What is dormancy in plants?

The new Seasons expansion has greatly changed the way gardening works in The Sims 4. Fertilizing plants seems to be much more important now, and there are many more seed packets available in the new “Gardening” category in buy mode, based on your Sim’s gardening skill. At this time, however, if you have a Sim with pre-existing gardening skill, the packets will not automatically unlock. A Sim in the household has to achieve the appropriate gardening skill after the pack is installed to unlock the seed packets. Hopefully this will be addressed in an upcoming patch. The biggest change, though, is the introduction of growing seasons. No more growing anything whenever – plants have growing seasons now. Wondering when you can grow what? The plants and harvestables themselves will tell you, but that doesn’t really help when you don’t actually have the plants! We’ve assembled a handy guide to tell you which plants can be grown in which season. Some of them have more than one season, and some of them are year-round, which we have noted in the table below.

Base Game Spring Summer Autumn Winter Always in season
Basil
Bird of Paradise
Blackberry
Blue Bells
Bonsai Buds
Carrot
Cherry
Chrysanthemum
Cow Berry
Daisy
Death Flower
Dragonfruit
Forbidden Fruit of the PlantSim
Grapes
Growfruit
Lemon
Lily
Mushroom
Onion
Orchid
Parsley
Pear
Plantain
Pomegranate
Potato
Rose
Sage
Snapdragon
Spinach
Strawberry
Tomato
Trash Fruit
Tulip
U.F.O. (Unidentified Fruit Object)
Outdoor Retreat Spring Summer Autumn Winter Always in season
Chamomile
Elderberry
False Morel Mushroom
Fireleaf
Huckleberry
Morel Mushroom
Muckleberry
Noxious Elderberry
Poison Fireleaf
Toxic Chamomile
Get to Work Spring Summer Autumn Winter Always in season
Fang Flower
Glow Orb
Quill Fruit
Vampires Spring Summer Autumn Winter Always in season
Garlic
Plasma Fruit
Sixam Mosquito Trap
Wolfsbane
Cats and Dogs Spring Summer Autumn Winter Always in season
Catnip
Madnip
Napnip
Nuzzlenip
Jungle Adventure Spring Summer Autumn Winter Always in season
Avocado
Black Beans
Cereberries
Flutterberries
Gutsberries
Merry Berries
Museberries
Razzleberries
Vimberries
Seasons Spring Summer Autumn Winter Always in season
Begonia
Bell Pepper
Christmas Rose
Crocus
Dahlia
Green Bean
Green Pea
Holly
Snow Drop
Money Fruit (Aspiration Points)
StrangerVille Spring Summer Autumn Winter Always in season
Bizarre Fruit
Island Living Spring Summer Autumn Winter Always in season
Coconut
Kava Shrub
Pineapple
Taro Root

We hope you find this guide useful! If you’d like to print this guide or would like an offline copy, click here for a downloadable and printable PDF file. Happy Simming!

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SimGurus took to Twitter today to give more info on The Sims 4 Seasons Expansion Pack. We will be adding more throughout the day, so be sure to check back!

You can keep reapplying the season with the Weather Controller while in the specified world, and then use it to set another season once you travel out of that one, but otherwise the worlds all follow the same seasonal schedule. It’d be way too hard to keep track otherwise. Sorry!

— Emory (@SimGuruEmory) June 13, 2018

Since the calendar is heavily tied to seasons, weather, & holidays, it’s going to be available only with Seasons. Sorry if that’s disappointing 🙁

— Emory (@SimGuruEmory) June 13, 2018

Yes, if it’s freezing out fishing isn’t available. Fishes need some time to warm up 🐟

— Emory (@SimGuruEmory) June 13, 2018

Hi @mattgiombetti There are no mermaids in Seasons. But there will be other interesting characters like Father Winter, the Flower Bunny, and a Scarecrow.

— George Pigula (@SimGuruGeorge) June 13, 2018

It isn’t an active career. Tomorrow on the live stream we will play through it a bit so you can see it in action.

— George Pigula (@SimGuruGeorge) June 13, 2018

Yep. 1, 2, and 4 week seasons.

— George Pigula (@SimGuruGeorge) June 13, 2018

Gardening update is free just before Seasons ships. Hold tight. https://t.co/F5UVSNbNrU

— Grant Rodiek (@SimGuruGrant) June 11, 2018

I recommend you start from Level 0. Much more rewarding and fun. https://t.co/6seEdTRL8a

— Grant Rodiek (@SimGuruGrant) June 11, 2018

No

— Grant Rodiek (@SimGuruGrant) June 11, 2018

Flowers —> Flower arranging

— Grant Rodiek (@SimGuruGrant) June 11, 2018

I was thinking about this! I’m not sure! I think different people will enjoy different aspects of each season the most. Maybe fall? There are so many fun traditions that fit classic fall holidays, the leaves are beautiful, and I had a blast doing harvest on my gardener sim!

— Morgan (@SimGuruMorgan) June 14, 2018

That’s a tough one! I love Winterfest! I think it’s better than ever with customizable traditions, but when I made Easter I giggled the entire time. The Flower Bunny is just too cute! pic.twitter.com/kWwaeaF4vP

— Morgan (@SimGuruMorgan) June 14, 2018

@SimGuruGeorge Did you say people were interested in San Myshuno in winter gifs? Also, hey @SimGuruPJ ! pic.twitter.com/p3YzNL9DbU

— Morgan (@SimGuruMorgan) June 14, 2018

Well, you brought out Elsa… Not even @SimGuruPJ could say no to her! ❄️ pic.twitter.com/J6W0YWhhfw

— Morgan (@SimGuruMorgan) June 14, 2018

For the stream we will only be showing Seasons. Everything you will see is in seasons. That way it isn’t confusing what you get with the pack.

I’ll keep you updated after the stream with a few other San Myshuno shots.

— George Pigula (@SimGuruGeorge) June 14, 2018

I’ve been watching too many super hero shows with lonely billionaires looking down on the city. It inspired this shot. pic.twitter.com/24GycloPEL

— George Pigula (@SimGuruGeorge) June 15, 2018

San Myshuno really is crazy beautiful in the snow! I love the train in this one! pic.twitter.com/bMmQBNtejB

— Morgan (@SimGuruMorgan) June 15, 2018

How To Care For Dormant Plants

by David Salman

Most perennial plants go into a state of dormancy, or winter rest, as a result of the cold temperatures and shorter daylight hours of winter. These sleeping plants lose their stems and leaves and are dormant, not dead! They will re-grow from their roots with the arrival of spring.

Dormant plants might appear dead, meaning you may not see any signs of growth or life above the soil. The key is to check the root system–it’s the truest way to tell if the plant is dormant. Look for light, strong, roots, as shown below with a Swamp Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) plant.

What To Do When Dormant Plants Arrive

  1. All dormant plants are ready to plant upon arrival. Don’t up-pot and hold. They will be healthier and grow more quickly when planted in the ground.
  2. After planting, water thoroughly with Root Stimulator Combination Pack (liquid seaweed and SuperThrive) at first watering, and then one or two more times 2 to 4 weeks apart.
  3. Mulch well – be sure to leave 1-2 inches around the base of the plant.
  4. After a thorough initial watering and mulching at planting, these plants will need little to no additional water until new growth begins to emerge. Check under the mulch. If the soil feels dry, then water lightly. (If planting in a low desert region, a watering once every 2 weeks may be needed if day temperatures are hot.)
  5. After plants begin to grow new leaves, watering once every 7 to 10 days is adequate until the weather warms and the plant begins active growth. Then water as needed.

High Country Gardens Guide To Dormant Plants

Our helpful chart will give you information about how to care for individual plants in dormancy. Most dormant plants will start to show new growth in late March, or when warm weather and longer days become consistent, unless otherwise specified. Be especially patient with dormant grasses, which won’t be expected to wake up until mid-April.

Agastache Glowing Embers®, Ava, Desert Sunrise®, Desert Solstice, Rosita (Hummingbird Mint)

Mature stems are bare and have been cut back, plant will push many new shoots from the crown by mid-spring.

Allium (Summer-Blooming Forms)

Allium Millenium (Millenium Ornamental Onion) and Allium scenscens ‘Blue Twister’ (Blue Twister Ornamental Onion) will push new foliage from the main bulb as weather warms. New side shoots will develop around the main stem by mid-summer.

Amorpha canescens (Leadplant)

As are most shrubs in spring, this plant is shipped completely dormant.

Amsonia jonesii (Western Bluestar)

May be starting to sprout when shipped, but it is often slow to wake in spring.

Andropogon gerardii Windwalker® (Big Bluestem Grass)

A warm season native grass that goes completely dormant in winter. Plants will begin to push new shoots from the base of the plant by mid-April as the nights begin to warm consistently.

Asclepias (Milkweed or Butterfly Weed) – All varieties

Most Asclepias species including Asclepias incarnata, Asclepias syriaca, Asclepias tuberosa Clay form and Asclepias tuberosa Western Gold are late to wake up in the spring, and will often be shipped as dormant plants. So don’t despair if your potted milkweed is asleep above ground. The white roots and woody crown are alive just waiting for consistently warm weather to wake up and begin to grow.

Artemisia filifolia (Sand Sage)

Thin semi-evergreen foliage on multi-branched main stem. Test for flexible stem.

Berberis fendleri (Fendler’s Barberry)

Deciduous shrub holds onto old leaves until emerging new leaves push them off. Test for flexible stem, but be careful not to snap it off with too much pressure.

Campsis grandiflora ‘Morning Calm’ (Morning Calm Trumpet Vine)

New growth will push from the base of the stem in late spring. Slow to wake up, new growth may not appear until April or May.

Ceratostigma plumbaginoides (Hardy Plumbago)

Plants hold foliage from last fall retaining its red color. Leaves may fall off before new foliage emerges in late spring. Slow to wake up, new growth may not appear until April or May. Be patient!

Chamaebatiera millifolium (Fernbush)

Thin semi-evergreen foliage on multi-branched main stem. Test for flexible stem.

Chilopsis linearis (Desert Willow)

All varieties of Chilopsis, including Conchas Dam Pink, Hope, Lucretia Hamilton and Paradise varieties are slow to wake up. This deciduous tree loses its leaves in fall. Healthy plants will have a flexible stem, but don’t bend it so hard that you damage or snap it. New growth may not appear until late April or May. Be patient.

Chrysothamnus nauseosus (Rabbit Brush) – all varieties

This deciduous tree loses its leaves in fall. Healthy plants will have a flexible stem, but don’t bend it so hard that you damage or snap it.

Dalea purpurea, Dalea candidum (Prairie Clover)

Herbaceous plant loses leaves and branches over the winter. Begins to wake up by mid-April. Look for tiny shoots emerging from the soil.

Forestiera neomexicana

Forestiera neomexicana ‘Berry Girl’ (female New Mexico Privet) and Happy Boy’ (male New Mexico Privet) will have thin semi-evergreen foliage on multi-branched main flexible stem.

Helianthus maximiliana (All Varieties)

Helianthus maximiliana ‘Santa Fe’ (Maximilian’s Sunflower), Helianthus maximiliana ‘Dakota Sunshine’ (Maximilian’s Sunflower): Plants go completely dormant losing stems and leaves. New growth begins to appear in early April. Look for new shoots by early April.

Liatris (All Varieties)

Liatris aspera (Rough Gayfeather), Liatris ligulistylus (Meadow Blazingstar), Liatris punctata (Prairie Gayfeather): Plants lose most or all leaves and stems over winter. Check for small corm (woody bulblet) just below the soil surface.

Mirablis multiflora (Wild Four O’clock)

Plants lose all leaves and stems over winter. Check for off-white carrot-like root just below the soil surface. Slow to wake up until the weather warms consistently in late April or May.

Miscanthus sinensis Gracillimus (Maidenhair Grass)

A warm season grass that goes completely dormant in winter. Plants will begin to push new shoots from the base of the plant by mid-April as the nights begin to warm consistently.

Oenothera macrocarpa cultivars, Oenothera fremontii ‘Shimmer’ (Evening Primrose)

A native plant that loses its stems and foliage over the winter. Plants begin to push new shoots by mid-spring and grow quickly as the weather warms.

Panicum virgatum (Prairie Switchgrass) all varieties

A warm season native grass that goes completely dormant in winter. Plants will begin to push new shoots from the base of the plant by mid-April as the nights begin to warm consistently.

Phemeranthus calycinum ‘Judith’s Choice’ (Fame Flower)

Plants lose all leaves and stems over winter. Check for thick, fleshy stem and crown just under the soil or sticking up right on the surface of the soil. Plants are slow to wake up. New growth will not appear until the weather warms consistently in late April or May. These plants won’t begin to grow until warm summer weather has arrived. The long thin string-like roots are brittle and do not like to be disturbed when transplanting, so don’t scratch out the root ball. Continued watering during cold weather will rot the roots. Don’t start to water regularly until the weather warms and the plants begin to grow.

Prunus besseyii ‘Pawnee Buttes’ (Dwarf Sand Cherry)

Deciduous shrub loses all foliage in fall. Slow to wake up in the spring. Will bloom first before leaves emerge in mid-spring. You can test for a flexible stem, but be careful not to snap it off with too much pressure.

Ribes odoratum ‘Crandall’ (Crandall Current)

Deciduous shrub loses all foliage in fall. Test for flexible stem, but be careful not to snap it off with too much pressure.

Salvia daghestanica Platinum® (Silver Sage)

Plant goes solidly dormant in winter. Foliage always looks dead in early spring. But the stems hold onto small tufts of silver foliage. New greener growth emerges in mid to late spring. Be patient.

Salvia reptans (Grass Sage)

A late-to-wake native plant from higher elevations of west Texas. Shoots will begin to emerge from the crown and base of the main stem by mid-April or early May.

Schzachyrium scoparium (Little Bluestem Grass) all varieties

A warm-season native grass that goes completely dormant in winter. Plants will begin to push new shoots from the base of the plant by mid-April as the nights begin to warm consistently

Shrubs (except for Chamaebatiaria)

Shrubs will not be leafed out yet, but stems will be flexible.

Vernonia lettermanii Iron Butterfly (Ironweed)

Native plant from Arkansas, this plant is very slow to wake up and will wait until late spring when the temperatures are consistently warmer to begin pushing new growth from the crown.

Vernonia lindheimeri v. leucophylla (Silver Ironweed)

Native plant from very hot area of West TX, This plant is very slow to wake up and will wait until late spring when the temperatures are consistently warmer to begin pushing new growth from the crown.

Zinnia grandiflora

Gold on Blue Prairie Zinnia, Prairie Zinnia: Old top growth in spring may look thin, but plants have strong crown and roots. This plant is very slow to wake up and will wait until late spring to begin pushing new growth from the crown. These plants won’t begin to grow until warm summer weather has arrived. The long thin string-like roots are brittle and do not like to be disturbed when transplanting, so don’t scratch out the root ball. Continued watering during cold weather will rot the roots. Don’t start to water regularly until the weather warms and the plants begin to grow.

Remember: Plant dormant plants immediately, as they are ready to go in the ground. Do not hold them or up-pot them. They will establish more quickly by being planted dormant. The roots will begin to grow before the new growth emerges. Allow your dormant plants some time to wake up. If your soil is still too cold, it may take longer in your region for these dormant plants to awake.

Managing Global Resources for a Secure Future

Seed dormancy is important to conservation because plants of many wild species are needed for restoration projects, and failure of germination due to seed dormancy can be a major impediment in producing these plants. Further, some species are endangered or threatened, and propagation from seeds may be critical for their survival. Thus, there are many reasons for germinating dormant seeds of wild species for conservation. However, sowing seeds in the field often results in little, or no, germination, unless nondormant seeds are sown when environmental conditions are favorable for germination. Information on the kind of dormancy in seeds facilitates determining how dormancy can be broken. There are five major kinds (classes) of seed dormancy, and these will be described briefly. Physiological dormancy (PD) is the most common class of seed dormancy and is broken in nature when conditions are not favorable for seedling establishment. To break PD, information is needed about the conditions in the habitat between the time of seed maturation/dispersal and germination. An example will be given of the breaking of PD via (1) a single relatively short treatment, e.g. hot (dry) summer; (2) a sequence of different conditions, e.g. summer→ autumn→ winter in the temperate zone; and (3) prolonged (2-3 years) incubation at warm, wet habitat conditions. One example will be presented to illustrate how difficult it may be to germinate seeds after dormancy has been broken. Physical dormancy (PY) is the second most common class of dormancy and is broken when the environment is favorable for seedling establishment. Breaking PY involves two steps: one set of conditions makes seeds sensitive to dormancy-break and a second set causes the water gap on the seed to open. In conclusion, information about the life cycle and habitat of a species will help us develop effective seed dormancy-breaking strategies.

Winter dormancy and chilling in woody plants

Since most plants do not grow during the winter, we say they are dormant. There are actually two types of dormancy during the winter. One is called endo-dormancy. In endo-dormancy, the plant will not grow even under good, warm, growing conditions. Endo is a Greek word meaning inside. In endo-dormancy, something inside the plants is inhibiting growth. The other is called eco-dormancy and occurs when the plant is ready to grow but the environmental conditions are not right, usually too cold. Endo-dormancy occurs first. Short days and freezing temperatures in the fall induce endo-dormancy in the plant. (See the Michigan State University Extension article, “Fall color show and winter dormancy in woody plants.”)

As the plant enters endo-dormancy, it tracks chilling units to track the passage of the winter. Chilling units are hours of time spent above freezing. The number of hours required for chilling varies for different plants from less than 500 to 1,500 hours or more. Many people think the plant is tracking hours below freezing. It is not. Hours below freezing have no effect on chilling, but will increase cold hardiness. If warm weather occurs before the plant completes its chilling requirement, no growth occurs. Chilling and endo-dormancy normally prevent plants from beginning growth during warm spells in the middle of the winter. Not all hours above freezing are equal. Temperatures between 40 and 50 degrees Fahrenheit (5 to 10 degrees Celsius) are most effective. Temperatures just above freezing and above 50 F are less effective and temperatures above 60 F often have a negative effect on chilling.

These peach buds appear dormant, but have completed their chillingrequirement and are waiting for warmer weather to begin growth. Photo credit: Mark Longstroth, MSUE

Plants from the south or far north have relatively short chilling requirements. In the far north, it is below freezing for a long time and the spring warm-up is relatively short. Likewise winters in the south are short and mild. Plants from the middle temperate regions like Michigan have relatively long chilling requirements that keep them dormant through the long stretches when the temperatures cycle above and below freezing in a Michigan winter. Most of the fruit crops we grow in Michigan have chilling requirements of 700 to 1,300 chilling units. We normally complete endo-dormancy here in Michigan in January, early January in the south and late January in the north. Of course, there are big differences between winters. Some are long and cold, others are warmer. The relatively warm winter we are experiencing in 2013 is allowing many plants to accumulate their chilling earlier than normal.

Another important thing happens during endo-dormancy. The plants are cold hardy. As long as the trees, bushes or vines are in endo-dormancy, they have the ability to acclimate to cold weather; we call this cold hardiness. As long as the temperatures are below freezing, the plants are ready for really cold temperatures. Maximum cold hardiness occurs when plants have been subject to cold, subfreezing temperatures for several days or more. As long as the plants are in endo-dormancy they have the ability to acclimate to colder temperatures and withstand winter cold.

After chilling is completed the plants are no longer in endo-dormancy. They are now in eco-dormancy. The plants are dormant only because of cold or cool weather. Warmer temperatures into the mid-40s will cause them to begin growth. Once the plants start to grow, they lose the ability to readjust to colder temperatures. There is usually a slow progression of development when the plant begins to grow as the temperatures slowly rise. Growth first becomes apparent when buds swell and then green tissue emerges from the bud. The plants actually begin growing before we notice the buds swelling.

Related MSU Extension articles

  • “Forcing cuttings to determine the end of dormancy in fruits and other plants”
  • “Winter cold hardiness in Michigan fruit crops”
  • “Fall color show and winter dormancy in woody plants”
  • “Freeze damage depends on tree fruit stage of development”

How can I tell if my tree is dead or dormant?

One of the questions that we get a lot this time of year from our clients is, “How can I tell if my tree is dead or dormant?”

WHAT IS NATURAL TREE BEHAVIOR?

It is natural for trees to drop their leaves during the fall and under times of stress such as drought. St. Louis deciduous trees will go dormant in the winter to conserve energy, giving them the ability to last without food or water until the spring season. This dormancy is seen by the tree shedding leaves and halting growth. The majority of trees will drop their leaves from the crown downward. Typically, what you don’t want to see is when the leaves turn brown, but never shed.

HOW CAN I TELL IF MY TREE IS DEAD OR DORMANT?

To really be able to tell if your tree is dead or dormant is by checking the stems. You can check the stems by performing a “Scratch Test”. To do this, you’ll need a smooth knife, a sharp pruning tool, or your fingernail depending on the shape and size of the tree.

Lightly scratch a small piece of the bark away from the tree trunk, on the branch you desire to test. You want to look at the tissue behind the bark for signs of life. Healthy stems are firm and green on the inside. Stems that are brittle and crack easily are likely dead. If the stem is mushy, it is likely very dead. Green hues and dampness are also good signs. Dry, brittle, and brown bark indicates that the tree is dead.

Another clue to look for is rotting or decaying. Sometimes this is obvious, in the case of open wounds or soft spots. Other times it may require an arborist, botanist, or horticulturist to determine. Wood boring insects are generally easy to find when you peel away the outer bark layer of the tree.

I CHECKED AND MY TREE IS STILL ALIVE

So what do you do if you determine that your tree is still alive, but is suffering? A plant that has sentimental value to you, or is an expensive or rare specimen may be worth saving!

If you check the stems and they appear dead, but the roots are still viable, there may still be hope. You can cut the stems back a little bit a time to find a part where they may still have life. When you do see pliable stems, stop cutting.

Prune the dead wood from the tree as frequently as you see it appear. You want to make sure that all nutrients that the tree has are able to go where needed. This includes removing suckers and water sprouts.

If it is feasible, you’ll also want to reconsider & change where the tree is planted. Soil conditions, shade vs. sun, and other environmental factors may not be favorable to the specimen. Transplanting should almost always be done in the fall. But remember, transplanting trees causes undue stress and generally you’ll need to get the tree healthy again before it can be moved unless it is truly a location issue. So proper diagnosis is key.

Trees are similar to humans when they get “sick”. If your tree has significant stress, it’s more susceptible to pests and disease. Trimming (opening a new wound) will force it to take more energy to heal itself. So, if possible, leave a stressed tree alone.

I CHECKED AND MY TREE IS DEAD

If you’re positive that your tree is dead, it’s important to remove it immediately. Dead or dying trees are hazardous because they are liable to fall over on a house or other object. They also bring in secondary invaders (pests), which makes the surrounding trees more prone to infestation.

Never try to cut down a large tree alone. It can be extremely dangerous to cut down a tree that has been compromised, and there are trained professionals that can help.

HOW CAN DOWCO HELP?

At Dowco, we are plant lovers, so we try to salvage trees and shrubs as much as possible. However, even with all the TLC in the world, sometimes it is not practical to save a badly damaged tree. In this case, we recommend starting over again. Typically, we won’t plant the same specimen in the same location, because the factors were not right.

If you’re not sure if your tree is dead or dormant, Dowco can help! Our horticulturists on staff will be happy to come out for a free consultation to determine if your tree is dead or dormant.

Dowco is the premier provider of lawn care and landscape maintenance services. We are committed to improving the quality of your life so that you can spend time doing the things you want to do! Our full service menu includes weekly maintenance of your property, plant health visits, and modern site enhancements.

(636) 532-9192

Understanding Plant Dormancy: How To Put A Plant Into Dormancy

Nearly all plants go dormant in winter—whether they’re growing indoors or out in the garden. This period of rest is crucial to their survival in order to regrow each year. While plant dormancy during cold conditions is important, it may be equally important during times of stress. For instance, during periods of extreme heat or drought, many plants (especially trees) will go into a dormancy-like state, shedding their leaves early in order to conserve what little moisture may be available to ensure their survival.

Making a Plant Go Dormant

Normally, you don’t need to do anything to get a plant to go dormant. This usually happens on its own, though some indoor plants may need to be coaxed. Most plants can detect the shorter days towards the end of summer or early fall. As cooler temperatures begin to approach soon after, plant growth will start to decline as they enter into dormancy. With houseplants, it may help to move them to a darker and cooler area of the home in order to allow them to go dormant.

Once a plant is dormant, foliage growth may be limited and even drop off, but the roots will continue to grow and thrive. This is why fall is often an ideal and preferable time for transplanting.

Outdoor plants that are in the ground won’t need any help, though outdoor potted plants may need to be moved, depending on the climate and type of plant. Most potted plants can be moved indoors or for hardier types, an unheated garage will be sufficient over winter. For a fully dormant plant (one that loses its leaves), monthly watering during winter dormancy can also be given, though no more than this.

Revive a Dormant Plant

Depending on your location, it can take weeks for plants to come out of dormancy in spring. To revive a dormant plant indoors, bring it back into indirect light. Give it a thorough watering and a boost of fertilizer (diluted at half strength) to encourage new growth. Do not move any potted plants back outdoors until all threat of frost or freezing temps has passed.

Most outdoor plants require little maintenance other than trimming back to allow for new growth to come through. A dose of fertilizer in spring can also help encourage the regrowth of foliage, though it will oftentimes occur naturally whenever the plant is ready.

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