Weeds in flower bed

How To Keep Weeds From The Flower Bed Out Of Your Lawn

Many homeowners work very hard to maintain a green and weed free lawn through diligent care of their grass. Many of these same homeowners will also keep flower beds as well. But what happens when weeds overtake flower beds? How do you keep them out of lawn areas? Keep reading to learn more.

Keeping Weeds Out of Lawn Areas

Weeds can establish themselves in a flower bed rather easily due to the fact that there is relatively little competition. There is plenty of open area with freshly disturbed soil, which is perfect for weeds to grow.

In contrast, weeds have a much more difficult time establishing themselves in a well maintained lawn due to the fact that the grass is so tightly packed and allows for little else to grow between the plants.

But problems can arise in a situation where weeds have established themselves in a flower bed next to a well maintained lawn. The weeds are able to grow strong and can send runners or seeds into the nearby weed free lawn. Even the most well tended lawn will not be able to fight of this kind of close proximity attack.

How to Keep Weeds from the Flower Bed Out of Your Lawn

The best way to keep weeds in your flower bed from invading your lawn is to keep the weeds from your flower beds to begin with.

  • First, thoroughly weed your flower bed to remove as many of the weeds as possible.
  • Next, lay down a pre-emergent, such as Preen, in your flower beds and lawn. A pre-emergent will keep new weeds from growing from seeds.
  • As an added precaution, add a plastic border to the edges of your flower bed. Make sure the plastic border can be pushed into the ground at least 2-3 inches. This will help prevent any weed runners from escaping the flower bed.

Keeping an eye out for future weeds in the garden will also go a long way towards helping to keep the weeds out of the lawn. At the very least, make sure to remove any flowers on the weeds that do grow. This will further ensure that no new weeds establish themselves from seeds.

If you take these steps, the weeds should stay out of both your lawn and your flower beds.

What’s the Best Way to Clear a Weed-Infested Flowerbed?

No eager gardener wants to hear this piece of advice, but you must move those plants and kill the weeds and grass, once and for all. Western weeds are tough. When we moved to our current house — before I knew that we had bindweed and bermuda grass in the backyard — I raced out and planted a huge border garden. All of the plants in it eventually had to be moved to new locations (at least for the season) while I dug and poisoned my way through the former border. Many experts say don’t dig because it can spread weed seeds; I find that at least cutting off the heads of the culprits with a hoe cuts off their food supply and weakens the weeds until they die. This process can take all season.

Try putting layers of black plastic over the soil to cut off light, air, and water and smother the weeds. This process should take one growing season. Then clean all weed debris from the bed, and spray any remaining culprits with glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup. In fall, dig in compost and pray for spring. You might want to cover the bed until then, too, with a permeable landscape fabric, to keep topical weeds from spreading to the patch. To keep ryegrass from creeping back in, line your new bed with metal edging that goes down into the ground several inches.

How to Redo a Flower Bed

A new flower bed can completely transform your front or backyard. On the other hand, an unkempt, overgrown flower bed can kill your home’s curb appeal.

How do you know when to redo flower beds in your yard? Many homeowners redo their existing flower beds seasonally with a small refresh in the spring, but others may find their flower beds overgrown with weeds and in desperate need of some TLC.

While redoing a flower bed may seem like a daunting task, we’re here to walk you through the process for clearing out and building a DIY flower bed that even a professional landscaper could be proud of.

How to Prepare a Flower Bed

In order to truly transform your old, overgrown flower bed into a new, thriving one, you must start with a clean slate. That means dividing or removing old perennials, which can be potted if healthy, and getting rid of all weeds, which typically live in conditions that don’t favor other plants. Your bed should be uninhabited but look clean.

The main purpose of preparing a flower bed is to improve soil fertility and drainage. To lightly prep a flower bed when you’re keeping existing features, you’ll need to clear out any weeds and turn organic matter in with the soil. Organic matter is actively decomposing plant or animal material, such as compost or manure, which improves the quality and fertility of your soil. If you’re planning for more of an overhaul, follow along with the following steps to completely redo an existing flower bed.

How to Clear an Overgrown Flower Bed

1. Pull Out the Weeds

To prepare your flower bed for new plants, you must clear and deeply cultivate the existing planted areas. To get control over short weeds, use a garden trowel – a shovel with a flat, pointed blade – to dig up the roots of the weed. Taller weeds can usually be pulled out by hand, and a trowel can help you free the roots from the ground. Make sure to clear out any leaves left behind, as they can further spread weed growth.

2. Clean Out Existing Plants

Once you’ve cleared out the weeds, roots and other debris, clean out old perennials. If you’re starting fresh in your new DIY flower bed, you can give the perennials away or dispose of them. If you’re not ready to say goodbye to your perennials, but it appears they’ve outgrown their space, dividing and replanting the sections in a new location will help them rejuvenate. You can save perennials to replant by dividing and potting them.

Follow up by using a weed killer on the newly cleared out soil. When you’re redoing your flower beds in the springtime, applying an herbicide after you’ve pulled weeds will set your garden up for success the rest of the year. Use caution when choosing a weed killer if you are planning to reseed your lawn, as it could interfere with grass growth in the surrounding area.

3. Prep the Ground

Once weeds and old plants have been cleaned out of the bed, rake through the soil to prepare your flower bed for composting. Soil should be smooth for the next steps, so it’s important to remove any rocks or gravel. If there are a lot of rocks in your soil, you may need a rototiller to remove them all. Learn more about how to remove rocks from soil and the tools you’ll need to do it.

4. Add a Layer of Compost

To enrich the soil and see more fruitful plant growth, lay a 2 to 3-inch layer of compost on the flower bed and turn into the soil with a shovel. Adding organic matter, such as compost, leaf mold, peat or manure, provides the soil with essential nutrients for your plants. Make sure you’re working with moist soil and turning over from about a foot deep.

For the truly sustainable gardener, learn how you can build your own homemade compost bin.

5. Remove Yard Waste to Start Fresh With Your New Flower Bed

When you’ve finished clearing your overgrown flower bed, you’ve likely accumulated a lot of yard waste from the weeds and plants you’ve torn out, as well as from excess soil and compost. You should haul all your landscape debris away from the newly cleared area in a wheelbarrow prior to building a new flower bed.

From a seasonal refresh to a complete garden overhaul, we’ll help you find the right yard waste disposal option for landscaping projects of all sizes.

Redesign Your Flower Bed

If you’re putting in the work to completely redo your flower bed, it makes sense to reconfigure and perfect the layout. For maximum visual appeal, your flower bed should be at least 6 feet wide.

You may consider turning straight edges into more appealing curved edges during your redesign. Adding curves and rounded corners can make your flower beds appear larger than straight, sharp-cornered ones, and they blend in more smoothly with the rest of your landscaping. Plus, curved beds are easier to mow around.

You also need to decide where you’ll be placing your plants ahead of time. Sketch out a drawing of your new DIY flower bed before making any changes so you can keep your edges crisp and clean.

Garden Design Tips

  • When building a flower bed, plan for your garden’s focal points first, which would be larger plants and trees. Then, make room for your hedges. Decorative shrubs and flowers should be worked into the design last.
  • Take note of how many hours of direct sunlight your flower bed receives each day, and take this into consideration when choosing plants. Learn more about sunlight tracking in gardens here.
  • If you’re redoing a flower bed for summertime, aim for flowers that are in the yellow, red and orange color families so they stand out in the sunniest months.
  • Plant flowers in odd-numbered groups of three or more for a fuller, more cohesive design.
  • Be conscious of any seasonal allergies you or your family members have, and either avoid pollen-producing plants or place them away from any windows.

“When planning a new flower bed in an existing bed, the first thing you’ll want to do is identify the plants that are there, do research on them and decide if you want to keep them or not. Pull out the plants you don’t want so you can see the space you have left – that will guide you on plant placement of your new flowers and shrubs.”

Jami Boys | An Oregon Cottage

Building a New Flower Bed Step by Step

1. Add New Soil

Prior to planting your DIY flower bed, it’s important to lay a good foundation for the flowers to grow. If you visit a local garden supply store, a landscape expert may be able to recommend what kind of soil is right for your garden.

Lay down a layer of garden-specific soil about 6 inches deep and spread it across the bed, working it in with the compost you added earlier to help boost the nutrition and quality of the new soil. Once finished, give your bed 30 to 60 days to settle before planting.

Work with soil when it’s damp, but not wet. Digging soil that is too dry is difficult and can be harmful to the dirt, and soil that is too wet will clump when turned over.

2. Plant and Mulch the Flower Bed

Armed with our garden design tips from above, you can confidently bring your DIY flower bed sketch to life.

When arranging and planting your groups of flowers, consider how they’ll look from all angles around your home. This may include arranging them from shortest to tallest or putting color groups together. This is the step where you can really show off your landscape style and boost curb appeal.

If you’re replanting potted perennials, make sure to place them at the same soil depth they were at before. New plants should be placed at the same soil depth they had in their nursery containers. Any damaged roots or leaves should be trimmed before planting.

After planting, remember to water your plants until there are small puddles around their bases. Spread a thin layer of mulch throughout your flower bed to help retain soil moisture and prevent weed growth. However, mulch should never touch the plant stems, as it can kill them.

“I like using the stuff labeled ‘garden compost’ at our local yard products center. It’s black (instead of orange like bark dust), and feeds the soil as it breaks down, providing all the nutrition these shrubs will need.”

Jami Boys | An Oregon Cottage

3. Clean Up the Yard

As you wrap up your DIY flower bed project, determine how much yard waste you’ll be disposing of. The disposal solution you would need varies based on how large the job is, whether you’re redesigning a flower bed and removing dirt or removing multiple trees and shrubs from a big yard.

For a small seasonal refresh and weed removal, you can likely bag up the debris and use your city’s curbside service. If you’ve done a landscaping overhaul after clearing your overgrown flower beds, you may consider renting a dumpster to remove your yard waste. This allows you to clean up at your own pace, while getting rid of all your yard debris at once when the project is complete.

Enjoy Your New DIY Flower Bed

With a clean lawn and a beautiful new flower bed, now is the time to sit outside and enjoy your yard.

Feeling inspired to take on more DIY landscaping projects? Check out our DIY landscaping guide, as well as some other budget-friendly yard improvement projects:

  • 15 Ways to Improve Your Home’s Curb Appeal
  • 10 Ideas for Backyard Landscaping on a Budget
  • 6 Sustainable Landscaping Ideas for a Greener Yard

Thanks,I ended up renting a roto tiller and added compost etc,to my hard compacted soil .My soil in my bed is now deep, 12 in. plus. It looks and feels SANDY but light, fluffy and hopefully welll-aerated.

I have a fews ? Most lavender growing sites I read,(from real lavender local and distant farmers I wrote too and some from the internet) said after tilling their hard compacted soil and adding amendments to make their soil as stated above, they did one of the following,which should I do?
A 1), A2), A3), A4), A5)

A)This is in regards to mounding your soil or to just planting shallow, where the top of your soil is level with the ground

A 1) they mounded their soil in rows and then planted their plants in individual 12 in. high mounds

A 2) they mounded their beds (not sure if that meant they made one long mound and planted in that one long mound or also added individual mounds to that one long mound and planted in those added higher mounds or just made individual mounds?

A 3)where it was hard to till they dug and chipped to make a hole and then made a mound

A 4)where we could till(2-3in.deep)the soil we raked the soil into one long mound per row.

A 5)plant shallow, top of soil should be level with the ground. (no mounding).Totally different

B 1) dig a hole just big enough for the roots,deep enough and wide enough to contain the roots,saying lavender grows best in cramped conditions.

B 2,a) Dig a hole twice as wide as and equal to the depth of the container.

In regards to how big ones hole should be:
Which one should I do? B1) or B2a)?

The 2nd sight info.on height of plant in the soil, B 2,b) and B 2,c) states:
B 2,b) Replace enough removed soil to raise the top of your munstead’s rootball 1 inch higher than the lip of the hole. Center the plant on the soil layer and continue backfilling until the hole is three-quarters full. Water to settle the soil and remove air pockets.

B 2,c) Adjust the munstead plant as needed so the top of the rootball protrudes slightly from the hole. Finish backfilling.

Should i plant my lavender as stated in B 2,b) and B 2,c)

2nd sight info. on adding a 2-3 in basin mound ,B 2,d),says the following:

B 2,d) Encircle the hole with a 2- to 3-inch mound of the remaining soil, creating a basin to steer the water directly to the roots. Water again.
Should I add a basin as described? Yes ,No? Do you think the mound will collapse once you add water to it.? Yes,No? Maybe this is a temporary thing to do to initially add water.What do u think?

Another site,,(from a local farmer) also mentioned about making a sort of basin around the plant ,they called it a ditch or well,

C)Make a well or ditch around your plant? Should I make a well/ditch? C 1,Yes ,No?
They said,
after planting their plant in the center of a mound,
C 1) they made a water ditch around the plants to catch the water they gave to the plant,basically forming a well all around each plant.I question this method because I have made a water ditch before around other plants and once I added water to that well it collapsed shortly. Maybe they just mean to do it at first/one time at planting time to water the roots initially.What do u think?
I APPRECIATE YOUR TIME TO ASWER MY QUESTIONS.Looking forward to your advice.
Donna

NEW
Thanks,I ended up renting a roto tiller and added compost etc,My soil in my bed is deep12 in. + It looks and feels Alight , fluffy and hopefully wells-aerated.

Thanks,I ended up renting a roto tiller and added compost etc,to my hard compacted soil .My soil in my bed is now deep, 12 in. plus. It looks and feels SANDY but light, fluffy and hopefully welll-aerated.

I have a fews ? Most lavender growing sites I read,(from real lavender local and distant farmers I wrote too and some from the internet) said after tilling their hard compacted soil and adding amendments to make their soil as stated above, they did one of the following,which should I do?
A 1), A2), A3), A4), A5)

A)This is in regards to mounding your soil or to just planting shallow, where the top of your soil is level with the ground

A 1) they mounded their soil in rows and then planted their plants in individual 12 in. high mounds

A 2) they mounded their beds (not sure if that meant they made one long mound and planted in that one long mound or also added individual mounds to that one long mound and planted in those added higher mounds or just made individual mounds?

A 3)where it was hard to till they dug and chipped to make a hole and then made a mound

A 4)where we could till(2-3in.deep)the soil we raked the soil into one long mound per row.

A 5)plant shallow, top of soil should be level with the ground. (no mounding).Totally different

B 1) dig a hole just big enough for the roots,deep enough and wide enough to contain the roots,saying lavender grows best in cramped conditions.

B 2,a) Dig a hole twice as wide as and equal to the depth of the container.

In regards to how big ones hole should be:
Which one should I do? B1) or B2a)?

The 2nd sight info.on height of plant in the soil, B 2,b) and B 2,c) states:
B 2,b) Replace enough removed soil to raise the top of your munstead’s rootball 1 inch higher than the lip of the hole. Center the plant on the soil layer and continue backfilling until the hole is three-quarters full. Water to settle the soil and remove air pockets.

B 2,c) Adjust the munstead plant as needed so the top of the rootball protrudes slightly from the hole. Finish backfilling.

Should i plant my lavender as stated in B 2,b) and B 2,c)

2nd sight info. on adding a 2-3 in basin mound ,B 2,d),says the following:

B 2,d) Encircle the hole with a 2- to 3-inch mound of the remaining soil, creating a basin to steer the water directly to the roots. Water again.
Should I add a basin as described? Yes ,No? Do you think the mound will collapse once you add water to it.? Yes,No? Maybe this is a temporary thing to do to initially add water.What do u think?

Another site,,(from a local farmer) also mentioned about making a sort of basin around the plant ,they called it a ditch or well,

C)Make a well or ditch around your plant? Should I make a well/ditch? C 1,Yes ,No?
They said,
after planting their plant in the center of a mound,
C 1) they made a water ditch around the plants to catch the water they gave to the plant,basically forming a well all around each plant.I question this method because I have made a water ditch before around other plants and once I added water to that well it collapsed shortly. Maybe they just mean to do it at first/one time at planting time to water the roots initially.What do u think?
I APPRECIATE YOUR TIME TO ASWER MY QUESTIONS.Looking forward to your advice.
Donna

NEW
Thanks,I ended up renting a roto tiller and added compost etc,My soil in my bed is deep12 in. + It looks and feels Alight , fluffy and hopefully wells-aerated.
Thanks,I ended up renting a roto tiller and added compost etc,to my hard compacted soil .My soil in my bed is now deep, 12 in. plus. It looks and feels SANDY but light, fluffy and hopefully welll-aerated.

I have a fews ? Most lavender growing sites I read,(from real lavender local and distant farmers I wrote too and some from the internet) said after tilling their hard compacted soil and adding amendments to make their soil as stated above, they did one of the following,which should I do?
A 1), A2), A3), A4), A5)

A)This is in regards to mounding your soil or to just planting shallow, where the top of your soil is level with the ground

A 1) they mounded their soil in rows and then planted their plants in individual 12 in. high mounds

A 2) they mounded their beds (not sure if that meant they made one long mound and planted in that one long mound or also added individual mounds to that one long mound and planted in those added higher mounds or just made individual mounds?

A 3)where it was hard to till they dug and chipped to make a hole and then made a mound

A 4)where we could till(2-3in.deep)the soil we raked the soil into one long mound per row.

A 5)plant shallow, top of soil should be level with the ground. (no mounding).Totally different

B 1) dig a hole just big enough for the roots,deep enough and wide enough to contain the roots,saying lavender grows best in cramped conditions.

B 2,a) Dig a hole twice as wide as and equal to the depth of the container.

In regards to how big ones hole should be:
Which one should I do? B1) or B2a)?

The 2nd sight info.on height of plant in the soil, B 2,b) and B 2,c) states:
B 2,b) Replace enough removed soil to raise the top of your munstead’s rootball 1 inch higher than the lip of the hole. Center the plant on the soil layer and continue backfilling until the hole is three-quarters full. Water to settle the soil and remove air pockets.

B 2,c) Adjust the munstead plant as needed so the top of the rootball protrudes slightly from the hole. Finish backfilling.

Should i plant my lavender as stated in B 2,b) and B 2,c)

2nd sight info. on adding a 2-3 in basin mound ,B 2,d),says the following:

B 2,d) Encircle the hole with a 2- to 3-inch mound of the remaining soil, creating a basin to steer the water directly to the roots. Water again.
Should I add a basin as described? Yes ,No? Do you think the mound will collapse once you add water to it.? Yes,No? Maybe this is a temporary thing to do to initially add water.What do u think?

Another site,,(from a local farmer) also mentioned about making a sort of basin around the plant ,they called it a ditch or well,

C)Make a well or ditch around your plant? Should I make a well/ditch? C 1,Yes ,No?
They said,
after planting their plant in the center of a mound,
C 1) they made a water ditch around the plants to catch the water they gave to the plant,basically forming a well all around each plant.I question this method because I have made a water ditch before around other plants and once I added water to that well it collapsed shortly. Maybe they just mean to do it at first/one time at planting time to water the roots initially.What do u think?
I APPRECIATE YOUR TIME TO ASWER MY QUESTIONS.Looking forward to your advice.
Donna

NEW
Thanks,I ended up renting a roto tiller and added compost etc,My soil in my bed is deep12 in. + It looks and feels Alight , fluffy and hopefully wells-aerated.

I have a fews ? Most lavender growing sites I read,(from real lavender local and distant farmers I wrote too and some from the internet) said after tilling their hard compacted soil and adding amendments to make their soil as stated above, they did one of the following,which should I do?
A 1), A2), A3), A4), A5)
A)This is in regards to mounding your soil or to just planting shallow, where the top of your soil is level with the ground

A 1) they mounded their soil in rows and then planted their plants in individual 12 in. high mounds

A 2) they mounded their beds (not sure if that meant they made one long mound and planted in that one long mound or also added individual mounds to that one long mound and planted in those added higher mounds or just made individual mounds?

A 3)where it was hard to till they dug and chipped to make a hole and then made a mound

A 4)where we could till(2-3in.deep)the soil we raked the soil into one long mound per row.

A 5)plant shallow, top of soil should be level with the ground. (no mounding).Totally different

B 1) dig a hole just big enough for the roots,deep enough and wide enough to contain the roots,saying lavender grows best in cramped conditions.

B 2,a) Dig a hole twice as wide as and equal to the depth of the container.

In regards to how big ones hole should be:
Which one should I do? B1) or B2a)?

The 2nd sight info.on height of plant in the soil, B 2,b) and B 2,c) states:
B 2,b) Replace enough removed soil to raise the top of your munstead’s rootball 1 inch higher than the lip of the hole. Center the plant on the soil layer and continue backfilling until the hole is three-quarters full. Water to settle the soil and remove air pockets.

B 2,c) Adjust the munstead plant as needed so the top of the rootball protrudes slightly from the hole. Finish backfilling.

Should i plant my lavender as stated in B 2,b) and B 2,c)

2nd sight info. on adding a 2-3 in basin mound ,B 2,d),says the following:

B 2,d) Encircle the hole with a 2- to 3-inch mound of the remaining soil, creating a basin to steer the water directly to the roots. Water again.
Should I add a basin as described? Yes ,No? Do you think the mound will collapse once you add water to it.? Yes,No? Maybe this is a temporary thing to do to initially at at planting to add water .What do u think?

Another site,,(from a local farmer) also mentioned about making a sort of basin around the plant ,they called it a ditch or well,

C)Make a well or ditch around your plant? Should I make a well/ditch? C 1,Yes ,No?
They said,
after planting their plant in the center of a mound,
C 1) they made a water ditch around the plants to catch the water they gave to the plant,basically forming a well all around each plant.I question this method because I have made a water ditch before around other plants and once I added water to that well it collapsed shortly. Maybe they just mean to do it at first/one time at planting time to water the roots initially.What do u think?
I APPRECIATE YOUR TIME TO ASWER MY QUESTIONS.Looking forward to your advice.
Donna

There is nothing more frustrating than the constant battle to eliminate weeds from flowerbeds.

Gardeners spend hours and hours nurturing annuals and perennials to grow and bloom. All while watching helplessly as weeds thrive without any care at all.

Weeds are not only unsightly, but steal valuable nutrients from the soil. Nutrients that annuals and perennials require to flourish and flower.

Flowerbeds add so much beauty to the landscape. But keeping them weed-free can be frustrating.

But by avoiding a few common mistakes, and implementing a couple of simple techniques, you can eliminate weeds, and keep weeding chores to a minimum in the process.

How To Eliminate Weeds In Flowerbeds

Mulching Correctly

The number one way to eliminate weeds from flowerbeds is to keep the soil surface covered. And that means year round!

Open soil is a wide-open invitation for weeds to thrive and flourish. When the soil is bare, weed seeds easily drift or blow in and sprout.

The easiest and quickest method to effectively cover soil is with mulch.

Bare soil is an open invitation to weeds and weed seeds. Correct mulching is the first line of defense in keeping weeds at bay.

Mulch actually serves a whole slew of beneficial purposes when it comes to it’s use in flowerbeds.

Not only does it provide a barrier for weed seeds, it also helps regulate soil temperature and conserve moisture. And many mulches add valuable nutrients to the soil as they break down. (See : Choosing The Best Mulch For Your Landscape)

Mulching Deep

But just using mulch isn’t enough. It also needs to be put down and maintained correctly to help eliminate future weeds from your flowerbeds.

One of the most common mistakes made when mulching beds is failing to put down enough. An inch or two of mulch is simply not enough to keep weed seeds from finding a home in the soil below.

Mulch needs to be put down thick enough to be an effective barrier to weeds and weed seeds.

Mulch in flowerbeds should be kept at a minimum of 3 to 4 inched of depth at all times. Anything less, and weed seeds will cause havoc.

In addition, be sure to remove deep-rooted weeds before mulching. Large rooted weeds are not phased by deep mulch, and will simply return time and time again until their tap root is removed.

Don’t Disturb The Mulch

And finally, whatever you do, don’t rake that mulch! Believe it or not, not raking is one of the best ways to eliminate weeds in flowerbeds.

For many gardeners, heading out to stir up faded mulch in their flowerbeds is a great way to freshen up a bed’s appearance.

Unfortunately, although it might make the mulch look a bit less faded, it also creates weeds. And a lot of them! Every time mulch is disturbed by raking and turning, you are re-planting weed seeds that have been laying dormant on the surface.

The biggest mistake you can make is to rake the mulch in your beds. This gives weed seeds a chance to find a home underneath in the soil.

Seeds are constantly blowing into flowerbeds from all over. They can also be dropped on the surface of the mulch from birds, other wildlife, and from foot traffic.

On top of the surface, seeds struggle to find the ability to sprout. But as soon as mulch is stirred, they quickly find a home underneath below the surface.

In the blink of an eye after stirring up the surface, they are sprouting full force.

Adding a thin layer of mulch to freshen up beds is the better than turning your mulch!

Resist the urge to turn over mulch. Keep the mulch barrier in tact to keep weed seeds from finding soil. Instead, freshen up with an ultra light coat of new mulch every few months when mulch looks faded.

This also helps keep the mulch thick enough to repel weed seeds.

Fill The Flowerbed!

Speaking of mulch, the absolute best mulch of all is living mulch. And it is by far the number one way to eliminate future weeds from flowerbeds!

Instead of having wide open spaces providing a space for weeds to find a home, fill your flowerbeds full of plants. The more the better!

The more you fill flowerbeds with plants, the less chance for weeds and weed seeds to find a home. Fill those beds with more plants, and less mulch!

Thick plantings of annuals and perennials are the best defense against crowding out and preventing weeds.

And the benefits don’t stop there. Dense plantings help to conserve moisture in the soil, meaning less watering time for you. Maybe best of all, the less you need to mulch, the less mulch you have to have to spend on it!

As late summer and fall approach. divide and split overgrown perennials to fill in open spaces. It not only adds to the beauty of your beds, it cuts future weeding chores greatly. (See : How To Divide Perennials)

Here is to eliminating weeds from your flowerbeds this year!

This Is My Garden

This Is My Garden is a garden website created by gardeners, publishing two articles every week, 52 weeks a year. This article may contain affiliate links.

Too many weeds in flower bed – how to control?

WEED MANAGEMENT

1. Know what a weed is. Weeds are pioneers. They are natures way of covering disturbed and bare ground.

2. DonÂt disturb the ground. Except for actually planting new plants or cultivating for a new vegetable garden or flower bed, avoid breaking the surface of the soil.

That includes avoiding pulling, digging, tilling to remove weeds. Yanking out even the tiniest weed makes two mistakes. It brings up weed seeds that have been accumulating at the deeper levels of your soil where they have been too deep to germinate. It also creates a disturbed bit of ground that new weed seeds blowing in find suitable for setting anchor. An additional note: weed pulling disturbs the roots of the desired plants nearby. Evere wonder why people who pull weeds are ALWAYS pulling weeds?!

3. Cover the ground. Mulch newly planted areas, vegetable gardens and annual flower beds.

The best mulch for smothering weeds is a semi-composted organic material of medium diameter particles (about ½-inch) that is applied four to six inches thick. DonÂt skimp.

Contrary to popular belief, geotextile fabrics (plastics, “landscape cloth”) do not work well in the long run and actually lead to more weeds.

Plant living groundcovers to “finish” the landscape and garden. Use low, dense, mat-forming groundcovers to truly cover the ground completely. Some of the most effective weed-suppressant groundcovers include Acacia redolens, Campanula poscharskyana, Cerastium tomentosum, Dymondia margaretae, Gazania rigens (gray-leafed trailing), and Thymus polytrichus ÂPink ChintzÂ.

Plant other plants (low, dense, spreading shrubs and/or full clumping perennials) densely enough to leave no room between them.

The idea is to cover the ground so thoroughly that no weed seeds can find their way to the ground. Those that do make it to the ground cannot make their way up. And those very few that do make it up canÂt compete well.

4. Hoe weeds. When weeds do come up in open ground, the best way to eliminate weeds for the long run is to “shave” them off with a sharp hoe. A Dutch or onion hoe is ideal; these have shallow but wide blades that work as does your razor blade.

Hoeing works on weed seedlings. The larger the weed, unfortunately, the more difficult it becomes to actually be able to scrape them off with a hoe.

Use the hoe as you would a razor, scraping toward you with the blade level from side to side against the ground and the handle tilted up enough to allow the sharpest part of the blade to cut at the base of the weeds.

ItÂs important that you sharpen the hoe blade regularly with a fine rasping file. You keep your best kitchen knives sharp all the time; why not your hoe.

The soil is best hoed when pretty dry. The hoe doesnÂt cling to the soil and neither do the weeds.

Hoeing works for all young weeds. Young annual weeds (our most common type) once hoed, do not return.

Perennial weeds will re-sprout from storage roots, tubers, underground stems and the like. The resprouting does, however, use up the food in the storage organ, thereby weakening the plant and a second hoeing of these, within a week of their resprouting will rid the plant of its ability to photosynthesize (which puts more food back into the storage organ). With older perennial weeds, the storage organ will continue to send up a new sprout and your persistent hoeing will eventually totally exhaust the organ.

Where hoeing is impractical (tight spots, flower beds, containers), use a snipper of an apporpiate size. yeah, it works and it really isn’t that much work, in the long run. I do it.

5. Mow weeds. Where seasonal weeds have grown too tall for a hoe to scrape them off easily, mow them down with a regular lawn mower. If they continue to grow, mow them again. Repeat.

This works best if you mow them early, before they get too tall. The idea is to keep them mowed until beyond their blooming period, if you have to, so that they never set seed and become a worse problem or at least a continuing problem. Annual weeds eventually give up and peter away.

Tall-growing perennial weeds also give up and fade
away. Low-growing perennial weeds, however, are persistent  maybe even more vigorous — under this process. Hoeing (early on, of course) and mulching are better methods for such low-growing weeds as oxalis, dandelions and many clovers.

6. Snip off the awkward weeds. Where you have small weeds popping up in the mulch or in the lawn, use any sharp tool to cut them off at their very base. No need to pull, which would either disturb the mulch or interfere with the lawn. This technique also is the best method for removing weeds from containers in which youÂre growing other plants.

7. Cut down the big stuff. Use a special tool called a weed cutter. ItÂs used much as you would a golf club, swinging with an easy stroke back and forth through the stems of the weeds. For those of you who are power-inclined, get out your power weed whacker.

8. Mow your lawn high. If you need to reduce or prevent lawn weeds, set your mower blades to 3 to 4 inches high. A tall-growing lawn shades out weed seedlings and produces a healthier lawn overall that better competes with almost all weeds.

9. Avoid frequent fertilizing of your lawn. Lawns do best with a good organic fertilizer once or twice a year. More frequent fertilizing, especially with quick-acting fertilizers and especially in summer feed the weeds as well as your lawn.

10. Water your lawn infrequently and deeply. Frequent shallow watering encourages weed seed germination. An aside: frequent, shallow waterings also increase disease problems as well as create a less drought and heat tolerant lawn.

Joe

How do I stop my lawn growing in to my garden beds?

  • Creating a physical border to keep grass out of your garden beds is one of the best options
  • Keep in mind your lawn type and incorporate some barriers in your garden and lawn design
  • Regular maintenance – little often – is one of the best ways to stay on top of garden beds

If the overgrown look isn’t for you, there are other ways to rid your gardens of your lawn. We’ll look at some options shortly but the first thing to do in most cases is to kill off any grass that has entered your garden beds. Depending on your lawn-type or invasive-garden-bed-species, this can be a simple or rather complex task. Just ask anyone who has got couch grass established in their garden areas and they’ll probably tell you about the blisters that go along with continually pulling it out. Totally eradicating grass from your garden beds and then keeping it out can be done, but it does take a methodical approach.

There are herbicides that only kill grasses, without harming other plants. But, be careful when using sprays when it comes to lawns, as most are warm-season turfgrasses which are susceptible to non-selective herbicides such as glyphosate/roundup. Try and remove as much vegetation as possible by hand by using a garden knife or hand-scythe to cut the grass low to ground-height. Now if it’s a cool season grass-type weed and doesn’t have any runners like rye grass, fescue or the like you can pull the grass, roots and all and it won’t grow back. Warm season grasses on the other hand, Couch, Kikuyu, Zoysias and Buffalos are all warm-season grasses and have a runner system and that’s why they tend to invade the garden in the first place. With Couch, Kikuyu and Zoysias they also have a rhizome system that grows underground and can tunnel under edging and pop-up and establish in neighbouring beds. Once you’ve removed most of the plant it’s time to address the underground part of the grass and there’s a couple of ways to go about it. Cutting off the light with a covering – mulch, cardboard or newspaper is one way and can smother the grass and then make sure you spray any new shoots that appear.

The other method is to use a non-selective herbicide like round-up / glyphosate being careful not to spray any garden plants you want to keep. Depending on the grass type and the amount, you may well need several spray applications – and trimming back in between before you can see the end of the weed. This time of the year is an ideal time to attempt removal as the growth has slowed from its peak, yet it hasn’t gone completely dormant in most areas so will still take up the herbicide through the leaf. Once under control it’s a matter of being vigilant with a spray bottle handy to quickly knock over any new invasions as they appear. Now keeping it from re-entering from your lawn is a different matter and that’s where you’ll need to decide on your approach. As discussed above, the grass type can make a big difference as how it moves into beds and is a determining factor in the barrier-type you’ll find best to use.

Establishing a border or edging, is one of the easiest ways to keep your lawn from creeping into your garden beds. Hard borders can be made from virtually anything, from store-bought long bands of plastic or metal edging that push part-way into the ground, through to rocks, old plates, and even wine bottles are not excluded. Bricks, pavers, concrete and treated timber tend to be the favoured options, but whatever material you use, try and make sure the barrier is sunk deep enough to help limit grass from growing underneath. Another physical border option is the spade edge, or “English border”. It is basically a shallow ditch dug between the lawn and flower bed. It’s quite easy to dig out and maintain, with weeds and grass runners easily spotted in the ditch and either trimmed or sprayed out. Another short-term option can include using a non-selective herbicide, which would need to be used with care as this would kill your lawn as well as any garden plants and would again leave a bare dirt patch between the two. The only trouble here is keeping it neat as the edge always has that chemical-burn-look about it and as a long-term solution can be a cause of herbicide-resistant weeds in the long run.

Your choice of edging will hinge on many factors including the use of garden design materials that suit your outdoor spaces and your budget. Getting your edging to something that makes a lawn-edger or whipper-snipper easier to use use probably the ultimate goal as when these chores are attended to along with mowing, the finish is is clean and neat and one that you can be proud of. Sticking with one of Lawn Solutions Australia’s proven varieties and using one Lawn Solutions Australia’s preferred herbicides may very well help keep your lawn looking outstanding and convince you to rid yourself of those pesky garden beds once and for all – lawn invasion problem solved!

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Trim Pro Lawns

  • Grass Type to Plant – It is important to know that Bermuda grass spreads by roots that will grow underground when you turn your back – really! It is very hard to remove from flower beds once it creeps in the underground. St. Augustine grass grows mostly on top of the soil, so it is easier to see it begin to spread and remove it before it can get out of hand.
  • Mow the Lawn – This may seem a little obvious, but many homeowners do not realize the effect of uncut grass on planned landscaping. Grass types that seed should not be allowed to reach that point before the grass is mowed. In addition, Bermuda grass clippings can actually take root in a flower bed, so it is again important to keep the grass as short as possible with lawn maintenance College Station help by bagging the clippings so it cannot get into planned landscaping.
  • Use Mulch – A well-known means of at least slowing the growth of grass in planned landscaping is mulch. With the help of lawn service in College Station TX, the proper mulch for the area can be determined and placed around all plants and trees to help fight against the invasion of that green grass.
  • Install Edging – Place a properly installed edging around the beds. Drive the edging at least 4 to 6 inches into the ground as well as 1 inch above and watch for grass trying to creep over it. Unsightly edging can be covered with decorative stones as long as you watch for any ‘creepers’ over or through the stones.
  • Dig a Trench – An interesting alternative to edging is to dig a trench around the perimeter of the landscaped area that is about 6 inches deep and 4 inches wide. Make a mash of shredded newspaper and water that is about 10 to 20 pages thick and fill the dug trench with this mixture, stomping it in if necessary. Cover it with mulch so it has a good appearance – and good results can be achieved for about 10 months.

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