What is a jonagold Apple?

(T) Jonagold Apple Trees

UK mainland delivery is charged at £8.95. Sending a tree through the post isn’t easy, so our parcels are expertly packed to keep your goods in the best condition. There is no surcharge on the delivery of larger parcels/orders.

Tree size as supplied varies but is usually between 3.5′ – 4.5′ on despatch. A few varieties might be slightly smaller, some a little bigger, of course it does vary but this is a good average. WE SUPPLY YOUNG TREES – and are proud to do so. Although we are sometimes requested to supply older/bigger trees, the percieved advantages are outwighed by disadvantages! Older trees take longer to establish and will fruit no more quickly. The young trees we send out grow away and establish so quickly and healthily & often yield within 1 season of planting. Our customers even report fruits the first year of planting! All professional fruit growers prefer to plant young trees rather than older.

Our soft fruit bushes are usually 2 years old.
Everything is stringently graded, grown on the nursery and well packed!

  • No need to be in – You can request your parcel to be left in a safe place, or stipulate an alternative delivery address, at the checkout.
  • Free 16 page booklet with every order dealing with all aspects of fruit growing.

Sun Jonagold (Apple) Tokusen, Approx. 5kg (16-18 Apples)

JP¥ 4,960 (US$ 45.12) ~ JP¥ 8,918 (US$ 81.12)

Please kindly understand that, as the fees for each destination country differ, the selling price also differs.

Air transportation maintains freshness. Shipping fee from Japan included. Delivered without any additional fees.

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× Sun Jonagold (Apple) Tokusen, Approx. 5kg (16-18 Apples)

Item No. Price Stock status
JSA00004601
AO04010501
JP¥ 4,960 ~ JP¥ 8,918 Out of stock.

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This apple with stronger sourness than sweetness has a flavor that goes great when chopped into a salad, when used for apple pie, etc. This popular cultivar is a typical mid-season type that is harvested from the middle of October.
This type that is often large has flesh with a dense, crisp texture and juice that is abundant and thick. As well as sweetness, this also has very profound sourness, and both this sweetness & sourness are in a wonderful balance.
Sales period: November to December only

Order Deadline : Every Thursday
Estimated delivery date : Friday (Malaysia) or Saturday (Hong Kong / Singapore) the next week after order deadline
Final order deadline : Thursday, December 19, 2019
* Product delivery dates may vary depending on the quarantine of each country’s recipient country and the weather.
* Please note that we do not accept delivery dates for products

Airport delivery period : Friday, November 29, 2019 to Friday, December 27, 2019
Order deadline : 7 days before the desired delivery date
Scheduled delivery date : 7 days after the order deadline * Up to 14 days after
Final order deadline : Thursday, December 19, 2019
* If you choose to deliver at the airport, please order at least 7 days in advance.
Sakuraba Apple Farm
During a serious state of affairs where producers were aging and there were a lack of successors, a collection of young people motivated to grow apples came together and worked on the promotion of apple farms. They incorporate new cultivars as quickly as they can while placing importance on taste more than appearance, and strive to cultivate leaving nature as it is under the motto of “ripeness on a tree”.

●Ingredients: apple
●7 Main Allergens (wheat, buckwheat, egg, milk, peanut, shrimp, crab): none
●Contents: approx. 5,000g (16-18 apples)
●Made in Japan, Aomori Prefecture
●Manufacturer: Sakuraba Apple Farm
●Serving Instructions:
・Can be consumed as is.
・Its sweet & sour flavor goes great when chopped into a salad, when used for apple pie, etc.
●Please note:
・These Sun Jonagold apples are fresh, so store in a cool, dark place after delivery and consume as soon as possible.
・Please kindly understand that this item is shipped to Hong Kong, Singapore & Malaysia only.
・The delivery date may vary depending on various circumstances such as quarantine by the authorities in your country, the weather etc.
・Please kindly understand that the delivery date and time cannot be specified.
・The listed item weight is only a guide. Please kindly understand that the actual weight may differ.
・Please kindly understand that, as shipping fees & import/export fees differ for each country, item prices also differ.
●Storage Instructions: Store in a cool, dark place.
●Best before date (from date of manufacture): approx. 1 week Item No. JSA000046 No Refund or Exchange Care & Other Information × Care & Other Information ●All items are shipped directly from Japan.
●Depending on the item, the time from order placement to shipment may exceed the standard number of days for shipment (14 days).
Should shipment take longer than this standard number of days, you will be contacted by customer service in advance.
●Due to the nature of items, please kindly understand that we do not accept returns at the convenience of the customer if the color, shape or impression is different from the photo displayed.
●Please kindly understand that item information such as the storage instructions and serving instructions display Japanese specifications. Close

Fruit Tree Pollinator Charts & General Information

By: Jessica Groleau

Fruit Trees can be broken down into 2 categories:

1.) Self Fruitful or Self-Pollinating

-Cross Pollination is not essential but does improve the number of fruit

2.) Self-unfruitful or Needs Cross Pollination

– Cross pollination from one or more compatible cultivars is essential for Apples, Pears, most Sweet Cherries (except ‘Stella’ & ‘Compact Stella’), and most Japanese Plums.

– Pollen is primarily transfered by honeybees so plant trees 100 feet or less apart.

– Below are Cross Pollination Charts for Apples, Pears, Sweet Cherries and Japanese Plums.

Apple Cultivar Cross Pollination Chart

Braeburn

Cortland

Fuji

Gala

Golden Delicious

Honey Crisp

McIntosh

Red Delicious

Jonagold

Spartan

Jonamac

Braeburn

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Cortland

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Fuji

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Gala

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Golden Delicious

N

Y

N

N

N

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

Honey Crisp

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

McIntosh

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

N

Y

Y

Red Delicious

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Jonagold

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Spartan

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Jonamac

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

X

Y

N

Y

N

Y= good cross pollinator for that cultivar
N= will not cross pollinate with that cultivar

Pear Cultivar Cross Pollination Chart
Barlett d’Anjou Bosc Comice Seckel
Bartlett

N

Y

Y

Y

N

d’Anjou

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Bosc

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Comice

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Seckel

N

N

Y

Y

N

Y= good cross pollinator for that cultivar

N= will not cross pollinate with that cultivar

Sweet Cherry Cultivar Cross Pollination Chart
Bing Sam Van Montmorency Rainer Stella Compact Stella

Garden Bing

Lambert Royal Ann
Bing

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Sam

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Van

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Montmorency

Y

Y

Y

S

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Rainer

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Stella

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

S

S

Y

Y

Y

Compact Stella

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

S

S

Y

Y

Y

Garden Bing

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Lambert

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Royal Ann

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y= good cross pollinator for that cultivar
N= will not cross pollinate with that cultivar
S= Self Pollinating cultivar
Japanese Plum Cultivar Cross Pollination Chart
Burbank Santa Rosa Shiro Satsuma Elephant Heart
Burbank

N

Y

Y

Y

N

Santa Rosa

Y

S

Y

Y

Y

Shiro

Y

Y

N

Y

N

Satsuma

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Elephant Heart

N

Y

N

N

N

Y= good cross pollinator for that cultivar
N= will not cross pollinate with that cultivar
S= self pollinating cultivar

What to plant with Jonagold for pollination

Looks like a fig leave. Read this below and decide if you want to keep it or get rid of it, but pruning it is a waste of energy. Good luck! No fruit on the fig tree in your garden? The way you prune or fertilize may be the cause. Figs (Ficus carica) are among the easiest fruits to produce, because the trees have few disease or pest problems, and many fig cultivars do not require pollination to produce a crop. Figs produce best in Mediterranean climates. They can be grown in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 6 through 9, but bear the best fruit in zones 8 through 10. Failure of a fig tree to bear fruit is often the result of improper care practices. Ad Tree Service Contractors Enter Your Zip Code & Connect To Local Tree Experts. Free Estimates! homeadvisor.com Heavy Pruning While some trees require regular pruning, a fig tree produces best if you leave your shears on the shelf. If you want your fig tree to bear early fruit, you must leave old growth in place, especially on varieties such as "Croisic" or "Flanders," which produce a crop on old growth early in the season. For many figs that bear crops both early and late in the season, the larger crop comes late in the year, and is borne on the current year’s growth. To preserve the health of your fig tree, prune in winter just to remove dead wood and branches that cross or rub. Avoid excessive pruning of live wood. Too Much Nitrogen Nitrogen in the soil is good for plants that are heavy feeders, but if you want a fig tree that bears fruit, go light on fertilizer. If the fig gets too much nitrogen, it will focus its growing energy on producing leaves rather than fruit. If too much nitrogen is in the soil, you may get a light crop or no fruit at all. Too Little Water Water availability determines the health of a fig tree. If a fig tree is drought-stressed, it probably will not produce fruit that year. If the leaves turn yellow, it’s a sign that your tree needs more water. Put young figs on a regular watering schedule until they are well-established in the landscape. As the trees get established, you can reduce watering to a deep watering weekly or every two weeks, depending on the dryness of your garden. Lack of Pollination The common fig in the home garden does not require pollination, but three fig types, "Caprifig," "Smyrna" and "San Pedro" require pollination to set fruit, according to the California Rare Fruit Growers. "Caprifig" must be pollinated by the Blastophaga grossorum wasp, and "Smyrna" must be cross-pollinated by "Caprifig" to produce. If pollination fails, you will not get a crop from "Caprifig" or "Smyrna." The first fruiting of "San Pedro" does not require pollination, but the second fruiting does. Ensure a pollinator is available for figs that require pollination, or plant a type such as "Black Mission" that does not need pollination. Ads Tree Service Contractors Enter Your Zip Code & Connect To Local Tree Experts. Free Estimates!

Most sweet cherry varieties are self-unfruitful (self-incompatible, SI) and require cross pollination with another variety as the pollen source.

Some varieties, e.g. Bing, Lambert, Royal Ann/Napoleon, are also cross-unfruitful and cannot be depended upon to provide pollen for each other. Index, Lapins, Skeena, Sweetheart, White Gold, Sonata, Stella, Symphony, Sunburst, and Black Gold are self-fruitful (SF) and can serve as “universal” pollen sources for many self-unfruitful varieties with the same bloom time. However, Stella has been found to not work as a pollinator for Bing in some areas.

Their use as “universal” pollinators should also take bloom timing into consideration as follows. Early-bloom: SI – Somerset; SF – Lapins and Skeena. Early- to early-mid-bloom: SI – Kristin, Chelan, and Black Republican; SF – Sweetheart and WhiteGold. Mid- to late-mid-bloom: SI – Royalton, Summit, Ranier, Royal Ann / Napoleon, Bing, Burlat, Van, Regina, Lambert, Sam, and Windsor; SF – Sonata, Stella, Symphony, and Sunburst. Late-bloom: SI – Gold and Hudson; SF – BlackGold. Move bees into orchards on the first day of bloom. The pollination table below is a partial guide to help select pollen source parents.

Pollen Compatibility Table

Fruiting variety

Compatible Pollinizers

Bing Sam, Van, Montmorency*, Rainier, Stella, Compact Stella, Garden Bing
Lambert Sam, Van, Montmorency, Rainier, Stella, Compact Stella, Garden Bing
Rainier Sam, Van, Bing, Royal Ann, Lambert, Montmorency, Stella, Compact Stella, Garden Bing
Royal Ann Sam, Van, Montmorency, Rainier, Stella, Compact Stella, Garden Bing
Stella, Compact Stella, Garden Bing Self-fruitful
Van Sam, Bing, Royal Ann, Lambert, Montmorency, Rainier, Stella, Compact Stella, Garden Bing
Montmorency (*tart cherry) Self-fruitful

Resources

  • Oregon State University Extension – has a downloadable Sweet Cherry Compatibility & Bloom Timing Chart, organized by group codes, Oregon State University Extension, download pdf. (Accessed: 1/19/17).
  • Dave Willson Nursury – website has an extensive Cherry Bloom Sequence and Pollenizers table. (Accessed: 1/19/17).
  • Orange Pippin Fruit Trees – website has a pollen compatibility checker tool. (Accessed: 1/19/17).

We can make generalizations about apples. For instance, apples are generally delicious. We generally like to dip them in peanut butter, and we generally like them to be super crispy. But when it comes to the best apples for baking, generalizations are a lot less helpful. When baking with apples, we’re looking for a specific type, for a specific purpose. As soon as your oven get involved, not every apple is created equal.

The best apples for baking keep their structure, which keeps the chunks of fruit from turning into bland pockets of apple mush after spending some time in the oven. Granny Smith apples are generally our go-to baking apple, but in the BA Test Kitchen, we have a few favorites that hold up under heat and balance that perfect sweet-tart flavor just as well if not better. Here are six to keep in mind on your way to the orchard:

Alex Lau

Jonagold

Tart with a honeyed sweetness, Jonagolds hold up exceptionally well in the oven. They don’t store well, however, so use them early in the fall at their peak. Make something like braised and brûléed apples with ice cream to give them all the attention they deserve. This sweetness is not to be hidden.

Honeycrisp

This is our desert-island apple. Its shatteringly crisp texture is guaranteed to hold firm, whether they show up in apple dumplings or an elegant tarte tatin. We wouldn’t blame you if you just ate them straight-up. Like we said, this is the one.

Braeburn

This superbly crisp apple has a concentrated taste and bakes up juicy but not mushy. They’ll do well under heaps of streusel in this yeasted apple coffee cake, using an intense flavor to stand up to a boatload of cinnamon.

Gentl & Hyers

Mutsu

Also known as Crispin, this firm-fleshed, less tart option is similar in flavor to a Golden Delicious. But it excels when it comes to structure, keeping more of a solid firmness. Mutsus are great for pies or other recipes that call for gentle cooking.

Winesap

Intensely flavored with deep cider-y notes, these apples resist breaking down during cooking and deliver great complexity to baked goods. They’ll hold their own against the figs and other fruits in an apple custard.

Pink Lady (or Cripps Pink)

Balanced between sweet, tart, and tannic notes. It will retain its distinct shape when used in something like this apple gingerbread cake with cream.

Now, let’s bake some apples!

Easiest Caramel Apple Clafoutis

This easy, one-skillet apple dessert goes out to all the baking-phobes out there, because making something sweet shouldn’t require all the bowls and measuring cups in your kitchen plus an advanced degree in chemistry. Pink Ladies and Granny Smiths are our go-to baking apples, but you can choose any kind you like as long as it has a firm texture and a good bit of acidity. View Recipe

Honeycrisp was just the beginning: inside the quest to create the perfect apple

The idea that a red apple is a delicious apple is one of the greatest frauds ever perpetrated against Americans. The apples we’re supposed to eat to keep doctors away, the apples we’re supposed to give to teachers to show our appreciation, the apples we compare to oranges — all of them are a deep, predictable red, and none of them are delicious.

The apple variety known as Red Delicious has, according to the US Department of Agriculture, dominated the apple industry since at least 1980. It’s been the most widely produced variety in the United States for nearly 40 years.

The name is a total fabrication, a lie that’s woven its way into the tapestry of American culture. At best, biting into a Red Delicious is like biting into a firm cantaloupe that has only a serviceable sweetness. At worst, it’s like biting into an old baseball mitt, with shudder-inducing softness compounded by a flavor that tastes like it was muzzled between two cotton balls. Because they are common and cheap, Red Delicious apples are often served in hospitals and cafeterias across this great nation.

Fuck the Red Delicious.

Thankfully, there’s hope. In the past several years, a new apple has emerged, one that all other apples should be judged against. This apple exemplifies American exceptionalism; it is a feat of science as well as of grit and determination.

The Honeycrisp apple is as good as the Red Delicious is bad.

Its story is also a harbinger of apple greatness still to come.

The Honeycrisp apple’s greatness, explained

The Honeycrisp is a millennial apple born in the 1990s, after years of careful planning. It’s also considered the first “brand name” apple — the University of Minnesota had a patent on it, earning royalties from trees sold to growers.

Honeycrisps, as if in defiance, aren’t shaped like Red Delicious. They’re smaller, rounder, and lack the gaudy, bulbous top that set Red Delicious apples apart. Honeycrisps also never achieve the deep crimson lipstick-like hue of the Red Delicious. Their skin is more demure, usually a gradient spanning the first two bands of the rainbow and underscored by a singe of green.

It took 30 years for UMN scientists to develop the Honeycrisp, through a painstaking breeding process and lots of trial and error. Consumers first got their hands on it in 1992, but the buzz and media attention didn’t really take off until 2007. (Food trends like artisanal, organic, and local foods certainly helped.)

According to the US Apple Association, the Honeycrisp is the fifth most popular apple on the market today, ranking behind the Gala, the aforementioned Red Abhorrence, Fujis, and Granny Smiths.

Honeycrisp apple sales are on the rise. US Apple Association

As is the case with most other apples, Honeycrisps are best in the fall — peak Honeycrisp season is now, running from mid-September until right around Thanksgiving. And you should be able to find them at most grocery stores — they’re grown in orchards throughout the country.

What sets the Honeycrisp apart from other apples is its combination of flavor and texture. Biting into a Honeycrisp evokes a feeling similar to the first minute of your weekend. It’s like listening to Dusty Springfield for the first time. It crunches in a way that people who were raised on Red Delicious apples didn’t know (or believe) that apples could crunch.

The texture of a Honeycrisp is no accident: Its cells have been bred to be bigger than cells in other apples, making the fruit feel juicier and crunchier than its competitors. These cells explode as your teeth tear into them. Then there’s its distinct flavor — a clean, clarified sweetness that’s almost frosty.

Honeycrisp apples are neither elusive nor rare — you don’t need to arm yourself with a canary and a lantern and find that one mysterious druid at the farmers market who sells them. But you will pay more; Honeycrisps are more expensive than nearly all other common varieties currently on the market. In September, when I checked my local grocery store in New York City, they were approximately $3 more per pound than Red Delicious, which clocked in at 99 cents per pound.

If you’re wondering how to pick the perfect Honeycrisp, experts say to look for the “undercolor” of the apple’s skin — the greenish blush that peeks through the red — and choose one that is ever so slightly shifting to a light yellow. And always store them in the fridge to keep them crispy and fresh.

What makes the Honeycrisp apple so good

When you talk to apple people — the people who create, market, and produce apples like the Honeycrisp — the phrase they tend to repeat is “eating experience.” It’s the snap of biting into an apple, followed by the wave of sweetness as the flesh breaks apart in your mouth. Ultimately, an apple is judged on its combination of texture and flavor.

For consumers and breeders, Honeycrisp has become the standard-bearer on both of these fronts. It’s the most successful of the apple varieties developed at UMN’s Agricultural Experiment Station (MAES), a horticultural research center that breeds new apples.

Dr. James Luby, a professor at UMN, says consistency has been a key factor in the Honeycrisp’s success, and a huge reason why other apple breeders want to emulate it.

Prior to 2008, the university had a patent on the apple, which earned the school, its investors, and a research fund at the university $1.30 on every tree sold. The patent brought in more than $6 million. It also was a way to control the supply and quality of the apple, as growers needed authorization from the university to plant the tree.

Even with the patent and authorization, Honeycrisp trees are a challenge to grow. They’re susceptible to heat, powdery mildew, and black rot. According to Growing Produce, a website geared toward American fruit growers, the tree is “finicky,” with brittle wood, and needs to be thinned carefully.

UMN’s patent expired in 2008, capping its Honeycrisp revenue stream and allowing anyone to plant the apple. That’s why you may hear anecdotes about subpar rogue Honeycrisps. In 2016, Wired suggested the apple’s eventual decline is inevitable.

“Anybody can use that brand, anybody can grow one, and try to sell it,” Luby said. “When they’re in short supply, buyers don’t always have the luxury of being choosy.”

Honeycrisps, Luby said, made a name for themselves based on their texture, a desirable crunch that’s crisp and firm but not too hard. Not only was their texture superior, it was also consistent from apple to apple — which other varieties can fail to achieve.

“A lot of the things that breeders are looking for when they’re coming up with new varieties is making sure that when a consumer eats this apple, it’s going to taste the same every single time,” says Cristy Warnock, the operations manager at PVM, a marketing firm working with apple breeders at Washington State University. “A bad eating experience would be something that you have with, like, a Red Delicious, where it’s mushy or it’s inconsistent.”

Honeycrisps’ consistent crispness isn’t a function of freshness but rather of marvelous breeding. Its parent apples are somewhat of a mystery, but that amalgam gave the Honeycrisp its signature crunch. Red Delicious, in contrast, was bred, marketed, and sold for the color of its skin, while its interior was overlooked. The process certainly made the skins redder, but it also made them tougher, and the insides became spongy.

Breeders have learned their lesson.

“We kind of always say that the appearance of the apple kind of gets the first date,” Luby said. “But unless the eating quality is really good, there won’t be very many repeat dates.”

It’s possible to breed apples more flavorful than Honeycrisp

Some SweeTango apple porn. Courtesy of SweeTango

The Honeycrisp’s consistent crunch is its strong point, but Luby says breeders are working on apples that have the potential to outshine it.

They’re focusing mostly on flavor, which is driven by an apple’s sugar levels, acid levels (which determine tartness), and aromatic compounds.

“Now, the Honeycrisp has a good flavor, but there are certainly apples that are richer in flavor,” Luby said. “I think probably SweeTango represents one of the best flavors when you get a fully ripened one. But there are some other flavors that I think we can get in that would be interesting, some more fruity kinds of things. We’ve got one that’s got kind of a cherry flavor, for example.”

After speaking to Luby, I went to Fairway market in New York City and grabbed a few SweeTangos and Zestars, two newer creations from Luby and the MAES team. The SweeTango — a cross between a Honeycrisp and a Zestar — boasted a honeyish, almost maple-like depth. The Zestars were more tart than the Honeycrisp.

Once I’d sampled several varieties of apples, I started to feel like I was shedding my human skin and becoming a pretentious wine snob, but with apples.

And there are still so many more new designer apples I haven’t tried, including a handful of varieties that are still in the pipeline. For example, UMN has created the Rave, a cross between a Honeycrisp and an unreleased variety called the MonArk, that’s due out in 2017. What it’ll taste like when it hits the market is still a little bit of a mystery.

There’s also the Cosmic Crisp, an apple created by Washington State University. It isn’t slated to hit the market until 2019 or 2020, yet buzz has been swirling around it since the beginning of this decade.

Breeders routinely experiment with different combinations, and people like Luby believe they can build more complex apple flavors — say, with a hint of brown sugar or cherry — while still maintaining consistent texture and brisk sweetness.

Creating a new apple takes at least 15 years

Cosmic Crisp apples, which are not yet on the market. Courtesy Cosmic Crisps

In the United States, the Big Three of apple breeding are UMN, Cornell University, and Washington State University. They are where new apples come from, and their breeders are constantly experimenting by crossing different kinds of apples.

It’s not exactly a speedy process.

From the concept phase to getting an apple into a consumer’s hand, creating a new apple variety takes 15 to 17 years. The in-between stages involve everything from pollinating apple trees by hand to researching the regions where the new variety of apple might thrive to conducting an extensive naming process once you have a winning combination of texture and flavor.

At UMN, Luby says that when testing a new variety, they plant 5,000 seedlings. “Probably 25 of them are good enough to send to the second stage of testing,” he says. “ about one-half of 1 percent.”

The time, investment, and level of commitment required to develop a new apple are why Washington State’s forthcoming Cosmic Crisp is so highly anticipated. Cosmic Crisps are the offspring of the Honeycrisp and another variety called the Enterprise (a spicier, sturdy apple). According to this promotional video, the Cosmic Crisp is large, juicy, crisp, sweet, and, most importantly, consistently crisp with every single bite:

As part of her work with Washington State, PVM operations manager Warnock is one of the lucky few to have tasted the Cosmic Crisp. She describes it like so:

It’s very juicy. It’s got a balance of sweet and tart flavors. Whenever we’ve done some consumer taste testing, over and over and over again, the consumers say the same thing about the flavor is one of the standout parts of it, the texture is awesome, the juiciness is awesome. It also, naturally, doesn’t turn brown right away, so you can, it’s great in food service kind of things. You can cut it up and put it in a salad, or have slices.

And UMN’s Luby says apples will only get better from here.

“I think we put the pressure on ourselves, actually,” he said. “The better the new apples are, it raises that bar that you’ve got to pass. Since Honeycrisp has come on the market, I think a lot of growers say, ‘Okay, is it as good as Honeycrisp?’ It’s pretty typical of anything in product improvement, I guess, is it as good or better or different than the last or what’s currently available. “

If apple breeders were content with sitting on their laurels, we wouldn’t have much more than Red Delicious. Thankfully, they want to keep creating wondrous things. They want to bring joy into people’s lives. That’s dedication. That’s love. That’s determination. And look me in the eye and tell me that’s not goddamn American.

There will eventually be a better apple than the Honeycrisp

When breeders talk about the current crop of newer and upcoming apples — SweeTangos, Zestars, Raves, Cosmic Crisps, Envies — there are small nuances that make each one special. Some look better than others. Some don’t brown once they’re sliced. Some are crunchier. Some taste warmer or sweeter than others.

What these apples have in common is that they’re known as “club apples,” meaning that each variety is patented and trademarked. All growers must buy into a club — the Big Three (usually with the help of a management company) license these patented and trademarked apples to specific groups of growers. Being part of that club allows the growers to reap the benefits of marketing and promotion.

The club also manages and makes sure the apples are being grown to a certain standard. Paying to grow these apples is very expensive (at least $2,000 per acre in some cases), a self-selection process of sorts that gives a grower incentive to produce high-quality fruit. The club is also discerning, only letting a select number of growers grow certain apples — according to NPR, a group of only 45 apple growers were allowed to produce the SweeTango when it came to market in 2009.

The result is, ideally, a better product and a more consistent quality, since every step of the licensing and growing process is intensive and regimented and everyone is invested in the apple’s success. It essentially tries to eliminate a scenario where someone bites into a bad apple.

Red Delicious sales are in decline. US Apple Association

Over the past 10 years, the Red Delicious apple’s stranglehold on American consumers has loosened. Growers are focusing more on varieties that taste better, like the Pink Lady and Honeycrisp, and cutting back on Red Awfulness.

Club apples, which put a premium on the consumer experience, seem like the future.

But this model is not without drawbacks.

For one thing, it’s very expensive. Growers, unless they are willing to pay, won’t be able to grow the most popular club apples. These clubs also control the quantity of apples produced, so as not to saturate the market and drive prices down.

“The problem sometimes with is that it keeps production fairly low, and limited, because only so many people are allowed to grow it,” Warnock said.

Essentially, the owners of various brand-name club apples have control over those apples’ availability. They also help foster demand by drumming up marketing for the apple.

Marketing campaigns for specific apples are still a new phenomenon. The Honeycrisp’s popularity is largely due to word of mouth. That’s why, according to Warnock, it took a while for the apple to gain a foothold. And it has sort of continued on that path — currently, the Honeycrisp doesn’t really belong to anyone (though its patent is still in effect in some countries overseas) so there’s no real central Honeycrisp marketing firm putting out advertising and getting the apple into markets.

The people behind the various club apples — investors, universities, breeders, marketing firms — believe they can capture the same intensity the Honeycrisp has wrought, but also improve on it by using the club apple business model to get people amped for specific apples. The buzz around the Cosmic Crisp is evidence that they may be onto something.

The Honeycrisp’s success is what spawned the club apple model. Had UMN trademarked the apple instead of just patenting it, it would still have some control over it and benefited from its popularity.

I’m hesitant to say the Honeycrisp’s appeal is waning. If anything, growers are responding to its popularity and producing more of it. But its success has proven that the market for delicious apples is a lucrative one.

Club apples, unless something drastically changes or someone creates the perfect apple, will probably never match the enormous scale of production achieved by the Red Delicious, which, according to the US Apple Association, accounted for 21 percent of the apples produced in 2015. But that’s not really the goal of apple breeders like Luby, who simply want to create a better apple, regardless of what “better” means — sweeter, more complex, crispier, more appealing, more resistant to oxidation.

“, we’ll be figuring out which parents we want to cross with one another,” he told me, as UMN prepares to start a new apple development cycle. “I just can’t say anything right now about the next ones coming.”

In 17 or so years, we’ll get to see them for ourselves.

Jonagold apple

Where to buy trees

The following tree nurseries offer Jonagold apple trees for sale:

  • Orange Pippin Fruit Trees (USA)
    United States
    Jonagold apple trees for sale >>
  • Cummins Nursery
    United States More >>
  • Keepers Nursery
    United Kingdom More >>

Where to buy fresh fruit

United States

  • Alabama

    • Crow Mountain Orchard, Fackler
    • Isom Orchards, Athens
    • Scott’s Orchard, Hazel Green
  • California

    • Apple Lane Orchard, Julian
    • Bellevue’s See Canyon Farms, San Luis Obispo
    • Jon A. Yori Ranches, Modesto
    • Moms Country Orchards, Yucaipa
    • Noble Orchards, Paradise
    • Peacefiel Orchard, Julian
    • Prevedelli Farms, Watsonville
    • Seven C’s Family Orchard, Tehachapi
  • Colorado

    • Apple Valley Orchard, Penrose
    • Bolton’s Orchards, Grand Junction
    • Ferrara’s Happy Apple Farm, Penrose
    • Gott Bro’s Orchard & Produce, L.L.C., Ignacio
    • Happy Apple Farm, Penrose
    • Peachfork Orchards & Vineyard, Palisade
    • Red Mountain Ranches, Cedaredge
  • Connecticut

    • Averill Farm, Washington Depot
    • Bishop’s Orchard, Guilford
    • Emerald Green Farm & Gardens, Wallingford
    • Hindinger Farm, Hamden
    • Lyman Orchards, Middlefield
    • Norton Brothers Fruit Farms, Cheshire
  • Delaware

    • Fifer Orchards, Camden Wyoming
    • T.S. Smith & Sons, Bridgeville
  • Georgia

    • B.J. Reece Apple House, Ellijay
    • Freedom Farms – Apple & Peach Orchard, Chatsworth
    • Hillside Orchard Country Store, Lakemont
    • Mercier Orchards, Blue Ridge
    • R & A Orchards, Ellijay
    • Red Apple Barn (Little Bend Orchard), Ellijay
  • Idaho

    • BYU-Idaho Apple Orchard Museum, Rexburg
    • Kelley Orchards (Weiser), Weiser
    • Williamson Orchards & Vineyards, Caldwell
  • Illinois

    • All Seasons Apple Orchard, Woodstock *** Feature Orchard ***
    • Braeutigam Orchards, Belleville
    • Camp’s Orchard, Roseville
    • Christ Orchard, Elmwood
    • Curtis Orchard & Pumpkin Patch, Champaign
    • Eckert Orchards, Inc., Belleville
    • Edgewood Orchards, Quincy
    • Homestead Orchard, Woodstock
    • Jonamac Orchards, Malta
    • Mileur Orchard, Murphysboro
    • Pleasant Row Orchard, Cuba
    • Prairie Sky Orchard, Union
    • Royal Oak Farm and Fruit Orchard, Harvard *** Feature Orchard ***
    • Stone’s Apple Barn, East Moline
    • Tanner’s Orchard, Speer
    • Valley Orchard, Cherry Valley
    • Woodstock Country Orchard, Woodstock
  • Indiana

    • Anderson Orchard, Mooresville
    • Apple of His Eye, Anderson
    • Bender’s Nursery and Orchard, Albion
    • Blue River Orchard, Fredericksburg
    • Chandler’s Farm, Fillmore
    • Cook’s Orchard, Fort Wayne
    • County Line Orchard, Hobart
    • Deer Creek Orchard, Galveston
    • Ditzler Orchard, Rosedale
    • Doud’s Countyline Orchard, Wabash
    • Dougherty Orchards, Cambridge City
    • G. W. Stroh Orchards, Angola
    • Garwood Orchards, LaPorte
    • Goley’s Orchard, Madison
    • HighPoint Orchard & Farm Market, Greensburg
    • Kercher’s Sunrise Orchards Farm Market, Goshen
    • McClure’s Orchard, Peru
    • Melton’s Orchard and Country Market, Bloomington
    • Orchard Hill Farms, Kendallville
    • Pleasant View Orchard, Fairland
    • Radke’s Orchards, Michigan City
    • Schafer Orchards, Princeton
    • Tuttle Orchards, Greenfield
    • Wea Creek Orchard, Lafayette
    • Harker Family Farms & Orchard, Waldron
  • Iowa

    • 3 Bee Farms, Griswold
    • Allen’s Orchard, Marion
    • Appleberry Farm, Marshalltown
    • Appleberry Orchard, Donnellson
    • Belaire Winery, St Ansgar
    • Berry Patch Farm, Nevada
    • Blueridge Orchard, Denver
    • Center Grove Orchard, Cambridge
    • Deal’s Orchard, Jefferson
    • Ditmars Orchard, Council Bluffs
    • East View Orchard, Fredericksburg
    • Gravert’s Apple Basket Orchard, Sabula
    • Hillside Orchard, Hamburg
    • Iowa Orchard, Urbandale
    • Mincer Orchard & Farms, Hamburg
    • Smalls Fruit Farm, Mondamin
    • Storybook Orchard, Story City
    • The Big Apple Orchard, Mount Vernon
    • Timeless Prairie Orchard, Winthrop
    • Wilson’s Orchard, Iowa City
  • Kansas

    • Fieldstone Enterprise, Overbrook
    • Meadowlark Farm, Rose Hill
    • Stephen’s Orchard, Bonner Springs
  • Kentucky

    • Apple Tree (Home of the Scarlett Gala), Cumberland
    • Eckert | Boyd Orchard, Versailles
    • Evans Orchard & Cider Mill, Georgetown
    • Helton Orchard, Salyersville
    • Hidden Hollow Orchard and Wildlife Sanctuary, Louisville
    • Hinton’s Orchard & Farm Market, Hodgenville
    • Reed Valley Orchard, Paris
  • Maine

    • McDougal Orchards, Springvale
    • Megquier Hill Orchard (formerly Goss), Otisfield
  • Maryland

    • Baugher Apple Orchard and Farm, Westminster
    • Bragunier Orchard, Big Pool
    • Lewis Orchards and Farm Market, Cavetown
  • Massachusetts

    • Berlin Orchards, Berlin
    • Bird of the Hand Farm, Sterling
    • Green River Farms, Williamstown
    • Mann Orchards, Methuen
    • Marino Lookout Farm, South Natick
    • Parlee Farms, Tyngsboro
    • Ragged Hill Orchard, West Brookfield
    • Russell Orchards, Ipswich
    • Tougas Family Farm, Northborough
  • Michigan

    • (A.W.) Overhiser Orchards, South Haven
    • Alber’s Orchard & Cider Mill, Manchester
    • Apple Valley Orchard, Saginaw
    • Bayne’s Apple Valley Farm, Freeland
    • Crane’s U-Pick, Fennville
    • Erie Orchards and Cider Mill, Erie
    • Erwin Orchards U-Pick & Cider Mill, South Lyon
    • Evans Brothers Fruit Company, Frankfort
    • Forraht Farms, Berrien Springs
    • Grand View Orchard, Hudsonville
    • Gull Meadow Farms, Richland
    • Hildebrand Fruit Farms, Berrien Springs
    • Husted Farm Market and Cider Mill, Kalamazoo
    • Keeney Orchards, Tipton
    • Klackle Orchards, Greenville
    • Knaebe’s “Mmmunchy Krunchy” Apple Farm Cider Mill, Rogers City
    • Koan’s Orchard, Flushing
    • Lange Farms, Niles
    • Lehman’s Orchard, Niles
    • Lewis Farm Market & Petting Farm, New Era
    • Markillie Orchard and Cider Mill, Howell
    • Miller Family Orchard, Vassar
    • Moelker Orchards & Farm Market, Grand Rapids
    • Nye’s Apple Barn and Farms, St. Joseph
    • Orchard Hill Farm, Caledonia
    • Orchard on the Lake,
    • Phillips Orchards & Cider Mill, Saint Johns
    • Rennhack Orchards, Hart
    • Ridgeway Farm Market, Bangor
    • Robinette’s Apple Haus and Winery, Grand Rapids
    • Schultz Fruitridge Farms, Mattawan
    • Springhope Farm, Galien
    • Steffens Orchard Market, Sparta
    • Tompkins’ Orchard and Country Store, Vassar
    • Uncle John’s Cider Mill & Fruit House Winery, St. Johns
    • Hanulcik Farm Market, Ionia
  • Minnesota

    • Southwind Orchards, Dakota
    • Sunrise River Apple Farm, Wyoming
  • Missouri

    • Centennial Farms, Augusta
    • Kithcart’s Orchard, Rich Hill
    • Lehman Family Orchard, LLC, Spickard
    • Mother Earth Market LLC, Waverly
    • Peters Orchards & Market, Waverly
    • Purple Gate Farm, Highlandville
    • Schweitzer Orchards, St. Joseph
    • Sunshine Valley Farm, Rogersville
    • Theirbach Orchards & Berry Farm, Marthasville
    • West Orchards, Macon
  • Montana

    • O’Farrell Orchards, Bigfork
    • Wise Owl Orchards, Florence
  • Nebraska

    • Apple Acres Orchard, Kearney
    • Degroot Orchards, Madison
    • Martin’s Hillside Orchard, Ceresco
  • Nevada

    • Sweet Farm, Fallon
  • New Hampshire

    • Alyson’s Apple Orchard, Walpole
    • Apple Annie, Brentwood
    • Butternut Farm LLC, Farmington
    • Demeritt Hill Farm, Lee
    • Lull Farm, Hollis
    • McLeod Brothers Orchard, Milford
    • Old Ciderpress Farm, Westmoreland
    • Smith Orchard, Belmont
  • New Jersey

    • Alstede Farms, Chester
    • Battleview Orchards, Freehold
    • Delicious Orchards, Colts Neck
    • Heritage Station, Richwood
    • Longmeadow Farm, Hope
    • Neale’s Orchards Farm Market, Glassboro
    • Parks Farms, Chester
    • Peaceful Valley Orchards, Pittstown
    • Riamede Farm, Chester
    • Stoneyfield Orchards, Belvidere
    • Terhune Orchards, Princeton
    • Tree-Licious Orchards, Port Murray
  • New Mexico

    • Alary Farm, Corrales
    • Cadwallader Mountain Farms, Mountain Park
    • Manzanar Los Silvestres, Abiquiu
  • New York

    • Apple Barrel Orchards, Penn Yan
    • Bellinger’s Apple Orchard, Fultonville
    • Black Diamond Farm, Trumansburg
    • Borden’s Orchard, Schaghticoke
    • Bowman Orchards, Rexford
    • Exelsior Farms, Kent
    • Fishkill Farms, Hopewell Junction
    • G and S Orchards, Macedon
    • Goold Orchards, Castleton on Hudson
    • Hopedale Farm, Hudson
    • Indian Ladder Farms Inc., Altamont
    • LoveApple Farms, Ghent
    • Masker Fruit Farms Inc., Warwick
    • Mead Orchards LLC, Tivoli
    • Miller’s Apples, Dunkirk
    • Morgan Farms LLC, Marion
    • Northern Orchard Co Inc., Peru
    • Ontario Orchards Farm, Market & Cider Mill, Sterling
    • Prospect Hill Orchards, Milton
    • Rose Hill Farm, Red Hook
    • Samascott Orchard, Kinderhook
    • Seven Ponds Orchard, Water Mill
    • Soons Orchards Inc., New Hampton
    • Trapani Farm LLC, Milton
    • Weed Orchards, Marlboro
    • Whittier Fruit Farm, Rochester
    • Wickham’s Fruit Farm, Cutchogue
  • North Carolina

    • AH & W Farm, Boomer
    • Billy Laughter Orchards, Hendersonville
    • Brushy Mountain Farm&Orchard, Moravian Falls
    • Creasman Farms, Hendersonville
    • DH Orchards, Moravian Falls
    • Haight Orchards, Reidsville
    • JH Stepp Farm’s Hillcrest Orchard, Hendersonville
    • Justus Orchards, Hendersonville
    • Lyda Farms, Hendersonville
    • Old Cider Mill, Bat Cave
    • Piney Mountain Orchards, Hendersonville
    • Skytop Orchards, Flat Rock
    • Tall Pine Apple Orchards, Hendersonville
  • Ohio

    • Arrowhead Orchard, Paris
    • Bauman Orchards, Rittman
    • Beckwith Orchards, Cider Mill and Gift Shop, Kent
    • Burnham Orchards, Berlin Heights
    • Eshleman Fruit Farm, Clyde
    • Fuhrmann Orchards, Wheelersburg
    • Hidden Hills Orchard, Marietta
    • Hoen’s Orchard and Market, Delta
    • Hugus Fruit Farm, Rushville
    • Johnston Fruit Farms, Swanton
    • Legend Hills Orchard, Utica
    • Lynd Fruit Farm, Pataskala
    • MacQueen Orchards, Holland
    • Monroe’s Orchard & Farm Market, LLC, Hiram
    • Moreland Fruit Farm, Wooster
    • Ochs Fruit Farm, Lancaster
    • Rittman Orchards, Doylestown
    • The Orchard & Company, Plain City
    • Wesler Orchards, New Paris
    • West Orchards, Perry
  • Oklahoma

    • High-Fence Farm LLC, Sand Springs
  • Oregon

    • Bays Farm, Banks
    • Beilke Family Farm, Brooks
    • Bells Orchard, Beaverton
    • First Fruits, Independence
    • Haury Farms, Salem
    • Kiyokawa Family Orchards, Mount Hood Parkdale
    • Marquam Meadows Fruit Company, Molalla
    • Mason Hill Orchard, North Plains
    • River Bend Farm/Pleasant Hill Orchard, Eugene
    • Smith Berry Barn, Hillsboro
    • Stephens Farm, Dayton
    • Thomas Orchards, Kimberly
    • B&P Hitz Fruit Farm, Woodburn
  • Pennsylvania

    • Andrews Farm Market, Saint Thomas
    • Apple Castle, New Wilmington
    • Brown’s Orchards & Farm Market, Loganville
    • County Line Orchard, Kempton
    • Dries Orchards, Sunbury
    • Flinchbaugh’s Orchard and Farm Market, Hellam
    • Grim’s Greenhouse & Farm Market, Breinigsville
    • Half Crown Hill Orchard, McDonald
    • Hollabaugh Brothers, Biglerville
    • Kauffman’s Fruit Farm, Bird-in-Hand
    • Kistaco Farm, Apollo
    • Klim Orchard, Lake Ariel
    • Masonic Village Farm Market, Elizabethtown
    • McConnells’ Farm, Aliquippa
    • Northrop’s Apple Acres, Lake City
    • Orton’s Fruit Farm, North East
    • Paulus Orchards, Dillsburg
    • Rice Fruit Company, Gardners
    • Rocky Ridge Orchards, Kane
    • Ross Run Ranch, Tionesta
    • Shady Brook Farm, Yardley
    • Shanesville Fruit Farm, Boyertown
    • Shaw Orchards, Stewartstown
    • Shenot Farm, Wexford
    • Simmons Farm, McMurray
    • Soergel’s Orchards, Wexford
    • Solebury Orchards, New Hope
    • Strites’ Orchard, Harrisburg
    • Sycamore Spring Orchard & Farm Market, Jonestown
    • Taggart’s Orchard, Washington
    • Townsend Brother’s Fruit Farm, Spring Church
    • Weaver’s Orchard, Morgantown
  • Rhode Island

    • Barden Family Orchard, North Scituate
    • Young Family Farm, Little Compton
  • Tennessee

    • Melody Orchard, Rogersville
  • Texas

    • Love Creek Orchards, Medina
    • The Apple Conservatory, Austin
  • Utah

    • Burgess Orchards, Alpine
    • Fowers Fruit Ranch LLC, Genola
    • McMullin Orchards, Payson
    • Zollinger Fruit & Tree Farm, Inc, Logan
  • Virginia

    • Berrier Farms, Inc., Cana
    • Carter Mountain Orchard, Charlottesville
    • Dickie Brothers Orchard, Roseland
    • Graves Mountain Farm, Syria
    • Hollin Farms, Delaplane
    • Jenkins Orchard, Woodville
    • Marker-Miller Orchards Farm Market, Winchester
    • Morris Orchard, Monroe
    • Showalter’s Orchard & Greenhouse, LLC, Timberville
    • Silver Creek and Seamans’ Orchards, Inc., Tyro
  • Washington

    • Borton Fruit, Yakima
    • Muscle and Arm Farm, Freeland
    • Rosabella’s Garden, Bow
    • Skipley Farm, Snohomish *** Feature Orchard ***
    • Tonnemaker Hill Farm, Royal City
  • Wisconsin

    • Door Creek Orchard, Cottage Grove
    • Hillside Apples, Casco
    • Maple Ridge Orchard, Cashton
    • Orchard Store at Old Homestead, Franksville
    • Pleasant View Orchard, Niagara
    • Rim’s Edge Orchard, Germantown
    • Sutter’s Ridge Orchard, Mt Horeb

United Kingdom

  • England – midlands

    • Walsgrove Farm, Worcester
  • England – north

    • Pickering Road Community Orchard, Hull
  • England – south-east

    • Holton Orchards, Halesworth
  • England – south-west

    • West Bradley Orchards, Glastonbury

France

  • Poitou-Charente

    • Les Vergers de Vendée, Maureuil sur Lay

Netherlands

  • Noord-Holland

    • Het Keetje, Westwoud

Canada

  • British Columbia

    • Apple Barn Pumpkin Farm, Abbotsford
    • Apple Luscious Organic Orchards, Salt Spring Island
    • Applebarn — Taves Family Farms, Abbotsford
    • Blue Haze Farm, Victoria
    • Dragonfly Farm, Salt Spring Island
    • Fruit Forest Certified Organic Farm, Cobble Hill
    • Garside’s Fruit Farm, Abbotsford
    • Michell Brothers Farm, Victoria
    • Orchard Corners Organics, Kelowna
    • Riley Creek Farm, Lillooet
    • Roseridge Orchards, Kelowna
    • Salt Spring Apple Company, Salt Spring Island
    • Spencer Hill Orchard, Grand Forks
    • Starry Night Meadows Farm, Mayne Island
    • Swallow Hill Farm and Orchard, Metchosin
  • New Brunswick

    • Verger Belliveau Orchard, Memramcook
  • Nova Scotia

    • Elderkin’s Farm Market, Greenwich
    • Sarsfield Farms Inc., Canning
    • Vista Bella Farm Orchard and Apiary, Malagash
  • Ontario

    • DeVries Fruit Farm, Fenwick
    • Dixie Orchards, Caledon
    • Juicy-Fruit Orchards, Thedford
    • Kennette Apple Orchard, Lakeshore
    • Meleg’s Lakeview Orchard & Cider Mill, Kingsville

Australia

  • Victoria

    • Petty’s Orchard, Templestowe

Switzerland

  • Geneva

    • Verger de Saint-Loup, Versoix

Jonagold Apple Info – How To Grow Jonagold Apples At Home

Jonagold apple trees are a cultivar that have been around for a while (introduced in 1953) and have stood the test of time – still being a great choice for the apple grower. Interested in learning how to grow Jonagold apples? Read on for Jonagold apple info regarding growing Jonagold apples and Jonagold uses.

What are Jonagold Apple Trees?

Jonagold apples, as their name suggests, are derived from Jonathan and Golden Delicious cultivars, inheriting many of the best qualities from their parents. They are super crisp, large, yellow/green apples blushed in red, with creamy white flesh and both the tartness of a Jonathan and the sweetness of a Golden Delicious.

Jonagold apples were developed by Cornell’s apple breeding program at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, New York in 1953 and introduced in 1968.

Jonagold Apple Info

Jonagold apples are available as both semi-dwarf and dwarf cultivars. Semi-dwarf Jonagolds attain heights of between 12-15 feet (4-5 m.) tall by the same distance across, while the dwarf variety only reaches 8-10 feet (2-3 m.) in height and again the same distance wide.

These mid-late season apples ripen and are ready for harvest in about mid-September. They can be stored for up to 10 months in the refrigerator, although they are best eaten within two months of harvest.

This cultivar is self-sterile, so when growing a Jonagold, you will need another apple such as a Jonathan or Golden Delicious to aid in pollination. Jonagolds are not recommended for use as pollinators.

How to Grow Jonagold Apples

Jongolds can be grown in USDA zones 5-8. Select a site with well-drained, rich, loamy soil with a pH of 6.5-7.0 in full to partial sun exposure. Plan to plant the Jonagold in mid-autumn.

Dig a hole that is twice as wide as the rootball of the tree and slightly shallower. Gently loosen the rootball. Making sure the tree is vertical in the hole, back fill with the removed soil, patting down the soil to remove any air pockets.

If planting multiple trees, space them 10-12 feet (3-4 m.) apart.

Water the trees in well, saturating the ground completely. Thereafter, water the tree deeply each week but allow the soil to dry completely between watering.

Jonagold Uses

Commercially, Jonagolds are grown for the fresh market and for processing. With their sweet/tart flavor, they are delicious eaten fresh out of hand or made into applesauce, pies, or cobblers.

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