Sweet almond bush propagation

Pruning Flowering Almonds: How And When To Trim Flowering Almond Plants

An ornamental flowering almond (Prunus glandulosa) entrances you in early spring when its bare branches suddenly burst into flower. These small trees, native to China, are often multi-stemmed shrubs about four or five feet high, with lovely white or pink flowers. Pruning a flowering almond tree annually is a good way to keep the tree full and compact. If you want to learn how to prune a flowering almond, read on.

Pruning Flowering Almonds

Ornamental almonds are easy to grow. The plants are not picky about soil conditions as long as the site is well drained, and grow well in full sun or partial shade. However, in order to obtain more flowers on the tree, you’ll do better to plant in sun. The amount of sun the tree gets impacts how heavily blooms.

Flowering almond trees bloom in spring before they begin to leaf. The frothy flowers can be single or double, depending on the cultivar, and they seem to explode off of every limb. Since flowering almond trees are grown for the blooms, not fruit, the growth pattern of the blossoms helps you figure out when to trim flowering almond plants.

Almond trees bud on old wood. Therefore, ornamental almond pruning should take place in late spring, immediately after the blooms fade. That way, pruning flowering almonds won’t reduce the amount of beautiful blossoms you will get the following spring. If you prune in winter, you’ll clip off many of next year’s buds.

How to Prune a Flowering Almond

Pruning a flowering almond tree should be an annual affair. The trees respond well to pruning, and ornamental almond pruning is the best way to keep the tree an optimal height. When you learn how to prune a flowering almond, you’ll find it a simple matter.

You’ll need to sterilize the pruners with denatured alcohol before pruning flowering almonds to be sure you don’t spread disease. The next step in pruning a flowering almond shrub is to trim out all dead, insect infested or diseased branches. Prune back branches that cross or rub against each other.

Finally, complete your ornamental almond pruning by cutting back about a third of the tree’s new growth. Make each cut just above a lateral branch or bud. This clipping keeps the tree compact and encourages the formation of new buds. Some claim it encourages deeper rooting too.

What Is A Sweet Almond Bush – Learn About Sweet Almond Bush Care

Sweet almond bush is a plant that has won many fans in the American South. What is a sweet almond bush? It’s a large shrub or small tree native to Argentina. Sweet almond shrubs offer scalloped leaves and showy white flowers that exude a powerful, honeyed fragrance. The plant is sometimes called almond verbena. Read on for information on how to grow sweet almond verbena and for tips on sweet almond propagation.

What is a Sweet Almond Bush?

Sweet almond (Aloysia virgata) is a popular garden plant, especially in southern states. It can be evergreen, semi-evergreen, or deciduous depending on where you grow it. The shrub is hardy to U.S. Department of Agriculture zone 7. In cooler areas, it grows as a deciduous dwarf plant. In perpetually warm climates, it never loses

its stiff, scalloped leaves, even in winter, and it can rise to 15 feet tall (4.6 m.).

The long, spiked flower clusters of tiny almond-scented flowers are very fragrant. One plant can fill your garden with a strong sweet almond or vanilla-like fragrance. Flowers stay on the bush all summer long and well into fall, making sweet almonds good sources of nectar for butterflies and birds.

The textured leaves are stiff and green, scalloped at the edges. The shrub’s branches have a slightly weeping habit.

Growing Sweet Almond Verbena

Growing sweet almond verbena in full sun is recommended, although the plants can tolerate partial shade.

You don’t have to water much once the sweet almond is established. Sweet almond bush care requires only moderate to low irrigation, and the shrubs tolerate great heat.

While sweet almond bush care does not include deadheading, it’s a good idea to trim between bloom cycles since it tends to get leggy over time.

Sweet Almond Propagation

If you have a sweet almond tree, it’s very likely you will want more. Sweet almond propagation is quite easy with softwood or greenwood cuttings – nonflowering growth from the current year.

Take cuttings about as long as your hand in spring or early summer. Trim each cutting just below a node and insert the cut end into rooting medium.

Water the cuttings, then cover them with a plastic bag to retain moisture. Keep in the shade until the roots develop.

This Aloysia genus belongs to the verbena plant family Verbenaceae.

cultivar413 from Fallbrook, California ,via Wikimedia Commons

This is a common garden plant in the Southern states of the United States of America including Alabama, Arizona, Florida, and California.

The beauty of this small tree lies in its scalloped leaves and showy flowers.

Depending on where it is planted, Aloysia virgata is deciduous, evergreen, or semi-evergreen.

This lovely shrub or small tree has a few common English names as follows:

  • Sweet Almond Verbena
  • Incense Bush

Sweet Almond Bush Care

Size and Growth

Aloysia virgata is an upright to rounded shrub/tree, reaching up to 15′ feet tall in height and spreading up to 12′ feet in width.

The plant usually has evergreen leaves in warmer climates while it grows as a deciduous plant in cooler regions.

In subtropical climates, the plant swanks semi-evergreen leaves.

These versatile leaves are usually oval in shape with a smooth surface and a grayish-green color.

They expand to 4″ inches long and half as wide.

Flowering and Fragrance

Sweet almond bushes develop long, pointy spiked flower clusters with pretty white blooms.

These flowers are supremely fragrant and fill the garden with a sweet scent of vanilla or almonds.

Sweet almond flowers have an extensive bloom period.

They stay abloom all summer long and well into fall.

Lighting and Temperature

A sweet almond bush enjoys full sun and part shade.

It mostly requires five hours of sun a day.

The sweet flowering almond tree does best in a variety of climates.

However, it necessitates a brief period of chilly weather to kick-start flowering in the spring season.

The minimum cold temperature for the growth of sweet almond trees is from 10° to 15° degrees Fahrenheit (-12° to -9° C).

The large shrub falls in the USDA hardiness zone 7.

Watering and Feeding

Sweet almond bushes are drought-tolerant. They easily thrive in hot climates and won’t need regular watering.

However, this deciduous shrub requires little water to keep growing happy and healthy.

Ideally, water the bush twice a month, especially during the dry weather conditions.

When it comes to feeding, botanists suggest using a general landscape fertilizer (10-10-10) for the plant.

Apply it once in March, June, and August to encourage healthy growth.

An alternative to a general landscape fertilizer is a slow-release fertilizer.

Soil and Transplanting

The shrub performs best in an extensive range of soils from a loamy soil to clay.

During the first year of the plant, water it regularly to keep the soil wet.

This will help the plant to develop a strong and healthy root system.

Transplanting of established shrub shocks the plant which is why it is seldom recommended.

However, it may be necessary if a landscape is not ideal for the shrub’s growth.

Before transplantation, water the soil to soak it well.

This lets you dig up the shrub easily.

Next, dig up a wide hole to house the root ball.

Using burlap, place the root ball in the newly-dug hole.

Make sure to place the plant in a sunny spot so it gets enough sunlight.

Gently firm the soil and water it regularly.

Grooming and Maintenance

Unlike high-maintenance shrubs, sweet almonds do not need deadheading.

Pruning this flowering shrub should be an annual affair.

The plant bursts with beautiful flowers in early spring and tend to multiply in numbers over the seasons.

Hard pruning is often done to keep the plant full and compact.

Pruning should take place right after the bloom time is over i.e., late summers.

Avoid pruning in winter as this may cut off next year’s buds.

Always ensure the plant is receiving enough sunlight to grow.

You may also like the Flowering Almond (Prunus triloba).

How To Propagate and Grow Sweet Almond Verbena

The propagation of the incense bush is quite easy and simple.

Softwood or greenwood cuttings are common propagation methods for sweet almond bushes.

  • Take cuttings in late spring or early summer, making sure they are of your hand’s length.
  • Trim them and then place them in a plastic bag.
  • Keep them in the shade until the roots grow.

Sweet Almond Aloysia Virgata Pests and Diseases

The fruit trees are prone to many diseases and pest problems.

Some common diseases to watch out for are leaf spot, wilt, verticillium, cankers, black knot, and dieback.

Harmful insects include:

  • Plant Scale
  • Aphids
  • Borers
  • Caterpillars
  • Japanese beetles
  • Spider mite

Sweet Almond Bushes Uses

This bush is a lovely choice to accentuate your garden and to welcome pollinators like bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds.

The fragrant leaves and flowers bloom all year round and perfume gardens and backyards with a fresh, sweet scent.

Shrub Verbena Stock Photos and Images

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  • Lantana Or Shrub Verbena at Butchart Gardens – Brentwood Bay, near Victoria, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada
  • Common Lantana or Shrub Verbena (Lantana camara)
  • ‘Spanish Flag’ Lantana or Shrub Verbena, Javea / Xabia, Alicante Province, Comunidad Valenciana, Spain
  • Lemon Zest Verbenaceae Lantana Flowers which is a type of Verbena photographed at the Botanical Gardens in New Mexico.
  • LANTANA CAMARA
  • ‘Spanish Flag’ Lantana or Shrub Verbena, Javea / Xabia, Alicante Province, Comunidad Valenciana, Spain
  • Vouliagmeni Greece Lantana verbena Shrub
  • Lantana or Shrub Verbena, Javea / Xabia, Alicante Province, Comunidad Valenciana, Spain
  • bumblebee collecting pollen on a lantana macro,sunny summer day,blurred natural background
  • ‘Spanish Flag’ Lantana or Shrub Verbena, Javea / Xabia, Alicante Province, Comunidad Valenciana, Spain
  • LANTANA CAMARA MIX SHRUB VERBENA FLOWERS
  • bumblebee collecting pollen on a lantana macro,sunny summer day,blurred natural background
  • ‘Spanish Flag’ Lantana or Shrub Verbena, Javea / Xabia, Alicante Province, Comunidad Valenciana, Spain
  • Verbena Lantana flowers in full bloom in the summer sunshine – shallow depth of field, focus in the centre of the image.
  • Image of yellow shrub Verbena
  • ‘Spanish Flag’ Lantana or Shrub Verbena, Javea / Xabia, Alicante Province, Comunidad Valenciana, Spain
  • Lantana – Shrub Verbena Single Pink Flower Closeup With Shadow
  • Verbena thymifolia flowers.
  • lantana verbenaceae yellow and orange flowered shrub in full bloom against a stone wall
  • Verbena bonariensis and Cotinus coggygria ‘Young lady’ on a show garden at RHS Tatton Park flower show 2018, Cheshire, UK
  • lemon verbena isolated on white background
  • lush green bush of pink and purple verbena flower
  • Verbena bonariensis and Cotinus coggygria ‘Young lady’ on a show garden at RHS Tatton Park flower show 2018, Cheshire, UK
  • lemon verbena isolated on white background
  • lush green bush of pink and purple verbena flower
  • lemon verbena isolated on white background
  • a verbena enduraxcape pink fizz garden gardening plant plants gardens
  • Lemon grass (verbena) isolated on white background
  • lush green bush of pink and purple verbena flower
  • Lemon grass (verbena) isolated on white background
  • Zitronenverbene, Aloysia citrodora, verbena plant, several years’, lemon shrub, lemon aroma, herbs, Würzmittel, spice plant, herbs, spice herbs,
  • Lippia polystachya (verbena) isolated on white background
  • lush green bush of pink and purple verbena flower
  • Duranta erecta is a species of flowering shrub in the verbena family Verbenaceae, native from Mexico to South America and the Caribbean It is widely
  • Lippia polystachya (verbena) isolated on white background
  • lush green bush of pink and purple verbena flower
  • Lemon scented foliage and panicles of small white flowers of the half hardy lemon verbena, Aloysia citrodora
  • Lippia polystachya (verbena) isolated on white background
  • lush green bush of pink and purple verbena flower
  • Lemon scented foliage and panicles of small white flowers of the half hardy lemon verbena, Aloysia citrodora
  • Verbena ‘La France’
  • Lemon Verbena sprig (beebrush) isolated on white background
  • Wild type verbena
  • lemon verbena isolated on white background
  • Garden flowers. Lantana sp. genus of perennial flowering plants in the verbena family, Verbenaceae. common name are shrub verbena or lantana.
  • Wild type Spanish Flag verbena
  • Lantana vines with colorful blossoms are a banned, noxious plant in many places.
  • Foliage of a Lemon Verbena (Aloysia citrodora) plant.
  • Close-up of flower on Geisha Girl, a member of the verbena group of plants.
  • Lantana is a genus of about 150 species of perennial flowering plants in the verbena family, Verbenaceae.
  • Shrub verbena
  • Verbena Bonariensis, Verbena Patagonica, Verbenaceae.
  • Lantana is a genus of about 150 species of perennial flowering plants in the verbena family, Verbenaceae.
  • Shrub verbena
  • Lantana is a genus of about 150 species of perennial flowering plants in the verbena family, Verbenaceae.
  • Lantana camara flowers in a plant pot
  • Shrub verbena
  • Lantana is a genus of about 150 species of perennial flowering plants in the verbena family, Verbenaceae.
  • Lantana camara flowers
  • Green Organic Fresh Lemon Verbena Herb Leaves
  • Lantana is a genus of about 150 species of perennial flowering plants in the verbena family, Verbenaceae.
  • Lantana camara flowers
  • Green Organic Fresh Lemon Verbena Herb Leaves
  • Lantana is a genus of about 150 species of perennial flowering plants in the verbena family, Verbenaceae.
  • Lantana camara flowers
  • Green Organic Fresh Lemon Verbena Herb Leaves
  • Lantana is a genus of about 150 species of perennial flowering plants in the verbena family, Verbenaceae.
  • Aloysia citrodora. Lemon verbena growing in the herb garden.
  • Green Organic Fresh Lemon Verbena Herb Leaves
  • Lantana is a genus of about 150 species of perennial flowering plants in the verbena family, Verbenaceae.
  • Yellow lantana flowers close-up
  • Green Organic Fresh Lemon Verbena Herb Leaves
  • Lantana is a genus of about 150 species of perennial flowering plants in the verbena family, Verbenaceae.
  • Aloysia citrodora
  • Lantana is a genus of about 150 species of perennial flowering plants in the verbena family, Verbenaceae.
  • Green Organic Fresh Lemon Verbena Herb Leaves
  • Aloysia citrodora
  • Lantana is a genus of about 150 species of perennial flowering plants in the verbena family, Verbenaceae.
  • Green Organic Fresh Lemon Verbena Herb Leaves
  • Beautiful Multicolored Lantana Abloom in Arizona
  • Lantana is a genus of about 150 species of perennial flowering plants in the verbena family, Verbenaceae.
  • Green Organic Fresh Lemon Verbena Herb Leaves
  • Double Lantana flower in Spain
  • Blooming verbena
  • Green Organic Fresh Lemon Verbena Herb Leaves
  • Lemon verbena
  • Blooming verbena
  • Green Organic Fresh Lemon Verbena Herb Leaves
  • lemon verbena (Aloysia polystachya, Phyla alba), blooming
  • Lemon Verbena, Citronverbena (Aloysia citrodora)
  • Green Organic Fresh Lemon Verbena Herb Leaves
  • White and pink Verbena plants in bloom, in the month of May, Terracina, Lazio, Italy.
  • Lemon verbena, Lemon beebrush (Aloysia triphylla, Lippia citirodora, Aloysia citriodora, Aloysia citrodora), leaves
  • Green Organic Fresh Lemon Verbena Herb Leaves
  • Lemon Verbena, culinary garden, Long Meadow Ranch Winery and Farmstead, Saint Helena, Napa Valley, California, United States
  • Lemon verbena, Lemon beebrush (Aloysia triphylla, Lippia citirodora, Aloysia citriodora, Aloysia citrodora), leaves
  • Green Organic Fresh Lemon Verbena Herb Leaves
  • Verbena Blooming
  • Lemon verbena, Lemon beebrush (Aloysia triphylla, Lippia citirodora, Aloysia citriodora, Aloysia citrodora), blooming
  • Green Organic Fresh Lemon Verbena Herb Leaves

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Garden Q&A: My sweet almond bush is getting out of control

I have a love/hate relationship with my over 10-foot-tall, 4-year-old sweet almond bush. It started out as an 18-inch-long stick with some puny roots attached, and now look at it. As much as it has taken over the yard, I forgive it because of its intense almond scent that fills my yard on warm days, and because of the sight and sound of every kind of bee that enjoys its nectar. My question then is obvious. Can I tame this beast, and, if so, how?

Your sweet almond bush has a variety of names. It’s also known as almond verbena and the incense bush for obvious reasons as you report. And the term “bush” can be deceiving because it can easily grow into a small tree reaching 15 feet. It’s a very rapid grower as you’ve experienced. In colder climates, or when we have our rare hard freezes, it may freeze to the ground, only to reemerge the following spring and reach 8 feet in a single growing season.

The sweet almond bush is listed as a deciduous shrub, but around north Florida, it’s often an evergreen with its fine-textured gray-green foliage. In spring, its showy white flower clusters appear at the ends of the shoots and continue to fill the air with an intoxicating vanilla-almond fragrance well into fall. The scent makes this plant a destination for bees, butterflies and hummingbirds.

Because you want to tame this garden beast, the good news for you is that the sweet almond tolerates heavy pruning so you can keep it as a smaller shrub. The bad news is that you should trim it several times a year between its bloom cycles. However, you’ll end up with a bushier, healthier plant this way.

You may never have a pest problem with sweet almond, but if do, be aware that aphids, scale insects and borers can cause deformed growth and damage to the leaves and stems. Usually, horticultural oil or insecticidal soaps will take care of the problem when the products are used according to the label’s instructions.

I kill Christmas cacti. Every year, every one dies well before the next Christmas season. It would be nice if they flower again, but my goal is to just keep it alive. The grocery store had this one labeled “Zygo cactus.”. Is that a variety that will improve my chances?

The grocery store was smart to label it more specifically, but it’s still not the scientific name. Zygocactus is one of several common names for Thanksgiving cactus (Schlumbergera truncata syn. Zygocactus truncata), also sold as Christmas cactus and Holiday cactus. True Christmas cactus (Schlumbergera x buckleyi) blooms around Christmas, while the Thanksgiving cactus blooms in late November. No matter the name, the brilliant flowers on the ends of gracefully drooping branches are a favorite holiday addition and worth the effort to keep it alive and hopefully growing.

First thing to remember is that even though Thanksgiving/Christmas/Holiday cactus may be a true cactus, they are only distant cousins of desert cacti and therefore require very different conditions and care.

The Thanksgiving cactus is an epiphytic plant from southeast Brazil. Unlike desert cacti, epiphytes don’t grow in soil, but rather sprout in the crotches of trees or branches in humid, shady rain forests, using their roots to anchor them in place. They absorb moisture from the air through specially designed leaf openings. They thrive only when there’s plenty of humidity in the air around them.

As a general rule, most desert cacti need strong light and hot dry conditions, with chilly nights. Your Thanksgiving cactus, on the other hand, wants bright light away from drafts and from hot afternoon sun. They want more moderate temperatures like those found in our homes and will need to be brought indoors when the temperatures are below 50 degrees.

As with all our plants, watering is key. While the desert cactus needs infrequent water and fast-draining soil mix, epiphytic cacti should be kept only slightly damp. How often to water? The only sure method is to put your finger in the potting medium. If the top inch of soil is dry, then it’s time to water. Watering is particularly important when the Thanksgiving cactus is in bloom. If the soil dries out, the plant will drop its buds and flowers. When the flowers have gone by, it is safe to allow the plant to be a bit on the dry side. Remember that more plants die of overwatering than underwatering.

When the blooms have gone in late winter, fertilize holiday cactus with a general-purpose houseplant fertilizer at half strength once a month through summer. Also, once a month, on a week when you aren’t fertilizing, irrigate with water mixed with 1 teaspoon of Epsom salts to a gallon of water. This will prevent magnesium deficiency.

To make your plants fuller, prune or pinch the stems in June to encourage more branching. Thanksgiving cactus likes to be a little pot-bound, but plan to provide fresh potting medium when repotting every two or three years.

Now that you know that not all things labeled “cactus” are the same, you have the basics to keep your Thanksgiving/Christmas/Holiday cactus alive and growing. Next, you can focus on how to get your holiday cactus to bloom on schedule. That information and more is available at “Thanksgiving & Christmas Cacti”, https://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheet/thanksgiving-christmas-cacti/.

Not essential for enjoying the plant, but fun to know: there are two ways to decide if yours is a Thanksgiving or Christmas cactus. First, Thanksgiving cactus have a flattened stem segment (called phylloclades) with two to four saw-like projections. The anthers, the pollen-producing part of flower found at the tip of the stamen, are yellow. Christmas cactus segments are more rounded and the anthers are pinkish-brown.

Paula Weatherby is a Master Gardener with the Duval County Extension Service and the University of Florida/IFAS. For gardening questions, call the Duval County Extension Office at (904) 255-7450 from 9 a.m. to noon and 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. and ask for a Master Gardener.

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