The sugar maple tree

Contents

Sugar maple

Tree & Plant Care

Avoid pruning in early spring as maples are ‘bleeders’ and will lose large amounts of sap.

Disease, pests and problems

Susceptible to leaf scorch, verticillium wilt, tar spot and anthracnose.
Pests include borers and cottony maple scale.
Suffers from salt, drought, and air pollution.

Disease, pest, and problem resistance

Tolerant of black walnut toxicity.

Native geographic location and habitat

C-Value: 3

Bark color and texture

Bark is gray brown and deeply furrowed.

Sugar maple (Acer saccharum) photo: John Hagstrom Leaf or needle arrangement, size, shape, texture, and color

Simple leaves in pairs (opposite); 3 to 6 inches long.
The 5 lobed leaves are dark green in summer, changing to yellow, orange and red in fall.

Flower arrangement, shape, and size

Small, pale yellow flowers in pendulous clusters.
Inconspicuous by themselves, but can be showy when the whole tree is in flower.

Fruit, cone, nut, and seed descriptions

Fruit are winged seeds in pairs (samaras); 1 inch long.
Green, maturing to brown.

Cultivars and their differences

These plants are cultivars of a species that is native to the Chicago Region according to Swink and Wilhelm’s Plants of the Chicago Region, with updates made according to current research. Cultivars are plants produced in cultivation by selective breeding or via vegetative propagation from wild plants identified to have desirable traits.”

Apollo® sugar maple (Acer saccharum ‘Barrett Cole’’): This cultivar is narrow and more columnar than the species, growing 30 feet tall and 10 feet wide. Fall color is yellow-orange to red.

Autumn Fest® sugar maple (Acer saccharum ‘JFS-KW8′): An upright, oval cultivar growing 50 feet high and 35 feet wide. Faster growing than the species. Reliable orange-red to red color.

Bonfire™ sugar maple (Acer saccharum ‘Bonfire’): This cultivar is faster growing than the species; broadly oval form; 50 feet high and 40 feet wide. Fall color is orange to red. Good heat tolerance and resistance to leaf hopper.

Commemoration® sugar maple (Acer saccharum ‘Commemoration’): 50 feet tall and 35 feet wide, with an oval to rounded form. Faster growth rate than the species. Thick green leaves are resistant to leaf tatter. Fall color is orange to orange-red.

Crescendo™ sugar maple (Acer saccharum ‘Morton’): 30 to 40 feet high and 30 feet wide; broadly oval shape. Tolerant of heat and drought once established. Dark green leaves that turn an orange-red in the fall. Introduced by The Morton Arboretum through Chicagoland® Grows.

Fall Fiesta® sugar maple (Acer saccharum ‘Bailsta’): 60 to 70 feet high and 40 to 50 feet wide; oval to rounded shape. Leathery glossy green leaves turning yellow, orange, and red in fall. Faster growing than other sugar maples.

Green Mountain® sugar maple (Acer saccharum ‘Green Mountain’): 50 to 60 feet high and 45 to 50 feet wide; upright, oval shape. Adaptable to moderately high pH. Tolerant of heat and dry conditions. Dark green leathery foliage that turns orange and golden yellow during fall. Thick leaves that are resistant to leaf scorch.

Legacy® sugar maple (Acer saccharum ‘Legacy’): Oval form; growing 50 feet high and 35 feet wide. Very thick, green leaves are resistant to tatter and drought damage. Red-orange to red fall color.

Majesty® sugar maple (Acer saccharum ‘Flax Mill’): A broadly oval-shaped cultivar; grows 50 feet high and 40 feet wide. Resistant to frost cracking. Orange to red fall color.

PLANT PROFILE:Fall Fiesta® Sugar Maple

Acer saccharum ‘Bailsta’ PP11,119

Description & Overview

Compact and sturdy when young, the Fall Fiesta® Sugar maple matures to a symmetrical, full-sized tree with thick, dark green foliage. It truly shines in autumn, its leaves turning a brilliant mix of red, orange and yellow color!

Core Characteristics

Wisconsin Native: No – Variety of North American Native USDA Hardiness Zone: to zone 4 Mature Height: 50 feet Mature Spread: 40 feet Growth Rate: Slow Growth Form: Upright, rounded canopy Light Requirements: Full Sun to Partial Shade Site Requirements: Intolerant of compacted soil and salt spray. Flower: Insignificant Bloom Period: April Foliage: Thick, glossy dark green Fall Color: Red, Orange, Yellow Urban Approved: No Fruit Notes: Samara

Suggested Uses:

Although intolerant of salt spray and compacted soil, the Fall Fiesta® Sugar Maple does well when sited away from roads and areas with heavy soil. Use it as a focal point for fall color or as an accent tree.

Wildlife Value:

Branch crotches provide good cover and nesting value to bird species. Like other Sugar Maples, the Fall Fiesta® Sugar Maple provides habitat for insects which birds will eat. The samaras provide a winter food source for birds as well. Look for Orioles, Wrens, and Warblers.

Maintenance Tips:

With its slower growth rate, the Fall Fiesta® Sugar Maple requires structural pruning by a trained arborist every 7-10 years to maintain good form and vigor.

We invite you to check out the Arborist For Hire lookup at the Wisconsin Arborist Association website to find an ISA Certified Arborist near you.

Pests/Problems:

Like other maples, Fall Fiesta® Sugar Maple can be infected by tar spot (Rhystima spp.). This is an ornamental disease and will not kill the tree.

Although no major disease problems have been noted, Fall Fiesta® Sugar Maples can develop Verticillium Wilt, Anthracnose, and Cankers. Leaf Scorch may develop in especially dry conditions. Maintaining tree vigor through proper watering and mulch is the best way to prevent these diseases from damaging the tree.

Scale insects, borers, and aphids can sometimes damage the tree. Keep the tree healthy to prevent these insects from causing heavy damage. If a tree has become infested, contact an arborist to develop a plant health care plan.

Leaf Lore:

Fall Fiesta® Sugar Maple is a Bailey’s Nursery cultivar selected in 1987. Compared to pure Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum), Fall Fiesta® Sugar Maple is more vigorous and symmetrical in growth. Its thicker leaves give it good resistance to leaf scorch and make it more heat, wind, and drought tolerant than the species.

Companion Plants:

The Fall Fiesta® Sugar Maple is a statement on its own, but can also be paired with Musclewood for added fall color and varied texture. Shade-tolerant perennials can also be used to fill out the base, like Hostas, Coralbells, or Geranium.

FALL FIESTA® SUGAR MAPLE BENCHCARD

Are answers to diseases hidden in the leaves and bark of trees such as maples? Researchers are finding out. (Photograph: University of Rhode Island)

In the 1992 film Medicine Man, biochemist Robert Campbell, played by actor Sean Connery, searches for new drugs in the Amazon’s vast rainforests. There Campbell finds a cure for cancer not in the rainforest’s rare flowers – which don’t have “juju,” or the power to heal – but in an indigenous ant species.

All is looking up, until a logging company builds a road straight to Campbell’s research station. The biochemist demands that the construction stop. A fight breaks out, a bulldozer goes up in smoke, and the research station is destroyed. Along with it, acres of rainforest burn to the ground, taking the cure-containing ants with them.

Campbell perseveres, however. He remains in the Amazon, convinced he’ll locate more ants and stop cancer in its tracks.

Two decades after Medicine Man’s appearance, such seemingly fanciful discoveries are becoming realities.

The road to new treatments for common diseases may take scientists toward maple trees. (Photograph: NPS)

Thousands of miles from the tropical rainforest and far from any movie theater, other medicine men are on the path to cures – in this case, to inflammation and metabolic syndrome, a cluster of conditions that includes high blood pressure and elevated blood sugar and cholesterol levels.

Metabolic syndrome increases the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes. Remedies couldn’t come too soon: the overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the U.S., according to the Journal of the American Medical Association, is 33 percent.

As fall arrives and the leaves of sugar maples and red maples turn flame orange and deep crimson, could maple trees offer new answers to these all-too-common diseases?

To discover the medicinal secrets of maples, I talked with biochemist Navindra Seeram of the University of Rhode Island in Kingston, Rhode Island. Seeram is conducting research on plants’ bioactive properties. Amid bubbling beakers in his lab, he offered an in-depth look at autumn’s iconic maples.

Scientist Navindra Seeram and a member of his team study medicinal plant extracts. (Photograph: University of Rhode Island)

What led to your research on maple trees as sources of possible disease treatments?

There’s a lot of evidence for the ethnomedicinal use of maples — native peoples prized maple bark, for example, as a “liver tonic.” Today, maple syrup is the most-consumed and commercially produced food product obtained entirely from the sap of deciduous trees. It’s mostly tapped from sugar maples and red maples in eastern North America. These maples have biochemical substances in their leaves, bark and sap that may counteract inflammation, the root of many of the diseases we’re facing.

Do all maple trees have these biochemical properties?

Yes and no. Our studies of several maple species show that there are minor variations in the biochemistry of the sap, but larger differences in the biochemistry of other parts of the trees.

Based on research in your lab, what diseases could maples cure?

I don’t like to use the word “cure” for plant-derived foods such as maple syrup because they’re usually more preventive than therapeutic. But research on non-human animals demonstrates that maple syrup reduces the inflammation associated with metabolic syndrome and other diseases.

Maple syrup may help with metabolic syndrome and type-2 diabetes. (Photograph: Wikimedia Commons)

How can a syrup that tastes sugary potentially counteract metabolic syndrome and diabetes?

Maple syrup won’t cure metabolic syndrome or diabetes. But its unique “cocktail” of minerals, vitamins, amino acids, organic acids and phytochemicals may work against the inflammation linked with, for example, type-2 diabetes. Among sweeteners, I believe that maple syrup is a healthier choice than refined sugar. However, like everything else, it should be consumed in moderation. My advice is to drizzle, not guzzle!

With Alzheimer’s disease on the rise in the U.S. and around the world, do maples offer any hope?

A healthy lifestyle that includes enough exercise and a proper diet may prevent or delay the onset of several chronic human diseases, including cancer, heart disease and some neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s. There are also indications of beneficial effects of maple compounds on Alzheimer’s, possibly by counteracting neuroinflammation.

Sugar maples are attractive for more than their beautiful fall foliage. They may contain new treatments for diseases such as Alzheimer’s. (Photograph: Wikimedia Commons/Famartin)

Do you foresee new drugs being developed from maple trees?

Yes. Certain molecules in maple syrup could be synthesized and modified into substances with drug-like properties. Extracts of maple syrup that are sugar-reduced and phytochemical-enriched, as well as extracts of other maple parts, are being developed by my group as nutraceuticals. Nutraceuticals are standardized extracts derived from foods, including plants. In the U.S., nutraceuticals are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration as dietary supplements and food additives.

If maple syrup and leaves contain potential new treatments, how can people obtain the benefits? How much would be needed to make a difference?

Before we can understand dosing, we’ll need to wait for the results of studies on maples’ effects on people.

In North America, sugar maples range from Canada south along the Appalachian Mountains and across the U.S. Upper Midwest. (Map: USGS)

Is research on maples and disease taking place in other countries? For example, Canada is known for its maple trees.

There are ongoing studies on maples and their health benefits in Canada and Japan, which, like the U.S., have extensive stands of maple trees.

What’s next in the link between maples and human health?

We’re expanding from maple sap and syrup to studies of other parts of the tree, such as using leaves in brewed teas, and bark as a spice like cinnamon. Compounds in almost every part of a maple tree show promise in fighting disease.

Should we all grow a sugarbush — a plantation of sugar maples – in our backyards?

As compared with cutting down the trees and constructing more shopping malls, yes! Who knows what formulas for health that sugarbush might someday reveal?

At the University of Rhode Island’s Heber W. Youngken, Jr. Medicinal Garden, visitors see plants that help treat everything from heart disease to cancer. (Photograph: University of Rhode Island)

Planting Sugar Maple Trees – How To Grow A Sugar Maple Tree

If you are thinking of planting sugar maple trees, you probably already know that sugar maple are among the best-loved trees on the continent. Four states have picked this tree as their state tree – New York, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Vermont – and it is also the national tree of Canada. While grown commercially for its sweet syrup and value as lumber, sugar maple also makes an attractive addition to your backyard. Read on for more sugar maple tree facts and to learn how to grow a sugar maple tree.

Sugar Maple Tree Facts

Sugar maple tree facts provide lots of interesting information about this remarkable tree. Well before colonists began sugar maple tree growing in this country, Native Americans tapped the trees for their sweet syrup and used the sugar made

from it for bartering.

But sugar maples are lovely trees in and of themselves. The dense crown grows in an oval shape and offers ample shade in the summer. The leaves are dark green with five distinct lobes. The small, green flowers grow in groups hanging downward on slender stems. They flower in April and May, producing the “helicopter” winged seeds that mature in autumn. About that same time, the tree puts on a fantastic fall show, its leaves turning to bright shades of orange and red.

How to Grow a Sugar Maple Tree

If you are planting sugar maple trees, select a site in full sun for best results. The tree will also grow in partial sun, with at least four hours of direct, unfiltered sun every day. A sugar maple tree growing in deep, well-drained soil is happiest. The soil should be acidic to slightly alkaline.

Once you have finished planting sugar maple trees, they will grow at a slow to medium rate. Expect your trees to grow from one foot to two feet each year.

Caring for Sugar Maple Trees

When you are caring for sugar maple trees, irrigate them during dry weather. Although they are fairly drought tolerant, they do best with soil that is constantly moist but never wet.

A sugar maple tree growing in too small a space will only create heart ache. Be sure you have sufficient room to grow one of these beauties before planting sugar maple trees – they grow to 74 feet tall and 50 feet wide.

Sugar Maple Tree

Sweet Addition to Any Landscape

Why Sugar Maple Trees?

Beauty, charm and strength – the Sugar Maple is a hardwood that embodies it all. Rising to large heights, the Sugar Maple expands its grace, spreading out its incomparable leaves. It’s no wonder New York and Vermont have both adopted it as their state trees and Canada has adorned its national flag with the Sugar Maple’s incredible leaf.

Plus, you get a show of color like no other. In fact, its autumn foliage stands out above all others in the landscape. That’s when the substantial green leaves morph to rich golds, bright yellows, then a burnt orange so vivid it almost glows. The show of color ends with an unmatched deep red that will keep you looking forward to next fall.

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With a gorgeous array of brilliant colors, Sugar Maples make an exceptional roadside tree. But the best part of our Sugar Maple is that we’ve planted, grown and nurtured it long before shipping. Now, you reap the rewards of our hard work at the nursery with better long-term results in your own landscape.

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Planting & Care

1. Planting: Tolerant of soggy soils, Sugar Maples grow nicely in any fertile soil but prefer well-draining soil. And once established, it tolerates droughts with little harm although infrequent, deep irrigation will help retain more foliage in extremely dry periods, especially in regions with hot summers.

Select a spot where the tree is in full to partial sun exposure (4 to 8 hours of sunlight per day), and dig a hole for the Maple that’s 2 to 3 times the width of your tree’s root ball and equal depth. Place your tree in the planting hole, keeping the top of the root ball even with the ground. Fill a small amount of the soil into the hole to maintain the tree’s upright position and water thoroughly. Once the water has absorbed into the root ball and surrounding soil, fill the remaining soil into the planting hole. Pack firmly and water a second time.

Finally, mulch to retain soil moisture and keep competing growth away from the planting site.

2. Watering: During its formative years, your Maple will require weekly watering, and as it matures, your tree will still need plenty of water during the summer months. Be sure to water correctly – light green leaves are a sign of over-watering, while drooping leaves signify both over-watering and under-watering.

3. Fertilizing: During the first growing season, use only slow-release fertilizer tablets on your new maple. Any 10-10-10 fertilizer will be suitable. Fertilize your maple twice a month when it is coming out of dormancy and once a month during the summer. Discontinue before the tree returns to its dormant state.

4. Pruning: Prune when the leaves have fully matured. At this time, there will be less sap. Remove all dead or dying branches. Do this before you start cutting live branches; it will give you a better idea of what your tree looks like and how many of the live branches you’re going to need to cut. Decide which branches you’re going to cut before you start cutting. Look for large branches growing at narrow angles to the main trunk, branches that are rubbing others or branches that are growing inwards and crossing others.

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Sugar Maple

Acer saccharum

Leaves are opposite simple.

The sugar maple (hard maple, rock maple) is one of our largest and finest forest trees, growing to a feet with a diameter of 2 or more feet. The tree produces a dense, round, compact crown when grown in the open and is used quite extensively as a shade or ornamental tree. In the fall the yellow, red and crimson colors of the leaves form a very showy and beautiful part of the landscape. It is the best of the maples for production of maple syrup and sugar.

It is found throughout southeastern Canada, the eastern United States and as far west as central Iowa.

The leaves are three to five lobed, but usually five lobed. The lobes are deeply cut with rounded divisions between the lobes, dark green above and pale green with a silvery cast below.

The twigs are opposite on the stem, smooth and gray to brown in color.

Similar to other maples, the fruit is a pair of winged seeds about 1 inch long. The seeds ripen in the autumn.

On large branches and trunk the bark is light to dark gray, narrowly ridged with long, deep furrows, sometimes becoming scaly.

Leaves:

  • Five main lobes.
  • Margin (edge) of leaf is entire (not serrated).
  • The margins of the central lobe are parallel.
  • Notches between the lobes are moderately deep.
  • Palmately veined.
  • Base of lobes are rounded.
  • Turn yellow, orange, and scarlet in the fall.

Branching: opposite

Bark: dark gray. As the tree matures, the bark becomes deeply fissured (looks shaggy).

Height: 60 to 80 ft.

Trunk Diameter: 1 to 3 ft.

Longevity: 200 to 300 yrs.

Tolerance: extremely tolerant

Range: eastern U.S. as far south as Tennessee

Fun Facts:

  • Maple syrup is made from the sap.
  • Lumber used for furniture and bowling alleys.
  • It takes about 40 gallons of sap to make one gallon of maple syrup.

Identify Another Tree

Sugar Maple

(Acer saccharum)

Leaves Bark Fruit

Family: Sapindaceae

Habitat: Grows in moist, fertile soil

in wooded areas although it is quite

tolerant of a variety of soil types. They

can grow in the shade of larger trees.

Range: Many states in the northeast and

south in the United States. Extends out

westward towards Oklahoma.

Physical Characteristics:

Leaves: Grow up to 20 centimeters in both

length and width. The leaves are green in

the spring and summer. In the fall they

change to a bright yellow, orange or

red-orange color.

Flowers: The flowers grow in clusters of

around 5-10. They are yellow-green in color

and do not have petals.

Fruit: It is a double samara (has a flattened

wing) with two seeds each having a wing.

The seeds are 7-10 millimeters in diameter

and the wing is 2-3 centimeters in length.

Interesting Facts:

Sugar maple is a “keystone species” and

thus an ecologically significant element of

deciduous forests in the northern and

central U.S. forming associations with

species of trees such as beech, yellow

birch, white ash and red oak, among

others.

Sugar maples can transfer water via their

roots from regions of moist soil to drier

layers of lesser depth, a process known

as hydraulic transfer. This redistribution of

water can aid nearby plants.

The wood is used for furniture, musical

instruments and flooring.

Maple syrup is made from the sap, it takes

40 gallons of sap to make one gallon of syrup.

Sugar maple numbers are down in many areas

due to disturbances such as forest cutting as

well as air pollution and acid precipitation.

In the neighborhood of roads, deicing salts

have also damaged trees. The spread of

Norway maple has contributed to the decline

of sugar maple.

Webpage References:

Additional References:

Emerman, S. H. and Dawson, T. E. 1996. Hydraulic lift and its influence on the water content of the rhizosphere: an example from sugar maple, Acer saccharum. Oecologia 108: 273-278.

Hett, J. M. 1971. A Dynamic Analysis of Age in Sugar Maple Seedlings. Ecology 52:1071–1074.

Tyree, M. Maple sap exudation: How it happens. Maple Syrup Journal 4:10–11.

10 Interesting Facts About Maple Trees

Maple trees are one of the most well-known trees, spanning across the northern hemisphere. The maple’s leaf is even featured on the Canadian flag! Maples belong to the family Aceraceae, and there are more than 128 species, making it an incredibly diverse and fascinating family of trees. Ready to learn more about these trees? Here are 10 interesting facts about maple trees!

Maple trees are ancient

According to fossil records, maple trees are actually quite ancient. They date back to at least 100 million years ago, if not even older. These trees were growing when dinosaurs roamed the Earth! Of course, not every species of maple tree survived from that time. But maples belonging to the family Aceraceae existed back then and still today.

Maples vary radically in size

With more than 128 species of maple in the world, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that they vary so much in size! Some maple trees can be grown as Bonsai trees, only a few inches tall. Others tower to upwards of 150 feet! The world’s largest known maple tree, a bigleaf maple found in Oregon, was 103 feet tall and had a spread of 112 feet! Unfortunately, the tree succumbed to a wind storm in 2011.

Maples do flower

When you think of maple trees, you probably think of their foliage. But maples do flower as well! These flowers can be red, yellow, orange, and even green. The flowers are pollinated by insects like flies and honeybees. These seeds produce the iconic “helicopter” seeds that fall slowly from the trees’ branches.

Maples produce the best syrup

Some of the sweetest, richest syrup comes from maple trees. A maple tree must be 30 years old before it can have its sap extracted and made into syrup. It takes somewhere between 40 and 50 gallons of maple sap to produce just 1 gallon of syrup. The process of harvesting sap for syrup does not harm the trees.

Maples live a long time

When grown in the right conditions, maple trees can be quite hardy and live a long time. If planted in the right place, a maple tree can live for 300 or more years!

Maples suffer from disease and pests too

The Asian long-horned beetle in particular is a huge threat to maple trees in Canada and the United States. Thousands of trees in Illinois, New York, New Jersey, and Massachusetts have been lost to the invasive insect. Maple trees are also impacted by various fungal diseases.

Maples are used to make whiskey

Syrup isn’t the only commercial good that maple trees make! Charcoal from maple trees is required in order to make Tennessee whiskey, using the Lincoln County Process. This process is used when making almost all Tennessee whiskey.

Maple is a “tonewood”

Maple trees are considered to be a tonewood, which is a type of wood that carries sound waves well. Because of this, some musical instruments are made from the wood of maple trees. Violins, violas, double basses, and cellos all have components that are usually made of maple wood. Drums and some woodwind instruments, like the bassoon, also are made from maple. The necks of electric guitars are also commonly made from maple. Les Paul once famously wanted an all-maple guitar, but due to the weight of the wood, he had to settle on using maple only for the tops of the guitars.

Maples are a tourism boon

Some of the most iconic fall foliage is a result of the maple’s red, orange, and yellow autumn foliage. Sugar maple trees are the favorites for fall foliage, attracting people primarily to New England and eastern Canada. In Japan, there is a custom called momijigari that specifically celebrates the changing of the maple’s leaves.

Maples are important for bees

More and more alarm bells are being raised about the loss of honeybees. Without bees to pollinate, it will be much harder to feed the world! Maple trees are an important source of pollen early in the spring for honey bees waking up from their hibernation. If you want to support your local bees, plant some maple trees!

Sugar Maple Seedlings

Sugar Maple Seedlings For Sale Affordable At Tennessee Wholesale

Sugar Maple seedlings or better known as Acer Saccharum. Hardy in planting zones 3-8. The growth rate is 3 feet each year. Plant in full sun or partial shade and in almost any kind of soil as it is very adaptable to a wide range of soil conditions. They will bring wildlife to your landscape from rabbits to squirrels that feed on seeds, buds, and leaves. They prefer soil that is moist but does have some drought resistance. Beautiful fall color that is brilliant red and yellow; In spring from April to May there will be green to yellow flowers. It does have a fruit that is second winged seeds on one stem. These trees make lovely shade trees and could cut down on cooling cost due to the shade they provide. These trees prefer to be planted deep, in the well-drained and moist soil.

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Broad, textured leaves of green tops and silver bottoms, combined with the tree’s brilliant fall foliage display also make it a popular choice for planting in home landscapes. The deciduous nature of the large tree blocks hot summer when while allowing the warm rays of winter sun to permeate the home landscape, both of which helps to lower home energy usage and costs. This fast-growing maple tree grows well in soggy soil, nutrient depleted soil and in other conditions in which most other trees refuse to grow. Silver maples are easily adaptable, thrive when transplanted and can live well over 100 years.

Zones: 3-9

Mature Height: 50′-70’ft

Width: 40′-60’ft

Shape: Oval to round shape

Growth: Fast growing

Sunlight: Full Sun

Soil: Does best in moist, well-drained soil but will adapt to poor soil

Botanical name: Acer saccharinum

Silver maples produce tiny greenish-yellow flowers in the early spring, which are quickly eclipsed by newly sprouting leaves. The fall foliage color keeps in line with its spring floral display and turns a brilliant yellow in autumn. Silver maples produce strong, thick limbs which lend themselves well to children’s swings and tree houses.

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Sugar Maple Seedlings are known for their ecstatic maple syrup and thick lumber

The Sugar Maple Seedlings, (Acer Saccharum), also known as the Rock Maple, is a deciduous tree that is grown for its syrup, thick lumber, and beautiful colors. It is one North Americas most loved trees and is the reason for New England’s reputation for their spectacular fall color.

Native to Missouri, the Sugar Maple tree grows in hardy zones of 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8. Growing in hardwood forests in Eastern Canada from Nova Scotia to Western Quebec and South from Ontario to South Eastern Manitoba. It also increases in the Lakewood’s area, and in the Northern parts of North America from New York to West Virginia and Vermont.

Sugar Maple Seedlings thrive the best in full to partial sun, with at least four hours per day of being in direct/ unfiltered sunlight. They need to be in well-drained soil that has alkaline in it, and that is acidic. If in proper soil and light, the Sugar Maple will grow at a moderate rate of one to two feet per year, as its fastest-growing rates are during its first 35 years. At maturity, the tree will be between 40’ and 80’ tall, with the possibility of growing to 100’ tall, and will measure 30’ to 60’ across.

Sugar Maple Seedlings are a very aesthetically pleasing tree

Its leaves come in 3-5 lobes that are 3”-6” wide and that are dark green during the summer and change from green to yellow to burnt orange, to red during the fall and early winter months. The Sugar Maple flowers from early April through the end of May. It has small green flowers that grow in groups that hang downward on slender stems. In the autumn, when the leaves start to change color, the tree produces ‘helicopter’ winged seed pods.

With its vibrant, showy colors, and enormous size, there’s no wonder why the Sugar Maple is one of the United States most loved trees.

In the summer months, if you are in drought-prone areas, you will have to give this tree water. This tree is loved by many because of the bright red and orange leaves that it produces during the fall months, this tree is often a show stopper among people who drive by. You will love having this tree in your yard. It is easy to grow and will last for many many years.

The Sugar Maple Seedlings have a lot of close relatives such as the Bigtooth Maple. Some botanists even classify Bigtooth Maple as a subspecies of the Sugar Maple. However, it is the Norway Maple that Sugar Maple is often confused. Ironically, they are not closely related when it comes to genus. It is easy to identify a Sugar Maple from a Norway Maple if you know what to look. Sugar Maple has a clear sap while Norway Maple has a white colored sap. Sugar Maple has brown sharp tipped buds while the Norway Maple has more of a green or reddish tipped buds. The leaf lobes of Sugar maple are more in triangle shape while Norway Maple has more of squarish leaf lobes.

Sugar Maple Seedlings have lots of uses

In fact, it is one of the most important trees in Canada because of the sap which is the primary ingredient in making maple syrup. It is possible to make Maple syrup from other kinds of tree sap. However, the sugar content in Sugar Maple is the highest among the species, and other trees produce a more cloudy sap.

One of the best things about Sugar Maple is the wood that it produces. Sugar Maple wood is one of the densest and hardest. The wood is often used as flooring or furniture making it highly prized by woodworkers and woodcrafters.

Any decent bowling pins and bowling alleys are made from Sugar Maple wood. The wood is also used in most basketball courts. In fact, the wood flooring that is used in the NBA is manufactured from Sugar Maple. In the baseball league, Sugar Maple baseball bats are very popular. Most skateboards are made of Sugar Maple wood. Sugar Maple wood is also used in making musical instruments like the sides and back of violins, guitar necks, and drum shells.

If you are interested in buying Sugar Maple tree for your home, then you can hardly go wrong with it. The tree is often a favorite when it comes to being a garden tree or street tree. The tree is fast growing, easy to transplant, easy to propagate and produces beautiful colors in the fall. Sugar Maple can develop in any soil, even if it is sandy, as long as it is not very dry. Loose or light clay soils are also known to support the tree. This makes Sugar Maple a viable option for homeowners who are living in an area having loose or light clay soils. However, the best medium for rooting for the tree is a rooted well-drained loam.

Sugar Maple Seedlings

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Sugar Maple’s leaves turn to shades of red, orange, and yellow during Autumn. The branches of the tree are reddish-brown and are very slim. The buds on the tree are too small in size. This tree produces greenish-yellow flowers, and a fruit called a double samara; Sugar maple trees are among the most stunning when it comes to fall foliage; Their crimson or orange leaves make them immensely popular landscaping choices. The sugar maple is one of the most popular trees used in parks because it is relatively fast-growing, is quite easy to transplant and has cute looks. The sugar maple is the primary source of maple syrup. The fruit described as being wing-shaped. The tree itself is firmly ensconced in U.S. culture; it’s the state tree of Wisconsin, West Virginia, Vermont and New York. Without a doubt, a sugar maple tree would be an excellent and pleasing addition to your landscaping.

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When the autumn time comes to the leaves on this tree turn to shades of red, orange, and yellow; This tree is beautiful to look at but is also used to harvest maple syrup. The branches of the tree are reddish-brown and are very slim. The buds on the tree are too small in size. This tree produces greenish-yellow flowers, and a fruit called a double samara; Sugar maple trees are among the most stunning when it comes to fall foliage. Their crimson or orange leaves make them immensely popular landscaping choices. The sugar maple is one of the most popular trees used in parks because it is relatively fast-growing, is quite easy to transplant and has cute looks. The sugar maple is the primary source of maple syrup; The Sugar Maple Tree is a slow-growing maple; The fruit described as being wing-shaped. The tree itself is firmly ensconced in U.S. culture; it’s the state tree of Wisconsin, West Virginia, Vermont and New York. Without a doubt, a sugar maple tree would be an excellent and pleasing addition to your landscaping.

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Sugar Maple trees considered as fast-growing trees. On top of that, it can be an excellent shade tree if it is allowed to mature sufficiently. Sugar Maple trees usually grow to a height of twenty-five to thirty-five meters. Some of the fast-growing ones can reach heights up to forty-five meters. A ten-year-old Sugar Maple shade tree is usually five meters tall. The leaf of aSugar Maple is known for its distinct shape of having five palmate lobes. Its leaves classified as deciduous. The leaf coloring of the Sugar Maple tree is spectacular during the fall season. The colors may range from a bright yellow, orange, and red-orange. The leaves tend to change color unevenly during the fall, which only amplifies its natural beauty. If you get lucky, you can find all the leaf colors in a single tree. There are instances that certain parts of the Maple trees change colors weeks behind or ahead than the rest of the tree.

Maple tree flowers in corymbs of five to ten together usually yellow-green and does not have any petals. Flowering often happens during spring and on a specific temperature range. The fruits of the Sugar Maple classify as double samara, and it has two winged seeds. These seeds typically fall off from the tree during autumn and are only viable for a few days. The Sugar Maple tree has a lot of close relatives such as the Bigtooth Maple. Some botanists even classify Bigtooth Maple as a subspecies of the Sugar Maple. However, it is the Norway Maple that Sugar Maple is often confused. Ironically, they are not closely related when it comes to the genus. It is easy to identify a Sugar Maple from a Norway Maple if you know what to look for. Sugar Maple has a bright sap while Norway Maple has a white colored fluid. Sugar Maple has brown sharp tipped buds while the Norway Maple has more of a green or reddish tipped buds. The leaf lobes of Sugar maple are more in triangle shape while Norway Maple has more of a squarish shaped leaf lobe.

Sugar Maple has lots of uses.

In fact, it is one of the most important trees in Canada because of the sap which is the primary ingredient in making maple syrup. It is possible to make Maple syrup from other kinds of tree sap. However, the sugar content in Sugar Maple is the highest among the species, and other trees produce a more cloudy fluid. One of the best things about Sugar Maple is the wood that it provides. Sugar Maple wood is one of the densest and hardest. The wood is often used as flooring or furniture making it highly prized by woodworkers and wood crafters. Any decent bowling pins and bowling alleys are made from Sugar Maple wood. The wood is also used in most basketball courts. In fact, the wood flooring that is used in the NBA is manufactured from Sugar Maple. In the baseball league, Sugar Maple baseball bats are very popular. Most skateboards are made of Sugar Maple wood. Sugar Maple wood is also used in making musical instruments like the sides and back of violins, guitar necks, and drum shells.

Sugar Maple Tree

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