When to fertilize holly?

Espoma Holly-Tone Plant Food 4-3-4

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Directions

For New Plantings:

Dig a hole twice as wide and the same depth as the root ball so that roots can spread naturally. Remove 1/3 of the soil and replace it with compost, peat moss or humus. Mix 1 cup of Holly-tone into amended soil. Place the plant in the hole so that it sits at the same depth it was previously growing (use soil mark on the trunk as a guide). Fill the hole halfway with amended soil. Pack the soil firmly, soak it with water, and allow it to settle. Finish filling hole leaving the top two inches loose for easy absorption of water. Make slight depression around the plant to help hold water. Add mulch to help conserve water, slow down evaporation, and control weeds. Keep well watered until plant is established.

For Established Plants:

Feed acid-loving plants twice yearly – Spring and Fall. Use half the recommended rate in the Fall application. If the area to be fed is mulched, it is preferable to remove the mulch, feed and then restore the mulch on top of the plant food. If this is not possible, double all recommended feeding rates.

Trees

Sprinkle 1 lb. (3 cups) per inch of trunk diameter around drip line of plant (area under and slightly beyond branch spread). Triple the quantity for diameters 3 inches and over. For larger trees, make a series of holes under the branch spread starting 1/3 of the distance out from the trunk and extending a similar distance beyond the branch line. Holes should be 2-3 inches in diameter, 2-3 feet apart, and 12-18 inches deep. Divide the Holly-tone evenly among the holes and fill the remainder with soil. Water thoroughly.

Shrubs

Sprinkle 1 cup of Holly-tone per foot of branch spread (diameter) around the drip line of the plant (area under and slightly beyond branch spread). Double the quantity if branch spread is 3 feet or larger.

Garden Beds

For new beds, mix 10 lbs. of Holly-tone per 100 sq. ft. into the top 4 inches of soil. For established beds, mix 5 lbs. per 100 sq. ft.

Potted Plants

Mix one part Holly-tone to 30 parts potting soil when planting. Feed established plants 1 teaspoon of Holly-tone for each 4 inches of pot diameter.

Holly-tone is an organic & natural fertilizer that’s not just for Hollies. It can be used for any acid-loving plants, such as blueberries, camellias, rhododendrons, evergreens, hydrangeas and more.

You will want to fertilize your plants twice a year – In early spring and late fall. When you apply the fertilizer in late fall, only use half of the recommended dosage.

How to Apply Holly-tone:

Before fertilizing your acid-loving trees, shrubs and plants with Holly-tone, be sure to take a look at the back of the bag. It lays out instructions for each type of plant to give it the best chance to grow.

Trees:

When fertilizing trees, first figure out the diameter of the tree trunk. This will help you determine how much fertilizer to use. Use one pound of fertilizer for each inch of your tree.

Drill holes every 2-3 feet around the drip line of the tree, in the video Laura demonstrates using a drill and hole auger. The drip line is basically where the canopy of the tree ends. Distribute the fertilizer evenly in each hole, backfill and water in.

Note: Arborvitae and boxwoods are not acid-loving evergreens, so use Plant-tone instead.

Shrubs:

Shrubs are a bit easier to fertilize than trees, since there is no digging required. Similar to trees, the amount of fertilizer used is based on how big the shrub is. Use one cup of fertilizer for every foot of branch diameter. Sprinkle it around the drip line of the plant, work it into the soil and water it in well.

Garden Beds:

Established garden beds are the simplest of the three to fertilize. Again, it’s all about the size of the beds you have in your garden. For every 100 square feet of your garden bed, use 5 pounds of fertilizer. Sprinkle it as evenly as possible where the plants are and water it in.

For new garden beds, use twice as much fertilizer to prepare the soil for new plants. For a 100 square foot garden bed, use 10 pounds of fertilizer. Sprinkle it on top of the soil and work it in the top 4 inches, to get it nice and prepped for the new plants.

Containers:

If you have plants like blueberries, in containers, you will want to use 1 teaspoon for every 3 inches of your pot diameter. Sprinkle it around the inside edge of the pot and water in.

Have non-acid-loving trees ready to be fertilized? Laura from Garden Answer shows how to fertilize with Tree-tone.

Product Featured in this Video

September 30, 2018

How to Feed Acid-Loving Plants with Holly-tone

Published by Adriene Vesci in Bucks Country Gardens • Plants

Espoma’s Holly-tone is an organic and natural fertilizer that’s not just for Hollies. It can be used for any acid-loving plants, such as blueberries, camellias, rhododendrons, evergreens, hydrangeas and more.

It’s important to fertilize your plants twice a year – in early spring and late fall. When you apply the fertilizer in late fall, only use half of the recommended dosage. Holly-tone is rich in natural organics and has used by professionals for decades. It also contains Bio-tone® which biologically enhances the organic fertilizer to ensure superior plant growth.

Click image to watch How-to video

How to Apply Holly-tone:
Before fertilizing acid-loving trees, shrubs and plants, be sure to take a look at the back of the bag. It lays out instructions for each type of plant to give it the best chance to grow

Sweetbay Magnolia

Trees:
When fertilizing trees, first figure out the diameter of the tree trunk. This will help you determine how much fertilizer to use. Use one pound of fertilizer for each inch of your tree.

Drill holes every 2–3 feet around the drip line of the tree, in the video Laura demonstrates using a drill and hole auger. The drip line is basically where the canopy of the tree ends. Distribute the fertilizer evenly in each hole, backfill and water in.

Note: Arborvitae and boxwoods are not acid-loving evergreens, so use Espoma’s Organic Plant-tone instead.

Rhododendron

Shrubs:
Shrubs are a bit easier to fertilize than trees, since there is no digging required. Similar to trees, the amount of fertilizer used is based on how big the shrub is. Use one cup of fertilizer for every foot of branch diameter. Sprinkle it around the drip line of the plant, work it into the soil and water it in well.

Pacheysandra

Garden Beds:
Established garden beds are the simplest of the three to fertilize. Again, it’s all about the size of the beds you have in your garden. For every 100 square feet of your garden bed, use five pounds of fertilizer. Sprinkle it as evenly as possible where the plants are and water it in.

For new garden beds, use twice as much fertilizer to prepare the soil for new plants. For a 100 square foot garden bed, use ten pounds of fertilizer. Sprinkle it on top of the soil and work it in the top 4 inches, to get it nice and prepped for the new plants.

Blueberry Shrub

Containers:
If you have plants like blueberries in containers, use one teaspoon for every three inches of your pot diameter. Sprinkle it around the inside edge of the pot and water in.

Acid-loving Plants:

Amaryllis Andromeda Aster Azalea Bayberry Bleeding Heart Blueberry Camellia Dogwood Evergreens Ferns Fir Gardenia Heath Heather Hemlock Holly Huckleberry Hydrangea Inkberry Juniper Leucothoe Lily of the Valley Lupine Magnolia Marigold Mountain Ash Mountain Laurel Oak Pacheysandra Phlox Pieris Pine Raspberry Rhododendron Spruce Strawberries White Cedar Wood Sorrel Have non-acid-loving trees ready to be fertilized? Fertilize with Espoma’s Organic Tree-tone.

Reposted from Espoma.com – Originally posted on Sept 21, 2018

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