When to transplant sunflowers?

How Do You Transplant Sunflowers?

Transplanting sunflowers isn’t difficult and is similar to transplanting other plants. The main thing to keep in mind is that the stems on young sunflowers are very delicate and may require a bit of care for the first weeks.

  1. Prepare the ground for planting

    Dig holes for the plants. Remember that sunflowers are tall and so the roots spread out farther than you might expect. Space the holes far enough apart the plants aren’t crowded once they get larger. The holes should be 3 to 4 inches deep with loose soil all around so the roots have something to grab.

  2. Put the sunflower into the hole

    Carefully place the sunflower into the middle of the hole, and loosely cover the roots. Don’t pack the soil too tightly in the hole.

  3. Water lightly

    Sunflowers are hardy and don’t need to be fertilized unless your soil is seriously depleted. They don’t need great quantities of water, but watering helps the plant overcome transplanting trauma and settle into its new home.

  4. Provide support

    If you are transplanting very small plants, staking them with popsicle sticks or other small wooden or plastic supports is helpful. It isn’t necessary in all cases, but strong wind or heavy rain can bend the plants and damage those delicate stems. Attach the plant to the stakes carefully so you don’t tear the stems, bruise the leaves or prevent natural growth.

Sunflower growth and transplantation advice!

Hi again! I have so many planting projects going on as I got a bit carried away as a beginner. I appreciate all your help so far. I planted loads of sunflower seeds in plastic and paper cups and they have really taken off!! Have my the seedlings now outgrown the cups? I am a bit scared about killing them if I try to plant them outside. I moved one a few days ago from the plastic cup into a small terracotta pot and I did not realise that sunflowers have long taproots and how long it actually was. It was like very weak string. When I transplanted it, it seemed to break in places so I moved it quickly. Seems to be doing okay at the moment but it is very tall and I don’t know if it is alive or just being held up by the chopstick. How are you supposed to transplant such a flimsy root? You can’t hold it properly, position it, or press it as per fibrous roots? How deeps should I plant it also?

Also when I started, in some cups I put the compost to the top, and some only halfway because I did not know which one was correct. Will the cups with only half compost not produce as tall sunflowers due to the restricted room for the taproot? If I become brave enough to eventually plant them in the soil outside (and if the weather ever actually gets warmer!), will they re-gain their original growth?

I know sewing sunflower seeds in cups is something 5-year olds do in school but I have never done it! So I would really like to not lose any of my sunflowers!! Thinking of dotting them around the garden in all the bedding spaces on fence sides, and some in a large empty area on the raised rockery bed…the latter is rather exposed but if I stake them will they be okay? (that is if I have not killed any of them while transplanting!!).

Thanks in advance.

Transplanting Sunflowers

May 21, 20100 found this helpful

Transplanting Sunflowers

Does the bright face of a golden sunflower cheer you up? Did you plant hundreds of the sunflowers seeds, so you could be continuously cheery, but realize that now you need to thin them out? Or maybe some just popped up in the wrong location. Never fear, you can move your beloved sunflower to an appropriate place safely, and enjoy its beauty for the rest of the season.

There are over sixty varieties of sunflowers. Each one has specific needs for growth and care, but the basics are all about the same. You’ve planted the seeds, whether indoors or out, and now need to transplant or thin them out in the garden. The process will take a little time, but should result in undamaged sprouts or flowers in the end.

When Transplanting Seedlings
Seedlings are very delicate until several weeks when the stem grows thicker and develops in to a stalk. When you are moving them from a germination flat from indoors to outdoors, you will need some special care. Pick a location that receives full sun or only partial shade for the best results. Do not plant outdoors until all danger of frost is gone, as the cold will freeze the tender stems and they will die and not regrow.

Begin by digging small holes where you would like your seedlings to go. Make sure they are adequately spaced so the roots will have plenty of room to grow. You don’t want to have to re-transplant them again in another month by spacing them to close together. Dig a hole about two or three inches in to the ground. Work the soil so it is loose and the roots can take hold and latch on, on the sides and bottom of the hole.

Position the sunflower in the center of the hole and cover with soil. Pat gently so the soil is firm and will keep sunflower in place. Water the area to give the roots extra help in growing and repairing themselves from the transplant.

If your seedlings are small and don’t stand up on their own, you might want to use a stake. You can buy metal or wood ones and prop next to the seedling or tie it with some string. Popsicle sticks and wooden stakes cut down to the size of the seedling work best. The stakes will also protect against heavy rain and high wind damage.

And like all young sprouts, they will attract wildlife. Rabbits especially like to eat the tender green stems of sunflowers. Its not uncommon to have a beautiful row or two of sprouts emerge, grow to six inches tall, and then be completely mowed down overnight by a hungry rabbit or deer. A fence made of wire or mesh might keep them out, at least until the seedlings can grow tall enough where the rabbits lose interest. A fence would need to be at least eight feet tall to keep deer out, and then it isn’t even a guarantee. Human or animal hair placed near the seedlings may also repel their interests.good luck.

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29 Jun 5 Tips for Growing and Harvesting Sunflower Seeds

Posted at 07:00h in Growing by kellogggarden

Sunflowers are one of the easiest flowers to grow in the garden. For this reason, they took the top spot in the Top 5 Easiest Plants for Kids to Grow. Sunflowers are a beautiful addition to a summer flower garden and are helpful with attracting pollinators to the garden. Many of us have memories of planting sunflowers when we were young; the stems seemed to shoot up before our eyes. Bring some of that magic into your garden by growing sunflowers. If you choose the right variety, you get the added benefit of harvesting delicious sunflower seeds.

Here are 5 tips for growing and harvesting your own sunflower seeds:

1. Sunflowers are simple to grow. Sunflowers aren’t picky about the soil. Sunflowers tolerate rocky and sandy soils; to be sure though, sunflowers grown in rich soil will grow taller and fuller than those that aren’t. Sunflowers are easily grown from seed. If you do transplant, don’t wait too long as sunflowers get rootbound quickly and don’t always recover well. Space large sunflower plants 2-3 feet apart. If the plants are too close to each other, the heads will be smaller.

2. Choose the correct variety. Confection varieties are grown for edible seeds. There are two main types of confectionvarieties: “tall” types and “short” types:

Tall confection types typically produce the most seeds, but seeds may be smaller sized. Varieties include “Giganteus”, “Mammoth Gray Stripe”, “Mammoth Russian”, and “Titan”. You can tell from the names these are going to be big flowers!

Short varieties are (obviously) shorter and they normally have fewer seeds per head, but the seeds are larger. Varieties include “Royal Hybrid”, “Snack Seed”, and “Super Snack Mix”.

3. Harvest at the right time. Growing sunflowers is easy, but knowing when to harvest the seeds isn’t. If you harvest too soon, you will have plenty of seeds but small kernels inside. If you wait too long, on the other hand, they may dry out or get harvested by the birds. A few things to look for when determining when to harvest are:

  • Harvest when seeds are plump and developed.
  • Harvest when flower petals begin to dry out and fall off.
  • Harvest when the back of flower turns from green to yellow (if you are cutting the stem off to dry).
  • Harvest when the back of the flower is brown (if you are letting seeds dry with the stem intact).

4. Choose a method for collecting seeds. One method is to let seeds develop on the stem, harvesting them when they begin to loosen. This method usually requires you to cover the heads with netting or paper bags to protect the seeds from being eaten by birds. Loosen seeds by hand to remove them from the head. Let seeds dry out before storing. Another method is to harvest the head when outer seeds are mature and the inner seeds begin to ripen. Cut off the stalk about 4 inches below the head, and hang upside down in a warm area covered in a paper sack until seeds mature.

5. Enjoy your harvest! After collecting the seeds, you can eat them right away, roast them with a little salt, or save some to plant for next season. The nice thing about growing sunflower seeds is you will probably have enough seeds to do all three! Once dry, you can store sunflower seeds for 2-3 months in a sealed container, or up to a year if kept in the freezer.

About the Author:

Angela Judd is an avid vegetable, flower and fruit tree gardener. A mother of five children, she enjoys growing and preparing food from the garden for her family. She is a certified Master Gardener. She shares inspiration and tips to help home gardeners successfully grow their own garden on growinginthegarden.com. Follow her on Instagram and Facebook.

Potted plants can be great for adding life to your home interior. But if you want to decorate your outdoor space, or reuse your pots for something else, you can often replant your indoor foliage into an outdoor flower bed.

Here’s how:

1. Check compatibility.

Most potted plants such as the Sunshine & Joy Garden can survive in the ground, but only if the conditions are right. Look up your particular potted plant online to see what temperature range, sunlight and soil/water conditions it prefers. It doesn’t hurt to let the plant adapt to the change by setting it outside in its pot for a few days prior to transplanting.

2. Prepare the soil.

If you don’t already have a flower bed prepared, and are digging up untilled soil, it is a good idea to mix in some compost or a bag of garden soil. And make sure the ground is dry enough; moist soil is great, but digging in mud will result in rock-hard clumps.

3. Dig the hole.

You want to make sure the hole is deep enough and wide enough to hold the plant’s root system. The easy way to be sure of this is to set the pot itself in the hole; if it will hold the plant and the pot, it will easily hold the plant by itself, with plenty of room to fill in loose dirt under and around it.

4. Carefully remove the plant from the pot.

To do this, place one hand around the base of the plant, on top of the potted soil. With your other hand, tip over the pot so that the plant and soil slide out together. You’ll likely need to tap the pot to loosen the soil from the edges. You generally don’t want to pull the plant out, especially from a larger pot, as it may rip out part of the root system.

5. Loosen the edge of the root ball.

If the plant has been in the pot for a long time, the roots will start to wrap around and match the shape of the container. You now want those roots to grow outward into the surrounding soil. So, gently tease out thetips of the roots using your fingers, a pencil or a toothpick.

6. Place the roots in the ground.

You don’t want to bury the plant itself, so if the hole is too deep, you can scoop a few handfuls of dirt in to provide a base. Then, carefully fill in loose dirt around the roots until the hole is filled, and pat the soil down to eliminate gaps. You don’t want to pack the soil too tightly, but it needs to be solid enough to support the plant and hold the roots in place.

7. Water and care for your plant.

When finished, thoroughly water the plant to help recover and get established in its new surroundings. Then follow the regular recommended care for your variety of flower.

8. Recycling your pot.

Now you’re left with one more thing to transplant: the empty pot. Though you can use it to raise a new plant, there are many other creative uses for old flower pots—from cute fairy gardens, to practical de-icing salt dispensers, to kitchen utensil holders. Some “pots,” like our garden plants in decorative baskets or watering can containers, can be reused as spring decor.

Of course, for more ideas, there’s always Pinterest.

Does the bright face of a golden sunflower cheer you up? Did you plant hundreds of the sunflowers seeds, so you could be continuously cheery, but realize that now you need to thin them out? Or maybe some just popped up in the wrong location. Never fear, you can move your beloved sunflower to an appropriate place safely, and enjoy its beauty for the rest of the season.

There are over sixty varieties of sunflowers. Each one has specific needs for growth and care, but the basics are all about the same. You’ve planted the seeds, whether indoors or out, and now need to transplant or thin them out in the garden. The process will take a little time, but should result in undamaged sprouts or flowers in the end.

When Transplanting Seedlings

Seedlings are very delicate until several weeks when the stem grows thicker and develops in to a stalk. When you are moving them from a germination flat from indoors to outdoors, you will need some special care. Pick a location that receives full sun or only partial shade for the best results. Do not plant outdoors until all danger of frost is gone, as the cold will freeze the tender stems and they will die and not regrow.

Begin by digging small holes where you would like your seedlings to go. Make sure they are adequately spaced so the roots will have plenty of room to grow. You don’t want to have to re-transplant them again in another month by spacing them to close together. Dig a hole about two or three inches in to the ground. Work the soil so it is loose and the roots can take hold and latch on, on the sides and bottom of the hole.

Position the sunflower in the center of the hole and cover with soil. Pat gently so the soil is firm and will keep sunflower in place. Water the area to give the roots extra help in growing and repairing themselves from the transplant.

If your seedlings are small and don’t stand up on their own, you might want to use a stake. You can buy metal or wood ones and prop next to the seedling or tie it with some string. Popsicle sticks and wooden stakes cut down to the size of the seedling work best. The stakes will also protect against heavy rain and high wind damage.

And like all young sprouts, they will attract wildlife. Rabbits especially like to eat the tender green stems of sunflowers. Its not uncommon to have a beautiful row or two of sprouts emerge, grow to six inches tall, and then be completely mowed down overnight by a hungry rabbit or deer. A fence made of wire or mesh might keep them out, at least until the seedlings can grow tall enough where the rabbits lose interest. A fence would need to be at least eight feet tall to keep deer out, and then it isn’t even a guarantee. Human or animal hair placed near the seedlings may also repel their interests.

When Transplanting Older Plants

When digging your sunflower up, make sure to give it wide berth. If you dig too close to the stalk, the roots can be damaged and your beloved flower might not recover. The farther out you dig, the more roots will remain on the stalk. Dig straight down to go deep and avoid cutting the largest roots. Shake off excess dirt if it is too heavy to carry to the new location.

Pick your location and dig a hole about six to eight inches deep, and at least that in width, depending on the exact age of your plant. It is has a lot of roots, dig even deeper so they have adequate room to grow. Loosen the dirt around the area so the roots have air and can latch hold easily.

Place the plant in the center and cover with dirt, packing it down to hold the plant firmly in place. Give it lots of water so the roots can recover from the trauma of being removed. A grown plant should not require stakes if it is planted deep enough.

Care

Sunflowers don’t require fertilizer while they are growing in normal conditions. If you have an unusual soil type, you may consider it, but do it lightly. Sunflowers are hardy plants, but chemical interference may do them in.

After a sunflower has bloomed, birds will start to notice it and the seeds within the center. Keep the sunflowers up until the next planting season, so the birds have an abundant food supply all winter long. Cut the heads or pull the entire stalk out of the ground when the seeds are all gone. Begin your new crop for the new season!

Seedling care: transplanting, thinning, and preventing disease

When the seedlings have developed their second set of true leaves, it’s time to transplant or thin them. If you don’t need many plants, you can thin them in place: just pinch or snip off the excess seedlings, leaving the remaining ones spaced about 2 inches apart. Seedlings in individual pots or cells should be thinned to one plant per pot or cell. If you want to save most of the plants that have germinated, you’ll need to transplant them to larger containers for growth to planting-out size. It’s best to use individual pots or cell-packs for this purpose, so that seedlings won’t suffer much root disturbance when planted out in the garden.

To transplant seedlings, fill each new container with moist planting mix. Loosen the soil around the seedlings (a kitchen fork or spoon is handy for this); then carefully lift them out, one at a time. Or lift a clump of seedlings and gently separate individual plants by carefully teasing apart the tangled mass of roots. Handle seedlings by their leaves to avoid damaging the tender stems. Poke a hole in the new container’s planting mix, place the seedling in the hole, and firm soil around it. Water the transplant right away. Keep the containers out of direct sunlight for a few days to let the transplants recover from the move.

About 10 days before the seedlings are ready to plant outside, harden them off so they can withstand bright sun and cooler temperatures. Stop fertilizing them, and set them outdoors for several hours each day in a wind-sheltered spot that receives filtered light. A cold frame is useful for hardening off seedlings. Over the next week or so, gradually increase exposure until the plants are in full sun all day (shade lovers are an exception; they shouldn’t be exposed to day-long sun). Then set them out in the garden as illustrated in Planting annual and perennial seedlings.

Damping off

If your seedlings suddenly collapse and die, one of the fungal diseases called “damping off” or “seed and seedling rot” may be to blame. In one type of damping off, the seedling’s stem collapses at or near the soil surface; in another type, the seedling rots before it emerges from the soil, or the seed decays before it even sprouts.

To prevent these problems, use pasteurized potting mix and new or thoroughly washed and disinfected containers. Try using seeds treated with a fungicide. Take care not to overwater seedlings; be sure to provide good air circulation and ventilation, so tops of seedlings stay dry and standing moisture is kept to a minimum. Thinning seedlings to eliminate crowding is also helpful.

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