Tennessee zone for planting

Corn was the chief agricultural product almost from the beginning of human settlement in Tennessee. Referred to as “Indian corn” throughout the 1800s, the cereal was widely cultivated by the Cherokees and formed a basic element of their diet. Most southern tribes practiced some form of the summer “green corn” festival in celebration of the life-giving grain.

The fact that corn could, with reasonable success, be grown in newly cleared ground made it the staple crop on most pioneer farms. Planted as soon as land was cleared (or even before, in hills between the stumps), corn was cultivated through May and June, “laid by” in July and August, then picked by hand in early autumn. It provided the basic sustenance for pioneer farmers. Corn whiskey was the distinctive drink of the Scots-Irish pioneer–a home distilled palliative easy to make and far cheaper than imported rum or wine. The adoption of cornmeal and pone was a benchmark of Americanization, that is, of the settlers’ moving away from the European and coastal preference for wheat flour and bread to local corn-based products.

Corn was admirably suited to the southern growing season; it produced a large amount of starch and glucose for fattening livestock; it was susceptible to few diseases or insect pests; and it yielded a larger food product than any other cereal. The amount of corn grown was closely tied to the production of hogs, for which it was the principal feed. Corn and hogs complemented one another perfectly and offered a type of farming well suited to the state’s many small landholders. As the basic ingredient in fattening animals for meat and in its other forms–meal, grits, hominy, whiskey–corn constituted the staple of most Tennesseans’ diets.

By 1840 Tennessee was the leading corn-producing state in the Union, with 12 percent of the nation’s total. Ten years later, the state grew enough corn to feed its three million hogs, the most in the nation. It made an ideal commercial crop since it could be readily transformed into marketable commodities like cured pork, whiskey, and cornmeal. Such products were easily stored and shipped by riverboat to the cotton-growing areas of the Deep South. As plantations concentrated on cotton before the Civil War, the granaries of border states like Tennessee grew correspondingly. Tennessee produced twice as much “Indian corn” between 1850 and 1860 as all other grains combined, and its prolific corn-hog agriculture served as a breadbasket for the Cotton South.

Corn continued to play a prominent role in post-Civil War agriculture, although prices did not recover to their pre-war level for several decades. While corn was grown universally before the war as a means of self-sufficiency, afterwards production began to follow market prices. Middle Tennessee counties such as Maury, Bedford, Wilson, Williamson, and Rutherford were the powerhouse corn producers for most of the nineteenth century. The extent of production was highest in 1900 with 3.37 million acres planted yielding an average of twenty-eight bushels (or about five “barrels,” as corn was then measured) per acre. Traditionally, Tennesseans preferred single-ear, white varieties of corn such as White Dent and Tennessee Red Cob, although multi-eared varieties such as Neal’s Paymaster were gaining acceptance by the twentieth century.

The value and amount of corn harvested peaked in 1920, after which Tennessee agriculture in general began a slow decline. The corn harvest lost half of its value from 1920 to 1925. The introduction of modern hybrids, tractors and mechanical pickers, chemical insecticides, and fertilizers greatly increased the yield (and cost) of corn farming, even as acreage and the number of farmers declined. Extensive dam construction in Tennessee also reduced accessibility to river bottoms–land that had been devoted almost exclusively to corn.

The productivity of corn farming quadrupled following World War II, with higher yields being produced on considerably less land. Cultivation also migrated westward in the state. By 1954 nine of the top ten corn-producing counties were in West Tennessee, with Weakley, Gibson, and Obion leading the way. Also during the 1950s cotton and tobacco finally surpassed corn in terms of cash value. Once vital to the subsistence and commercial life of rural Tennesseans, corn continues to play a significant, though much diminished, role in the state’s farm economy.

Find your U.S. Sunset climate zone

A plant’s performance is governed by the total climate: length of growing season, timing and amount of rainfall, winter lows, summer highs, wind, and humidity.

Sunset’s climate zone maps take all these factors into account, unlike the familiar hardiness zone maps devised by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which divides most of North America into zones based strictly on winter lows.

The U.S.D.A. maps tell you only where a plant may survive the winter; our climate zone maps let you see where that plant will thrive year-round.

Sunset’s Climate Zones consider temperature as well as other important factors:

Latitude
Generally, the farther an area is from the equator, the longer and colder are its winters. Closer to the poles, the number of daylight hours increases in summer and decreases in winter.

Elevation
Gardens high above sea level get longer and colder winters, often with intense sunlight, and lower night temperatures all year.

Ocean influence
Weather that blows in off the oceans and the Great Lakes tends to be mild and laden with moisture in the cool season.

Continental air influence
The North American continent generates its own weather, which ― compared with coastal climates ― is colder in winter, hotter in summer, and more likely to get precipitation any time of year. The farther inland you live, the stronger this continental influence. Wind also becomes a major factor in open interior climates.

Mountains, hills, and valleys
In the West, the Coast Ranges take some marine influence out of the air that passes eastward over them. The Sierra-Cascades and Southern California’s interior mountains further weaken marine influence.

From the Rocky Mountains to the Appalachians, continental and arctic air dominate, with moist air from the Gulf pushing north during the warm season.

During winter, Arctic outbreaks are most intense between the Rockies and the Appalachians. Both ranges act as barriers that limit the influence of the cold beyond them.

Microclimates
Local terrain can sharply modify the climate within any zone. South-facing slopes get more solar heat than flat land and north-facing slopes. Slope also affects airflow: warm air rises, cold air sinks.

Because hillsides are never as cold in winter as the hilltops above them or the ground below them, they’re called thermal belts. Lowland areas into which cold air flows are called cold-air basins.

Microclimates also exist within every garden. All else being equal, garden beds on the south side of an east-west wall, for example, will be much warmer than garden beds on the north side of the same wall.

What is the difference between USDA & Sunset climate zones?

USDA Zones
In the 1960’s the US Department of Agriculture began compiling information about weather records throughout the U.S. in order to show the average coldest temperatures for each region. They transformed these records into various zones of plant hardiness, and created a map showing each zone. In 1990, the USDA map was updated to create 11 USDA plant hardiness zones.

Sunset Zones
Sunset Magazine created their own 24-zone climate system over 40 years ago. Sunset zones are more precise than USDA zones because they consider many other factors besides a region’s average cold temperature, including: summer highs, elevations, proximity to mountains or coasts, rainfall, humidity, aridity, and growing seasons. These zones are specifically for the western region of the U.S.

SUNSET and USDA ZONES

What is the difference between USDA & Sunset climate zones?

USDA Zones
In the 1960’s the US Department of Agriculture began compiling information about weather records throughout the U.S. in order to show the average coldest temperatures for each region. They transformed these records into various zones of plant hardiness, and created a map showing each zone. In 1990, the USDA map was updated to create 11 USDA plant hardiness zones.

Sunset Zones
Sunset Magazine created their own 24-zone climate system over 40 years ago. Sunset zones are more precise than USDA zones because they consider many other factors besides a region’s average cold temperature, including: summer highs, elevations, proximity to mountains or coasts, rainfall, humidity, aridity, and growing seasons. These zones are specifically for the western region of the U.S.

Here at the Front Yard Nursery we label all of our plants according to the Sunset climate zones. Placerville is in Sunset Zone 7.
To find out what Sunset zone your region is .

Note that Sunset Climate Zones are used as guidelines for determining which plants may thrive in a given area. Other factors such as microclimates and plant location must also be considered.


USDA versus Sunset zones: Note the differences

Carol Savonen Special to the Statesman Journal Published 3:02 AM EDT Sep 18, 2015 A Brandywine seed produced by Territorial Seed Company has been selected to perform well in the Willamette Valley’s Maritime conditions. But plant a Brandywine seed from Kentucky, and it might perform quite differently than the locally bred and selected strain. Statesman Journal file

Question: What do you think of the USDA hardiness zones versus the Sunset gardening zones? Which do you prefer? Why are there two systems? It is confusing!

Answer: Most of us gardening in and around the Willamette Valley reside in USDA hardiness zone 8b. USDA bases their hardiness zones on average temperature ranges only.

Sunset climate zones are based more on local microclimates and quirks of our western landscape. Western Oregon is in Sunset climate zones 4, 5 or 6, depending on your elevation, exposure, distance from the ocean, etc.

I think the USDA hardiness rankings are not as descriptive as the Sunset climate zones for microclimates west of the Rockies. For example, those of us Western Oregonians residing in USDA zone 8b are in the same USDA hardiness zone as Austin, Texas, and Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.

Obviously, those of us in Western Oregon grow our gardens quite differently than gardeners in Texas and South Carolina. I have family in Austin, Texas, where it reaches more than 100 degrees quite often during several months of the year.

At least until the last couple years, Western Oregonians could count annual average 100-plus days per year on one hand. Summer rain is quite rare in our Maritime climate. Texas and South Carolina have summer storms and warm monsoonal rains emanating off the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic.

The USDA hardiness zones are of some use though. The maps of when to plant on the back of seed packages, especially from companies that have a national market, like Burpee, base their planting times on the USDA information. They are a broad brush portrait of climate patterns.

The Sunset Zone descriptions are quite specific and are of great help in understanding our own microclimates. For example, most of the Willamette Valley lies in Sunset Zone 6, characterized by a long growing season (155 days at Cottage Grove to 280 days in Portland neighborhoods). If you live near the Coast, in Zone 5, your growing season averages between 200 and 250 days, but you have less heat and warm-season vegetables like tomatoes, peppers and eggplants take longer to mature and ripen.

I live in a cool, Coast Range Valley at the foot of Marys Peak, in Zone 4, which has shorter growing season, colder temperatures and more snow than the Willamette Valley and the Coast, on average. I know this much is true — the Corvallis daffodils and fruit trees bloom weeks earlier than at my house. It is often 8 degrees cooler at my house than in town.

All three of these Sunset zones are considered “maritime” climates, heavily influenced by the Pacific Ocean, with summer drought, relatively mild temperatures and most of our precipitation coming in the fall, winter and spring months as rain.

Learning the details about the local climate zones will help you better select varieties appropriate for your region. Over the years, I’ve learned not to trust the “days to maturity” ratings on seed packages coming from other regions of the country.

Unless varieties come from local seed companies that were bred and selected for excellent performance in our pattern of climate, growing success with non-locally suited varieties may be way more of a crap shoot. For example, a Brandywine seed produced by Territorial Seed Company has been selected to perform well in our Maritime conditions. Plant a Brandywine seed from your cousin in Kentucky, and it might perform quite differently than the locally bred and selected strain.

“Days-to-maturity” listed for varieties grown and sold in other regions will not be accurate here. Keep in mind that warm-season vegetables, unless locally bred and selected, will probably take much longer to mature. Expect a generic package of summer crop seeds (say a watermelon) from a national company to take up to 50 percent longer to mature than it says on the package.

On the other hand, we can plant cold crops such as lettuce and greens way earlier and grow them for more months than in regions with super hot summers. Like the tortoise, our gardening season is generally long and slow.

Future complications loom. As our climate destabilizes, it may be more difficult to predict weather and climate zones and to know when and what to plant successfully. But hopefully, we will continue to enjoy a climate that makes gardening and growing our own food easier than in many other parts of the country.

Published 3:02 AM EDT Sep 18, 2015

Time in Nashville, Tennessee

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    Nashville, Davidson County, TN is located in Central Time Zone.

Current local time in Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee, Central Time Zone – daylight saving time change dates 2020

Local Time in Nashville, TN

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Best Perennials for Nashville and Middle Tennessee

Indian Summer Rudbekia

Perennials are the backbone to any garden. These flowers are some of the toughest and best performing plants that you will have in your landscape.

With so many types of perennials to chose from, we came up with the following list of the best perennials that we have found to help you make your dreams come true.

If you need help deciding which perennials would thrive in your garden, let one of our professionals at Acer Landscape Services design the perfect garden for you home that you may enjoy for years to come.

Below is a list of the best perennials for Nashville and Middle Tennessee area. As you look over the following list, you may find some that bring back some good memories. Maybe your grandmother grew them in her own yard, or maybe you have clipped some pictures out of a magazine that you want to incorporate, or have pictures of some of the beautiful gardens in Europe that inspires you. … a field of poppies, sunflowers, or lavender is spectacular!

The following list of full sun perennials is for zone 6 as well as all the Mid South

    • Clump verbena (Verbena canadensis)
    • Coneflowers (Rudbeckia spp.)
    • Northern Sea Oats (Can also take shade)
    • Purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea)
    • Big Sky hybrid coneflowers (Echinacea)
    • Swamp sunflowers (Helianthus simulans)
    • Yarrows (Achillea spp.)
    • Wormwoods (Artemisia spp.)
    • Butterfly Weed(Asclepias tuberosa)
    • False Indigo (Baptisia australis)
    • Snowbank boltonia (Boltonia asteroides ‘Snowbank’)
    • Chrysanthemums (Chrysanthemum spp.)
    • Shasta daisys (Chrysanthemum xsuperbum)
    • Hairy goldaster (Chrysopsis villosa)
    • Tickseed (Coreopsis grandiflora
    • Pinks (Dianthus spp.)
    • Hardy ageratum (Eupatorium coelestinum)
    • Joe-Pye weed (Eupatorium purpureum)
    • Gaura (Gaura Lindheimeri)
    • Daylilies (Hemerocallis spp.)
    • Candytuft (Iberis sempervirens)
    • Bearded iris hybrids
    • Japanese iris (Iris Kaempferi)
    • Yellow flag iris (Iris Pseudocorus)
    • Roof iris (Iris tectorum)
    • Spike gayfeather (Liatris spicata)
    • Tiger lily (Lilium tigrinum)
    • Russian sage (Perovskia atriplicifolia)
    • Common Rue (Puta graveolens)
    • Goldenrods (Solidago spp.)
    • Stokes’ aster (Stokesia laevis)
    • Red valerian (Centranthus ruber)
    • Showy primrose (Oenothera speciosa)
    • Garden phlox (Phlox paniculata)
    • Goodness Grows veronica (Veronica alpina ‘Goodness Grows’)
    • Verbenas (Verbena spp.)
    • Sages (Salvia spp.)
    • Sedums (Sedum spp.)
    • New Enland aster (Aster novae-angliae)
    • Lamb’s ear (Stachys byzantina)
    • Byzantine gladiolus (Gladiolus byzantinus)
    • Spiney Bear’s Breeches

Fall and spring are the two best times to plant perennials in your garden. It’s also a perfect time to be sure the soil is optimal for the success of your plants.

Contact Acer today to inquire about our design services to help you make your garden its very best.

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Plants For Tennessee

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Narrow Selection

Plants for Tennessee are easy to plant and maintain for the most part

Is your garden or landscape located in Tennessee? If so, then this page is for you. Every plant on this page is rated for zones 5a-8a (the USDA hardiness zones that apply to Tennessee), and we stock individual plants that have adapted over several generations to your climate. Better yet, all our plants are grown here in Tennessee so they’ll be perfectly suited to your garden.

Plants for Tennessee don’t have to be watered as often as most

How to grow plants in Tennessee
Tennessee has a high annual rainfall when compared with other areas in the US. This means you won’t need to water as often, but you will need to ensure you provide plenty of drainage for your plants, so they don’t get waterlogged. (If you do have a waterlogged or boggy area, choose wetland plants.) It’s also a good idea to plant lots of ground covers or lay lots of mulch to stop the rain from washing away your precious topsoil.

Plants for Tennessee should be planted with mulch and in the correct soil

While Tennessee gets some snow, you’re likely to get less snow each year than many other areas of the US. As snow is good for insulating plant roots during winter, you may also find your plants appreciate the same mulch and ground covers over winter — ground covers and mulch insulate the soil so the soil temperature fluctuates less and that keeps plant roots more comfortable. And happy plants means a better display for you when your plants come out of their dormancy.

Other than these things, your plants are likely to need little maintenance. Depending on your soil conditions, you may need to add some fertilizer, but you shouldn’t need to use vast amounts of fertilizer. Just choose plants that suit the light level and soil and in your garden and you should have no problems growing beautiful plants in your Tennessee garden.

Pro tip:
Tennessee’s climate is perfect for fruit trees and berries, many of which need a reasonable number of chilling winter hours to set fruit properly.

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