What zone is illinois?

Illinois Planting Zones – USDA Map Of Illinois Growing Zones


Click on the image above to see a larger version.

About the Illinois Hardiness Planting Zone

Knowing your Illinois planting zone will make gardening much easier for you. In order to learn more about Illinois growing zones, it’s important to view the USDA plant hardiness zones map. This not only provides hardiness zones for all states, but will also tell you what garden zone is Illinois. The map provided here is for the Illinois hardiness planting zone, which should help determine the most ideal plants for your area. Illinois growing zones range from zones 5-7.

By looking at the map above and locating the approximate area in which you live, you will be able to find your Illinois hardiness planting zone. Simply compare the color-coded zones for your area with those of the legend on the right of the map.

Due to climate changes and increasingly warmer temperatures, this map of Illinois growing zones is based on the revised USDA planting zones made in 2012.

It is important to understand your Illinois hardiness planting zones in order to choose the most suitable plants for your area. For areas bordering separate zones, choosing plants that tolerate cooler conditions (such as a zone lower) will oftentimes help ensure their winter survival, as those that are less hardy will require additional protection.

Most local nurseries provide plants that are suitable for Illinois growing zones. Keep in mind that only reputable nurseries specialize in selling landscaping plants appropriate for your area’s hardiness zone and will have these clearly marked as such. In addition to these plants, non-hardy species may also be available. These, too, should be clearly marked.

Do You Know Your Building Science Climate Zone?

One of the fundamental principles of building science is that buildings must be suited to their climate. When they’re not, problems can ensue. Maybe it’s just that they’re not as efficient as they should be. Maybe it’s worse. Put plastic between the drywall and framing of your exterior walls in Ottawa, and it can help control vapor drive from the interior air and its associated moisture problems (rare in all but except in extremely cold climates). Put that plastic in the same place in Georgia, and you’re going to rot the walls.

The first thing to know about climate zones is that we divide them up based on two parameters: temperature and moisture. The map above, from Building Science Corporation, is one that seems to be in a lot of the curricula for home energy rater and other energy auditor classes. The fancy word for this type of division is hygrothermal, and Building Science Corp. has a nice interactive map of hygrothermal regions.

The map above divides all of North America into broad regions based on temperature and then humidity. My friend and former colleague Mike Barcik likes to say that the color of the zone shows what color your skin turns in winter.

The International Code Council has a more fine-grained and quantitative approach to climate zones in the US,† as shown in the map below from the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). (Click on the map to see an enlarged version.) Each zone has a number, starting with 1 for the hottest US climate, the southernmost tip of Florida, and going up to 8, the coldest parts in Alaska.

Temperature divisions

The number of each zone tells you how warm or cold it is. I wrote above that temperature is the parameter, but that’s not a full description, of course. It’s not just how cold or how hot the place gets. It’s based on accumulated temperature calculations called degree days. Basically, degree days combine the amount of time and the temperature difference below some base temperature.

For example, the most common base temperature for heating is 65° F. If the temperature stays at 55° F for 24 hours, you’ve just accumulated 10 heating degree days (HDD). It’s the same for cooling degree days (CDD). The IECC uses 50° F for the cooling base temperature, so if the temperature is 90° F for 24 hours, you’ve got 40 CDD. For heating and cooling, you add up the total number of HDD or CDD for the whole year, and that tells you how hot, cold, or mild the climate is. (A great source of data for degree days is the degreedays.net website. Check it out.)

The table above (click for enlarged version) shows how the IECC uses the number of cooling degree days for climate zones 1 through 4 and the number of heating degree days for climate zones 3 through 8. In zones 1 and 2, cooling is the only important factor. In zones 3 and 4, it’s heating and cooling. In zones 5 and higher, it’s all about heating. Atlanta has about 3000 HDD (in ‘those annoying imperial units’) and is in climate zone 3.

Moisture divisions

Notice that the IECC map also shows how moisture impacts the climate zones. Generally, it’s moist to the east, dry to the west, and marine along the West Coast. I remember driving across Texas, from west to east, in the summer of ’88 and feeling the humidity hit us when we crossed that black line. At the time I had no idea what that big black line was when we drove over it, but now it’s clear.

People have known about that line since the 19th century, as a matter of fact. It lies pretty close to the 100th meridian of longitude, and divides the part of the US that gets enough rain to farm without irrigation from the dry side that requires irrigation.

The three main moisture divisions are:

  • Moist (A) This is designated by the letter A after the climate zone number. Here in Atlanta, we’re in climate zone 3A. The primary factor is precipitation. If it doesn’t meet the dry climate definition below, it may be moist. The other necessary condition is that it’s got to fall outside the marine climate conditions.
  • Dry (B) This is based on the amount of precipitation and the annual mean temperature. The calculation is 0.44 x (TF – 19.5), where TF is the annual mean temperature in degrees Fahrenheit. If the annual precipitation is less than the number you get, it’s a dry climate and the zone number has a B after it. El Paso, Texas, for example, is in climate zone 3B.
  • Marine (C) This is the Goldilocks climate, in a way. It’s not too hot in the summer (warmest month mean temperature < 72° F), not too cold or too warm in winter (between 27 and 65° F), has at least four months with mean temperatures above 50° F, and has its dry season in the summer. We’re talking Santa Barbara (3C), Portland (4C), and Seattle (4C).

Actually, there’s a 4th moisture division shown on the map. Notice the white line going horizontally across the Southeast. It divides the eastern, moist side of the US into moist and moister, basically. This division isn’t based on precipitation, though. It’s based on humidity. A climate zone is called warm-humid if the wet bulb temperature is:

  • ≥ 67° F for 3000 hours or more
  • ≥ 73° F for 1500 hours or more

It’s all in the IECC

Wherever you read building science, you’re likely to run into someone talking about climate zones, and if you don’t know the exact definitions, it can be a bit confusing. Now you’ve got my little summary here, but you can always get yourself a copy of the IECC as well. Most states are still on the 2009 version. Maryland and Illinois have moved up to the tougher 2012 already. The climate zone definitions are the same in both versions. In addition to the basic definitions above, the IECC also tells you county-by-county what the local climate zone is.

Now get out there and design, build, and renovate in ways that work for your climate.

Footnote

† The International Code Council is based in the US and, like the World Series, has little foothold outside our borders. Although the IECC climate zone map here shows only the US, you can use the definitions of the climate zones for any location in the world. For example, most of Canada is in climate zone 70. Just kidding. Most Canadians probably live in climate zones 5 and 6. By looking up heating degree days on degreedays.net, I found the following: Climate Zone 4C – Vancouver; CZ 5A – Toronto; CZ 6A – Ottawa, Montreal, Quebec; CZ 7B – Calgary.

Building Science 101

You Don’t Need a Vapor Barrier (Probably)

This Winter Is 37% Warmer than 2010-11 (by Heating Degree Days)

Image credits: North American climate zone map from Building Science Corporation. IECC climate zone map and table from International Code Council.

Illinois Planting Zones

Illinois is a long state of close to 400 miles, and that, coupled with a mid-continental placement results in an extremely varying climate that dictates the Illinois planting zones. The majority of the state has a humid continental climate and sees hot, long, wet summers with colder winters. Extremes are the norm for both regions of the state. The southern half leans more toward a humid subtropical climate while the northern half is designated as a warm-summer humid continental climate. The state averages close to around 50 days of thunderstorm activity each year, putting it just above average for the country as a whole. And average precipitation ranges from around 35 to 48 inches, depending on location. Annual snowfall can be anywhere from just about 14 inches in the south to 38 inches in the Chicago region.

Illinois planting zones fall between 5a and 7a, with the northern part of the state being at the lower end of the range. Before planning a garden, it is important to research planting zones specific to the region you will be growing in. Check out Gilmour’s Interactive Planting Zone Map for the exact zone in any Illinois region. Planting zones dictate both what and when to plant, and as a general rule, planting anything rated for the noted zone or below will lead to a successful gardening season. Zones are determined by first and last frost dates.

Any Illinois planting zone will offer a wide variety of both flowers and vegetables. Hosta, peonies, yarrow, daylily and allium are all good choices for foolproof, easy-to-grow options for a flower garden. Many vegetables are also easy to grow in the area. Fill vegetable gardens with tomatoes, beans, beets, kale, spinach, peas and Brussels sprouts, to name just a few. Plants with pretty foliage like coleus and jack-in-the-pulpit also do very well throughout the state.

The USDA has just released their new Plant Hardiness Zone Map. This is a much-needed update using the 30-year period of 1976-2005 versus the old USDA map which used the period 1974-1986.
One of the outstanding features of the new map is the northward shift of the hardiness zones in Illinois. For example, the boundary between zones 5 and 6 have shifted about 60 miles to the north. Zone 4 has left Illinois in the new map. In addition, the new map shows a lot more detail including the warming effect of the Chicago urban area (see map below).
In the second figure, the minimum winter temperature for each year is shown for Champaign-Urbana. The old USDA plant hardiness zone map used an unusually short period during one of the colder periods in the record (1974-1986). The general trend in the data shows an increase in the minimum winter temperature from the late 1800s to about 1950, followed by a cooling trend to the 1980s, and finishing with a warming trend through 2005. Interestingly, the last few years showed a cooling trend – except for this year when our coldest temperature so far is 4°F.
The other important feature in the second figure is that even if an area changes Zones, there is still a lot of year to year variability in the minimum temperature for winter. For example, while Champaign-Urbana is nearly classified as Zone 6 in the new map, Champaign-Urbana dipped into Zone 4 a few times (-20°F or less) in the last 30 years. In fact, as a gardener I would say that the period from the 1930s to the early 1970s was more benign and less challenging than the 1980s and 1990s with respect to winter temperatures. Summer conditions would be another story since the 1930s and 1950s were marred by severe droughts.

Time in Chicago, Illinois

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  • What time is it in Chicago, Illinois right now?
    Chicago, Cook County, IL is located in Central Time Zone.

Current local time in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, Central Time Zone – daylight saving time change dates 2020

Local Time in Chicago, IL

5:49:42 PM, Saturday 01, February 2020 CST 24 hours

Chicago time change

Next time change is in 1 month and 6 days, set your clock forward 1 hour.

Daylight saving Time Change Dates 2020

DST started on Sunday 08 March 2020, 02:00 local standard time (CST)
DST ends on Sunday 01 November 2020, 02:00 local daylight time (CDT)

Chicago time zone

Central Time:
– CST – Central Standard Time
– CDT – Central Daylight Time when daylight saving time is being observed (from early March to early November)

Offset to GMT/UTC

Standard time zone:

UTC/GMT -6 hours
(Central Standard Time)

No daylight saving time at the moment

Chicago – Geographical Location

Latitude:

41° 51′ 00″ North

Longitude:

87° 39′ 00″ West

Chicago online map

View time at locations near Chicago: Cicero, Oak Park, Berwyn, Forest Park, North Riverside

Airports

Airport IATA ICAO Distance to Chicago
Chicago Midway International Airport MDW KMDW 10 km
Chicago O’Hare International Airport ORD KORD 25 km

Get Free Website Html Clock for Chicago

Online Html clock provided by 24TimeZones.com is really nice and fancy website widget! This analog html clock is adjusted for Daylight Saving Time changes and always displays correct current local time for Chicago, Illinois. You can adjust color and size of your Chicago clock or choose clock for any city in the US here!

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Area codes

312, 773, 872

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Current local time in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA, Central Time Zone. Check official timezones, exact actual time and daylight savings time conversion dates in 2020 for Chicago, IL, United States of America – fall time change 2020 – DST to Central Standard Time. Correct time: hora exacta, aktuelle zeit, hora certa, ora esatta, heure, reloj.

The USDA has just released their new Plant Hardiness Zone Map. This is a much-needed update using the 30-year period of 1976-2005 versus the old USDA map which used the period 1974-1986.

One of the outstanding features of the new map is the northward shift of the hardiness zones in Illinois. For example, the boundary between zones 5 and 6 have shifted about 60 miles to the north. Zone 4 has left Illinois in the new map. In addition, the new map shows a lot more detail including the warming effect of the Chicago urban area (see map below).

In the second figure, the minimum winter temperature for each year is shown for Champaign-Urbana. The old USDA plant hardiness zone map used an unusually short period during one of the colder periods in the record (1974-1986). The general trend in the data shows an increase in the minimum winter temperature from the late 1800s to about 1950, followed by a cooling trend to the 1980s, and finishing with a warming trend through 2005. Interestingly, the last few years showed a cooling trend – except for this year when our coldest temperature so far is 4°F.

The other important feature in the second figure is that even if an area changes Zones, there is still a lot of year to year variability in the minimum temperature for winter. For example, while Champaign-Urbana is nearly classified as Zone 6 in the new map, Champaign-Urbana dipped into Zone 4 a few times (-20°F or less) in the last 30 years. In fact, as a gardener I would say that the period from the 1930s to the early 1970s was more benign and less challenging than the 1980s and 1990s with respect to winter temperatures. Summer conditions would be another story since the 1930s and 1950s were marred by severe droughts.

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