combining with salvias, agastaches and aromatic nicotianas.

Orange mexican sunflower

California poppies

The California poppy, Eschscholzia californica, is a hardy annual that’s perfect for sowing in pots and containers, or in gaps in borders. Check out our advice on how to sow California poppies outdoors. For darker orange flowers, try a cultivar like ‘Mikado’.

Mid-orange Californian poppies

Geums

There are geums to grow in just about every shade of orange, from peachy ‘Pineapple Crush’, to luminous ‘Totally Tangerine’, to burnt orange ‘Firefinch’. Try growing them in a mixed herbaceous border alongside verbascums and scabious.

Geum ‘Fire Opal’ beside contrasting blue flowers

Lilies

In this case, you have the option of growing oriental lilies (lilium) or daylilies (hemerocallis) – or both if you like! If you have clay soil, daylilies are ideal, whereas oriental lilies do better in a well-drained, acidic soil.

Orange lily

Kniphofias

Aptly named red hot pokers for their hotly coloured blooms, kniphofias are easy-to-grow hardy perennials. Try growing alongside other plants that also enjoy moist, well-drained soil in full sun, such as achilleas and Euphorbia mellifera.

Red hot pokers in a contrasting orange and purple border

Eremurus

These magnificent perennials are native to western and central Asia. Reaching an impressive 1.5m in height, foxtail lilies are at home in a sunny spot, in well-drained soil – a gravel garden or similar is ideal. Many varieties have orange blooms, but yellow- and white-flowered varieties are easy to find, too.

Spires of orange foxtail lillies above yellow flowers

Campsis

Trumpet vines (campsis) are fast-growing climbers are perfect for quickly covering sunny walls and fences. Despite exotic appearances, they’re hardy to -10°C. For rich orange blooms, take a look at cultivars like ‘Indian Summer’ and ‘Madame Galen’.

Trumpet vine ‘Indian Summer’

Berberis darwinii

Berberis darwinii is a robust, evergreen shrub, producing masses of luminescent orange blooms in April and May. It works well as a compact hedge, too. Other barberries with orange flowers include Berberis x lologensis and Berberis linearifolia.

Orange flowers of berberis ‘Darwinii Compacta’

Witch hazels

Witch hazels (hamamelis) are deciduous, winter-blooming trees with distinctive, fragrant blooms. There are lots of cultivars with orange flowers, as well as others with red and yellow flowers. Check out ‘Aphrodite’, ‘Jelena’ and ‘Orange Beauty’.

Advertisement Golden-orange witch hazel ‘Aphrodite’ Arrowhead, green vulcan grass

Plants to combine with orange flowers

  • Verbena bonariensis
  • Agastaches
  • Salvias
  • Aeoniums
  • Phlox
  • Heleniums
  • Cannas
  • Briza media
  • Wangenheimia lima

Orange is my favorite color. I love it in clothing, home decor and flowers. It’s also the de facto Dutch national color. Here are my favorite 30 orange flowers. Each listed flower includes a photo and key growing information.

Orange is my favorite color. I love it in clothing, home decor and flowers. It’s also the de facto Dutch national color. Perhaps it’s my favorite color because I love Autumn so much when orange reigns supreme glowing in changing leaves and of course pumpkins.

Lucky for me, there are many flowers that bloom in orange. Here are my favorite 30 orange flowers. Each listed flower includes a photo and key growing information.

Related: Orange Bedroom Ideas | Orange Dining Room Ideas | Orange Interior Design Ideas | Orange Kitchen Ideas

Aloe Vera

Scientific Name: Aloe barbadensis

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun

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Water Needs: Low

Hardiness Zones: 8 to 11

Soil: pH 7.0 – 8.5

Begonia

Scientific Name: Begonia obliqua

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full sunlight to partial shade, depending on the variety

Water Needs: High – water regularly and keep the soil moist

Hardiness Zones: 9 to 10

Soil: pH 5.5 – 6.2

Bird of Paradise

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Scientific Name: Strelitzia

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: Moderate

Hardiness Zones: 9 to 11

Soil: pH 6.0 – 6.5

Bulbine

Scientific Name: Bulbine frutescens

Type: Perennial

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Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: High – water regularly but don’t overwater

Hardiness Zones: 9 to 11

Soil: pH 6.1 – 7.8

Butterflyweed

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Scientific Name: Asclepias tuberosa

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: Low

Hardiness Zones: 3 to 9

Soil: pH 6.0 – 7.0

California Poppy

Scientific Name: Eschscholzia californica

Type: Perennial but often grown as Annual

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: Low

Hardiness Zones: 5 to 12

Soil: pH 6.5 – 7.5

Canna

Scientific Name: Canna

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: High – develop well with a good supply of water

Hardiness Zones: 8 to 11

Soil: around pH 6.5

Carnation

Scientific Name: Dianthus caryophyllus

Type: Perennials

Sun: Full Sunlight

Water Needs: Moderate – water once or twice weekly

Hardiness Zones: 3 to 9

Soil: pH 6.7

Chrysanthemum

Scientific Name: Chrysanthemum morifolium

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sunlight

Water Needs: Moderate

Hardiness Zones: 3 to 9

Soil: around pH 6.5

Coppertips

Scientific Name: Crocosmia

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade

Water Needs: Moderate watering until established

Hardiness Zones: 6 to 9

Cosmos

Scientific Name: Cosmos

Type: Annual

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: High

Hardiness Zones: 3 to 10

Soil: pH 6.5 – 7.0

Crown Imperial

Scientific Name: Fritillaria imperialis

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade

Water Needs: Low – needed during dry season

Hardiness Zones: 4 to 10

Soil: pH 5.0 – 8.5

Dahlia

Scientific Name: Dahlia pinnata

Type: Annuals

Sun: Full Sunlight

Water Needs: Low until flowers established, maintained with Moderate Watering

Hardiness Zones: 8 to 11

Soil: pH 6.5 – 7.0

Daylily

Scientific Name: Hemerocallis

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade

Water Needs: High – watering is most important during Spring and Summer

Hardiness Zones: 3 to 10

Soil: pH 6.0 to 6.5

Gerbera Daisy

Scientific Name: Gerbera Jamesonii

Type: Annual or Perennial, depending on climate

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: Moderate

Hardiness Zones: 9 to 11

Soil: pH 6.0 – 7.0

Helenium

Scientific Name: Helenium

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: Moderate

Hardiness Zones: 3 to 8

Soil: pH 5.5 – 7.0

Iris

Scientific Name: Iris croatica

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sunlight

Water Needs: Moderate – water thoroughly when planting

Hardiness Zones: 3 to 10

Soil: pH 6.8 – 7.0

Lantana

Scientific Name: Lantana camara

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: Low

Hardiness Zones: 2 to 11

Soil: pH 6.5 – 7.5

Lily

Scientific Name: Lilium

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sunlight

Water Needs: Moderate

Hardiness Zones: 3 to 9

Soil: 5.5 – 6.5

Lily of the Incas

Scientific Name: Alstroemeria

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full sun or Partial Shade

Water Needs: Moderate – enough moisture until established

Hardiness Zones: 8 to 10

Soil: < pH 7.0

Lion’s Tail

Scientific Name: Leonotis leonurus

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: Low

Hardiness Zones: 8 to 11

Soil: pH 6.6 – 7.5

Marigold

Scientific Name: Tagetes

Type: Annual

Sun: Full Sunlight to Partial Shade

Water Needs: Low – once per week but more during warmer months

Hardiness Zones: 8 to 10

Soil: pH 6.0 – 7.5

Mexican Sunflower

Scientific Name: Tithonia diversifolia

Type: Annual

Sun: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Water Needs: Low

Hardiness Zones: Hardy to zone 9a

Soil: pH 6.6 – 7.5

Ranunculus

Scientific Name: Ranunculus

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: Low – once a week until fall comes around

Hardiness Zones: 8 to 11

Soil: pH 6.0 – 6.5

Rose

Scientific Name: Rosa

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sunlight

Water Needs: Moderate

Hardiness Zones: 4 to 9

Soil: pH 5.5 to 7.0

Strawflower

Scientific Name: Xerochrysum bracteatum

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: Moderate – water during dry season

Hardiness Zones: 8 to 11

Soil: pH 6.6 – 7.5

Tiger Lily

Scientific Name: Lilium lancifolium

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade

Water Needs: Moderate

Hardiness Zones: 3 to 9

Soil: pH 4.5 – 7.8

Trumpet Honeysuckle

Scientific Name: Lonicera sempervirens

Type: Perennial

Sun: Full Sun or Partial Shade

Water Needs: High – consistent watering until established

Hardiness Zones: 4 to 9

Soil: pH 3.7 – 6.8

Tulip

Scientific Name: Tulipa

Type: Perennial or Annual depending on the climate

Sun: Full Sunlight

Water Needs: Low

Hardiness Zones: 4 to 10

Soil: pH 6.0-7.0

Zinnia

Scientific Name: Zinnia elegans

Type: Annual

Sun: Full Sun

Water Needs: Low

Hardiness Zones: 3 to 10

Soil: pH 5.5 – 7.5

Related: Orange Bathroom Ideas | Orange Living Room Ideas

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Tags: Flowers, Orange Categories: Gardens and Landscaping
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by Matt Gibson

Looking for orange flowers to add to your garden this growing season? We don’t blame you. The color orange is vibrant and energetic, falling between yellow and red in the color spectrum. The color orange is reflective of joy, heat, warmth, creativity, success, change, health, happiness and fun. Orange promotes a feeling of overall wellness and positive energy and orange flowers in your garden will bring that feeling to everyone who enters it. Orange is an eye catching color. It is flamboyant and stimulating. It has all the passion and fierceness of the color red mixed with the subtle calmness and happiness of yellow.

There are around thirty different flowers that have orange varieties. The following list contains the cream of the crop of orange garden flowers and is complete with care instructions to get your orange flower garden started up right. One small warning: if your orange blossoms spring up in perfect harmony, you will be the envy of all of your neighbors.

Did we miss any of your favorite orange flowers? Leave a comment and tell us about it!

Ranunculus blooms have layer upon layer of rich, loud color. Their long stems elevate their beautiful blooms up high upon a pedestal for all the world to see. At the end of the summer, they will fade to yellow. When this occurs, you should consider cutting them and bringing them inside to decorate your home inside a vase, where they enjoy a long and healthy second life. Leave a little foliage behind, however, as green leaves help to gather the sun’s energy for next year’s blooming season.

Ranunculus grow best in zones 8-11 and enjoy well-drained soil and full sunlight.

Lion’s Tail

Lion’s tail (leonotis leonurus) blooms are exotic and full of expression. This perennial stands tall and proud, while it’s bright orange blooms catch the eye of every passerby.

Use gloves when handling lion’s tail, as its spine has sharp thorns like the claws and teeth of the jungle beast it’s named for. Lion’s tail is a perfect addition to any garden, as its drought resistant durability keeps it blooming bright and strong all season long.

Lion’s tail thrives in zones 10-11 in well-drained soil and full sunlight.

Begonia

Plant your begonias in between other flowers that stand tall and provide ample shade and protection from the wind. Be sure to select an orange varietal, as begonias come in many different shades.

The large, bright double blooms of the begonia stand out well atop dark green foliage underneath. Be careful not to overwater their soil, but keep it nice and moist.

Begonias enjoy zones 6-11 and prefer moist, well-drained soil and a mix of full sun and partial shade.

Marigolds (Tagetes) are quite a popular annual found in many gardens. They won their popularity due to their gorgeous color and long bloom cycle, which can last a full summer. The ruffled feather petals come in thick layers similar to the blooms of carnations. Marigolds love to bask in the sunlight and prefer deep watering to light daily drinks. Make sure the soil is completely dry around your marigolds before re-watering and water at the base of the plant instead of from above to keep the blooms healthy and dry.

Marigolds do best in zones 9-11 and love well-drained soil and full sunshine.

Gerbera Daisy

The Gerbera daisy (Gerbera Jamesonii) is a bright but gentle beauty, ranging anywhere from 2 to 5 inches in diameter. It’s bloom looks similar to a sunflower, and like a sunflower, the gerbera daisy enjoys lounging in the sunlight.

The only drawback to these lovely daisies is their susceptibility to crown rot if the crowns are buried too deep within the soil, so be sure plant them with the crowns well above ground level and keep an eye on the crowns to ensure that they do not burrow too deep as they sink into the ground from watering and weight.

The Gerbera daisy thrives in zones 9-11, in full sun and well-drained soil.

Butterflyweed

The Butterflyweed’s name is somewhat misleading, as it is hardly an invasive weed, but a lovely bushy perennial with cluster-like blooms of bright, flat-topped orange flowers that can draw the eye from far away.

The one downside to these luscious lovelies, are their tendency to draw aphids. To keep them free from pests, blast the plants with water or run your fingers on the underside of their lance shaped leaves a few times per week.

Butterflyweed performs best in zones 3-9 in well-drained soil and full sunlight.

The dahlia flower has large luxurious blooms adorned with curved, spiked petals that symmetrically frame the blossoms.

Wait until your garden’s ground temperature reaches 60 degrees before planting, as dahlias struggle in cold weather conditions. Keep soil conditions moist but avoid overwatering as dahlias like to drink low and slow. Be sure to select orange varieties as dahlias are available in a wide array of colors.

Dahlia’s get along famously in zones 8-10 in full sun and moist, well-drained soil.

Zinnia

The dazzling auroral glow of the daisy-like zinnia blossoms are always a pleasing sight in any garden. Blooming annually and extending up to three feet tall, the zinnia flower stands high above its floral friends like a gleaming, sunny pillar. Gardeners love zinnias as they are both very easy to please and stunningly beautiful. Their long, slender stems may occasionally need some light support from medium stakes. To promote continuous flowering throughout the season, remove faded blooms and watch as new buds pop up in their place in no time. Fertilize lightly several times throughout the season instead of using a time released food source or fertilizing heavily once or twice.

Zinnias relish zones 3-10 in full sunlight and well-drained soil.

These 8 orange flowers will help your garden stand out and bring immense pleasure to all who get a chance to see them. The bright orange buds should give you and your family a warm, calming sense of peace and serenity and inspire active days and stress-free contentment. When it’s time to add a little zest into your life, orange flowers will more than do the trick. Feel free to add other orange flowers to the combination, or sprinkle in some additional colors (red and yellow pair well with orange) to bring some variety to the table.

Want to learn more about growing orange flowers in the garden?

HGTV covers Eye-Catching Orange Annual Flowers
Home Stratosphere covers 30 Different Types of Orange Flowers (A-Z)
ProFlowers covers 27 Types of Orange Flowers
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Gardenerdy covers A Wow-worthy List of 20 Orange Flower With Names, Facts, And Pictures

A Wow-worthy List of 20 Orange Flower With Names, Facts, And Pictures

Do you have information on all the orange flower names? Browse through the following article and find yourself refreshed with vibrant images of the flowers given below.

A warm summer season includes yellow and orange colors. We all know that roses are red and violets are blue. But what about orange-colored flowers? I find this color to be quite bashful. It reminds me of all bright things, and screaming for attention. It stands for energy, enthusiasm and even warmth. They say these flowers symbolize confidence, satisfaction and even a strong passion for life.

These dawn-colored flowers always add a lively touch to any garden or floral arrangement and are pleasant to look at. The color orange is said to enhance the oxygenation of the brain. It helps stimulate mental activity and influences social activities. These flowers can add elegance and sophistication to any situation. You can mix orange and blue colors in any arrangement, as these colors complement each other on a color wheel. Red and yellow add to the warmth and freshness of the cheerful color. You can create a graceful look by pairing few orange and purple flowers that have a few white ones tucked in between. One can also add a psychedelic chaos to your floral arrangement with a few pink ones bunched together with orange blossoms.

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Orange symbolizes autumn where you find different shades of it strewn across the nature’s palate. It is a mark of sophistication and exuberance. Many orange flowers like the Birds of Paradise are chosen to add a tropical touch in parties and weddings. They also signify friendship between two people. They invoke a sense of happiness and make us nostalgic.

Names of Orange Flowers

Asiatic Lily

Butterfly Weed

Blackberry Lily

The Asiatic lily are intense bloomers and go well with white, pink and blue flowers. These exotic flowers always add a tropical look to any place where they grow. Blackberry lilies are fan-shaped that bloom bright orange to yellow in color and have dark spots over them. Thus, they are also called the leopard lily. Another favorite of gardeners is the Butterfly Weed. It is known to attract plenty of butterflies.

Fritillaria

Iceland Poppy

Marigolds are cheerful and look like large pompoms. Bright orange in color, they were first discovered by the Portuguese in Central America way back in the 16th century. With a lifespan of just one year, the orange Cosmos knows how to spread smiles in its short life. The bright color of these cosmos flowers appear like juicy tangerines to the eye. Stunning varieties of the orange Fritillaria are hard to forget. They have tall stems covered in a bell-shaped flower that has an upside down shape.

Kangaroo Paw

Contemporary wedding flowers, the orange Gerbera has a striking look. It will make you smile the minute you take a look at it. Also called a perfect flower, they can be arranged in a variety of floral arrangements. They have long stems with 10 to 12 blooms running along its length. Iceland Poppies have thin petals that look brighter when the sun shines down on them. It looks delicate and sweet. Also called ‘The Tequila Sunrise’, this plant gives rise to 5 to 6 foot floral spikes. They are found in Western Australia, especially in regions prone to wildfires.

Pokers

Persian Buttercup

If you love the shade of sunrise orange, then the orange Lantana is your favorite flower. They bloom all summer and can bloom well into autumn. I love the Persian Buttercup. It is large and consists of petals that look like crêpe paper. They are often a florists’ delight. Bright and long-lasting, the Peruvian Lily is another appealing variety. It stands for friendship and devotion and is often used to brighten up many occasions. An extraordinary looking flower, the orange Pincushion Protea is an exotic type. It adds an elaborate touch to any floral arrangement.

Pincushion

An eye candy for the beholder, the orange Snapdragon is an ideal option for large centerpieces. A poke hot plant, the Torch Lily will set up the garden on fire. They look like a flaming torch and can be at least 6 feet tall. Energy, enthusiasm, passion and desire are symbolized by none other than the gorgeous orange Tulips. The orange Zinnia are multi-petaled, ball-shaped flowers. They are about 3 inches big and go well in a summer floral arrangement.

The above names will help you identify some of the vibrant blossoms. If you want to add a dash of energy with a tablespoon of bright cheer to your surroundings, make sure you have some orange flowers around.

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Orange Flower

Orange Flowers are the blossoms of the citrus fruits. Besides in general usage, the flowers which are orange in color are also reffered to as orange flowers. But the real Orange flowers are white and are very fragrant. Orange flower is also popular for its flower and fragrances.

Kingdom Plantae Division Magnoliophyta Class Magnoliopsida Subclass Rosidae Order Sapindales Family Rutaceae Genus Citrus Species C. sinensis

Facts about Orange Flowers

  • The outstanding feature of orange flowers and flowers of related citrus species is their pleasant fragrance.
  • Orange flowers usually open in one great flush of bloom in the spring and give rise to orange fruits the following autumn or winter. It is very interesting that the previous year’s oranges often are still on the trees when the new flowers are blooming.
  • Orange flowers are mostly hermaphrodite, releasing pollen when the stigma is receptive.
  • Orange flowers are arranged in clusters of 1-6.
  • The orange flower, is traditionally associated with good fortune, and was popular in bridal bouquets and headwreaths for weddings for some time.
  • The pollenless flowers of the Citrus are well known for their ability to set parthenocarpic fruit.
  • Citrus generally yields nectar copiously. Because of the large amount and superior quality of honey that citrus flowers produce, many beekeepers place their colonies in or near most groves.
  • Orange flowers yield an essential oil which is widely used in perfumery and in Aromatherapy.
  • Orange flowers have specific flower fragrances.

The orange flower (Citrus sinensis) was adopted as Florida’s state flower on May 5, 1909.

The Orange trees are small trees, growing 10 m tall, with thorny shoots and evergreen leaves 4-10 cm long. The fruit of Citrus sinensis is called sweet orange to distinguish it from Citrus aurantium, the bitter orange. The orange is a hybrid of ancient cultivated origin, possibly between pomelo (Citrus maxima) and tangerine (Citrus reticulata). Oranges originated in southeast Asia, in either India or modern day Pakistan, Vietnam or southern China. The fruit of Citrus sinensis is called sweet orange to distinguish it from Citrus aurantium, the bitter orange. There are about 16 species in the genus, Citrus.

from our stores

Orange Flower Oil

  • Hundreds of compounds have been identified in these oils. Orange flower oils were obtained by hydrodistillation and by supercritical fluid carbondioxide extraction of the concretes from orange flowers.
  • Orange Flower Oil as obtained from pomatum, slightly modified with other extracts, can be employed to make ‘Sweet Pea’ and ‘Magnolia’ perfumes, the natural odours of which it slightly resembles.
  • The flowers yield by distillation an essential oil known as ‘Neroli’, which forms one of the chief constituents of Eau-de-Cologne.

The extract of bitter orange (Citrus aurantium) has been used in dietary supplements as an aid to fat loss and as an appetite suppressant.

Propagation

  • Propagation of citrus trees can be done by either budding or grafting.
  • Bud cuttings of orange cultivars are grafted onto one or two-year old seedlings of the same or a related species.
  • In bud-grafting, a small patch of bark containing a bud is removed from the scion (donor plant) and inserted beneath the bark of the receiving plant (rootstock).
  • The principal root stocks in use are sour orange (C. aurantium), for areas with good quality soils; ‘Rough’ lemon or ‘Volkamer’ lemon (C. limon), used for warm areas with sandy soils; and trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata), used in colder areas.

Brazil is the largest producer of orange juice in the world, followed by Florida, USA.

Planting Steps

  • The first step is to wash off about an inch or so of the potting material all around the root ball to allow the roots immediate contact with the surrounding soil. If the tree is severely potbound, it may be necessary to use a knife to make several cuts through the base of the ball to stimulate root growth.
  • The second step is to clear an area of bare soil in a minimum three foot diameter around the planting hole to allow for watering and to prevent any vegetation from competing with the young tree.
  • Next, dig a planting hole to exactly the same height as the root ball. This is critical. Never plant a citrus too deep as it is extremely susceptible to foot rot, particularly in the area around the graft.
  • Place the tree in the center of the hole, backfill about halfway up the root ball and then water. After watering, fill the hole with soil and tamp lightly. Then add about another inch of soil on top of the root ball to seal it with the surrounding soil in which the tree will grow and prevent the root ball from drying.
  • Finally, build a raised watering ring of soil, about six inches high, to surround the planting hole. Then fill the ring with water and allow it soak in. Check to see if the sinking water exposes any of the roots in the root ball. If it has, cover with a little more soil.

Plant Care

  • Water the entire root area deeply about once a week.
  • Prune any time of the year. When the trees are young, prune overly vigorous growth.
  • Prune mature trees to remove dead, broken, and diseased branches. Give mature trees 1 to 1-1/2 pounds of nitrogen a year.
  • Apply in four portions throughout the year, or just once six to eight weeks before bloom.
  • Citrus trees are susceptible to a number of different disease and insect pests, depending on region.

Fire Lily

Native to South Africa, this ever- green member of the amaryllis family offers both spectacular flowers and handsome foliage. It makes an exceptional and long-lived potted plant for indoors or out. In the Tropical South, where it is hardy, it’s also a great addition to the mixed border. Blooms dependably in shade.

Blooming Orange and Yellow Flowers

  • Large clusters of brilliant orange, funnel-shaped blossoms are carried atop 2 feet stalks that rise above dense clumps of strap-shaped dark green leaves to 112 feet long; attractive red berries follow the flowers.
  • Blossoms may appear in winter, but bloom mainly comes in spring and lasts for weeks.
  • French and Belgian hybrids have extra-wide leaves and yellow to deep orange-red blooms on thick, rigid stalks.
  • Solomone hybrids have pale to deep yellow flowers.
  • ‘Flame’ is an exceptionally brilliant orange-red fire lily.
  • ‘Good Hope’ has wide leaves and large clusters of clear yellow flowers.

Clivia Miniata Growing Tips

  • Clivias like bright lightbut don’t expose them to direct, hot sun, which will burn and yellow the foliage.
  • Plants with crowded roots bloom better, so resist the urge to repot or divide.

Caring for Potted Fire Lilies

  • From spring to autumn, fertilize potted plants every other week with a general-purpose liquid houseplant fertilizer; water when the soil surface becomes dry.
  • You can keep potted plants outdoors from spring to fall, but bring them indoors for winter; they are badly damaged by freezing temperatures.
  • Indoors, they do best near an east-facing window.
  • In winter, to encourage bud set, provide cool temperatures (5060F), cease feeding, and water once every 4 weeks.
  • Outdoors, set plants 1122 feet apart in fertile, moist, well-drained soil.

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