When to prune sedum?

Planting Sedums – How To Grow Sedum

There are few plants more forgiving of sun and bad soil than sedum plants. Growing sedum is easy, so easy, in fact, that even the most novice gardener can excel at it. With a large number of sedum varieties to choose from, you will find one that works for your garden. Learn more about how to grow sedum in the article below.

How to Grow Sedum

When growing sedum, keep in mind that sedum plants need very little attention or care. They will thrive in conditions that many other plants thrive in, but will do just as well in less hospitable areas. They are ideal for that part of your yard that gets too much sun or too little water to grow anything else. A common name for sedum

is stonecrop, due to the fact that many gardeners joke that only stones need less care and live longer.

Sedum varieties vary in height. The smallest are just a few inches tall, and the tallest can be up to 3 feet. The large majority of sedum varieties are shorter and sedums are frequently used as ground covers in xeriscape gardens or rock gardens.

Sedum varieties also vary in their hardiness. Many are hardy to USDA zone 3, while others need a warmer climate. Make sure the sedum that you plant is suited to your hardiness zone.

Sedums need no additional water or fertilizer. Overwatering and overfertilizing can hurt the plants far worse than not watering or fertilizing.

Tips for Planting Sedums

Sedum is easily planted. For shorter varieties, simply laying the sedum on the ground where you want it to grow is normally enough to get the sedum plant started there. They will send out roots from wherever the stem is touching the ground and root itself. If you would like to further ensure that the plant will start there, you can add a very thin covering of soil over the plant.

For taller sedum varieties, you can break off one of the stems and push it into the ground where you would like to grow it. The stem will root very easily and anew plant will be established in a season or two.

Popular Sedum Varieties

  • Autumn Joy
  • Dragon’s Blood
  • Purple Emperor
  • Autumn Fire
  • Black Jack
  • Spurium Tricolor
  • Bronze Carpet
  • Baby Tears
  • Brilliant
  • Coral Carpet
  • Red Creeping
  • Jaws
  • Mr. Goodbud

Sedums: Plant Care and Collection of Varieties

The succulent foliage of many types of sedum is topped by starry flowers in late summer and fall. Low-growing types are perfect for rock gardens, while taller varieties thrive in perennial borders. Another common name is stonecrop.

About sedums
There are numerous types of sedum, all of which have fleshy, succulent leaves. Low-growing varieties hug the ground and may reach just 2 inches in height, while tall varieties top out at 2 feet or more. Use the low-growing types as ground covers and in rock gardens; tall varieties command attention in the perennial border with their dense foliage and large flower heads. Flower colors include red, pink, gold, yellow, and white, and plants bloom in summer to fall, depending on the species. Well-drained soil is essential to ward off fungal diseases, especially during wet summers.

Special features of sedums
Easy care/low maintenance
Good for cut flowers
Attracts butterflies
Unusual foliage
Tolerates dry soil

Choosing a site to grow sedums
Select a site with full sun to light shade and very well-drained soil.

Planting Instructions
Plant in spring, spacing plants 6 inches to 2 feet apart, depending on the variety. Prepare the garden bed by using a garden fork or tiller to loosen the soil to a depth of 12 to 15 inches, then mix in a 2- to 4-inch layer of compost. Dig a hole twice the diameter of the pot the plant is in. Carefully remove the plant from its container and place it in the hole so the top of the root ball is level with the soil surface. Carefully fill in around the root ball and firm the soil gently. Water thoroughly.

Ongoing Care
Apply a thin layer of compost each spring, followed by a 2-inch layer of mulch to retain moisture and control weeds. Water plants during the summer if rainfall is less than 1 inch per week. After the first killing frost, cut stems back to an inch or two above soil line. Divide plants every 3 to 4 years as new growth begins in the spring, lifting plants and dividing them into clumps.

Sedum, also known as Showy Stonecrop or Border Stonecrop, is an attractive and hardy perennial plant with hundreds of varieties. Sedum is a popular plant for landscaping because it is easy to care for and it’s fall blooms come in a wide array of vivid colors.

Sedum for Borders

The taller species of sedum are best for borders and look great when planted with tall grasses. Some of the best sedum varieties for borders include:

  • Autumn Joy
  • Abbeydore
  • Matrona
  • Vera Jameson
  • Neon
  • Black Jack

Sedum for Groundcover

A multitude of low growing sedum varieties make excellent groundcover and can thrive in almost any type of soil. These hardy little plants virtually take care of themselves, requiring very little attention:

  • Dragon’s Blood
  • Rose Carpet
  • Voodoo
  • Mossy Stonecrop
  • Tricolor
  • Capo Blanco
  • Bainbridge
  • Blue Spruce
  • Angelina
  • John Creech

Sedum for Containers

Sedum is a great plant type for a variety of different containers. You can plant different types of Sedum, both short and tall, to create a unique and interesting contrast. Naturally, you will need a deeper, larger container if you plan to plant tall sedum varieties.

Sedums fall into a category of plants known as succulents. Succulents are fleshy-leaved plant species such as aloes, kalanchoes and sempervivums. These types of plants are able to thrive in harsh environments and are able to tolerate intense sun, drought and poor soil.

Low growing sedum varieties make beautiful and interesting arrangements in shallow containers. You can also try sedum species that grow to a medium height, in between the low growing and tall stemmed species, in containers such as strawberry pots. Barrels, troughs and a variety of planters can be used to create miniature gardens both indoors and outdoors with sedum species such as:

  • White Diamond
  • Blue Carpet
  • Sandys Silver Crest
  • Turkish Delight
  • Variegatum
  • Fruland
  • Superbum

Benefits of Sedum

In addition to being one of the easiest types of plants to care for, there are other advantages to planting sedum. Most species are late bloomers, therefore once the summer blooms of other flowering plants have faded away, sedum makes a beautiful fall display in your garden that often carries over far into the winter. Sedum blooms also attract wildlife into your garden such as butterflies, bees and hummingbirds.

The taller sedum species often used in borders stand tall throughout the winter, with their seed heads attracting birds. Low to medium growing sedum plants are excellent choices for filling in gaps in landscaping designs and provide beautiful groundcover with their fleshy, plump, multicolored foliage. If you have spots on your property where the soil is poor and can’t support most other types of plants, you can fill in these areas with sedum. Varieties such as Roseflower Stonecrop and Heckner’s Stonecrop make excellent additions to rock gardens or stonewalls.

If you own property in remote areas where wildlife such as deer and rabbits make regular appearances in your yard or garden, there are many types of sedum you can add to your landscape that are undesirable for these animals to eat, such as:

  • Fulda Glow
  • Autumn Joy
  • Autumn Charm
  • Angelina
  • Voodoo
  • Cauticola

Something for Everyone

With over 400 varieties of sedum available in all shapes, sizes and colors, there is bound to be a type of sedum that will appeal to any gardener. Not every type of sedum requires intense sun and dry, well-drained soil. Some varieties thrive in shady areas with cooler temperatures and moist soil. No matter what type of climate you live in, you only have to do your research to discover which types of sedum will make a great addition to your home.

Sedum Plants Stock Photos and Images

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  • Display of sedum plants at the Bellagio casino in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
  • Alpine Sedum plants growing in a garden flowerbed. Spring. UK.
  • Comma Butterfly feeding on Sedum – Polygonum c-album
  • Sedum plants growing on rooftop
  • Trays of Sedum plants between the platforms and the tracks at the Deansgate-Castlefield tram stop, Manchester, England, UK
  • Close-up Of Sedum Plants
  • Sedum plants. Succulent and xerophile plants. Mljet Island. Croatia. Europe.
  • Grey metal mailbox mounted on wooden pole next to large rock with flower pot filled with sedum plants surrounded with green grass and Lily
  • Drought tolerant Sedum plants growing on the roof of a modern building to provide living insulation
  • Green Roof composed of drought resistant Sedum plants improves appearance insulation and biodiversity THey also help to slow run
  • A green roof consisting of a diverse range of sedum plants on a single storey timber building
  • partial green roof top covered with sedum plants
  • Mr. Goodbud Sedum. Oregon.
  • Pink Ice Plants (sedum spectabile) just coming into bloom and surrounded by yellow Rudbekias plants
  • Close up of sedum and plants
  • Frosted sedum plants in winter
  • Bumblebee waking up having spent night on ice plant Sedum spectabile in late September
  • A colourful mixed flower border with Monarda ‘Cambridge Scarlet’ and a Sedum covered roof on a garden shelter
  • Pink Sedum telephium ‘Joyce henderson’ flowers and flower stems growing in garden, August, England, UK
  • Colourful sedum plants in winter
  • Alpine Sedum plants growing in a garden flowerbed. Spring. UK.
  • Nice green succulents on rocks in garden in sunny day
  • Sedum plants growing on rooftop
  • Trays of Sedum plants between the platforms and the tracks at the Deansgate-Castlefield tram stop, Manchester, England, UK
  • Sedum plants used for Green roof
  • Sedum plants. Succulent and xerophile plants. Mljet Island. Croatia. Europe.
  • Sedum plants are often used for green roof applications.
  • Pots of young Sedum plants in a nursery
  • Sedum for green roofs on display at the Greenroof Environmental Literacy Laboratory in New York
  • A curved green roof consisting of a diverse range of sedum plants on a single storey timber building
  • living roof top covered with sedum plants with gravel path and vent pipe
  • Floral display depicting a bird made up of planted Sedum plants
  • Pink Ice Plants (sedum spectabile) just coming into bloom and surrounded by yellow Rudbekias plants
  • Cotinus Coggyria and sedum belo dry stone wall
  • Sedum Plants Growing in Springtime
  • Bumble Bees love to pollinate the lovely pink stonecrop Sedum plants
  • The roof of a garden shelterplanted and covered with assorted Sedums
  • Pink Sedum telephium ‘Joyce henderson’ flowers and flower stems growing in garden, August, England, UK
  • Colourful sedum plants in winter
  • Rocky coastline of South Devon with small stonecrop (Sedum) plants in foreground
  • Red stonecrop, Sedum rubens, Crassulaceae, Gargano National Park, Puglia, Italy
  • UK, England, Shropshire, Craven Arms, Stokesay Castle, gatehouse, spiky succulent plant growing in lead gutter
  • Rock Stonecrop (Sedum forsterianum) growing on rocks, red list of alpine plants, Germany, Europe
  • Sedum plants used for Green roof
  • Small succulent sedum plants growing in a tray
  • Sedum plants are often used for green roof applications.
  • Pink flowers of Sedum Hylotelephium Spectabile (brilliant group) with their fleshy leaves otherwise known as ‘ice plants’ or stronecrop.
  • Alpine Sedum plants growing in a garden flowerbed. Spring. UK.
  • A green roof consisting of a diverse range of sedum plants surround doors on a single storey timber building
  • green roof top covered with sedum plants
  • White stonecrop (Sedum album) flowering among rocks
  • Dew drops on Sedum, succulent plant
  • Sedum plants growing among weeds in a garden. Mallorca, Balearic islands, Spain.
  • Sedum Plants Growing in Springtime
  • Sedum spathulifolium,sedums, stonecrop,rock garden,rockery,alpine,plant,plants,planting,drought,tolerant,garden,gardens,groundcover,RM Floral
  • Eco green living wall, office building in Camden, London
  • Pink Sedum telephium ‘Joyce henderson’ flowers and flower stems growing in garden, August, England, UK
  • Vieuw of sedum and plants on a blue sky
  • Sedum atratum L. plants. Pinocchina nera, Sedo sanguigno. Valgrisenche valley. Valle d’Aosta, Italian Alps. Europe.
  • Scharfe Fetthenne, Sedum acre, Mauerpfeffer, Europa, europe, Pflanzen, plants, Heilkraeuter, medicinal herbs, bluehend, blooming
  • SEDUM X GRAPTOPETALUM
  • Rock Stonecrop (Sedum forsterianum) growing on rocky floor, red list of alpine plants, Germany, Europe
  • Sedum plants used for Green roof
  • Pot with stones and different stonecrop plants, sedum
  • English stonecrop, Sedum anglicum, flowering mat of plants on the shingle of Chesil Beach, Dorset, May
  • Close the leaves of the plants of the genus Sedum pachyclados
  • Alpine Sedum plants growing in a garden flowerbed. Spring. UK.
  • A green roof consisting of a diverse range of sedum plants surround Fakro roof windows on a single storey timber building
  • green building roof covered with flowering sedum plants
  • White stonecrop (Sedum album) flowering among rocks
  • Yellow flowering sedum acre plants growing in the dunes
  • Sedum plants growing among weeds in a garden. Mallorca, Balearic islands, Spain.
  • Sedum Plants Growing in Springtime
  • Sedum plants with dew growing at the roof of a stones
  • Young plants of Sedum spathulifolium purpureum in Spring. Evergreen perennial that flowers in summer with bright yellow star shaped flowers.
  • Alpine garden plants in bloom Alpine pink Dianthus- Mrs. Holt and Sedum stenopetalum- Douglassii Hardy, Greater Sudbury, Ontario, Canada
  • Variety of sedum plants (Sedum sp.) growing in rock garden in central Virginia
  • Close-up of a section of a vegetated roof with mainly orange and green sedum plants
  • Sedum plants, sempervivum succulent rockery plants with yellow flowers used for sustainable roof plantings
  • Environmentally sustainable eco-roof made from live plan material including sedum and sempervivum
  • Sedum ‘Neon’
  • Sedum plants used for Green roof
  • Pot with stones and different stonecrop plants, sedum, cultivar, horticulture, gardening, plant, garden
  • Hylotelephium ‘Frosty Morn’. Sedum erythrostictum ‘Frosty Morn’ flowers.
  • Flowering Sedum spectabile Cultivar ‘Iceberg’ in Autumn commonly known as the Ice Plant.
  • Alpine Sedum plants growing in a garden flowerbed. Spring. UK.
  • A green roof consisting of a diverse range of sedum plants surround Fakro roof windows on a single storey timber building
  • living roof top covered with sedum plants with gravel path
  • Rocky seashore vegetation flowering Roseroot (Rhodiola rosea) Rose-Root (Sedum rosea) on Sanna island, Træna, Nordland, Norway, Scandinavia
  • Purple Sedum flowering perennial plants in a herbaceous border.
  • Sedum plants in the garden
  • Corsican Stonecrop, Leafy Stonecrop, Sedum dasyphyllum ssp. glanduliferum, Crassulaceae. Western Mediterranean, Europe.
  • Sedum plants with dew growing at the roof of a stones
  • graphic image of the pattern created by close planting of sedum plants
  • Alpine garden plants in bloom Alpine pink Dianthus- Mrs. Holt and Sedum stenopetalum- Douglassii Hardy, Greater Sudbury, Ontario, Canada
  • 0902-1016 – Stonecrop and silverweed cinquefoil and other low lying plants. Mistake Island, Nature Conservancy pre
  • Close-up of a small section of an eco-roof with red sedum plants amidst green, pink and orange succulents
  • Siempre Viva, sedum palmeri plants in garden
  • Sedum flowering in summer surrounded by alpine rockery plants
  • Sedum or Stonecrop hardy succulent ground cover perennial light green plants with thick succulent leaves and fleshy stems with flowers

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Search Results for Sedum Plants Stock Photos and Images

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Sedums, sometimes known as Stonecrops, are great plants–they have nice flowers, they’re drought and heat tolerant, and they are beloved by bees and other pollinators.

The only downfall with them, in my opinion, is their tendency to flop over late in the season. One day you have a nicely rounded mound of plant and the next day it’s come apart, leaving two halves of the plant lying on the ground. Some varieties don’t seem as prone to this, but it is common with the most common types (e.g. the variety Autumn Joy). But there’s a very easy solution!

It’s “pinching back” or “tip pruning” the plants. When your sedums start to get some height on them, you shorten them, causing the plants to send out multiple shoots at each pinch point. This creates a bushier plant that will have more blooms and retain its nice rounded shape until frost.

This sedum (photographed in Niagara Falls, Ontario last week) wasn’t pinched back and already has flower buds. If it was mine, I would be pinching it back right away.

Here is one of my sedums–a dark variety whose name I lost a long time ago–with spindly stems that were ready to be pinched back last week:

I’ll show you exactly how I did it by focusing on this one stem:

I’m going to pinch the top of the stem off, about 4 sets of leaves down from the tip of the plant:

I use my fingers to pinch the stem off, as close to the next set of leaves as possible. You could use secateurs for this if you prefer.

And with one pinch, the stem is gone!

This is what the plant looked like when I was finished:

You can see another sedum to the right of it–it’s a different variety and is not yet big enough to be tip pruned.

And these are all the pieces I trimmed off of that one little plant:

In a couple weeks new growth will sprout and it will start to look like this:

The new green growth with turn as dark as the rest of the plant as it grows. Eventually, all of those new stems will produce flower buds.

A few minutes spent pinching back your sedums now will pay off later, both in more blooms and in plants that retain their shape. It’s a simple technique to help you have a fabulous looking garden.

Would you like to have more sedums? They’re very easy to grow from cuttings. If I was going to do that with the pieces I pinched off (above) I would trim off any flower buds and the bottom sets of leaves, leaving 2 or 3 sets of leaves in total, with some stem sticking out the bottom. I would let the cuttings sit out in a shady spot for a few hours so that the stems have time to callous over, and then stick them in the garden, up to the bottom set of leaves (i.e. don’t cover any leaves with soil–they will rot). The cuttings won’t get to be large plants this year, but they will start to grow and will get to full size in a couple years.

Bonus tip: I haven’t done this myself, but my friends at the Toronto Botanical Garden tell me that if you stagger the pinching back–say you do the front third of your plant this week, the middle third next week, and the back third the week after–you will be able to have your sedum in bloom for longer. The part you pinched back first will bloom first, then a week or so later, the next, and so on. I think this would look best if you had a few plants growing together in a swath.

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ONE of my favourite perennials, the pink Sedum spectabile “Autumn Joy”, is an amazing plant in its own right and also a firm favourite in Britain and Holland, where it is planted en masse for a wonderful autumnal flower display.

Sedum “Autumn Joy” en masse.Interestingly, when it finishes flowering in autumn, the first frosts quickly wither the leaves and flower stalks. If you have not already done so, cut all the frost-affected top to ground level. Immediately, you will see a mass of tiny green shoots, which will continue to grow all through winter and although the top growth of autumn is killed off by frost, the tiny, seemingly delicate, new shoots are unaffected by frost at all.

By the middle of spring these will be centimetres tall providing lush green growth all summer. Look out also for the white-flowering Sedum spectabile “Iceberg”.

SINCE returning from holidays, I have been busy raking leaves and filling the compost heap, at the same time adding a good handful of garden lime to each barrow load of leaves etcetera. I have previously mentioned the damage that can result with an accumulation of wet leaves on hedges. It is equally important to remove wet leaves that can easily kill plants from ground covers such as thyme or convolvulus.

I have also been busy cutting back perennial plants.

Which ones? To start with, all the salvias, asters (Michaelmas daisies), campanulas (Canterbury Bells), Sedum “Autumn Joy” and chrysanthemums can be cut to ground level.

Frost-hardy young Sedum emerging in winter.When doing this, you will immediately notice the first green shoots of new spring growth. All of these can be dug up and divided, using two thirds to fill vacant spots in the garden and one third to place back in the original planting hole.

This is a cheap and easy way to increase the number of plants in your garden. They also pot up nicely for the church or school spring fete.

In my case, I underestimated the ultimate size of salvias planted last season, such as Salvia “Heatwave Brilliance” growing to more than 75cm tall and getting tangled with other nearby plants.

Obviously, I need to relocate these to allow sufficient space to do them justice. Now is the time to do the relocating and, at the same time, try to remember where I had planted bulbs!

HERE’S something different when it comes to family pets. Recently, I visited a large Dutch garden owned by Albert Tielens, a garden designer like me.

Walking around this amazing garden I noticed, from a distance, what looked like a stone pig. Getting closer, this huge pig was gently snoring away in the sunshine. Albert seem unperturbed that the pet pig was lying on the clipped box hedging plants. I understand in larger gardens, in England and Holland, pigs are becoming popular as pets, although there are smaller types than shown here!

The family “pet” relaxes in a Dutch garden.WITH the winter solstice behind us, it is now downhill all the way to spring. It may not seem so but the days will gradually get longer as we think about the coming splash of colour of spring bulbs.

In the meantime, continue to feed them with a high-potassium plant food to encourage flowering right up until you see evidence of flower heads forming.

In the winter garden…

  • Break the ice on the bird bath before leaving for work.

  • Wait until frosts are over before pruning frost-damaged leaves on evergreen shrubs.

  • Wait until late winter before planting onion seedlings.

  • Remove old wood on hydrangeas and reduce last year’s growth to three leaf nodes (joints).

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