What is a lemon

24 Delicious Citrus Fruits You Should Definitely Give A Try Arshiya Syeda Hyderabd040-395603080 August 22, 2019

They’re zesty, they’re tangy, they’re oh-so-delicious. If the mango is regarded as the “king” of fruits, then citrus fruits sure do form the royal court. The perfect combination of sweet and sour flavors provided by citrus fruits make them some of the most favored and sought-after fruits around the world. After all, who hasn’t experienced the joy of sucking on a cold orange popsicle on a hot summer afternoon?

Contents

Table Of Contents

  • List Of Citrus Fruits
  • What Are The Health Benefits Of Citrus Fruits
  • What Are Some Healthy Ways To Eat Citrus Fruits
  • Recipes

There are only three original species of citrus fruits – mandarin orange, pummelo, and citron. All the other citrus fruits we see in stores and at farmers’ markets today are actually products of crossing these original species. Yes, this includes the common sweet oranges, lemons, and limes! Mindblowing, isn’t it?

There are many more amazing things about citrus fruits that you are not yet aware of, and they will completely blow your mind. But before we delve into that, let’s look at all the types of citrus fruits that you can get your hands on.

List Of Citrus Fruits

Here are some popular varieties of citrus fruits:

1. Orange

The beloved orange that is readily available around the world is actually a hybrid between a pomelo and a mandarin. This sweet fruit grows in tropical and subtropical climates and has been around longer than Christianity as it has been mentioned in Chinese literature dating all the way back to 314 BC!

  • Botanical Name: Citrus sinensis
  • Origin: Southern China, Northeastern India, and Southeast Asia
  • Preferred Zones: Zones 9-11
  • Size Of Tree: 30-33 feet
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil: Slightly acidic to neutral soil with good drainage

2. Tangerine

The trusty ol’ tangerine is believed to be a variety of another citrus fruit, the mandarin orange. It is much sweeter than a regular orange and is used in preparing a bunch of drinks, desserts, salads, and other dishes. Tangerine peels are so delicious that they are also eaten coated in chocolate!

  • Botanical Name: Citrus tangerina
  • Origin: Morocco
  • Preferred Zones: Zones 9-10
  • Size Of Tree: 8-10 feet
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil: Slightly acidic to neutral loamy soil with good drainage

3. Key Lime

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Who hasn’t experienced the slice of heaven that is key lime pie? This delicious fruit is also known as Mexican lime and West Indian lime. Besides the fruit having a sweet flavor, the flowers that bloom with it are also a super pretty off-white with a delicate purple tinge at the edges.

  • Botanical Name: Citrus aurantiifolia
  • Origin: Southeast Asia
  • Preferred Zones: Zones 9-10
  • Size Of Tree: 16 feet
  • Exposure: Full sun, protected from cold winds
  • Soil: Well-drained, slightly acidic to neutral broken rocky soil

4. Clementine

I’m sure you must have spent some part of your childhood being taught the ubiquitous song Oh My Darlin’ Clementine. Well, this classic also features one of the most commonly found citrus fruits out there. Clementine is a sweet citrus fruit that is a cross between a mandarin orange and a sweet orange. It has lesser acid than a sweet orange and is often confused with mandarin orange.

  • Botanical Name: Citrus clementina
  • Origin: Algeria
  • Preferred Zones: Zones 9-11
  • Size Of Tree: 25 feet
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil: Well-drained soil

5. Blood Orange

Blood orange has quite the fitting moniker considering its flesh is a very distinctive dark red. This is because it contains unique antioxidants called anthocyanins that are not found in any other citrus fruits. Another feature that sets it apart from its other citrus counterparts is that it has a distinct raspberry flavor to it in combination with the usual citric flavor.

  • Botanical Name: Citrus sinensis
  • Origin: China
  • Preferred Zones: Zones 9-10
  • Size Of Tree: 15 feet
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil: Slightly acidic, well-drained loamy soil

6. Mandarin Orange

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The mandarin orange is a citrus fruit that closely resembles the more common sweet orange. This sweet citrus fruit holds a special place in Chinese medicine and Ayurveda for treating abdominal, digestion, and phlegm related issues. Mandarin oranges are also traditional symbols of abundance and are thus presented and displayed during the Chinese New Year.

  • Botanical Name: Citrus reticulata
  • Origin: China
  • Preferred Zones: Zones 9-10
  • Size Of Tree: 8-10 feet
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil: Well-drained loamy soil

7. Lemon

Who doesn’t know the joy of having a glass of cold lemonade on a hot summer day? Owing to its unique sour taste, lemon is a citrus fruit that is used in preparing food and refreshing drinks all over the world. Additionally, its high citric acid content makes it a strong cleaning agent, and its essential oil is used in aromatherapy for relaxation.

  • Botanical Name: Citrus limon
  • Origin: Southeast Asia
  • Preferred Zones: Zones 9-10
  • Size Of Tree: 10-20 feet
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil: Acidic, well-drained, loamy soil

8. Grapefruit

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The grapefruit boasts of a unique flavor profile that ranges from sour to semi-sweet to bitter notes. It’s a cross between two other citrus fruits – sweet orange and pomelo. This citrus fruit gets its name from the way it grows in bunches that resemble grapes. The flesh of this beautiful fruit can come in red, white, or pink hues, depending on its cultivars.

  • Botanical Name: Citrus paradisi
  • Origin: Barbados
  • Preferred Zones: Zones 9-11
  • Size Of Tree: 16-20 feet
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil: Well-drained soil

9. Meyer Lemon

The Meyer lemon is named after the American agricultural explorer Frank Nicholas Meyer, who first sampled and brought this citrus fruit to the US from China. It’s a cross between a lemon and a mandarin orange. Though first used as an ornamental tree in China, this fruit found its way into cooking, thanks to popular chefs like Alice Waters and Martha Stewart.

  • Botanical Name: Citrus meyeri
  • Origin: China
  • Preferred Zones: Zones 9-10
  • Size Of Tree: 6-10 feet
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil: Slightly acidic, well-drained, loamy soil

10. Kaffir Lime

Kaffir lime (also known as makrut lime) is a citrus fruit that features quite prominently in Southeast Asian cuisine. In fact, its leaves are used way more than the fruit in preparing Thai, Cambodian, Vietnamese, and Indonesian dishes. Kaffir lime juice is also used as a shampoo in this region and is believed to kill head lice.

  • Botanical Name: Citrus hystrix
  • Origin: Tropical Asia
  • Preferred Zones: Zones 9-11
  • Size Of Tree: 6 to 35 feet
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil: Well-drained, loamy soil

11. Tangelo

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Tangelo is a citrus fruit that is a cross between a tangerine and a pomelo or grapefruit. It is extremely juicy and has a mildly sweet flavor. This sweet flavor makes it possible for tangelos to be used as a substitute for sweet oranges and mandarin oranges in drinks and dishes.

  • Botanical Name: Citrus tangelo
  • Origin: USA
  • Preferred Zones: Zones 9-10
  • Size Of Tree: 8-12 feet
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil: Well-drained, slightly acidic soil

12. Kumquat

Kumquat (the name just rolls off your tongue, doesn’t it?) is very similar to a sweet orange but is much smaller in size and more resistant to cold weather. This juicy citrus has many more variants like the Morgani (round) kumquat, Nagami (oval) kumquat, Jiangsu kumquat, and the Centennial Variegated kumquat.

  • Botanical Name: Citrus japonica
  • Origin: South Asia and Asia Pacific region
  • Preferred Zones: Zones 9-11
  • Size Of Tree: 8 to 15 feet
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil: Well-drained soil

13. Persian Lime

Persian lime is the most widely cultivated lime species and is a hybrid between a key lime and a lemon. The unique features that make it great for commercial cultivation are that it is seedless, has a longer shelf life, is bigger than the key lime, and its bushes have no thorns. However, it is less acidic and has a less bitter taste than key lime.

  • Botanical Name: Citrus latifolia
  • Origin: Persia (now Iran)
  • Preferred Zones: Zones 9-10
  • Size Of Tree: 15 to 20 feet
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil: Well-drained soil

14. Sweet Lime

Sweet lime is a cultivar of lemon and is immensely popular in South Asia. It has a very mild, sweet flavor and is low in acid content. Sweet lime is most commonly consumed in its juice form and is the most common fruit drink found in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh.

  • Botanical Name: Citrus limetta
  • Origin: South and Southeast Asia
  • Preferred Zones: Zones 9-11
  • Size Of Tree: 26 feet
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil: Slightly acidic, well-drained soil

15. Pomelo

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Pomelo (or pummelo/pamplemousse/jabong/shaddock – this fruit has way too many names!) is one of the three original citrus species from which the rest of the citrus fruits hybridized. The white-fleshed pomelo is sweet while the pink-fleshed one is sour. Pomelos are eaten in Asia during the Mooncake festival.

  • Botanical Name: Citrus maxima
  • Origin: South and Southeast Asia
  • Preferred Zones: Zones 9-10
  • Size Of Tree: 25 feet
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil: Well-drained, loamy soil

16. Yuzu

Yuzu is a highly aromatic citrus fruit that looks a lot like a small grapefruit. The interesting thing about yuzu is that it is rarely consumed as a fruit. Yuzu juice is used in the preparation of ponzu sauce, yuzu vinegar, yuzu tea, and some alcoholic drinks.

  • Botanical Name: Citrus junos
  • Origin: Central China and Tibet
  • Preferred Zones: Zones 9-11
  • Size Of Tree: 12 to 18 feet
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil: Well-drained soil

17. Ugli Fruit

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This fruit may sound ugli and look ugly, but it sure is one delicious citrus fruit. Ugli fruit is created by crossing a grapefruit, an orange, and a tangerine. This super juicy fruit is sweet like a tangerine, less bitter than a grapefruit, and has a very aromatic rind.

  • Botanical Name: Citrus reticulata × Citrus paradisi
  • Origin: Jamaica
  • Preferred Zones: Zones 9-11
  • Size Of Tree: 6 to 8 feet
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil: Well-drained, slightly acidic soil

18. Citron

And we’re back to one of the original citrus fruit species with citron! This dry, pulpy fruit is used to make jams and pickles in South Asia. Citron serves a variety of medicinal purposes like combatting nausea, hemorrhoids, and skin diseases and ejecting parasitic worms from the body.

  • Botanical Name: Citrus medica
  • Origin: Southeast Asia
  • Preferred Zones: Zones 9-10
  • Size Of Tree: 8 to 15 feet
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil: Well-drained, loamy soil

19. Rangpur

A hybrid between mandarin orange and lemon, rangpur is named so after Rangpur in Bangladesh, where it is found in abundance. Due to their high acid content, rangpurs are used as a substitute for lime while cooking.

  • Botanical Name: Citrus limonia
  • Origin: Southeast Asia
  • Preferred Zones: Zones 9-11
  • Size Of Tree: 12 to 18 feet
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil: Slightly acidic, well-drained, loamy soil

20. Finger Lime

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The finger lime, as the name suggests, looks like an elongated lime. Its juicy vesicles are used as garnish in various dishes and are referred to as ‘lime caviar.’ Finger lime has a tangy flavor that makes it perfect for making pickles and marmalade. But that’s not all! Its peel is also dried and used as a spice.

  • Botanical Name: Citrus australasica
  • Origin: Australia
  • Preferred Zones: Zones 9-11
  • Size Of Tree: 20 feet
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil: Well-drained soil

21. Bitter Orange

As you may be able to tell by the name, bitter orange is a very bitter flavored variety of citrus fruit. It’s a cross between a pomelo and a mandarin orange. The world-renowned British marmalade is made using bitter orange. It is widely used in preparing Turkish cuisine and is also known to act as a dietary supplement as it suppresses your appetite.

  • Botanical Name: Citrus aurantium
  • Origin: Southeast Asia
  • Preferred Zones: Zones 9-10
  • Size Of Tree: 30 feet
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil: Well-drained, slightly acidic, loamy soil

22. Buddha’s Hand

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When it comes to oddly shaped fruits, Buddha’s hand sure does top the list. This unique fruit is divided into finger-like segments. Due to its lack of pulp or juice, only its zest is used in preparing desserts, dishes, and alcoholic drinks.

  • Botanical Name: Citrus medica var. sarcodactylis
  • Origin: Northeastern India and China
  • Preferred Zones: Zones 9-11
  • Size Of Tree: 10 to 17 feet
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil: Well-drained soil

23. Calamondin

A cross between a mandarin orange and a kumquat, calamondin is a small citrus fruit that is rarely consumed by itself owing to its sour taste. Its juice is used as a seasoning and condiment in Asian cuisines, and the fruit itself can be used to make marmalade.

  • Botanical Name: Citrofortunella microcarpa
  • Origin: South Asia
  • Preferred Zones: Zones 9-10
  • Size Of Tree: 10 to 20 feet
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil: Well-drained, slightly acidic soil

24. Kinnow

Kinnow is a delicious citrus fruit that is a cross between the citrus cultivars of ‘King’ and ‘Willow Leaf.’ Due to its high seed content acting as a hindrance during consumption, a low seed variety of kinnow was developed in 2015 by Pakistani agriculturalist Niaz Ahmad Chaudhry.

  • Botanical Name: Citrus nobilis x Citrus deliciosa
  • Origin: Pakistan and India
  • Preferred Zones: Zones 9-11
  • Size Of Tree: 8 to 12 feet
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil: Well-drained soil

Now that’s what I call a long list of fruits! But here’s the best part – the wide variety of citrus fruits that you can get your hands on also means that you get an equally wide variety of health benefits. Don’t believe me? Then just keep on reading…

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What Are The Health Benefits Of Citrus Fruits?

  1. They aid weight loss as they have a high water and fiber content, which keeps you full for a long time. This fiber also boosts heart health and prevents cardiovascular disease.
  2. Citrus fruits can help reduce the risk of esophageal, stomach, and ovarian cancers.
  3. They reduce your risk of developing cataracts and age-related macular degeneration.
  4. The vitamin C in citrus fruits helps regenerate collagen that maintains the elasticity of your skin. Hence, these fruits can help delay the signs of aging.
  5. They help reduce the overall duration of the common cold by a day.

But wait a minute! While it sure is great that citrus fruits give you a wealth of nutrients, you need to keep in mind that you can obtain their benefits only if you select the right fruits at the market, store them properly, and eat them before they start rotting. Here’s what you need to do…

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What Are Some Healthy Ways To Eat Citrus Fruits?

When it comes to taste, no fruit can beat the perfect blend of sweet, sour, and slightly bitter flavor notes of citrus fruits. You can simply peel and eat them out of hand, drink their freshly squeezed juice or incorporate them in a ton of healthy and simple recipes!

  • When I watched The Jungle Book as a kid, I absolutely fell in love with the idea of plucking fruit straight off a tree and devouring it because of how delicious it looked when Mowgli did it. Now you may not have the option of picking your citrus fruits off a tree, but you sure can eat them the way God intended you to. Most citrus fruits also have the added advantage of having a loose peel that can be removed by hand and being naturally divided into bite-sized segments. So you don’t need to mess around with knives or forks! Eating citrus fruits this way also ensures that you don’t miss out any of the fiber and great nutrients that they pack. The best time to eat citrus fruits is right in the morning with a glass of milk. And if you’re diabetic, make sure there’s a gap of a couple of hours between your meals and citrus fruit consumption because otherwise, it could raise your blood sugar level too much.

  • For those of you who prefer drinking juices instead of eating fruits (like me!), freshly squeezed citrus fruit juices are going to be your new best friend. But don’t you dare strain out the pulp before chugging that juice! The pulp of citrus fruits contains fiber that has the all-important pectin that is responsible for getting rid of cholesterol from your body.
  • Add peeled segments of any citrus fruits you like to your salad, a bowl of low-fat yogurt or chia seed pudding to add a dash of sweet and tangy freshness to an otherwise boring meal!

While these are some super simple ways to enjoy citrus fruits, you can also prepare some yummy dishes with them that will make you a hit with your family and friends. Below are just a few dishes that you can try out.

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Recipes

1. Glazed Lemon Coconut Loaf

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What You Need
For the loaf
  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 5 tbsp unsalted butter
  • 3 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 tsp lemon extract
  • 1 1/2 tbsp grated lemon zest
  • 1/4 cup milk
  • 2 big eggs
  • 3/4 cup buttermilk
  • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 sweetened desiccated coconut
  • 9 x 5 inch loaf pan
  • Parchment paper
For the glaze
  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 2 tbsp unsalted butter
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1/4 tsp lemon extract
  • A pinch of lemon zest
  • 1/3 cup sweetened desiccated coconut
Directions
  1. Line your loaf pan with parchment paper and preheat your oven to 350°F.
  2. Melt the butter.
  3. In a bowl, mix the powdered sugar, melted butter, vegetable oil, lemon extract, vanilla extract, lemon zest, and milk. Whisk them together thoroughly.
  4. In another bowl, whisk the eggs and buttermilk.
  5. In another bowl, use a sieve to sift the flour, baking powder, and salt together.
  6. Add half of your flour mixture to the sugar mixture and stir with a wooden spoon until there are no lumps.
  7. Now, alternately add some of the flour mixture and some of the egg mixture to the previous mixture, stirring thoroughly between each addition until all your ingredients are combined in one bowl.
  8. Stir in the desiccated coconut into the batter.
  9. Pour your batter into the loaf pan and bake it for around 45 minutes, or until a skewer/butter knife/toothpick poked into the center comes out clean.
  10. Remove the loaf from the pan and place it on a cooling rack.
  11. To make the glaze, combine all the glaze ingredients (except for the desiccated coconut) and whisk the mixture until it reaches a thick consistency. You can adjust the consistency by adding more sugar (to thicken) or more lemon juice (to thin).
  12. Use a spoon to pour an even layer of glaze on top of your loaf and sprinkle some desiccated coconut on top of it to garnish it.

2. Citrus Tart

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What You Need
  • 1 1/2 cups Marie biscuits (crushed)
  • 5 tbsp butter (melted)
  • 2 tbsp demerara (brown) sugar
  • 1/4 tsp powdered cinnamon
  • 1 can sweetened condensed milk
  • 1/3 cup chilled orange juice concentrate
  • 1/4 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 3 tbsp powdered sugar
  • 9-inch tart pan with removable bottom
What To Do
  1. Mix the crushed biscuits, melted butter, brown sugar and cinnamon together in a bowl.
  2. Using a spoon, press this mixture tightly and in an even layer all along the base and sides of the tart pan.
  3. Separate the egg yolks and whites.
  4. Combine the condensed milk, orange juice concentrate, lemon juice, and egg yolk in a bowl and whisk them until they are completely blended.
  5. Beat your egg whites until they form stiff peaks (you could use an electric whisk to get the job done faster) and gently fold them into the condensed milk mixture using a spatula.
  6. Pour the mixture into the tart tin.
  7. Bake the tart for 20 to 25 minutes or until the filling is completely set.
  8. Let the tart cool down on a wire rack before chilling it in a fridge for about 4 hours.
  9. Remove the tart from the pan.
  10. Whisk the whipping cream and powdered sugar until stiff peaks form.
  11. Dollop the whipped cream along the edges of the tart or cover the top completely.
  12. You can garnish the tart with orange slices and mint sprigs to make it look pretty.

3. Citrus Mango Salsa

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  • 1 blood orange
  • 1 grapefruit
  • 1 lime
  • 1 ripe mango (peeled and chopped/sliced)
  • 1 red bell pepper (seeded and diced)
  • 3 tablespoons red onion (finely chopped)
  • 1/2 jalapeno
  • Salt (as desired)
Directions
  1. Preheat your oven to 325°F.
  2. Peel the blood orange and separate the segments.
  3. Cut between the membranes to release the blood orange segments from it and drop them in a bowl.
  4. Cut these segments into bite-sized chunks.
  5. Repeat the previous 3 steps with the grapefruit.
  6. Combine all the ingredients in a bowl, season with salt, and toss them together gently with a spoon.

Well, after reading about all the goodness that citrus fruits have to offer, I’m sure you can’t wait to stock up on these delicious fruits! Do comment below and let us know which citrus fruits you love the most.

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Expert’s Answers For Readers’ Questions

What citrus fruit has the most vitamin c?

Among citrus fruits, orange has the most vitamin C (ascorbic acid) content with about 70 milligrams of vitamin C found in a single medium-sized orange.

Are grapes citrus?

No. Grapes are berries that grow on deciduous vines and belong to the genus Vitis. Though they do contain a small amount of citric acid, the main acids found in grapes are tartaric and malic acids.

Is tomato a citrus fruit?

No. Though tomatoes do contain citric acid in abundance, they are not considered citrus fruits because they grow on vine plants that belong to the genus Solanaceae.

Is pineapple considered a citrus fruit?

No. Only fruits that belong to the genus Rutaceae are considered to be citrus fruits. Pineapple belongs to the Ananas genus of plants. It is acidic and has a tangy flavor because it contains ascorbic acid, not the citric acid that is found in citrus fruits.

Why do citrus fruits conduct electricity?

Citrus fruits conduct electricity because they contain acid and water. When a metal comes in contact with acid, the metal’s atoms give up electrons. The water in citrus fruits, in turn, allows the electrons to flow through and conduct electricity.

How to freeze citrus fruits?

When it comes to freezing citrus fruits, there are a bunch of different ways you can go about it. You can leave them whole and unpeeled, or you can peel them and cut them in slices. If you want to wet pack them, put the fruits in a freezer safe jar and fill it up with water. Make sure you leave about an inch wide space on top to so that the jar doesn’t break when the water expands after freezing. You can also dry pack them by simply laying them on a tray covered with cookie paper. Once the fruits have frozen, simply pop them in a ziplock bag for easy storage.

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Arshiya Syeda

Arshiya Syeda is an editor and certified counselor. Ever the lover of the written word, she served on the editorial boards of her school and college newsletters. Writing articles on hairstyles, hair care, and nutrition helped her combine her love for reading, writing, and research. As an associate editor, she helps her team members deliver polished and meticulously researched content. Fluent in English, Urdu, and Hindi, Arshiya now aims to become a multilinguist by learning German and teaching herself American Sign Language (ASL).

Spring is finally here! Flowers are blooming, the birds are chirping, and our favorite citrus fruits are ready to be enjoyed. Not only do oranges, mandarins, and grapefruit taste great, they also have many nutrients to keep us happy and healthy.

– Oranges: Probably the best known citrus fruit, oranges are a great spring time snack with a refreshing taste. If you are not a fan of eating whole oranges, try cutting them up and pairing them with other favorite fruits to make a fresh fruit salad or kabob.

– Grapefruit: Grapefruits are loaded with many nutrients but are often the most bitter of the citrus fruits. To avoid the sugar that many pour on grapefruit, try cutting them up and using them in various salads with a combination of leafy greens, avocados, nuts, and seeds.

– Mandarins: Also thought of as mini oranges and sometimes marketed as Cuties and halos, mandarins are great on-the-go snacks for work, school, or any day trip with the kids. They tend to be sweeter and are also easy to peel.

– Clementine: These are a hybrid between a mandarin orange and sweet orange. Clementine are also delicious, nutritious, portable, and easy to peel.

– Lemons & Limes: These dynamic duos are great for doses of antioxidants, but are not usually eaten by themselves due to their sour and tart tastes. Try adding a few slices of lemons and limes to your water or squeezing some fresh juice on a salad or fish dish for an added kick of flavor.

Other Sources of Vitamin C
Citrus fruits are not the only great tasting food with vitamin C! There are plenty of other fruits and vegetables that have the same immune boosting nutrients such as:

– Broccoli
– Spinach
– Strawberries
– Peppers
– Kiwi
– Guava
– Tomatoes
– Peas
– Pineapple
– Cauliflower
– Brussel Sprouts
– Mango

For delicious recipes, nutrition tips, and to find cooking and nutrition classes, go to the Kendall Reagan Nutrition Center website. More great info also available at the College of Health and Human Sciences Pinterest board.

Lemon is a citrus plant that originated in Asia, particularly in northeast India, northeast Myanmar, and China. Cultivation started in the 1st century AD while the top five countries that produce lemons are India, Mexico, China, Brazil, and Argentina.

The lemon tree is an evergreen tree that blooms year round and reaches 3-6 meters in height. It can also last 50-100 years old. Fruits are picked 6-10 times a year while one lemon tree can produce an average of 225-270 kgs. The most common types of lemons are Meyer, Eureka, and Lisbon lemons.

Lemon Nutrition Facts Chart

Now let’s jump into your lemon options.

Types

Avalon Lemons

This variety of lemons is very similar to the Lisbon lemon, which is one of the two main types of lemons commonly found in grocery stores, the other being the Eureka lemon. It originated in Florida.

Bearss Lemons

It is believed that Bearss lemons originated in Italy from a variety that is now extinct. Similar to the Lisbon lemon, the current version of the Bearss lemon originated in the early 1950s in Florida and is a very popular variety for lemon-growers. It is considered a true lemon, and it is high in lemon oil. It is also popular because it produces high-quality fruit, a lot of lemons on each tree, and because of its peel.=

Buddha’s Hand Lemons

Also known as Finger Citron lemons, these fruits are misshapen, but very fragrant. It is not a round fruit but instead has numerous “fingers” that start at the top of the lemon. The pith and the rind, therefore, are where the culinary benefits come from, since there is no juice or pulp in the fingers. Moreover, the lemons symbolize good fortune, happiness, and longevity in places such as China, and they are often included in temple offerings.

Bush Lemons

Also called rough lemons, the bush lemons have a very thick skin that is also very bumpy. They are similar to a true lemon in that the rind produces a very strong flavor. They are self-seeding lemons that have a strong taste, very little juice, and a good hardiness that makes them perfect to use as a rootstock when grafting other varieties of lemons.

Citron Lemons

Citron lemons are used more for their rinds than anything else, in part because there is very little juice in this type of lemon. A very large fruit, it can grow up to 10 pounds in weight, and there are three distinct types of the citron lemon.

These include the acidic pulp group, which includes varieties such as the Greek citron and the Florentine citron, the non-acidic pulp group, which includes varieties such as the Moroccan and the Corsican citron, and the pulp-free varieties, which include the Buddha’s Hand lemon and the Yemenite citron lemon. It also boasts that nearly every part of the lemon has an important use, from medicinal to culinary, so you can do much more than just eat the fruit itself.

Dorshapo Lemons

Similar to the Eureka lemon, the Dorshapo lemon originated in the early 1900s and was developed by three growers, whose names make up the name of the lemon. These lemons are very sweet and are not very acidic.

Eureka Lemons

Eureka lemons are the predominant lemon in most countries of the world. Different varieties of the lemon have been developed throughout the years, and it looks very similar to the Lisbon lemon. The main difference is that the Eureka lemons have a nipple end that is very prominent. It also comes from trees that are thorn-less and which bear fruit all year long, which is one of the reasons it is so popular among growers.

Fino Citron Lemons

These lemons resemble Verna lemons but have less juice and are much smaller. Fino citron lemons are not very popular because their trees have a lot of thorns, and, therefore, they are difficult and time-consuming to harvest. The average Fino citron lemon tree produces fruit twice a year, and this type of lemon is very acidic and has a very good flavor. It also has a few more seeds than many other types of lemons, which is yet another reason for its lack of popularity.

Greek Citron Lemons

Used in many different types of religious rituals throughout the centuries, it was initially found in the Ionian Islands. It is also known as the Corfu etrog, or simply the etrog.

Lisbon Lemons

Because it is long and has a prominent nipple end, the Lisbon lemon is very similar to the Eureka lemon. The two lemons also have slight pitting on the rind and has medium thickness. With few or no seeds, the Lisbon lemons are very acidic, and the differences between them and the Eureka lemon include:

  • The Lisbon lemon does well in cooler climates, whereas the Eureka lemon needs warm weather to thrive.
  • The Lisbon lemon tree produces fruit twice a year, whereas the Eureka tree can produce fruit all year long.
  • The Lisbon tree is thorny, while the Eureka tree has no thorns.
  • The Lisbon lemon has an end that is slightly pointed, whereas the Eureka lemon has a short neck end.

Meyer Lemons

Meyer lemons are not true lemons, but, instead, they are a combination of a lemon and a sweet orange, such as a mandarin. They can be yellowish-orange in color and in pulp, and they are very juicy and sweet, although they are also slightly acidic.

Meyer lemons are loved by professional chefs because of their taste and texture, and they can be used to make everything from tarts to sorbets. They have a very floral aroma and unlike most other lemons, Meyer lemons are not picked green but only when they turn the right shade of yellow-orange. Meyer lemon trees also produce fruit all year long.

Organic Lemons

Organic lemons are grown without pesticides and other chemicals, which is especially important if you’re going to use the lemons for their rinds, their peels, and even their juice. In fact, there are many good reasons to choose lemons that are organically grown over those that aren’t, and a little research on the Internet will tell you everything that you need to know.

Ponderosa Lemons

Ponderosa lemons have thick and bumpy skins, and they are thought to be a cross between a lemon and a citron. It is not a true lemon and is more cold-sensitive than other types of lemons, with a very citrusy taste. It originated in the late 1880s in Maryland, and the fruit is smaller than true lemons.

Sweet Lemons

There are two main types of lemons, the acidic lemons and the sweet lemons, so the term “sweet” simply refers to the fact that these lemons are not acidic in nature. The lemons are known by many other names, including sweet lime, sweet limetta, and Mediterranean sweet lemon. Instead of being juiced, you can eat sweet lemons as fruits, and even the peel is beneficial because it has a large quantity of lemon oil in it.

True Lemons

True lemons are simply acidic forms of lemons, and some of the examples include both the Lisbon and the Eureka lemons. True lemons do not include sweet lemons or non-acidic citrus such as citron.

Verna Lemons

These are acidic lemons that are very similar to Eureka lemons. They have thick skins, only a few seeds, and they are extremely juicy. Their trees normally produce fruit twice a year, but in certain circumstances it can produce a third batch of fruit during the year. Although no one knows for sure where Verna lemons originated from, most people think they came from Spain.

Miscellaneous Lemons – Less Well-Known Brands

Avon Lemons

Of the 50 varieties of lemons, the Avon lemons were the first to be grown in Florida, and they are mostly used to make concentrate.

Baboon Lemons

Similar to limes in taste, the Baboon lemon originated in Brazil and has a very bright yellow color.

Bonnie Brae Lemons

These lemons are found mostly in the San Diego area. The fruit is seedless, has skin that is very smooth, and it has a very oblong shape to it.

Cameron Highlands Lemons

These lemons originated in the Cameron Highlands section of Malaysia, and, in fact, they grew there in the wild. It is a small round lemon with a slightly green tint.

Escondido Lemons

These lemons are a deep-yellow color and grow close to the Escondido River in Nicaragua. Despite its bright color, it is small and contains very little juice.

Femminello St. Teresa Lemons

These lemons are acidic and have a very tart taste. Nearly three-fourths of the lemons produced in Italy are the Femminello variety. It is also one of the oldest varieties of lemons in Italy.

Genoa Lemons

These lemons are similar to the Eureka lemons, and they came from Genoa, Italy, even though today they are thriving in California.

Interdonato Lemons

The Interdonato lemons originate from Turkey and Italy, and they are often one of the earliest lemons to bloom each season. With a mildly bitter taste, these lemons have very little juice.

Jhambiri Lemons

Very popular in South Asia, the Jhambiri lemons have extremely sour pulp. The lemons are bright-yellow in color and have rough skin.

Kϋtdiken Lemons

These lemons are believed to have originated in Italy, mostly because they are so similar to both the Eureka and the Femminello lemons. They are a variety that grows in large numbers in Turkey.

Lamas Lemons

These lemons come from Turkey and are actually stored in caves.

Lapithkiotiki Lemons

Similar to the Eureka and the Genoa lemons, the Lapithkiotiki is the primary lemon found in Cypress.

Lemonade Lemons

Contrary to its name, Lemonade lemons taste like grapefruit and have a skin that is pale-yellow in color.

Nepali Oblong Lemons

With medium acidity, the Nepali Oblong lemons look like a citron and are a very juicy type of lemon. They are grown commercially in India.

Otaheite Lemons

Although its fruit is small and yellow and looks like other types of lemons, Otaheite lemons are often called a separate species. They are used mostly as a decorative indoor plant.

Perrine Lemons

With a slight lime taste, this type of lemon is pale in color and very juicy. It is also a mixture of the Genoa lemon and the Mexican lime.

Pink Lemonade Lemons

This is a medium-sized lemon that is tart and has a color of tinged pink. It also develops stripes on its rind right before it matures.

Primofiore Lemons

These lemons are quite large and often used to make lemon juice and lemon pies. They are considered to be novelties.

Variegated Pink Lemons

Variegated pink lemons start out as a green and striped fruit, and. as they mature, they turn a deep-yellow color and have a pink flesh. If the trees are planted outdoors, they can get as high as 15 feet, and they grow white blooms that are very fragrant.

Villafranca Lemons

Villafranca lemons were once Florida’s most common and most popular type of lemon.

Volkamer Lemons

These lemons originated in Italy and are small and round in shape. The Volkamer lemons are low in acid, and most experts believe they are a cross between a lemon and some type of sour orange.

Yen Ben Lemons

These lemons are very thin-skinned and smooth. The trees can grow to 10 feet or more in height, and they usually produce fruit twice a year – in the Fall and in Winter.

Characteristics of Lemons – What to Look for When Buying Lemons

Geography

Some people have a preference when it comes to where their lemons are grown. This can also affect their overall taste, which is likely the main reason for their preference. Eureka lemons, for example, are grown commercially and can be found in grocery stores all over the place, yet Lisbon lemons are often found only in Florida at various local produce stands. Meyer lemons are usually home-grown in places such as California, while limettas are common in home gardens in various areas, including the Mediterranean, the United States, and India.

Seeds: Seed versus Seedless

This is one characteristic that is irrelevant to most people, but lemons can come with or without seeds. For example, Lisbon lemons have no seeds, while the Eureka lemons do.

Skin Color

The color of a lemon’s skin can tell you a lot about what type it is. Meyer lemons have an orangish look, while most other types of lemons are a bright shade of yellow. If you are looking for a particular characteristic when searching for the perfect lemon, you may have to rely on other aspects instead of skin color, because most lemons are roughly the same color.

Taste: Sweet versus Sour

Although many people are unaware of this, lemons can be sweet or sour in taste. Most commercially grown lemons are sour, or acidic, because most sweet varieties are found in home gardens. However, the limetta and Meyer lemons are very sweet and are actually hybrids.

The limetta is a cross between a lemon and a Mexican lime, while Meyer lemons are a mixture of a lemon and an orange. The more sour the taste is, the more likely you have purchased a Eureka or Lisbon lemon, and in some cases, you have to slice the lemon open and sample the juice itself to know which lemon you have in your possession.

Texture

The Eureka lemon has thick skin that is pitted and has a lot of very small holes in it. Eureka lemons are very juicy and they are usually grown in large quantities because they are popular for commercial use. Lisbon lemons have skin that is much smoother and tapers off to a point at the end, but the chances are very good that if you bought your fruit at a regular grocery store, it is a Eureka lemon. Eureka lemons are simply more common in grocery stores.

Benefits Associated with Eating Lemons

It Can Improve Your Circulation

Vitamin P, yes, there is such a vitamin, is found in lemons, and this vitamin strengthens the blood vessels and allows your circulatory system to run more efficiently.

No Need for a Laxative

Because lemons keep you regular, you won’t need a laxative quite as often. This is because a good dose of lemon juice stimulates the liver to produce more bile, which keeps everything operating efficiently day after day.

It Has Certain Medicinal Properties

Lemons are both antibacterial and antiviral, mainly because they have a low pH level which breaks down the cell membrane of several strains of harmful bacteria. A few of the results thought to be provided by the regular intake of lemons and lemon water include:

  • A decrease in your stress level
  • A great all-natural cleanser for your home
  • Decrease in cholesterol levels
  • Great for a probiotic effect, since it feeds your gut’s healthy bacteria
  • Improved overall cardiovascular health
  • Increase in the absorption of iron
  • Lower blood pressure
  • Lower risk of heart attack and stroke
  • Prevention of anemia

Good for Your Immune System

Let’s face it, almost everyone’s immune system could use a little boost now and then, and this is one of the things lemons do best. Because of lemons’ high doses of Vitamin C, they can help with everything from neutralizing free radicals to speeding up your recovery from a cold or other illness.

A Good Source of B Vitamins

The inclusion of B-complex vitamins in your diet is important for many reasons, mostly because these are vitamins that the body doesn’t produce on its own.

Giving You More Energy

Lemons give you additional energy because they stimulate brain activity. If you make up a large glass of water and squeeze some lemon juice in it first thing in the morning, then drink it throughout the day, this is a great way to stay active all day long.

It is Great for Bad Breath

No one likes hearing they have bad breath, and lemons are great as an oral cleanser, which makes your breath smell better instantly.

They are Very Nutritional

Lemons are made up mostly of water and a few carbohydrates, the latter being only around 10%. There is very little fat or protein in lemons, and they are only about 20 calories per fruit. In addition to Vitamin C, lemons also contain potassium, which is good for your cardiovascular system, and Vitamin B6, which readily converts food into energy.

Get Out of Your Acidic State

The body can be acidic or alkaline, the latter of which is healthier for you. Lemons help alkalize your body because once it’s absorbed by your body, it is no longer acidic. If you’re not sure what the ratio is between acid and alkaline in your body right now, you can go to any drug store and buy a kit that will test your urine and let you know for sure.

A Great Detoxifier

If you’re wanting to rid your body of certain toxins, simply drink some lemon juice. The high content of potassium in lemons can eliminate symptoms such as headaches, constipation, and even loss of appetite, among others. Lemons do this by getting rid of certain toxins, such as uric acid, found in the body.

Be Stone-Free in No Time

If you are suffering with kidney stones or gallbladder stones, treat yourself to some lemons because they can dissolve these and even calcium deposits due to the citric acid found in them.

Brain Disorders Can Be Greatly Relieved

If you know someone who has a brain disorder, such as Parkinson’s, try giving them lemon peel. The nutrients in the peel of a lemon have been found to reduce or even eliminate some of these illnesses.

Many Anti-Cancer Properties

There are a total of 22 properties found in lemons that have been proven to halt the growth of tumors in many studies, and lemons also stop cell division in cancer cells.

Helping You See Better

Lemons also contain rutin, which has been found to help in various eye disorders, including diabetic retinopathy and others, by greatly reducing the symptoms of these illnesses.

Help with Breathing Problems

Lemons can even help you breathe much better, so when you’re hiking in the mountains or taking a mountain-climbing adventure, don’t forget to drink lots of lemon juice while you’re doing so.

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LEMONADE TREE

Botanical Name: Citrus limon x reticulata Description

This delicious, sweet, juicy fruit tastes like lemonade and can be eaten as a fresh fruit straight off the tree. The tree often has thorns and bears several heavy crops each year.

Other Names: Citrus

Image Price Avail. Propagation Size Buy Options
$34.00 0 Grafted Pot: 4L
Height: 70-80cm
In Production
$79.00 0 Grafted Pot: 6L
Height: 90-100cm
Seeking Propagation Material

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Plant Information or Specifications

Sub Categories (HashTags)

Create Plant Filter using All Hashtags

Preferred Climate

Subtropical, Warm Temperate
Learn About Climate Zones

Grafted
Learn About Propagation Methods

Max Height (when in the ground with good conditions)

2-5m

Plants required to Pollinate

1 (Self Pollinating)
Learn about Pollination

Can it Handle Frosts?

Sometimes

Amount of leaves in Winter?

All Leaves (Evergreen)

Quarantine Restrictions to these Areas

SA

Suitability in Pots

Yes with 35L+ Pot

Water Requirements

Moderate Watering

Is it a Dwarf Fruit Tree?

Can be pruned to 2m

Time to Fruit/Flower/Harvest

2-3 Years

Sun or Shade

Full (Sun:80%-100%)

Preferred Soil Type

Good Drainage

Soil pH

Neutral (6.6-7.3pH)

Fruiting/Harvest Months

June, July, August, September, October

Hashtags

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Question & Answer

How do you know when the fruit is ripe, I have a tree that is full of fruit but all green at the moment. From: PERTH WA

Lemonade fruit is ripe when it comes easily off the tree. Grasp the fruit in your hand and if it feels heavy and comes away with a gentle twist, it’s ripe! The fruit will also soften ever so slightly just when it’s ripe. #DwarfLemonade737 #LemonadeTree736

Customer Comments on Lemonade Tree

Tree Information on growing, planting, pruning, maintenance, ripening, taste, pick or bonsai tips. But mainly how to grow a Lemonade Tree Share Your Advice or ask questions on our Forum

Lemonade

Grows slowly and looks untidy in Winter but crops well and fruit ripens to perfect sweetness even in our climate. Popular with the kids! | Anthony M Iceli – Mornington, VIC 24-Feb-2006 We planted our tree approx 4 years ago. As we expected, the frist few crops were small, however now our tree is almost contantly in fruit. We have flowers, tiny fruit, plum sized green fruit and full fruit all at the same time. We love our lemonade tree ! | Neen – Melbourne, VIC 10-Aug-2006 We have a delicious crop of lemonades on a small 4 year old tree. They make the perfct marmalade with Grapefriut and tangelos | Edna Wooding – Te Awamutu, NEW Z 13-Mar-2007 Weve got a really prolific fruiter and eat them as is but mostly juice them and dilute with about 2/3 water, way better than fizzy drinks and we freeze any excess. | Heath – Toowoomba, QLD 12-May-2007 Our tree is only 2.5 years old and this year we had a magnificent crop – 60 fruit on our 1.5m tree! | Ab – Canberra, ACT 10-Jun-2007 My variety is striped, so I don’t know when they are ripe ready to pick.any help? | Rosemary – Palm Beach, FLA 14-Jun-2007 Our lemonades are fruiting well at the moment. I like a squeeze of lemonade in a bacardi drink. | Craig – Canberra, ACT 28-Jun-2007 My lemonade tree I have just replanted after the winter crop which was that large I had to prop the branchs it is growing in a 40mill tub and loves it cow poo and blood and bone also for my mandarin tree | Norman Schofield – Gosford, NSW 28-Sep-2007 Not so much a tip but how do you know when to pick the crop.The tree is one year old and has about a dozen fruit on it. | Alan Nelson – Henley Beach, SA 17-Mar-2008 We have been told lemonades are best when picked and eaten whilst still fairly green coloured. They are delicious!!! | Roslyn Svensen – Rockhampton, QLD 05-Apr-2008 Yea they taste like lemonade out of a bottle but with no fizzzzzzzzz…. which i hate (i mean i hate the fiz) anyway pick them when they get a slight tinge of yellow or go pale green. theyre best then and if they go yellow(ish) they are overripe | Regerghtrhjtrsd – Hdfsthdtfhd, QQ 24-Jun-2008 I use them instead of lemons to make ice-tea-very nice and smooth. Can anybody tell me if it is a cross between a lemon and a grapefruit, a lemon and an orange or neither? | Antoinette Wijnberg – Yeronga, QLD 04-Aug-2008 Just want to know if the lemonade tree is crossed with anything. as it looks very much like mandarine, but taste like lemons. or is that just how they are | Donna King – Port Augusta, SA 08-Aug-2008 Does anyone know how tall they grow? i can only find small-medium, but thats not really much help to me.so in metres or centimetres would be great. | Mim Purple – Subiaco, WA 30-Nov-2008 My tree is 18mths old, and have got about 30 Lemonades on it, varying in size, tastes like lemonade/grapefruit, has the consistency of Mandadrin. | Grant – Port Pirie, SA 16-Jul-2009 My tree is 3 years old had 1 flower last year but no fruit, any ideas? removed it from plastic house and replanted outside looks good fingers crossed. | Janette – Newzealand, NZ 23-Jul-2009 My Lemonade tree is crowded in the garden with other shrubs, hardly gets any care except good waterering and it has loads of fruit every year. It is about 12 years old now. I squeeze the juice of what we we cannot eat. | Monte Jones – Dubbo, NSW 22-Aug-2009 I believe the lemonade is a cross between lemon and mandarin.mine is in a 45cm pot and has about 20 fruit,also has lots of thorns.is this normal or is this the graft which i should trim off. | Ken Dandie – Perth, WA 24-Mar-2010 I am after recipes for jam made from the lemonade fruit | Ann-maree Hall – Bonville, NSW 05-Apr-2010 Bought my first lemonade tree this week. Its about 1m tall in a 50cm pot, its flowering already. I’m excited. | Karl – Sydney, NSW 29-Aug-2010 Can be a microbial indicator in water | Chin Kim Cana – Docklands City, AUSTR 01-Sep-2010 Give your fruit trees a dose of epson salts twice a year around the drip line for bigger juicier fruit. | Maria Young – Childers, QLD 29-Jun-2011 My tree is 5 years old and seems to have fruit all year round! Currently is loaded with fruit and can hardly keep it’s branches off the ground. Kids love it and make there own Lemonade! Best bearing fruit tree we have. | G Brenton – South West Rocks, NSW 14-Jul-2011 I make excellent marmalade with a ratio of one NZ grapefruit to three or four lemonades. | Paul Allison – Amberley, New Zealand, CAN’Y 16-Dec-2011 Received Lemonade tree for Christmas in 20cm black bag, would like to repot into large pot, need to know what type of potting mix would be suitable. Plant is flowering and starting to producing fruit. | Laurence Robert – Crestmead, Brisbane, QLD 13-Jan-2012 Excited!!! We have one, have had it for four years and love it! Thanx guys for all your love-mail! We, too, live in the “love-infested” waters of this adorable tree! | Bente Lugo – Northmead, NSW 16-Jan-2012 I love my lemonade tree!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! | Lemonade Lover – Lemonadesville, NSW 04-May-2012 Lemon trees are lovely(; | Chicken Bird – Coledale, NSW 30-May-2012 I got told today there’s no such thing as a lemonade tree but I have one I wounder what it’s going to taste like!! | Shakira Laurelle Hurst – Tamworth , NSW 03-May-2013 Harvest period is may to september | Sam Walkers – Perth, WA 14-May-2013 I bought a house with a very established tree, about 5 metres tall, has heaps of fruit on it . From other locals it is across between a mandarin and lemon tree, mine are tart at moment but apparently a couple of more frosts will release more sugar. | Anton Jelicich – Miles, QLD 06-Jul-2013 Juice of half a lemon, fill glass with sparkling mineral water. Sooo refreshing !! And healthy!! No more sugary soft drinks for me. | Di Keller – Prahran, VIC 08-Jul-2013 Keep it well watered,watch for citrus grubs | Alan Cohen – Inverell, NSW 18-May-2014 My parents have a Lemonade tree thats is about 35 years old and it still has an abundance of fruit, like us my children love them!! | Shannon Blackburn – Te Awamutu, WAIKA 10-Aug-2014 Best cocktail ever: ice cubes, juice of one large lemonade fruit, whiskey and top up with ginger beer. Just as good without the whiskey. | Carole Baker – North Sydney, NSW 25-Jun-2015 Lemonade tree is a cross between a Lemon and a Mandarin | Garry Foye – Denistone East, NSW 02-Apr-2016 My lemonade tree was once infested with black aphids, so use this effective organic spray: mix a couple of soap flakes with warm water in some sort of non-plastic container. Let it dissolve, and pour into spray bottle. Spray until infestation is gone. | Samuel – Melbourne, VIC 24-Jun-2016 My small lemonade tree had a bumper crop.I have read that it is a cross between lemon and navel orange. Also read it’s a cross between mandarin and lemon. I don’t know which cross mine is, but I don’t care – I love it anyway. | Lorraine Ellis – West Wodonga, VIC 20-Jul-2016 Only 12 months old and has 8 fruit in a pot. Eaten 2 already. Yum | Kellie – Townsville, QLD 19-Feb-2018 Good soil n fertilizer | Julie Milo – Kellyville, NSW 23-Feb-2018

Customer Feedback
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Lemonade Tree (Grafted)

DM’s Edible Fruits
Update: 2763 days 17hrs

Planted: 2012

Growing: In the Ground

Qty: 1

Sun/Shade: Full Sun

Water Given in: Winter

Pollination: Self Pollination

Organic Status:Organic

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Lemonade Tree 10/10

Wendy1’s Edible Fruits
Update: 3428 days 0hrs

Comments: –

It just fruits endlessly, I can use it instead of Limes or Lemons, with fish whenever I want it I can just go pick one as needed as it is usually in fruit, drinks for kids in summer, desserts and varied meat dishes etc, and all my friends think I have a huge green thumb when I give them some of my lovely big juicy fruit – with no fuss or effort on my part. A great addition.

Fruiting Months January, February, March, April, May, August, September, October

Planted: 2003

Height 2 metres

Growing: In the Ground

Qty: 1

Fruit Harvest: 20 kilograms per Year

First Fruited: 2 Years from purchase in pot

Sun/Shade: Medium Sun

Pruned By: 20% in

Fertiliser or Organics Used: Biocycle house water recycled through drip system

Pest Control:

This year I sprayed it with an organic spray from major organic brand purchased at major hardware chain, but usually none, but now have more other fruit trees so a bit more conscious of bugs etc. Wild May fruit fly spray for other trees, a bit of

Question:

How long would it be usual to live for?

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Lemonade Tree (Grafted) 6/10

Toby1’s Edible Fruits
Update: 3415 days 10hrs

Comments: –

Lots of flowers and new shoots. Had small issue with leaf borer.

Height 1 metres

Growing: In the Ground

Qty: 1

First Fruited: 1 Years from purchase in pot

Sun/Shade: Full Sun

Water Given in: Spring

Pollination: Self Pollination

Fertiliser or Organics Used: seaweed

Pest Control:

Confidor for Bronze Orange Bugs and Aphids

Organic Status:Pesticides Used

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ManishU’s Edible Fruits
Update: 437 days 19hrs

Comments: –

Update: 09-Dec-2011: Produced a lot of flowers but only got one fruit out of them. Its still not mature enough to be harvested. Time will tell if i finally get to taste a lemonade or not. New pic attached.

Never tasted lemonade fruit before. But i believe it tastes like sweet lime. Have a few tiny little fruits on it at the moment. Lets see how many mature ones i get.

Fruiting Months September and October

Height 1.5 metres

Growing: In the Ground

First Fruited: 1 Years from purchase in pot

Sun/Shade: Full Sun

Pollination: No

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Lemonade Tree

Blackfinger1’s Edible Fruits
Update: 3821 days 14hrs

Comments: –

north east slope

mulch around with grass cuttings

Height 1 metres

Growing: In the Ground

Sun/Shade: Full Sun

Water Given in: Winter

When I Fertilise: Yearly

Pest Control:

none

escaped the stinkbugs

Organic Status:Organic

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Lemonade Tree (Grafted) 7/10

JohnMc1’s Edible Fruits
Update: 3149 days 13hrs

Comments: –

There is no sourness in this fruit at all. It is absolutely beautifully sweet. A bonus for this tree is that it is always in fruit.

Fruiting Months January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December

Planted: 2007

Height 1 metres

Growing: In the Ground

Qty: 1

First Fruited: 4 Years from purchase in pot

Sun/Shade: Medium Sun

Water Given in: Autumn

Pollination: Self Pollination

When I Fertilise: Yearly, Winter, Spring

Organic Status:Organic

Question:

nearly lost it. Comming back with a vengence.

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Paulaf1’s Edible Fruits
Update: 2904 days 22hrs

Comments: –

Another great tree. Fruits over a long period, so I always have fruits ripening at different times. Only problem though is the later ones are a magnet for fruit flys……so I usually cover the whole tree.

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Igor1’s Edible Fruits
Update: 3825 days 16hrs

Comments: –

Easy to grow to fruit, only a small tree.

Pollination: Cross Pollination

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Zeni’s Edible Fruits
Update: 3804 days 17hrs

Comments: –

Even though you can’t see it in the photo my tree is loaded with blossom and hopefully the fruit will follow (2/9/2009)

Height 1.5 metres

Growing: In a Pot

Qty: 1

Sun/Shade: Medium Sun

Water Given in: Spring

Pollination: Self Pollination

When I Fertilise: Spring

Organic Status:Organic

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Lemonade Tree 5/10

Michael’s Edible Fruits
Update: 3678 days 10hrs

Comments: –

The veins of the leaves are turning yellow. Must lack some trace elements.

Planted: 2008

Height 1 metres

Growing: In a Pot

Qty: 1

Sun/Shade: Medium Sun

Water Given in: Spring

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2 of 5 people found this review useful Pauline says…
The leaves will go a bit yellow over winter as it is too cold for them to be able to absorb the things they need from the soil (even if they are there).
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BJ11_old_address’s Edible Fruits
Update: 2946 days 10hrs

Comments: –

Planted in a raised bed and pruned to a standard shape the tree seems to be coping with WA soils and summers. It is flowering like crazy and I am pinching the flowers off because it is very young – but clearly very keen to grow and fruit. The leaves are going yellow – so I have tried epsom salts to provide extra magnesium. I’ve also added some trace elements (including iron). It is healthy but it just doesn’t seem happy or as bushy as the orange tree. Additional water is helping.

I re-dug the plant, replaced the local soil and replanted to provide better nutrition. This has helped, but the tree almost looks as if it is being attached by something as som tips are dying and leaves appear to be trying to grow back … but no inspection has revealed any pest. It has only grown 50cm since planting.

Planted: 2010

Height 1.5 metres

Growing: In the Ground

Qty: 1

Sun/Shade: Medium Sun

Water Given in: Spring

Pollination: Self Pollination

Pest Control:

none

Organic Status:Partially Organic

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2 of 4 people found this review useful pat1 says…
pat1 says…
I tried this tree as well and it was stunted so I gave up after 3 years and turned it into mulch!
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Lemonade Tree (Grafted) 8/10

Pauline’s Edible Fruits
Update: 3479 days 18hrs

Comments: –

Any growth from below the graft nipped as soon as it is seen. No fruit allowed to form for the first year.

Fruiting Months July

Planted: 2008

Height 80 Centimetres

Growing: In a Pot

Fruit Harvest: 3 Fruit Per Year

First Fruited: 1 Years from purchase in pot

Sun/Shade: Full Sun

Water Given in: Spring

Pruned By: 20% in Spring

Pollination: No

Fertiliser or Organics Used: Osmocote

When I Fertilise: Spring

Pest Control:

Citrus leaf minor. Leaves removed by hand and minors squished where seen.

Cottony cushion scale. Squashed by hand and tree sprayed with white oil.

Organic Status:Partially Organic

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Lemonade Tree (Grafted) 9/10

Rustynutz’s Edible Fruits
Update: 3265 days 5hrs

Comments: –

good to eat. kids love this one

Fruiting Months January, February, March, April, May, June

Planted: 1988

Height 3 metres

Growing: In the Ground

Qty: 1

Fruit Harvest: 30 kilograms per Year

First Fruited: 1999 Years from purchase in pot

Sun/Shade: Full Sun

Water Given in: Spring

Pruned By: 15% in After Fruiting

Pollination: No

When I Fertilise: Yearly

Pest Control:

needs shield beetle protection

Organic Status:Organic

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Lemonade Tree 6/10

Nelly1’s Edible Fruits
Update: 1785 days 23hrs

Comments: –

didn’t survive oct13fires

I think the wallabies like it more

Planted: 2010

Height 1 metres

Growing: In the Ground

Qty: 1

Sun/Shade: Medium Sun

Water Given in: Winter

Pollination: Self Pollination

When I Fertilise: Spring

Pest Control:

pUT A LOG IN FRONT OF THE HOLE IN THE FENCE TO DETER THE MARAUDING WALLABY

Organic Status:Organic

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Marilyn1’s Edible Fruits
Update: 2817 days 9hrs

Comments: –

Absolutely magic! Beautiful juice for breakfast!

Fruiting Months July and August

Planted: 2008

Height 6 Feet

Growing: In the Ground

Qty: 1

Fruit Harvest: 10 kilograms per Year

First Fruited: 1 Years from purchase in pot

Sun/Shade: Full Sun

Pollination: Self Pollination

When I Fertilise: Spring

Pest Control:

No probs with pests!

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Fruitful’s Edible Fruits
Update: 2581 days 1hrs

Comments: –

I love lemonade fruit!

Got this one from Clunes nursery – was very healthy and even though it is is quite young, I have been nipping its buds so it can get stronger before it fruits.

Im thinking now to just let it do what it wants and see what happens 🙂

Planted: 2012

Height 1 metres

Growing: In the Ground

Qty: 1

Sun/Shade: Full Sun

Water Given in: Spring

Fertiliser or Organics Used: Dynamic Lifter

When I Fertilise: Spring

Pest Control: Neem Spray

Organic Status:Organic

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Russ3’s Edible Fruits
Update: 2208 days 15hrs

Comments: – had these for a year now, Been lucky enough to get some fruit this season but not much in the way of vegetative growth.

Height 1.5 metres

Growing: In a Pot

Qty: 2

First Fruited: 6 Months from Purchase in Pot

Sun/Shade: Full Sun

Water Given in: Spring

Pollination: Self Pollination

Fertiliser or Organics Used: composted cow/chicken manure, seaweed, liquid fertiliser

Pest Control: home made herbicidal soap

Organic Status:Organic

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Fred1’s Edible Fruits
Update: 3632 days 16hrs

Comments: – This tree was here when we bought this property. We have had the property 5 years come July 2010. Lots of fruit

Fruiting Months February and March

Planted: 2003

Height 2.5 metres

Growing: In the Ground

Qty: 1

Sun/Shade: Medium Sun

Water Given in: Spring

Pruned By: 50% in After Fruiting

Pollination: No

When I Fertilise: When Fruiting, Winter, Spring

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VF1’s Edible Fruits
Update: 2680 days 18hrs

Comments: –

A sweet lemon sounded delicious, and on tasting, they really are! Very refreshing. Tough little tree – I accidently knocked half its’ roots off when planting; it got a bit sick but has made a full recovery. (It didn’t even drop the 3 young fruit it was carrying at the time, and they grew beautifully.) Having second crop maturing now, 31 good size fruit.

Very sweet and juicy, but with lemon flavour. My daughter takes these to school to eat as fresh fruit.

Height 1.4 metres

Growing: In the Ground

Qty: 1

Fruit Harvest: 31 Fruit Per Year

First Fruited: 4 Months from Purchase in Pot

Sun/Shade: Full Sun

Water Given in: Winter

Pollination: Self Pollination

Fertiliser or Organics Used: Manure and citrus feed

When I Fertilise: Yearly

Pest Control:

White oil used once for scale. No fruit fly. slugs seem to love the new growth on this particular citrus, so need to use snail pellets every growth spurt (the little slimers also attack my kaffir lime).

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StaceysGarden’s Edible Fruits
Update: 1208 days 19hrs

Comments: – I was really excited to grow this fruit after reports on how delicious the fruit are, but then after buying and planting I bought a lemonade fruit from the markets and was severely disappointed, I’m clinging to hope that I was sold an mislabelled product and my lemonades will be as delicious as everyone claims. The tree is very vigorous. Same ant/mealybug problem as the lime and lemon.

Height 2 metres

Growing: In a Pot

Sun/Shade: Full Sun

Pollination: No

Question: Is the fruit as delicious as is claimed?

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Lemon

Description

Lisbon & Eureka- Lemons in general hold very well on the tree, so for home gardeners either lemon is suitable and can give year-round supplies.
Eureka produces its main crop at about the same time as Lisbon but can carry a number of small crops during the summer-early autumn months.
Lisbon produces a large main crop which matures in the autumn-winter months and has little or no summer crop.

Meyer- Is the ideal cooler climate Lemon. The fruit turns a pale orange colour when mature on the tree and is rounder than most lemons. It is fairly frost hardy and is what could be called a “sweet” lemon. The skin is quite soft and lacks that “lemon zest” flavour. Because of its cold tolerance it is popular inland where frosts occur.

Thornless- The Thornless Lemon originated in South Australia. This is a strain of Lemon which is very similar to Eureka in growing habits. The only difference would be that the fruit has a smooth skin and when the fruit is left on the tree after ripening the skin remains finer than that of the Eureka.

Lemonade- The tree growth is vigorous and attractive. The main crop matures July/August and is reliable and quite heavy. With careful pruning and feeding a lighter summer crop is also possible. The fruit contains few seeds.

How to grow: Citrus

At a glance

Ease of Culture: Easy
Best Climate: Suitable for most areas depending on variety
When to plant: Spring and autumn most areas plus winter in tropics and subtropics
Height: 1.5m (dwarf) – 5m
Pollination: Self-fertile
First harvest: 3 years
Prune: As needed
pH: 6-7

Climate

• Citrus will grow in all parts of Australia except areas that experience severe frost
• Oranges and grapefruit are more frost tolerant than lemons and limes.

Position

• Citrus need maximum sun exposure to grow and set fruit – at least 6 hours direct sun per day or more
• Avoid positions that are exposed to strong wind, which can stress trees and disrupt pollination and fruit set

Soil

• Citrus trees prefer deep, well-drained, sandy loam soils.
• They will not tolerate poorly drained soils, which can cause devastating root rot disease
• Improve heavy soils by incorporating large amounts of compost and a few buckets of gypsum into a planting area at least 2m wide. Mound the soil to approximately 30-40cm deep in the centre to improve the drainage.
• The preferred pH is 6-7.5. If your soil is acid, add lime when preparing the soil to bring it up to the preferred pH.

Choosing stock

• Trees can be grown from seed, but will take 7+ years to produce a crop, and may not grow true to type.
• For most reliable results, buy grafted trees of well-known varieties grafted onto hardy rootstock.
• Most selections are available as ‘dwarf’ varieties, grafted on dwarf root stock. These are ideal for small spaces and container growing.

Planting

• The best time to plant young citrus trees is in spring when the risk of severe frost has passed.
• Advanced potted stock can be planted in spring, summer and autumn, but care needs to be taken to avoid root disturbance and to water regularly.
• Dig the planting hole twice the width of the container
• Do not put any fertiliser in the planting hole. This can burn sensitive roots.
• Remove tree from container, lightly tease roots and free up or cut any large roots that spiralled in the pot
• Place rootball in planting hole and position it with the top of the rootball at the same level as the top of the planting mound
• Backfill and gently press soil around the rootball and form a well around the tree to make watering easier.
• Water the tree in well and then cover the soil with a 10cm layer of mulch to conserve moisture, but keep it away from the trunk.

Watering

• In the first year, water trees at least once or twice a week, depending on the weather conditions.
• Once established, water trees deeply every two to three weeks, more in hot dry weather. Lack of adequate moisture, particularly in hot weather can lead to sudden fruit drop.
• Container grown trees may need soaking every day in hot weather, less often in cooler conditions.

Fertilising

• Citrus are heavy feeders. Apply a well-balanced organic citrus food according to directions in July, November and February
• Spread the fertiliser evenly around the tree, in the area from the trunk to one metre beyond the canopy and water it in well.

Pruning

• In general, citrus do not require special pruning to fruit well.
• Regular pruning is required to remove dead and diseased wood as well as wood affected by pests like borer and gall wasp (see below).
• Prune to keep plants to preferred size after harvest. Don’t give plants an all over haircut or you will sacrifice next season’s crop. Just remove up to 20% of the canopy each year, staring with the longest growth.

Harvesting

• Grafted citrus start to produce crops after two-three years.
• Fruit are ready to harvest when they have developed full colour and flavour.
• Fruit can be left on the tree for some time, but will deteriorate if left on for too long after their peak.
• Fruit that has been removed carefully without damage will store in the fridge for several weeks

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