Where does dill grow?

Growing Dill in Pots? Learn everything you need to know for proper dill plant care in this informative article.

Dill is a biennial herb but grown best as an annual. It can self-seed and keep growing like a perennial if you grow it in clumps on the ground. It’s an excellent choice for your container herb garden, as well.

Dill has feathery green fronds like a fern and has a sweet aroma like licorice and anise seeds. This popular kitchen herb is used both as a spice and herb. Harvest the fresh fronds to prepare salads, vegetables, sauces, meat, seafood, fish and curry dishes and use the seeds to flavor pickles, stews, sauerkraut, rice, and bread.

Botanical Name: Anethum graveolens

USDA Zones: 3 to 11

Type of Plant: Biennial, grown as an annual.

Plant form and Size: Dill has feathery foliage that can grow up to 2-4 feet tall and 1-2 feet wide. (Depending on the variety)

Soil pH: 5.5 to 7.5

Types of Dill

Dill has a range of varieties from Bouquet, Superdukat, Fernleaf, and Long Island Mammoth. Out of these, the Superdukat is particularly preferred for cooking needs and to grow in a pot, compared to Long Island Mammoth.

1. Bouquet

This showy variety has bright yellow flowers. This variety can grow large, usually between 24 to 36 inches tall. Because of this, it is best grown outdoors. Just be sure to plant this variety after the danger of frost has passed.

2. Superdukat

This compact hybrid variety of Dill is grown specifically to be more flavorful, and the size makes it suitable for container planting. This cultivar can grow between 12-24 inches tall but is slower to grow compared to Bouquet Dill. It is also reluctant to decline, so it has the benefit of being used for a more extended period. If you prefer more leaves than seeds, this is the variety to grow.

3. Fernleaf

A dwarf variety of Dill, this can be a great window garden plant for indoor growers as it doesn’t need much space to grow. It remains about 12-18 inches in height. This plant thrives best in a temperature range between 60-75 F (16 C to 24 C). Be sure to place it in a location where it can receive at least 6 hours of sunlight per day.

4. Long Island Mammoth

As with any variety of Dill, this plant forms taproots and doesn’t transplant well. So if you’re growing it in a container, be sure that it is at least 12-14 inches deep and wide because the Long Island Mammoth can grow up to a height of 36 inches with a spread around 24 inches. It’s commonly grown by commercial dill producers and thrives best outdoors.

Propagating Dill

You can’t grow dill from cuttings. You may try to root it in water, but this usually doesn’t work. Growing dill from seeds is the best option.

  • Instead of growing dill seeds in seed trays, sow them directly in desired pots as dill plants form long taproots and don’t transplant well.
  • Sprinkle dill seeds in pots and cover them with a 1/4-inch layer of soil mix.
  • Keep the soil evenly moist while the seeds germinate, which is usually 7 to 10 days. You’ll have to wait till 21 days if the growing conditions are not optimum or seed quality is poor.
  • Wait until the seedlings are 4-6 inches tall and thin them to one or two plants per pot, saving only the strongest ones.
  • You can start the dill seeds indoors in spring, 4 weeks before the last expected frost date.
  • Or, sow outside on your balcony or patio, after all the dangers of frost are passed and weather perks up to around 60 F (15 C).
  • Keep sowing seeds every 3 weeks for successive planting. You can plant seeds in summer as well if it’s cool in your area.
  • Grow dill in fall, too, begin planting last seeds at least 2 months before your first frost date.

Growing Dill in Hot Climate

If you’re growing dill in a warm climate (USDA Zones 9b-11), start seeds after the summer, in fall, when the weather is comparatively cold.

  • Keep growing seeds successively to grow dill in winter and up to spring.
  • It may die when your hot summer approaches unless you save the plant from heat.
  • Shield it from the afternoon sun and hot wind and water it more often to keep the soil evenly moist.
  • The plant will bolt in heat, keep trimming the flower buds before they open. Also, check out our article on how to grow dill in tropics here for more information.

Choosing a Container

Since dill forms a long taproot, choose a 5-gallon container that is at least 12 inches deep and wide similarly. In such a pot, you can grow one plant. For smaller varieties, select 10 inches deep pot. To grow a couple of dill weed plants together, get a much bigger pot.

Requirements for Growing Dill in Pots

Position

Provide a location that receives full sun or at least 6-7 hours of direct sunlight and good air circulation. You can grow dill in part sun, but it will not become bushier there than it would be in full sun.

If you’re growing dill indoors, keep it at a South or West-facing window for optimum growth. In a subtropical or tropical climate, save this herb from the intense afternoon sun, especially in summer.

Soil

Use well-drained, loamy potting soil when growing dill in pots. While it can tolerate poor soil, it’s a good idea to mix 20 percent aged manure or compost at the time of planting to make your growing medium slightly richer.

Watering

If the growing location is sunny and windy and the dill plant is growing in a clay pot, it will dry out faster, and you’ll have to water regularly to keep the soil mildly moist.

When growing indoors or in part sun, water only when the soil is about to dry. In the hot climate or summers, you’ll need to keep the soil moist.

Tip: Avoid overwatering to prevent root rot. Similarly, don’t practice overhead watering to stop fungal diseases and water around the base of the plant.

Staking

Dill is a floppy herb and tends to fall once it grows taller because of its weak and hollow stems. It’s better to use a plant stake like a bamboo stick or metal rod to support it.

Dill Plant Care in Pots

Fertilizer

Once your dill plant has grown several inches high and around 2-4 weeks older, it’s a time to fertilize it. Feed it every 4 weeks with a balanced liquid fertilizer in half of its prescribed strength on the label.

If you want to avoid chemical fertilizers, side-dress this herb with aged manure or compost, once or twice during the growing season.

Pruning Dill and Deadheading

  • Pinch back the top growing tips of young 4-5 inches tall dill plant to make it bushier as you do with other herbs.
  • If you’re harvesting this herb regularly, you don’t need to prune it.
  • Don’t trim more than 1/3 of its growth at one time for either pruning or harvesting.
  • Trimming the leaves from the top promotes bushier Dill growth. This forces the plant to grow outward instead of upward.
  • Never allow your dill plant to flower unless you want to collect the seeds. This step increases its vegetative life.
  • Remove as soon as the umbels of yellow flower buds (dill flower heads) appear, otherwise the plant flowers, form seeds and die.

Also Read: How to Prune Herbs

Pests and Diseases

Dill may get parsley caterpillars and tomato hornworms. Handpick the pests away from the plant. Aphids love this herb too, so keep an eye on them. In diseases, Leaf Spot and Mildew can be a problem, if you’ll practice overhead watering.

Harvesting Dill and Storage

Harvesting Dill Leaves

Once the plant reaches an ideal height of 8 inches–Start harvesting. Use a garden snip or a pair of scissors to harvest according to your needs.

For this, nip off individual leaflets close to the stem and lay them in one layer on a baker’s rack or something similar. Once dry, keep them in an airtight jar.

Refrigeration

You can keep extra trimmings in the refrigerator, and they’ll remain fresh for a few days. Fold them in a damp paper towel, and secure them in a plastic bag. Or you can freeze entire stems and clip the leaves as you need them. Store them frozen in butter or vinegar, so that they leave a tangy taste in your cooking.

Tip: Dill leaves have the best flavor before flowering.

Harvesting Dill Seeds

After about 60-80 days from sowing, dill flowers will appear and seed. These seeds will be mature in 2-4 weeks, depending on the climatic conditions. Trim the seedheads when seeds turn flat and brown and before they fall on the ground.

Tip: If you’re not growing dill in pots for seeds, snip off the flower buds before they open and seed. This way, the plant will keep growing and direct its energy on vegetative growth.

Hang seedheads upside down in a paper bag, so that the dry seeds fall into it. Collect and store the organic seeds in an airtight container and use them as the way you want.

Planting Depth Revealed – You can Successfully Grow Herbs and Vegetables in a 6″ (Inches) Pot

The versatile 6 inch pot! You can find them everywhere; garage sales, second hand stores or garden centers. Probably even in your own yard, just waiting to be recycled into this year’s dill crop. Here are the things you need to know when growing herbs and vegetables with a container planting depth of 6 inches.

Consider the watering requirements that you will create with a planting depth of 6 inches. The smaller the pot, the more frequently it will need to be watered, especially on hot or windy days.

The National Gardening Bureau in their post “Container Gardening: Anytime, Anywhere” suggests: “The deeper the pot the less watering it will need. Pots with a small soil volume will dry out faster and require more frequent watering. Unlike plants in the ground, plants in pots or hanging baskets in the yard, on a deck or on a windowsill are exposed on all sides to the drying effects of wind and sun. On hot, windy days you may have to water them more than once.”

Soil requirements are just as important. How much soil does your crop need to give you a good harvest? Choose a potting soil that will provide support for plants as they grow, and one that will help retain moisture. Look for a peat and perlite or vermiculite mixture.

Don’t use garden soil, which will be too heavy. As long as the soil is well aerated, roots will colonize the entire container, so buy a prepared soil less mix for container growing. It should be free of weeds and can contains added nutrients to help plants grow.

How much sunlight exposure will your pots get? Consider placing your containers in an area that will get late afternoon shade. Create the shade by placing your containers under or next to your vertical gardening. Darker colored containers will absorb more heat, which can get seeds and transplants off to a faster start, but these containers will need more watering if they are in direct sunlight. Lighter colored containers may be a better option if you cannot shade them.

Plants that will be grown outdoors in full sun in containers can benefit from a layer of mulch on top of the soil. Mulching helps retain moisture in the soil, discourage weed growth, and protect your plants from the harshness of raindrops or watering from a hose or watering can. Sawdust, shredded bark, grass clippings and polymer crystals can act as mulches—choose one appropriate to the container and the plants.

And remember: Anything that can be grown in a planting depth of 4 inches can also grow in a 6 inch pot.

What Can You Grow in a 6 Inch Pot? A LOT!

Related post: What can you Grow in an 8 inch pot?

What can you grow in a 4 inch pot?

What can you grow in a 12 inch pot?

Shared with: Frugal Days, Sustainable Ways

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Oregano Growing and Harvest Information

Temperature
Germination 60-70 F
For growth Cool
Soil and Water
Fertilizer Not Necessary
pH 6.0-8.0
Water below average
Measurements
Planting depth 1/4″
Root depth 14″+
Height 24-30″
Width 20-24″
Space between plants
In beds 12″
In rows 6-12″
Space between rows 12-18″
Companions
Companions Cucumber, melons, pepper, pumpkins, squash
Incompatibles None
Harvest
The leaves can be cut once the plant reaches a total height of about 6″. Cut the stems down to a few inches above the soil. To prolong the harvest, cut the flower buds off as they appear.

The name “oregano” is more accurately applied to a flavor than to a plant, and there are two varieties that you can grow for seasoning and call oregano, which is most commonly used as a spice in a dried form. Origanum vulgare is typically grown; it’s hardier and easier to propagate than the alternative, Origanum heracleoticum—also known as wild marjoram is another commonly available species.

Serving ideas: Oregano is an essential ingredient in many Italian dishes. It is the most common spice for pizza, and in general goes well with any tomato based dish. It also combines well with basil. Try it with cooked vegetables, potato salad, fowl, stuffing, soups, scrambled eggs and omelets.

Where to Grow Oregano

Oregano can be grown anywhere in the United States from root divisions or seed planted early in spring. In general, it is a sprawling herb and is not well suited for growing indoors.

Soil for Oregano

Oregano prefers light, well-drained, slightly alkaline soil with full sun. Just like most herbs, a rich and moist soil weakens the flavor and aroma. In addition, oregano should not be fertilized if grown for its flavor or aroma. Fertilizing oregano will allow the plant to produce an abundance of flavorless foliage.

Planting Oregano

When –

Start seedlings 6-8 weeks before the last frost date for your area. Plan on planting the seedlings outside on the average last day of frost, when they are about 3″ high. They can be planted outdoors earlier with some sort of protection from the cold.

How –

Seeds have a tendency to germinate slowly, and in addition, expect at least 25% of the seeds to be duds. They will germinate more consistently in controlled conditions, such as a windowsill or green house. You shouldn’t plan on storing your seeds for an extended period of time, as the germination rate will decline rapidly with additional storage time. Seeds can be directly planted in the ground in spring, or started indoors in seed flats to be transferred outdoors when ready. Don’t forget to harden off young seedlings for a week or so to get them accustomed to the outdoor temperature variation and sunlight intensity.

Oregano has a spreading root system and can also be propagated by cuttings. Cuttings are typically taken in late spring once the leaves are firm enough to prevent wilting when placed in sand. Place cuttings in a well protected area, and ensure the roots do not dry out. Once the cuttings establish a root system, they can be transferred outdoors into a pot, or directly into the ground.

How Oregano Grows

Oregano is generally considered as a perennial herb, with creeping roots, branched woody stems and slightly hairy grayish-green leaves, oval in shape. It grows to about 2-2.5 feet tall and 2 feet wide, and produces small blooms of pink, white, or purple on tall stems from late July until September. Once each flower matures, it will produce four small seed-like structures.

Storage Requirements
Oregano is most commonly used dried. Hang bunches, then store in airtight containers away from direct sunlight.
Method Taste
Fresh Excellent
Dried Good
Frozen Good

Culturing Oregano

Keep oregano plants on the dry side. Newly planted oregano may require some irrigation, but once established it will require very little water. As with most other herbs, fertilizing will reduce the production of essential oils, which gives the distinctive flavor and aroma of oregano. It should not be fertilized at all if grown as a culinary herb. Old woody branches that becomes leggy (more stem than leaf) should be cut out at the end of winter and plants should be replaced every five years or so to prevent legginess. The lifespan of oregano is about five or six years, and usually one harvest is done in the first year and two in the following years.

Harvesting Oregano

Harvesting the leaves and stem tips should start when plants are at the flowering stage, starting about 4 to 10 inches from the ground. It is ready to harvest once the flowers begin to appear. The production of essential oil declines after flowering, so either harvest before that or cut the flowers off to extend the growing period. To harvest the entire plant, cut the stems a few inches above the ground. If harvesting for fresh use, let the plant grow until it is about 6″ high, then pinch off the tips of stems to use for cooking. This will also encourage fuller foliage production.

Oregano deters pests in general and does not suffer any serious problems with pests.

Disease

Oregano as a species does not typically suffer from disease.

Growing Herbs at Home

Angelica; Angelica archangelica

  • Growth category
    Biennial
  • Light
    Light shade
  • Soil
    Moist
  • Height
    72 inches
  • Propagation
    Seed in fall
  • Hardiness
    Hardy

  • Best in cool climates
  • Description
    A very tall biennial with large clusters of small greenish flowers. The main use is for a condiment or confection. Hollow stems may be candied. Roots and leaves are collected in late summer of second year of growth.

Anise; Pimpinella anisum

  • Growth category
    Annual
  • Light
    Bright
  • Soil
    Well drained
  • Height
    18 to 24 inches
  • Propagation
    Seed in spring
  • Hardiness
    Half hardy

  • Alkaline soils
  • Description
    A dainty annual that has finely cut, serrated leaves with very small, whitish flowers in flat clusters. Leaves and seeds have a sweet taste that suggests licorice.

Basil, sweet; Ocimum basilicum

  • Growth category
    Annual
  • Light
    Bright
  • Soil
    Moist
  • Height
    18 inches
  • Propagation
    Seed in spring
  • Hardiness
    Tender

  • Excellent for pots
  • Description
    An annual that has light green or dark purple leaves. A number of varieties with different growth habits are available. Flowers are small, white and appear in spikes. Spicy leaves have many uses.

Bay, sweet; Laurus nobilis

  • Growth category
    Woody perennial
  • Light
    Light shade
  • Soil
    Well drained
  • Height
    48+ inches
  • Propagation
    Cuttings
  • Hardiness
    Tender

  • For containers, topiary
  • Description
    Also called laurel. Bay is an evergreen tree used as a potted plant in cold climates. This plant produces the well-known bay leaf, which may be picked for use or dried at any time.

Borage; Borago officinalis

  • Growth category
    Annual
  • Light
    Bright
  • Soil
    Dry
  • Height
    24 to 36 inches
  • Propagation
    Seed in spring
  • Hardiness
    Hardy annual

  • Often self-seeds
  • Description
    An annual with coarse, hairy leaves and attractive sky-blue, star-shaped flowers. Flowers and leaves give a cool, cucumber-like flavor to summer drinks. Attractive to bees.

Caraway; Carum carvi

  • Growth category
    Biennial
  • Light
    Bright
  • Soil
    Well drained
  • Height
    30 inches
  • Propagation
    Seed in spring or fall
  • Hardiness
    Hardy

  • Thin seedlings to 8 inches
  • Description
    A biennial that flowers in flat, white clusters with very finely cut leaves like carrot leaves. Caraway seeds are aromatic and are used as an ingredient of liqueurs. Popular for cooking.

Catnip; Nepeta cataria

  • Growth category
    Perennial
  • Light
    Bright, light shade
  • Soil
    Well drained
  • Height
    36 inches
  • Propagation
    Seed in spring, division, cuttings
  • Hardiness
    Hardy

  • Cut back in autumn
  • Description
    A hardy perennial with leaves that are green on top and gray underneath. Flowers grow in purple spikes. It is used for tea and seasoning and is attractive to cats.

Chervil; Anthriscus cerefolium

  • Growth category
    Annual
  • Light
    Light shade
  • Soil
    Well drained
  • Height
    24 inches
  • Propagation
    Seed in spring
  • Hardiness
    Hardy annual

  • Sow early, will self-seed
  • Description
    An annual with lacy leaves like parsley but paler green. It has flat heads of white flowers and is used like parsley.

Chives; Allium schoenoprasum

  • Growth category
    Perennial
  • Light
    Shade, light shade
  • Soil
    Dry
  • Height
    10 inches
  • Propagation
    Seed in spring, division
  • Hardiness
    Hardy

  • Can be grown indoors
  • Description
    Small, onion-like plant in clumps that produces light purple flowers. Useful as an ornamental plant. Leaves provide onionlike flavor.

Cicely, sweet; Myrrhis odorata

  • Growth category
    Perennial
  • Light
    Light shade
  • Soil
    Rich
  • Height
    36 to 48 inches
  • Propagation
    Seed in fall
  • Hardiness
    Hardy

  • Space 2 feet apart
  • Description
    Decorative fernlike downy leaves. White flowers in umbels. Needs partial shade. Seeds are picked green and used fresh with other herbs. Leaves may be picked for use at any time. Once used as a sugar substitute and a furniture polish.

Cilantro/Coriander; Coriander sativum

  • Growth category
    Annual
  • Light
    Bright
  • Soil
    Rich, well drained
  • Height
    24 inches
  • Propagation
    Seed in spring
  • Hardiness
    Hardy annual

  • Space plants 8 inches apart
  • Description
    An annual with fine, feathery leaves and umbels of pinkishwhite flowers. Leaves of this plant are called cilantro while the seeds are known as coriander. The leaves have a pungent aroma and are used in salads, stews and as a garnish. Seeds are widely used in spice mixes and curry powders. Seeds may be used whole or crushed.

Dill; Anethum graveolens

  • Growth category
    Annual
  • Light
    Bright
  • Soil
    Rich, well drained
  • Height
    24 to 36 inches
  • Propagation
    Seed in spring
  • Hardiness
    Hardy annual

  • Do not plant with fennel
  • Description
    An annual with dark green stems and feathery bluish-green leaves. Flowers are yellow in flat umbels. Chopped leaves and seeds have many uses.

Fennel, sweet; Foeniculum dulce

  • Growth category
    Perennial
  • Light
    Bright
  • Soil
    Well drained
  • Height
    48 to 72 inches
  • Propagation
    Seed in spring, division
  • Hardiness
    Hardy

  • Less vigor in clay soils
  • Description
    There are several species, but sweet fennel is considered most desirable. Leaves are bright green and delicate below umbels of yellow flowers. It has a faint anise fragrance. Traditionally used with fish, but now has many uses.

Horehound; Marrubium vulgare

  • Growth category
    Perennial
  • Light
    Bright
  • Soil
    Dry
  • Height
    24 inches
  • Propagation
    Seed in spring, division, cuttings
  • Hardiness
    Hardy

  • Alkaline soils
  • Description
    A coarse perennial covered with whitish hairs. Leaves are crinkled. Leaves and small stems should be cut before flowering begins. Most popular use is to flavor candy.

Hyssop; Hyssopus officinalis

  • Growth category
    Perennial
  • Light
    Bright
  • Soil
    Dry
  • Height
    24 inches
  • Propagation
    Seed in spring, division, cuttings
  • Hardiness
    Hardy

  • Cut back in spring
  • Description
    A hardy perennial with small, pointed leaves, spikes of blue flowers and woody stems. Harvest only youngest leaves, which may be added to salads. Flavor is slightly bitter and minty. Used to flavor liqueurs and sometimes as a condiment.

Lavender; Lavandula angustifolia

  • Growth category
    Perennial
  • Light
    Bright
  • Soil
    Dry
  • Height
    18 to 24 inches
  • Propagation
    Seed in fall, cuttings
  • Hardiness
    Hardy

  • Evergreen, may winter-kill
  • Description
    Several different species may be grown, but the English lavender is considered the finest. Plants are bushy with narrow grayish-green leaves. Flowers are bluish purple in spikes. All parts of the plant contain the scent, but it is strongest in the flowers. Much used in potpourri and sachets. Also used for tea.

Lemon balm; Melissa officinalis

  • Growth category
    Perennial
  • Light
    Bright, light shade
  • Soil
    Moist
  • Height
    18 to 24 inches
  • Propagation
    Seed in spring, division, cuttings
  • Hardiness
    Hardy

  • Can be grown indoors, weedy
  • Description
    Perennial plant with light green, heart-shaped leaves that are deeply veined. Yellowish-white flowers appear throughout the summer. May be harvested several times during the season, but first harvest is considered best. Many uses, but frequently added to jams, jellies and fruit salads.

Lemon verbena; Aloysia triphylla

  • Growth category
    Woody perennial
  • Light
    Bright, light shade
  • Soil
    Well drained
  • Height
    48+ inches
  • Propagation
    Seed in spring, cuttings
  • Hardiness
    Half hardy

  • Rarely survives winter, good indoors
  • Description
    Nonhardy, woody shrub for pots and indoor use. Long, pointed, dark green leaves come from each stem node in groups of three leaves. Lemon verbena adds a lemony taste to teas, cold drinks and jellies.

Lovage; Levisticum officinale

  • Growth category
    Perennial
  • Light
    Bright, light shade
  • Soil
    Rich, moist
  • Height
    36 to 60 inches
  • Propagation
    Seed in fall
  • Hardiness
    Hardy

  • Self-seeds
  • Description
    A tall perennial plant with shiny, dark green leaves. Has hollow stems that terminate in clusters of yellow flowers. Leaves, young stems and roots are eaten. It gives a slightly spicy taste to many dishes or soups.

Marjoram, sweet; Origanum majorana

  • Growth category
    Perennial
  • Light
    Bright, light shade
  • Soil
    Rich, well drained
  • Height
    8 to 12 inches
  • Propagation
    Seed in spring, cuttings
  • Hardiness
    Half hardy

  • Good in pots, sow seeds as annual
  • Description
    There are three major species, one of which is sometimes called oregano. Sweet marjoram is used as an annual plant often with thyme. It is sweet and spicy. Plants are low growing with small, gray-green leaves on tough, woody stems. Flowerheads have small, pale mauve to white flowers. The delicate flavor is most used for beef, game or poultry.

Myrtle; Myrtus communis

  • Growth category
    Woody perennial
  • Light
    Bright
  • Soil
    Well drained
  • Height
    60+ inches
  • Propagation
    Cuttings
  • Hardiness
    Tender

  • Evergreen, for large containers
  • Description
    The true myrtle is a nonhardy evergreen shrub with small evergreen leaves and small, creamy-white flowers that produce blue-black berries. Use as a pot or tub plant. Will take shearing well. Leaves used in potpourri and herb sachets.

Oregano; Origanum vulgare

  • Growth category
    Perennial
  • Light
    Bright, light shade
  • Soil
    Well drained
  • Height
    18 to 24 inches
  • Propagation
    Seed in spring, division, cuttings
  • Hardiness
    Hardy

  • Cut back in late fall
  • Description
    A sprawling plant with leaves much coarser than sweet marjoram. Although called oregano, there is some disagreement as to the best source of the oregano flavor. Among other plants with an oregano flavor, Spanish thyme, Thymus nummularius, is an alternative.

Parsley; Petroselinum crispum

  • Growth category
    Biennial
  • Light
    Bright, light shade
  • Soil
    Rich, moist
  • Height
    6 to 10 inches
  • Propagation
    Seed in spring
  • Hardiness
    Half hardy

  • Often self-seeds
  • Description
    A biennial plant with often curly, dark green foliage. Seeds are slow to germinate. Well known and the most popular of all herbs.

Peppermint; Mentha piperita

  • Growth category
    Perennial
  • Light
    Bright, light shade
  • Soil
    Moist
  • Height
    12 to 24 inches
  • Propagation
    Division, cuttings
  • Hardiness
    Hardy

  • Spreads easily, good indoors
  • Description
    A spreading plant with numerous upright shoots that may reach a height of 2 feet. Dark green leaves are produced from reddish stems. Grows best in moist soils. Best cut just as flowering begins. Mints can be invasive.

Rosemary; Rosmarinus officinalis

  • Growth category
    Woody perennial
  • Light
    Bright
  • Soil
    Dry, well drained
  • Height
    36 inches
  • Propagation
    Cuttings
  • Hardiness
    Tender

  • Alkaline soils, good in pots
  • Description
    May grow outdoors for summer, but not winter-hardy outdoors. Needs sunny location and well-drained soil. Can be pruned severely if necessary to keep in proportion with pot size. Popular for veal, lamb, shellfish and other meats.

Sage; Salvia officinalis

  • Growth category
    Woody perennial
  • Light
    Bright
  • Soil
    Dry, well drained
  • Height
    24 to 36 inches
  • Propagation
    Seed in spring, cuttings
  • Hardiness
    Hardy

  • Replace plants every 5 years
  • Description
    A woody plant with oblong leaves that have a wooly, gray-green covering that is lighter on the bottom. May grow 2 feet high but tends to sprawl. Several forms are available, including purple-leaved, variegated-leaved and dwarf growing. Needs a sunny location and well-drained soil. Used with meats and dressings.

Sage, pineapple; Salvia elegans

  • Growth category
    Perennial
  • Light
    Bright
  • Soil
    Well drained
  • Height
    24 to 48 inches
  • Propagation
    Seed in spring, cuttings
  • Hardiness
    Half hardy

  • Good indoors
  • Description
    Not reliably winter-hardy and should be overwintered in pots. Has rough, pointed leaves and attractive cardinal red flowers. Used to give a pineapple scent to potpourris or to add flavor to drinks such as iced tea.

Savory, summer; Satureja hortensis

  • Growth category
    Annual
  • Light
    Bright
  • Soil
    Rich
  • Height
    18 inches
  • Propagation
    Seed in spring
  • Hardiness
    Half hardy

  • Trim back during season
  • Description
    Produces small, bronze-green leaves and small white or lavender flowers. The small leaves are less conspicuous than the stems. Cut when in bud and hang to dry. Used as a condiment for meats and vegetables.

Savory, winter; Satureja montana

  • Growth category
    Woody perennial
  • Light
    Bright
  • Soil
    Well drained
  • Height
    24 inches
  • Propagation
    Seed in fall, division, cuttings
  • Hardiness
    Hardy

  • Alkaline soil
  • Description
    This woody plant has shiny, pointed, dark green leaves and small white or lavender flowers. Needs a well-drained, sandy soil. Dead branches should be trimmed out. May be picked and dried at any time.

Spearmint; Mentha spicata

  • Growth category
    Perennial
  • Light
    Bright, light shade
  • Soil
    Moist
  • Height
    18 inches
  • Propagation
    Division, cuttings
  • Hardiness
    Hardy

  • Spreads easily, good indoors
  • Description
    Has slightly crinkled leaves lighter green than peppermint. Needs moist soil, but very hardy. Leaves and stems may be picked anytime. For drying, pick stems as flowering begins. Leaves used in cold drinks or to make mint sauce.

Tarragon; Artemisia dracunculus

  • Growth category
    Perennial
  • Light
    Bright
  • Soil
    Rich, dry
  • Height
    24 inches
  • Propagation
    Division, cuttings
  • Hardiness
    Hardy

  • Needs winter protection
  • Description
    Has somewhat twisted, narrow, dark green leaves. Grows best in partial shade. Fairly hardy, but needs winter protection to ensure survival in colder climates. Leaves and stems are used fresh to flavor vinegar. Flavor is lost during drying.

Thyme; Thymus vulgaris

  • Growth category
    Woody perennial
  • Light
    Bright
  • Soil
    Dry
  • Height
    6 to 10 inches
  • Propagation
    Seed in spring. cuttings, division
  • Hardiness
    Hardy

  • Evergreen, grows indoors
  • Description
    Stems are low-growing, wiry and woody. Leaves are small and usually gray-green. Needs bright light and well-drained soil. Plants are not long-lived and may need replacement every few years. Other forms of thyme are also useful and attractive. Mother-of-thyme is a prostrate-growing species only a few inches in height. Lemon thyme is also popular. All thyme species may be used for seasoning food. Shoots should be harvested while in flower.

Woodruff, sweet; Asperula odorata

  • Growth category
    Perennial
  • Light
    Shade, light shade
  • Soil
    Moist
  • Height
    6 to 8 inches
  • Propagation
    Division, cuttings
  • Hardiness
    Hardy

  • Good groundcover
  • Description
    A low-growing perennial with shiny leaves in whorls around each stem. Should be grown in shady, woodland sites for best growth. Remove leaves just as the herb comes into flower or during flowering. Has been used for potpourri or strewn in storage cupboards and among linen. Used for the May cup or May wine. Best flavor occurs after leaves have wilted slightly.

3 Steps for Growing Dill in Containers

Dill is often used for culinary purposes, especially when cooking fish like salmon, and it is an excellent herb to grow in a container. If it’s provided with adequate growing conditions, it can grow more than three feet high. Container gardening gives you the power to control every aspect of your plant’s growing conditions. You have the freedom to reposition the plant in or out of the sunlight and your home, shielding it from overexposure to sun or frost.

Step 1 – Prepare Containers for Planting

Dill grows a long tap root, which means that it needs to be planted in a deep container to reach its full growth potential. Use a container that is at least one foot, but no more than three feet deep. Although the plant grows a long tap root, a pot larger than three feet deep is unnecessary because it’s an annual plant that establishes itself in one season. A larger container may encourage the herb to focus its energy on growing roots instead of foliage.

Fill the bottom two inches of the pot with gravel to aid in drainage. Fill the remaining space in the container with a nutrient rich and well-draining potting soil mix. You may also choose to use soil-less potting mix, which may hasten germination.

Step 2 – Purchase and Plant Seeds

Purchase your seeds from a nursery instead of a department store. Nurseries are more reliable when it comes to seeds, because they specialize in gardening. Choose a variety that is suited to thrive in your particular climate zone. It may be helpful to speak with an experienced professional before you decide on which seed packet to purchase.

Sprinkle your dill seeds over your container and cover them with a light dusting of potting soil. Make sure that the soil is moist but not saturated during planting. It is best to plant the seeds in early spring, immediately after the last sign of frost has dissipated.

Step 3 – Raise Seedlings with Care

Your dill seeds should sprout within two weeks if they receive at least six hours of sunlight a day and are kept in temperatures between 60 and 75 degrees. Make sure to check on the seeds and seedlings every other day, and supplement their soil with water by misting them. During the first four weeks of growth, keep the soil moist and let sun exposure range between six and eight hours each day.

In time, your dill plants should grow to reach healthy proportions and will provide you with a source of delicious herbs. When fall approaches, allow your dill plants to go to seed, and the next year they should sprout and grow all over again.

Dill is an herb that is known and used all over the world. When I hear the word dill, I automatically think of pickles. All parts of the plant are edible, but the leaves and seeds are generally used for flavoring food. Dill is grown annually by most gardeners, but is actually a biennial plant. Dill can reseed itself and grow year after year, whether it be in a container or a garden bed making it biennial. Dill is also referred to as dill weed because it is so easy to grow.

You can start by purchasing seeds or by transplants. It is very easy to start dill by seeds. Since the plant has a long tap root it is difficult to transplant the herb. Transplanting can cause the plant to be small or not produce as much. Whichever method you choose is fine.

Container Growing

To grow in containers is very simple. Since dill has a long tap root, you need to be sure that your pot is big enough to accommodate the root. It is recommended to use at least a 12 inch deep pot. It doesn’t have to be particularly wide, however.

The container needs to be placed where it can receive at least 6 to 8 hours of sunlight daily. It is okay to sow your seeds outside after the danger of frost, but if you want a head start then feel free to start it indoors.

These are some seedlings that have come up in this container. They now need thinned out to about two plants to leave adequate space.

Start by sowing seeds directly into your container, just as you would if you were sowing outside. A soilless potting mix will work best, and you need to make sure there are draining holes int eh bottom of the container. It can grow in most soils, but prefers well-drained, acidic soil.

Planting in a container will still allow your plant to grow. You can even bring your container of dill inside when the weather starts to change. The biggest rule to growing dill is being sure that it receives adequate amounts of light. You can put it in a sunny location or use a grow light.

Dill can be planted in any type of soil so long as it drains well. Fill your container with soil and then sprinkle your seeds over it. Lightly cover the seeds with some more soil and water. Keep the soil moist until the seedlings appear. The seedlings will start to emerge in 10 to 14 days.

Water your plants often by misting them lightly, and once the seedlings are a few inches tall, you can then them to just two per pot. Otherwise, caring for dill in a container will be exactly the same as tending to it in your outdoor garden!

After the seedlings have reached about two inches in height it is time to thin them. Thin the plants to one to two plants per container so that they have enough room to grow.

Dill does not require a lot of water. If the soil directly under the dill goes undisturbed you’re more than likely to get reseeding for next year.

You will want to do succession planting every 2 to 3 weeks so you have plenty of dill on hand. If the weather is too hot it will go to seed. I have a couple of pots of dill at any given time.

Varieties Of Dill

  • Bouquet Dill– the most common type grown by home gardeners. Leaves and seeds are perfect for cooking and pickling.
  • Fernleaf Dill– a common dwarf variety that can reach up to 18 inches. This is a great dill for container growing.
  • Dukat Dill– this is another dwarf variety perfect for growing in containers. It produces bright green leaves, and many people enjoy sprigs of it in their salad.
  • Mammoth Dill– also known as Long Island Dill. This is a very large variety that can reach up to five feet tall. It is best grown in garden beds, but can be grown in large containers, it does need full sun. This dill is great for pickling.
  • Vierling Dill– this dill is slow to bolt, and can grow all summer. This variety does well in warm climates.

Two of the dill varieties that you can purchase the seeds of

Pruning

Dill can grow as large as 5 feet tall, but most varieties reach around 3 feet. The plant has fine feathery looking leaves that grow around the stalk. The leaf is actually a unit that stands off from the stalk with the tiny tendrils, or feathery part, on it. The flowers look like clusters of small yellow umbrellas that can be up to 6 inches wide.

Dill does not require pruning, but you may want to do it if you grow in a container. If you pinch back the top of the plant, it will encourage it to grow bushier instead of taller.

If you want the plant to continue to grow you will want to prune the flowers. If the dill goes to seed the plant will die. Dill will cross pollinate with other herbs, and you do not want this to happen, so pinching back the flowers will prevent it.

If you harvest regularly you won’t need to prune. You can prune with scissors or pinch off with your finger. To prune you will want to look at what needs taken off, for example the flower, cut above the joint on the stalk where it is growing from. Even when you prune, you will want to use the cuttings, there is no need to waste.

The part in the yellow circle is what is considered a full leaf on the dill plant. The other parts off of it are the tiny feathery tendrils of the leaf.

Harvesting

It is not recommended to harvest from the plant until it has at least five leaves. You should always harvest from the top of the plant. If you need just a little bit of dill then you can take a pinch off of a leaf, or take the whole leaf off at the junction of the leaf and stalk.

Do not harvest too much at once, as it can kill your plant. A good rule of thumb is to leave at least ⅓ of the plant when harvesting.

Storage and Use

Dill tastes best when it is used fresh. It loses some flavor as it dries. It is recommended to harvest dill just before it starts to flower as it tastes the best then and will have good flavor after drying.

After harvest you can wash and dry your dill to remove any dirt and insects. At the end of season you will hopefully have a lot of dill to use. With a surplus of dill on your hands you have to be able to save it so there are a few options.

Refrigeration

Dill can stay fresh in the fridge for a week or two. You can put the dill in a glass of water or wrap it in a wet paper towel and plastic wrap to keep it fresh. Store the dill in your vegetable crisper drawer.

Drying

The stems, leaves, and seeds can all be dried. To dry the dill clip off the individual leaves and lay them out on a rack to dry. To dry be sure that they are laid out in a warm, dry room away from direct sunlight.

Turn the dill over daily to be sure that it gets even air exposure to dry. Once the dill has dried, crush it and store in a glass jar. The dried dill will store for up to six months if kept in a cool dark area.

If you want to harvest the dill seeds you need to allow the plant to flower and go to seed. Gather the bunches with the seed and tie them together by the stems and hang them upside down. Place a tray or something under where they are hanging to catch the seeds.

You can also hang a bag over them to get all of the seeds. You need to be sure that air can get through the bag, so you may need to punch some holes in it, to help the drying process.

Once the seeds are dry they will drop from the plant, which will take a few weeks. Store the seeds in a glass jar in a cool, dark place. Use the seeds for cooking or put them up until the next season to plant.

This is a pile of dried dill seeds.

** Helpful hint: the dried dill is not as flavorful, so you may need to double what the recipe calls for when using it to cook.

Companion Crops

With the risk of cross pollination and the certain bugs that are attracted to dill there are a few plants that you shouldn’t plant next to it. Dill attracts insects such as ladybugs and lacewings, which eat aphids. It attracts pollinators such as honeybees and swallowtail butterflies. It also helps in repelling spider mites, squash bugs , and cabbage loopers.

Due to its ability to repel these insects dill does excellent being planted next to plants in the cabbage family, asparagus, corn, beans, lettuce, onions, cucumbers, fennel, and eggplant. Since dill attracts pollinators you should avoid planting it near carrots, cilantro, caraway, and nightshades.

If cross pollination occurs among these plants, it will ruin them. This is good to know because even container gardening plants will still need to be placed next to each other.

Pests

There are few pests that tend to disturb dill. Aphids are attracted to dill and love to feast on the plant, Being attracted to dill is its problem though because ladybugs enjoy aphids and are also attracted to dill.

Caterpillars love to feed on dill, they don’t necessarily kill the plant but you still want them there. To rid the caterpillars simply remove them by hand.

Another pest of the dill is the cutworm, they will eat the stem off right at the soil line. To help rid cutworms use sharp objects around the base of the plant so that it cuts the worm.Some examples of this is crushed egg shells and diatomaceous earth.

Diseases

Diseases can affect your dill just like it can any other crop. Some of the diseases range from being fungal to being caused by insects spreading viruses to the plants.

1. Carrot-Motley Dwarf Disease: this virus is spread by aphids from carrots to other plants. This disease is caused by two separate viruses that have to be present to affect the plant.

This disease causes the plants to develop red and yellow discoloration to the leaves and it stunts the growth of plants. To rid Carrot-Motley Dwarf Disease you will need to use an insecticidal soap and avoid planting next to carrots.

2. Damping Off: this fungal disease is caused by the seeds not being able to germinate due to the seeds rotting from being too wet. To help control this disease you can treat with a fungicidal spray and be sure to plant in well drained soil.

3. Cercospora Leaf Blight: fungal again this disease causes the leaves to develop necrotic tissue that will spread over the leaves killing them. To treat this disease you will need to use a fungicidal spray and be sure to use disease free seeds, rotate your crops,and be sure to not leave old plants laying around.

4. Powdery Mildew: this is a fungal disease with a powdery growth that affects the leaves and stalks of the plant. To treat avoid over fertilization and use fungicides as needed.

5. Downy Mildew: another fungal disease that has yellow spots on the leaves with a fluffy growth on the underside of the leaves. Wet leaves tend to harbor the disease. This fungus targets young plants and can be treated by using disease free seeds and proper spacing of the plants.

Wrap-Up

As always when treating diseases, it is good practice to try to use disease-free seeds and follow the directions on the seed packet for proper planting. Do the proper treatment of insects and being sure to clean up your garden spot of any dead weeds. Also, remember to rotate your crops, and plant your garden in soil with proper drainage.

You should have no problem starting and growing your own dill. All you need to do now is figure out which way you prefer to use and eat it. Happy harvesting, and enjoy the dishes that are made great with the flavor of dill that you have grown yourself.

How to Grow Dill in Pots

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Growing dill in pots is fairly easy, and having this fresh, flavorful herb in your kitchen can really open up some culinary possibilities! This annual, self feeding plant attracts beneficial insects such as butterflies, so it’s a great herb to have! Learn how to grow dill in pots, care for it, and have a continuous dill harvest!

The most important thing to keep in mind when growing dill in pots, is to have deep pots as dillweed has long taproots. Be sure to have a pot or container that’s about 1 or 2 feet in depth.

Sowing Dill Seeds:

  • Sow dill seeds directly into pots or containers. Be sure that your pot has good drainage holes.
  • Fill the pot with soilless potting mix. Dill herbs will grow in almost any type of soil, but they do prefer well drained and slightly acidic soil.
  • Simply sprinkle the seeds directly on top of the soil and cover with a light layer of soil.
  • Place the potted plant in an area where it will receive 6-8 hours of sunlight per day.
  • Only move the potted plant outdoors once all danger of frost has passed. Until then, keep the plant indoors in front of a south facing window.

Dill Care:

  • Dill doesn’t require much care.
  • Be sure it gets an adequate amount of sun.
  • Keep the soil moist by misting often.
  • Thin dill to one or two plants per pot once they are a few inches in height.

So now that you know how to grow dill in pots, it’s time to roll up your sleeves and get to planting!

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How to Grow Dill Indoors Organically

Would you like to try to growing dill in your herb garden?

The winter months can feel like a very long period of time for gardeners. We crave sun on our faces and dirt under our fingernails. Just because most of the country is heading full swing into winter, it doesn’t mean gardening needs to stop. Have you ever grown an herb garden indoors?
Herb gardens can put a smile on the face of any gardener in the winter. Plus, you will get to cook with fresh herbs and your home will smell amazing. Today, we would like to share with you about growing dill indoors.

Dill is a great herb to start with if you have never before grown an herb garden. It also comes in really handy when cooking. Dill can add something tasty to potatoes, soups, and egg dishes. You can even save the seeds and add them to bread for a delightful flavor.

According Better Homes and Gardens,

Dill thrives in dry, sunny spots, and plants self-seed to keep the crop coming year after year. To ensure a steady supply of foliage for snipping, sow seeds every four weeks during the growing season.”

Growing Dill in a Container

While you can grow dill outside by planting the seeds in a container, you can also grow dill indoors. Growing inside isn’t too much different then growing it outside accept the herb will not grow as tall inside as it would outside.

To plant dill simply sprinkle the dill seeds into the container. Then, add a quarter of an inch of soil on top. Remember to keep the pot near a window so that the herb can get about 6 hours of sunlight a day.

Make sure that the herb gets plenty of water by installing a direct-to-root watering system like an aeration tube. According to EHow.com, the seeds should take about 7 days to sprout. Once sprouted, make sure to thin out all but the strongest plants.

Harvest the leaves while the plant grows. Once the plant flowers, it loses its flavor.

If you have any questions regarding dill or any other herb, please leave them in the comment section below.

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