When to plant cattails?

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Cattail Control

Cattails can quickly ruin a pond’s visual and recreational benefits. Control is best achieved through disruption of the root system. Cutting cattails 2 or 3 inches under the waterline 2 or 3 times to drown them can actually stimulate them if done in May. Pulling them out by the roots can be impractical.

We recommend using a Glyphosate 5.4 Herbicide and a surfactant for easy control without digging up the landscape or concern over maintaining water level.

Using our treatment method, herbicide travels throughout the plant killing both the roots and vegetative portions. Simply spray on the portions of the cattails that can be reached. There is no need to spray from multiple directions.

Contact us at 1-877-428-8898 for application tips regarding timing, affects of weather, results, and more.

(Typha latifolia and Typha angustifolia)

Cattails are thickly rooted with leaf blades that are long and strap-like flat, about 1″ wide, and rounded on the back. The slender stalks range between 3′ and 10′ tall and are topped by a cigar-shaped “cattail” called a catkin.

The catkin fruit, or seedhead, is green during early summer and turns brown and fuzzy in the fall and following spring. The cylindrical flowerspike catkin can be more than a foot long resembling a hot dog, making the cattail easily distinguishable from similar plants.

Cattails are perennial wetland plants found growing above the surface of the water in marshes, ditches, shoreline shallow areas of lakes, ponds, slow streams, quiet water up to 4 feet deep, and seasonal flood areas.

Although widespread throughout most of North America, Europe, Asia, and Africa, cattails are not likely to grow in depths exceeding 18″ to 24″ or areas not wet most of the growing season.

Cattails are colonial plants rising from creeping stems (called rhizomes) like a branching shrub on its side. The creeping rootstock of undergound rhizomes is one means of reproduction to rapidly spread cattails locally while the seeds are another way cattails establish new colonies.

Cattail seeds germinate in April and plants mature from July through August.

For easy cattail control, we recommend our Cattail products.

Are Cattails Good or Bad? How Can They Be Successfully Managed?

Contact the experts at 888-480-LAKE (5253) for all of your lake, pond, wetland and fisheries management needs.

Kara Sliwoski is an Aquatic Biologist and Territory Leader who works with clients to determine the most appropriate management strategies for their waterbodies while considering ecologically responsible ways to achieve them. Kara regularly collaborates with state and municipal regulatory agencies to ensure proper project coordination. She graduated from Roger Williams University with a degree in Marine Biology and Environmental Science.

SOLitude Lake Management is an environmental firm committed to providing full-service solutions that improve water quality, preserve natural resources, and reduce our environmental footprint. Our services include lake, pond, wetland and fisheries management programs, algae and aquatic weed control, mechanical harvesting, hydro-raking, installation and maintenance of fountains and aeration systems, water quality testing and restoration, bathymetry, lake vegetation studies, biological assessments, habitat assessments, invasive species management and nuisance wildlife management. Services, consulting and aquatic products are available to clients nationwide, including homeowners associations, multi-family and apartment communities, golf courses, commercial developments, ranches, private landowners, reservoirs, recreational and public lakes, municipalities, parks, and state and federal agencies. Learn more about SOLitude Lake Management and purchase products at www.solitudelakemanagement.com.

Water Plant Cattail

Cattails (Typha latifolia) have broad linear leaf blades with dense brown spike at the top. Cattails are great filter plants in a bog, stream or pond and are hardy to zone 3.

Common Names: Cattail, Broadleaf cattail, Common cat-tail, broad-leaf cat-tail

Scientific Name: Typha latifolia

Sun Tolerance: Cattails do well in full sun to part shade.

Planting Depth: Cattails can be planted in moist soil or up to 24 inches of water.

Height of Plant: Cattails can reach up to 4 feet.

Bloom color and time of year: Brown cylinder of flowers in the spring look unique in dried flower arrangements.

Native Status: Cattails are native to North America.

Benefit: Cattail is a rich source of food for birds, frogs, mammals and hungry gardeners who miss lunch. Cattails also provide habitat and nesting sites for wildlife. Cattails take up a lot of nutrients out of the water, so much so that they are often planted in effluent streams of waste water treatment plants.

Care: We recommend cutting the plants down in the fall to eliminate as much plant material that would otherwise decay at the bottom of the pond and creates a healthier environment for your fish over the winter. If used in water gardens or backyard koi ponds grow the plants in a container to keep them from taking over your pond edge.

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Cats and water? You probably think of a cartoon image where a startled kitty scrambles to get away from a bath, but the truth about cats and water is a bit more complicated.

You just have to watch your own cat play with a dripping tap or a full water dish to realize that, well, cats may not be totally opposed to the liquid stuff after all. While it’s unusual for a pet cat to seek out submersion in water, there are some breeds who tend to like swimming and bathing more than others.

Do Genetics Play a Role in Whether Cats Like Water?

Let’s look at wild cats—the animals our domestic pets are descended from—to better understand how cats handle water. Big cats in warm climates will often use water as a way to cool off, but those in cold climates avoid water because it can prevent their coats from holding in warmth.

Domestic breeds that are directly descended or mixed with cats who like water, like the Bengal and Savannah breeds, tend to be fine with a swim. A breed called the Turkish Van seems to actually delight in going for a swim. As well, felines without tails, like the Manx and Japanese Bobtail, seem to also like water—perhaps in connection with whatever genetic mutation creates the short tail.

Can Cats Be Trained to Like Water?

As long as they don’t need to get wet, many cats like to be near the water. Your pet may like to perch on the edge of the bathtub while a family member soaks or hang out near your hot tub. But that’s a far cry from wanting to jump in.

“It’s uncommon for a #cat to seek out submersion in water, but some breeds like swimming & bathing more than others.” TWEET THIS

If your cat is strongly opposed to getting wet, there’s probably not much you can do to force the issue. Some pet owners use positive reinforcement and/or clicker training to entice their kitties into water, but for most people, that’s not a battle worth fighting.

Cats that already show an interest in water may be trained to perform activities like swimming and skiing. Some cats seem to enjoy unconventional activities that put them close to the water, like Max in Minnesota who loves to journey by paddleboard. But these behaviors are not usually the norm for domestic cats.

Do Cats Ever Need a Bath?

For those cats who dislike getting wet, is there ever a time when you may need to override their displeasure and go for a bath? Fortunately, cats rarely need you to clean them. Healthy cats can use their tongues to effectively clean their fur, but in some circumstances or for some types of kitties, baths are sometimes required.

Some breeds that lack fur, like the Sphynx, need regular baths to reduce the oils on their skin. Older or obese cats that can’t reach everywhere on their bodies to groom may need bathing every couple of months. And of course, if your cat has become dirty, rolled in something yucky, brushed up against fresh paint or encountered a skunk, you’ll need to start the bath. Make sure to use a shampoo created just for cats to avoid stripping essential oils from their skin and coats, and never use a dog shampoo—especially one that contains flea repellents, as those products may be toxic to your cat.

If your cat begins to act dramatically different around water, such as an older cat who suddenly wants to sit in the running shower, call your vet. This can be a sign of early dementia. Likewise, if your cat begins to smell to the point where you’re thinking about a bath, a medical check may be a good idea, as excess odor in pet cats can indicate a dental issue or infection.

Otherwise, don’t worry too much about whether your cat is interested in getting wet. Just like people, some individuals will like water more than others.

Cattails

Ecological Importance

Cattails can help keep lakes and ponds healthy by filtering runoff, reducing nutrients and preventing shoreline erosion. Cattails provide nesting habitat for many species of wildlife and birds. Animals such as beavers and muskrats, use cattails for a variety of reasons, including food, den material, and as an escape from predators. Fish species, including northern pike, may spawn along or behind a cattail fringe.

Problems

Cattails account for nearly all pond owner complaints regarding emergent plants. Cattails are known to spread rapidly, completely surround ponds and extending several feet into the water creating a monoculture. Established cattails populations accelerate the transition from open water to a dominant emergent weed pond.

Cattails are highly attractive to muskrats, a mammal that can damage a pond in some circumstances. Dams and shorelines are vulnerable to their burrowing activities, compromising integrity.

Plant Description:

Cattails have flat to slightly rounded leaves that twist slightly over their length and can grow to 5 or 10 feet in height. Flowers form a dense dark brown, cigar-shape at the end of spikes (called the catkin). Cattails can be partially submerged or in boggy areas with no permanently standing water. Cattails spread rapidly because their seeds blow in the wind and float on the water’s surface. Cattails also spread from underground rhizomes.

Hints to Identify

Look for the fuzzy brown “cattail” near the top of the stalk. Leaves are long, flat, and about 1-inch wide.

Homeowner Treatment Options

Clearcast

Habitat

Shore-Klear

Reward

Weedtrine D

*Aquatic Biologists recommends implementing preventative management techniques and physical removal prior to, or in conjunction with treatment.

Common Application Questions

Q. When is the best time to treat?

A. Cattails should be treated when mature from July to approximately one week before the first killing frost. Cattails can be treated sooner but the need for a repeat application increases.

Q. Can I treat a portion of the Cattails?

A. Yes, because the application is topical it will only affect the cattails that are sprayed so you can choose to control a percentage.

Q. Do I have to treat Cattails every year?

A. No, control can last anywhere from three to five years or more depending upon if you treat all the cats or a portion. Ninety plus percent of Cattails are controlled the first year within the chosen treatment site. Some follow up is usually required the second season.

Q. How long before I see results?

A. Generally within ten days the tips will begin to turn brown migrating towards the base. If you wish to remove the treated Cattails wait at least two weeks post treatment to insure that the root structure has been destroyed or just let the cattails decompose.

Gardening Guide

Whenever you hear the word bulrush, do you think of cattails? Oddly enough, most people do. However, there are some differences between the two, although cohabitation is not unheard of. Cattails are known to invade a wetland much faster than bulrushes, taking over large expanses in a single growing season because of their mass quantities of wind-borne seeds. In growing season, cattails are more water dependent than bulrushes. Typically, the hardstem bulrush is used in wetland projects and restoration. Bulrushes are much slower than cattails in establishing and spreading because they proliferate primarily through underground rhizomes rather than seeds. Bulrushes can handle and withstand long, dry periods better than cattails. There are some noted differences between cattail and bulrush, as emergent vegetation, but one noted commonality between them is their special adaptation in transporting oxygen from the air to their roots, enabling them to grow in continually flooded, but shallow water areas. Both cattail and bulrush establish quickly, (although as stated previously, bulrushes are still slower than cattails at establishing), and both can tolerate poor quality water. However, bulrushes tend to grow in deeper water, whereas cattails prefer shallow water.
Bulrushes are various wetland herbs (aquatic) from the genus Scirpus. They are annual or perennial plants that are medium to tall in height. Also known as tule, wool grass and rat grass, this herbaceous plant can grow up to 10 feet tall; they are found all through-out North America and Eurasia.
They are divided into groups of soft-stem and hard-stem bulrushes, found in the Cyperaceae family. These two species are quite similar in their appearance and share commonalities regarding the areas they grow in. Bulrushes are often used in constructed wetlands to treat agricultural NPS pollution and for the creation and restoration of wetlands. One of the plants used for this kind of project is the species called the Giant Bulrush aka ‘Restorer’. It is considered a superior plant for this, particularly in the south-easterly states. Now you may be wondering, ‘What is NPS pollution and where does it come from?’ Good question!
NPS is short for ‘non-source pollution’, which comes from coal and metal mining, photography and textile industries, agricultural and urban areas, failed home septic tank drain fields as well as municipal wastewater, storm water, and other land disturbing activities that detrimentally impact 30 – 50% of the waterways of America. An affordable and efficient means to address and clean up diverse wastewater is with constructed wetlands. For almost 60 years, researchers have investigated and reported on the use of natural or constructed wetlands and their effectiveness and ability to cleanse polluted water. In 1989, one such researcher named Hammer, defined constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment as “a deigned and man-made complex of saturated substrates, emergent and submergent vegetation, animal life, and water that simulates natural wetlands for human use and benefits.”
The bulrush is one species of vegetation that is cultivated in shallow beds or channels containing a root medium such as sand and/or gravel are effective in helping to regulate water flow. At the same time, biochemical reactions occur on the submerged portions of the plants and within the wetland soils. Oxygen is passively made available for biochemical reactions mainly by the diffusion of air into the system (Rogers et al, 1991). In the United States alone, over 56 FWS (Fish and Wildlife Service) systems process 95 million gallons a day of runoff and wastewater (Reed, 1991).
Bulrushes are reed-like and have long, firm leaves, olive-green, three-sided stems and drooping clusters of small, often brown spikelets found near the stem tips. The stem bases have a few inconspicuous leaves. The roots (or rhizomes) produce edible tubers. The tips of the bulrushes bloom with clumps of reddish-brown or straw-colored flowers that turn into hard seed-like fruits, during the period of April through August.
They are often found along the shorelines of marshy or swampy areas; such as wet locations like the edges of shallow lakes, ponds, swamps, fresh and brackish marshes, wet woods, slow moving streams and roadside ditches. They can grow as high as 10 feet in moist soils, and in shallow or deep water, respectively, from 1 -9 ft of water. The bulrush is densely rhizomatous with abundant seed production.
The Scirpus species occur almost always under natural conditions in wetlands. They are divided into groups of soft-stem and hard-stem bulrushes, found in the Cyperaceae family. These two species are quite similar in their appearance. Soft-stem bulrush can grow to 10 feet and grows in dense colonies from rhizomes. Soft-stem bulrush has a round (in cross section), light gray-green, relatively soft stem that comes to a point with no obvious leaves (only sheaths at the base of the stems). Flowers usually occur just below the tip of the stem, from July through September. They grow in the places mentioned in the first paragraph, where soils are poorly-drained or continually saturated. As far as ecological importance goes, the soft-stem bulrush can triple its biomass in one growing season. One area that benefits from this bulrush are urban wetlands, where soft-stem bulrushes can be and have been used to reduce pollutant loads carried by storm water runoff.
The hard-stem bulrush (tule, black root) is a perennial herb with an obligate , robustly rhizomatous wetland plant that forms dense colonies. The stems of this bulrush are erect and slender, sharp to softly triangular; typically reaching 3-10 feet tall. Likewise, the leaves are slender blades that are sheathed around the long stem. The flowers are brown spikelets. The panicle can have 3 to numerous spikelets, which are oval to cylindrical. The nutlets are completely covered by whitish-brown scales and have 6 basal bristles. Bulrushes have stout rootstocks and long, thick, brown underground stems . The hard-stem bulrush has a much higher tolerance of mixosaline conditions, than the soft-stem bulrush. It regrows well after removal and is tolerant of fire.
Submerged portions of all aquatic plants provide habitats for many micro and macro invertebrates. These invertebrates in turn are used as food by fish and other wildlife species (e.g. amphibians, reptiles, ducks, etc.). After aquatic plants die, their decomposition by bacteria and fungi (called “detritus”), provides food for many aquatic invertebrates. Seeds of bulrushes are consumed by ducks and other birds while geese, muskrats, and nutria consume the rhizomes and early shoots. Muskrats and beavers like to use this emergent wetland vegetation for food, as well as for hut construction, thus improving the wetland habitat.
Bulrushes have been and are used by many cultures for medicinal purposes, as well as in the provinces of Shandong, Jiangsu, Anhui and Zhejiang, in China use the bulrush in teas, decoctions and extracts. The bulrush is believed to be effective and most commonly used to stop bleeding, whether from an injury or an internal disorder. It is also used to treat painful menstruation and postpartum abdominal pain. Evidence has shown that bulrush extracts can also reduce the amount of lipids in the blood, as well as being effective in treating colitis.
Native Americans would parch the edible rhizomes (seeds), which are high in protein and very starchy, grind them into a powder for flour, mixed it with water, boiled it and ate it as porridge. The young shoots are considered a delicacy, whether eaten in the raw form or cooked. The bulrush can be used for syrup and /or sugar, used in a salad or eaten as a cooked vegetable. The syrup is dried out to produce sugar and the pollen can be used to make breads and cakes.
They also made a poultice from the stems to stop bleeding and to treat snakebites. The roots can be processed and used in treating abscesses.
‘Boneset’ tea was a popular remedy used by Native Americans and pioneers alike to address general aches and malaise. It was said to have the most effective relief for the nineteenth and twentieth century flu epidemics. It remains popular as a herbal tea and is used as a tonic for colds, reduce sweating and to promote bone healing. It is the belief that it does indeed aid in bone healing that gave ‘boneset’ tea its name. Modern medical research confirms these benefits, stating that the compounds of ‘boneset tea’ stimulate the immune system.
Some Native Americans would chew the roots of the bulrush as a preventative to thirst. They also used the ashes from burned stalk to put on a baby’s bleeding naval.Stems are used to weave strong sleeping mats, ropes, baskets, purses, hats, skirts, sandals, curtains, temporary shelters, canoes and rafts, brooms and other household items. The plant must grow in coarse-textured soil that is free of gravel, silt and clay if the roots are to be used for quality basket-weaving. The root was sought for the black color, which was desired to highlight patterns created in the making of a basket.
The benefits and uses of the bulrush, both ecologically, medicinally and creatively, make it worth careful consideration for wetland planting zones and native restoration landscapes.

Cattail Plant

Cattail Plant – Cattail Typha Latifolia – For Sale Affordable Grower Direct Prices Tennessee Wholesale Nursery

Cattail Plant meaning that their root systems grow submerged in water, but the bulk of the plant rises above the water’s surface. They can reach up to 7 to 9 feet tall. They provide cover for wildlife, notably birds that nest and mate in the rushes. When grown along the edge of a pond or waterway, the plants soften the water’s edge and provide a dramatic appearance. During the winter months, the tall plants’ distinctive cigar-shaped brown heads hold snow.

Cattail Plant provide shelter for wildlife and even when the stalks turn a winter brown, the plants add landscape interest throughout the non-growing season. The plants are hardy to USDA zones 3 through 11 and can tolerate both high and low temperatures. Growers interested in permaculture find the plants extremely valuable, beyond simply their aesthetic appeal, because the plants are important pieces of a pond’s entire ecosystem. Their roots help remove pollutants from water. The root systems also aid in the decomposition of organic materials that wash ashore.

Buy Fast Growing Cattail Plant

To successfully grow cattails, they need to be planted in a moist, boggy environment with a water depth of no more than 1.5 feet. They spread via their rhizome root system, which requires a constant and consistent water source. Given the right conditions, they reproduce and divide rapidly. Cattail Plant is good news if your pond is undergoing severe erosion.

Affordable Cattail plants can also be grown in containers, or cut and dried for floral decorations

Cattail Plant fibrous stalks can be used for arts and crafts, and the decorative heads can be used for some ornamental purposes. The roots can be consumed as food, though this use is rare. Additionally, if your property has an area that is boggy or moist, planting cattails is an efficient way to filter water and control erosion. Cattail Plant

Cattail Plant

The Cattail Plant is often seen growing near a source of water, such as along the bank of a river or a stream. When you view the plant, it looks like there is a long brown tail on the top that could belong to a cat. The stem is often dark green, lighter in color if the plant is in its earlier stages of maturity. These plants are often used for landscaping areas located along edges of water as they grow well with similar plants and aquatic plants. Sometimes, they can take root and thrive in shallow water.

When the Cattail Plant has reached adulthood, it can sometimes be 10 feet tall. The plant enjoys being in the full light of the sun but can also grow in partial light if there are taller plants or trees in the area. Strong stems provide support for the tail at the top of the plant and can often stand up to above-average amounts of rain. Leaves on the plant are elongated and flat while the tails are long and cylindrical. Upon closer inspection, there are a few small spikes that can be seen on the ends of the tails. These spikes tend to stick to animals that get close to the plant and are then deposited on the ground so that the plant can reproduce.

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