Snowball viburnum growth rate

Common Snowball Viburnum

If you want to make a stylish impact but need to keep things easy care – take a really good look at Common Snowball Viburnum, (Viburnum opulus ‘Roseum’, syn. Viburnum opulus ‘Sterile’). Frankly, it’s hard not to look at this ornamental flowering shrub.

This variety has been a garden favorite for centuries. An incredible flower display of huge, rounded, sterile flower clusters are produced on the end of each branch in late spring.

The flowers really do resemble snowballs. Kids just love this shrub!

If you didn’t know better, you might think you were looking at an Annabelle Hydrangea. But this Viburnum shrub grows much taller and wider. It’s truly a show stopper every single year when they bloom.

That’s why we regularly sell out of this plant. People see them around their town, and they want one in their yard. If we have some in stock, please order today so you don’t miss out on these beautiful, giant, spherical clusters of white and green-tinted blossoms.

The blooms appear in masses in May or June, depending upon where it is grown. Some of the pristine blooms will even take on a pink cast as those flower clusters age.

Dark green, shiny maple-like leaves act as a perfect backdrop to the massive flower displays. In autumn, those green leaves turn purplish and red and are a welcome fall color.

This amazing Snowball bush Viburnum is ready to dazzle you, your family and friends. Order today!

How to Use Common Snowball Viburnum in the Landscape

Snowball Viburnum is a robust shrub and will need space in the landscape. Read the Plant Highlights to see the mature height and spread. Then, be sure to give it enough room.

Remember, plants grow out from either side of their roots. Plant it in the middle of your allotted space, and it will fill in the space on all sides. Plan for the largest listed size.

When planting large shrubs like this, it’s a good idea to give yourself a few extra feet of space between houses and fences. Start your measurements 2 feet away from any structure. After all, you’ll want to be able to access the structures without any trouble once the shrub is fully mature.

By giving it enough room, you’ll also eliminate the headache of pruning for size control. And, you won’t want to miss a single bloom! They make fantastic cut flowers and will give you armloads of blooms for cutting – so many you could never use them.

This makes a beautiful screening plant or natural hedge along a fence. Leave them un-pruned in their natural form. Plant them 9 feet apart (measuring from the middle of one, to the middle of the next one) if you’d like them to grow together into a continuous screen.

Try several of them along your patio for an easy-breezy privacy screen. It’s very hardy, and once established, will thrive with minimal care.

They’ll look wonderful in spring, dripping heavy with flowers. Next, they become a well-behaved backdrop to your mixed shrub and perennial border until they steal center stage again with their fall color display.

These are also magnificent shrubs to use near the corner of a house in a modern mixed foundation planting. Or, use one in the front yard as the centerpiece of an island garden bed in the lawn. It will definitely attract attention!

#ProPlantTips for Care

Common Snowball Viburnum tolerates full sun and part shade. It thrives in a wide range of soil conditions.

In dry periods, give it additional moisture. Viburnums appreciate having a few inches of mulch over the roots but be careful not to pile any mulch up against the stems of the plants.

As the plants develop and age, they are best maintained by renewal pruning. After the spring blooms, remove the oldest, thickest stems cutting them off at ground level. This lets the younger, thinner stems to remain and produce the new flowers. Renewal pruning allows the plants to look natural and they will flower on all of the branch tips.

If you prune back the tops of the branches to control size, always wait until the flowers are done blooming before cutting. The flower buds are borne on the previous year’s growth.

Common Snowball Viburnum is one of those “gotta have” bloom making machine shrubs. It’s just as popular today as it has been for past generations. Enjoy it and order yours today!

Plant of the Week: Viburnum, Snowball

The University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture does not promote, support or recommend plants featured in “Plant of the Week.” Please consult your local Extension office for plants suitable for your region.

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Snowball viburnum
Latin: Viburnum opulus ‘Roseum’

Snowball viburnum is a study in white when the blooms appear in mid spring.

Each generation of gardeners selects its own palate of plants considered indispensable for garden making. Some have a short shelf life and do not survive into another gardening era while others have staying power and remain commonplace centuries later. One of this latter group, the snowball viburnum (Viburnum opulus ‘Roseum’), has been grown in gardens since at least the middle of the 16th century and is still commonplace in many gardens.

Snowball viburnum is a multi-stemmed deciduous shrub with erect and then arching stems growing to 12 feet tall and wide. Unlike most viburnums, snowball has a distinctive three-lobed leaf almost reminiscent of a maple in outline. The leaves are to four inches long, rough textured, but unfortunately do not produce fall color.

Snowball is an apt name for this plant for the white clusters of blooms produced at the ends of the branches in mid-to-late spring are about the size and shape of their namesake. Each inflorescence is about three inches in diameter and consists of upwards of a hundred sterile flowers. The fertile form of the species, called the European cranberry bush, has bright red berries in a flat-topped panicle about four inches across.

The snowball viburnum in commerce is offered under the cultivar name ‘Roseum,’ a misleading name because the blooms are the purest white. It is said that sometimes the blooms will fade to a rose-tinged hue at the end of their two-week life span, but even this subtlety is hard to notice.

Viburnum opulus is native throughout Europe. The sterile snowball form is thought to have originated in Holland. It was commonplace in gardens by the time Gerard wrote the first edition of his herb book in the closing years of the 16th century. He called the plant “Gelder Rose,” perhaps an adaptation of the Dutch name that was “Gheldersche Roosen.” The name “snowball” did not appear in print until about 1760.

Snowball viburnum was introduced into the United States during colonial times and has remained in production since then. The earliest iteration of the American nursery industry was, not surprisingly, in the northeastern states where most of the people lived. Only plants able to grow in an area with long, cold winters and capable of standing up to the rigors of long, slow transport were grown. Snowball viburnum fit the bill nicely.

Spring blooming shrubs such as snowball all share one major flaw. They are one- shot wonders; they have a relatively short window of display and then fade into the background the rest of the year. And they are big, so they need lots of room. Snowball has traditionally been used as a stand-alone lawn specimen for screening or as part of the mixed shrub border. Today, dwarf versions of the snowball viburnum such as ‘Compactum’ (to 6 feet tall) and ‘Nanum’ (2 feet tall and 3 feet wide) make more sense in most landscape situations.

Like most viburnums, snowball should have six hours of full sun in order to flower best. It is tough and adaptable and will tolerate a wide array of soil types. Once established, it has great drought tolerance.

Aphids are a serious pest of new growth and cause much deformity of new leaves. But snowball viburnum is tough and, even if not controlled, aphids do not thwart the growth of this vigorous, easy-to-grow plant.

By: Gerald Klingaman, retired
Extension Horticulturist – Ornamentals
Extension News – April 11, 2008

The University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture does not maintain lists of retail outlets where these plants can be purchased. Please check your local nursery or other retail outlets to ask about the availability of these plants for your growing area.

Fragrant snowball

Size & Form

A large rounded shrub reaching 6 to 10 feet high and 6 to 8 feet wide.

Tree & Plant Care

Best in full sun to part shade in well-drained, slightly acidic soil.
Shallow-rooted and benefits with a layer of mulch to retain moisture.
Prune after flowering

Disease, pests, and problems

Leaf spot, viburnum crown borer, scale

Disease, pest, and problem resistance

Tolerant of black walnut toxicity.

Native geographic location and habitat

This is a hybrid originated in England and is a cross between V. carlesii and V. macrocephalum var. keteleeri.

Attracts birds and butterflies

Birds and butterflies

Bark color and texture

Light brown to gray.

Leaf or needle arrangement, size, shape, and texture

Opposite, 4 to 5 inch long, rounded foliage with wavy margins.
The leaves are dark green with a slight luster in summer changing to reddish-purple in the fall.

Flower arrangement, shape, and size

Very fragrant, large, white flowers arranged in dense, lumpy, snowball-like clusters (cymes 3 to 5 inches wide) in late April to early May.
Last of the semi-snowball, fragrant viburnums to bloom in spring.

Fruit, cone, nut, and seed descriptions

Sparse, berry-like drupes ripen to black. Fruit is not particularly abundant or showy.
For better fruiting potential, plant more than one plant.

Snowball Viburnum in bloom

Snowball Viburnum in bloom

(Photo courtesy of NetPS Plant Finder)

Snowball Viburnum flowers

Snowball Viburnum flowers

(Photo courtesy of NetPS Plant Finder)

Height: 12 feet

Spread: 10 feet

Sunlight:

Hardiness Zone: 3a

Other Names: European Highbush Cranberry

Description:

A popular feature shrub with rounded clusters of snowball-shaped flowers in spring, very showy, and good fall color, does not produce fruit; upright and spreading, will grow quite large; great as a solitary accent, flowers best in full sun

OUR FAVORITE SHRUB FOR NORTH FACING!

NORTH FACING YARDS TYPICALLY RECEIVE VERY LOW LIGHT. THIS IS ONE OF THE HARDIEST PLANTS THAT WILL THRIVE IN A NORTH FACING YARD.

Ornamental Features

Snowball Viburnum features showy balls of white flowers at the ends of the branches in late spring. It has dark green foliage throughout the season. The large serrated lobed leaves turn an outstanding deep purple in the fall. The fruit is not ornamentally significant. The smooth gray bark and gold branches add an interesting dimension to the landscape.

Landscape Attributes

Snowball Viburnum is a multi-stemmed deciduous shrub with an upright spreading habit of growth. Its average texture blends into the landscape, but can be balanced by one or two finer or coarser trees or shrubs for an effective composition.

This shrub will require occasional maintenance and upkeep, and should only be pruned after flowering to avoid removing any of the current season’s flowers. Deer don’t particularly care for this plant and will usually leave it alone in favor of tastier treats. Gardeners should be aware of the following characteristic(s) that may warrant special consideration;

  • Insects

Snowball Viburnum is recommended for the following landscape applications;

  • Accent
  • Mass Planting
  • General Garden Use

Planting & Growing

Snowball Viburnum will grow to be about 12 feet tall at maturity, with a spread of 10 feet. It tends to be a little leggy, with a typical clearance of 1 foot from the ground, and is suitable for planting under power lines. It grows at a medium rate, and under ideal conditions can be expected to live for 40 years or more.

This shrub does best in full sun to partial shade. It prefers to grow in average to moist conditions, and shouldn’t be allowed to dry out. It is not particular as to soil type or pH. It is highly tolerant of urban pollution and will even thrive in inner city environments. This is a selected variety of a species not originally from North America.

Snowball Bush

The Original Snowball Bush

An amazingly ‘SHOWY’ addition to any landscape; the Viburnum macrocephalum, more commonly known as the ‘Chinese Snowball Bush’, is beautiful and easy-to-grow. The flowers emerge a striking lime-green in late spring and gradually turn to snowy-white in mid-May; they retain their green color for several weeks before turning to cream and then to white.

At full maturity, the ‘Flower-Balls’ resemble brilliant white pom-pom’s, reaching up to 8-inches wide. The ‘Chinese Snowball Bush’ will bloom in mid-spring for weeks on end.

The Viburnum Macrocephalum is a sterile plant (producing no fruit) so all of its energy goes into blooming and . . . Does it ever!!! A relative of the honeysuckle, the 8-inch flowering clusters are made up of an abundance of delicate 1-inch flowers. The clusters resemble the blooms of the Hydrangea plant.

Best of all, this particular variety will provide a longer & more profuse BLOOMING SEASON than any other plant in its family. The foliage of the ‘Chinese Snowball’ is a brilliant dark green with 2″-4″ leaves that have a ‘saw-toothed’ edge; they are stunning against the stark white of the flowering clusters.

The ‘Chinese Snowball Bush’ can be trimmed to any size or shape; it can be sculpted into shrubs, hedges, borders and trees. Cut it back after flowering and prepare for another round of blooming; this incredible plant blooms on both, old and new wood.

The Viburnum Macrocephalum is an extremely hardy variety that is resistant to bacterial leaf spot and powdery mildew, unlike its’ relatives. If you are looking for an incredible ‘point-of-interest’ for your landscape, you have found it in the ‘Chinese Snowball Bush’.

  • Insect & Disease Resistant
  • Showy Clusters of ‘Flower Balls’ (up to 8 inches wide)
  • Repeat Bloomer
  • Carefree
  • Provides Bountiful Cut Flowers
  • Deer Resistant
  • Non-Invasive Root System
  • Heat & Drought Tolerant
  • Attracts Butterflies

Don’t Miss Out — Order Yours TODAY !

Planting & Care

Snowball Bush (Viburnum macrocephelum ‘sterile’) is a very showy, flowering ornamental that flowers in the early to mid spring depending on your location. The huge flowers start out lime green and turn a creamy white as the season progresses, starting to bloom in mid April and can last through June. Typically planted in USDA growing zones 6-9 (can also be successfully container grown) the Chinese Snowball bush are semi-evergreen in warm climates and fully deciduous in cooler climates. In warmer climates these will prefer afternoon shade to keep them out of the hot afternoon sun, but will thrive in full sun in cooler climates. Growing to an overall size of 12 feet tall/wide, these plants can be pruned to any shape or size after the blooming season.

Choosing a location: The Chinese snowball bush will perform well in either full sun or partial shade, depending on where you are located. In warmer climates, provide the plant with afternoon shade. In cooler areas, the snowball bush can take full sun. They prefer acidic, moist, well draining soil but can tolerate a wide variety of soil types.

Planting directions (In ground): Once you have chosen your location, it is time to plant.
1) Dig a hole that is 3 times the width of the container (the root ball), and just as deep.
2) Remove the plant from the container, lightly tapping it will help if the plant is stuck.
3) Gently comb the roots to loosen them, so that they spread out more quickly into their home.
4) Place the plant in the hole, so that the top of the rootball is even with the soil level.
5) Backfill with a mixture of 60% native soil and the remainder a quality compost or garden soil.
6) Water lightly every few inches as you backfill to remove any air pockets, water well when done, but do not saturate the area.
7) Mulch the area when done with a layer of mulch 2-3” thick and not quite touching the trunk of the plant. This helps to protect the roots from fluctuating temperatures as well as helping it to conserve moisture.

Planting directions (Potted): These plants can be kept in a container if you do not have room in your landscape.
1) You want to start the plants off in a container that is 1-2 sizes larger than the container it arrives in.
2) Use a quality, well draining potting soil to fill the container.
3) Remove the plant from the container and loosen the roots with your fingers.
4) Place the plant in the container so that it is at the same level that it was in the original container.
5) You will need to re-pot the plant about every season until the plant is in a container that is 20-24” across.

Watering (In Ground): The Snowball bush prefers moist, well draining soil, they don’t like to be saturated. Water the plants well after the soil has had the chance to dry out about 2 inches down. The frequency will vary depending on your climate and the weather conditions. They will need more water during times of excessive heat and drought. They will not need to be watered after they go dormant for the season or after the ground freezes.

(Potted): Water until the water flows through the drainage holes draining any excess from the catch tray if need. Allow the soil to dry about 2 inches down before watering again.

Fertilizing: Generally the snowball bush will not need a lot of additional fertilizer. To increase blooming, you can fertilize in the early spring with a high phosphorus fertilizer like bone meal or bloom booster. Look for the middle number of the formula to be higher than the others for the added boost of phosphorous (example: 5-25-10).

Pruning: Prune the snowball immediately after flowering for shape and to remove damaged or diseased limbs.

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Japanese Snowball Care: Learn About Japanese Snowball Trees

Japanese snowball trees (Viburnum plicatum) are likely to win a gardener’s heart with their lacy white globes of flower clusters hanging heavy on the branches in spring. These large shrubs look like they could require a lot of maintenance, but Japanese snowball care is really quite easy. Read on for more Japanese snowball information, including how to plant a Japanese snowball tree.

About Japanese Snowball Trees

Topping out at 15 feet, Japanese snowball trees might better be termed shrubs. Japanese snowball information gives a range of 8 to15 feet for mature height, and a little larger for mature spread. Snowballs are upright, multi-stemmed shrubs.

Japanese snowball trees flower heavily in spring. The pure white clusters appear in April and May, some reaching 4 inches wide. The clusters include both showy, 5-petaled infertile flowers and small fertile flowers. Butterflies enjoy visiting the snowball flowers.

The fruits of the Japanese snowball ripen as summer wanes. The small oval fruits mature in late summer, turning from red to black. Japanese snowball information confirms that the fruits are a source of food for wild birds.

The rounded, green leaves of Japanese snowballs trees are attractive, and create dense foliage in summer. They turn yellow, red or purple in fall, then drop, revealing the shrub’s interesting branching structure in winter.

How to Plant a Japanese Snowball Tree

If you want to learn how to plant a Japanese snowball tree, you’ll be happy to hear that it isn’t difficult. These shrubs thrive in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 5 through 8, where they are extremely easy to grow. Plant the seedlings in part shade or full sun.

Japanese snowball care is quite easy, as long as you plant your shrubs in well-draining soil. They tolerate many different kinds of soil as long as the drainage is good, but they do best in moist, slightly acidic loam.

These plants are drought tolerant once established. However, early Japanese snowball care includes generous irrigation for the first growing season.

However, gardeners are happy to hear that the Japanese snowball trees have no serious insect pests. They are not subject to any serious diseases either.

Japanese Snowball Bush Stock Photos and Images

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  • Japanese snowball bush Viburnum plicatum white flowers on ornamental shrub
  • Japanese Snowball Bush (Viburnum plicatum cultivar Rotundifolium)
  • Japanese Snowball bush, Viburnum plicatum, beginning to bloom. Tennessee, USA.
  • Viburnum plicatum f. tomentosum ‘Kilimanjaro Sunrise’ flowers in Spring. Japanese Snowball Bush.
  • Japanese snowball bush
  • Viburnum plicatum f. tomentosum ‘Kilimanjaro Sunrise’ berries in Summer. Japanese Snowball Bush.
  • Japanese snowball bush or crimped gueldres rose, Viburnum plicatum. Handcoloured copperplate engraving by George Barclay after an illustration by Miss Sarah Drake from Edwards’ Botanical Register, edited by John Lindley, London, Ridgeway, 1847.
  • Japanese snowball bush, Viburnum plicatum f. tomentosum ‘Sterile’ with sign. White flowers of shrub, family Adoxaceae
  • VIBURNUM PLICATUM SUMMER SNOWFLAKE. JAPANESE SNOWBALL BUSH.
  • Japanese snowball bush – Viburnum Plicatum
  • White flowering shrub, Japanese snowball (Viburnum plicatum), England, Great Britain
  • Viburnum plicatum mariesii in autumn
  • Viburnum plicatum in spring
  • Japanese Snowball Viburnum plicatum Flowers
  • A close up of the brunch of the blossoming Japanese snowball (Viburnum plicatum) with plenty of others blossoming balls in the background.
  • Viburnm plicatum tomentosum Lanarth, Japanese snowball Lanarth, Adoxaceae.
  • Pink Azalea and Snowball Bush in Japanese Garden
  • var. tomentosum JAPANESE SNOWBALL BUSH Date: 1887
  • Close-up of a flowering Japanese snowball Tree (Viburnum plicatum)
  • Japanese snowball bush Viburnum plicatum white flowers on ornamental shrub
  • Viburnum plicatum shrub with fresh foliage
  • Japanese Snowball bush, Viburnum plicatum, beginning to bloom. Tennessee, USA.
  • Japanese snowball, Viburnum plicatum f tomentosum, white flowers on ornamental garden shrub
  • Japanese snowball bush
  • Viburnum plicatum f. tomentosum ‘Kilimanjaro Sunrise’ berries in Summer. Japanese Snowball Bush.
  • Japanese snowball, Viburnum plicatum f tomentosum, white flowers on ornamental garden shrub
  • Japanese snowball bush, Viburnum plicatum f. tomentosum ‘Sterile’. White lacecap-like flowers of shrub in family Adoxaceae
  • Red ripening fruit of Japenese snowball bush, Viburnum plicatum, set against green foliage of this garden shrub, Berkshire, July
  • VIBURNUM PLICATUM SUMMER SNOWFLAKE. JAPANESE SNOWBALL BUSH.
  • japanese snowball (viburnum plicatum)
  • Viburnum plicatum mariesii in autumn
  • Japanese snowball (Viburnum plicatum)
  • Viburnum plicatum mariesii in flower
  • Viburnum plicatum var. tomentosum ‘Popcorn’, Caprifoliaceae, Doublefile Viburnum, Japanese Snowball Bush, kalina, Japan, Korea,
  • Japanese snowball bush or crimped gueldres rose, Viburnum plicatum. Handcoloured copperplate engraving by George Barclay after an illustration by Miss Sarah Drake from Edwards’ Botanical Register, edited by John Lindley, London, Ridgeway, 1847.
  • Vibernum plicatum ‘Pink Beauty’
  • Japanese snowball (Viburnum Plicatum)
  • Close-up of a flowering Japanese snowball Tree (Viburnum plicatum)
  • Japanischer Schneeball, Viburnum
  • Viburnum plicatum shrub with fresh foliage
  • Japanese Snowball bush, Viburnum plicatum, beginning to bloom. Tennessee, USA.
  • Viburnum plicatum ‘Watanabe’
  • Japanese snowball bush, Viburnum plicatum, in flower in an urban neighborhood. Knoxville, Tennessee, USA.
  • Viburnum plicatum f. tomentosum ‘Kilimanjaro Sunrise’ berries in Summer. Japanese Snowball Bush.
  • Japanese snowball bush
  • Japanese snowball, Viburnum plicatum, close up of the flower head
  • Red ripening fruit of Japenese snowball bush, Viburnum plicatum, set against green foliage of this garden shrub, Berkshire, July
  • VIBURNUM PLICATUM SUMMER SNOWFLAKE. JAPANESE SNOWBALL BUSH.
  • Japanese snowball bush (Viburnum plicatum) white sterile flowers on garden shrub
  • Viburnum tree (in Latin: viburnum x bodnantense)
  • Japanese snowball (Viburnum plicatum)
  • Viburnum plicatum mariesii in flower
  • Viburnum beetle (Pyrrhalta viburni) severe damage to Viburnum plicatum foliage
  • Viburnum plicatum var. tomentosum ‘Popcorn’, Caprifoliaceae, Doublefile Viburnum, Japanese Snowball Bush, kalina, Japan, Korea,
  • Red ripening fruit of Japenese snowball bush, Viburnum plicatum, set against green foliage of this garden shrub, Berkshire, July
  • Japanese snowball (Viburnum Plicatum)
  • Close-up of a flowering Japanese snowball Tree (Viburnum plicatum)
  • Japanischer Schneeball, Viburnum
  • Viburnum plicatum shrub with fresh foliage
  • . Ornamental shrubs of the United States (hardy, cultivated). Shrubs. Fig. 351. — Hobble-bush.. Fig. 350.—Japanese Snowball.. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Apgar, A. C. (Austin Craig), 1838-1908; Draycott, Ada (Apgar). New York, Cincinnati American Book Company
  • Viburnum plicatum ‘Watanabe’
  • . Ornamental shrubs of the United States (hardy, cultivated). Shrubs. Fio. 351.-Hobble-bush.. Fig. 350. — Japanese Snowball.. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Apgar, A. C. (Austin Craig), 1838-1908; Draycott, Ada (Apgar). New York, Cincinnati American Book Company
  • Viburnum plicatum f. tomentosum ‘Rowallane”.
  • Japanese snowball bush
  • Japanese snowball, Viburnum plicatum, close up of the flower head
  • Japanese snowball bush
  • . Viburnum- Opulus {High Bush Cran- berry). ® White flowers in June followed in au- tumn by bright scarlet berries which are very attractive until late in winter. Size 3 feet, 75c each. — Sterilis {Snowball, Guel- der Rose). <§) The popular white Snowball. Has large pendant balls of white flowers in May. Size 2 to 3 feet, 7Sc each. Plicatum {Japanese Snow- ball). One of the choicest hardy shrubs. Fine dark foliage. The perfect balls of pure white flowers are borne in great profusion in May. Size 2 to 3 feet, 75c each. -Snowball
  • Japanese Snowball (Viburnum plicatum), Caprifoliaceae.
  • Bee (in Latin: apis mellifera) collects pollen on a viburnum tree (in Latin: viburnum x bodnantense)
  • Branches of flowering viburnum plicatum mariesii
  • Viburnum plicatum mariesii in flower
  • Viburnum beetle (Pyrrhalta viburni) severe damage to Viburnum plicatum foliage
  • Viburnum plicatum mariesii in flower
  • Viburnum plicatum var. tomentosum ‘Popcorn’, Caprifoliaceae, Doublefile Viburnum, Japanese Snowball Bush, kalina, Japan, Korea,
  • Viburnum plicatum mariesii in flower
  • Close-up of a flowering Japanese snowball Tree (Viburnum plicatum)
  • Plants Viburnum Plicatum
  • Viburnum plicatum shrub with fresh foliage
  • Close-up of a flowering Viburnum lentago Tree (Viburnum lentago)
  • . Ornamental shrubs of the United States (hardy, cultivated). Shrubs. Fio. 351.-Hobble-bush.. Fig. 350. — Japanese Snowball.. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Apgar, A. C. (Austin Craig), 1838-1908; Draycott, Ada (Apgar). New York, Cincinnati American Book Company
  • Rufford Abbey and Mill Country Park Sherwood Forest Ollerton Nottinghamshire England GB UK 2008
  • Viburnum plicatum f. tomentosum ‘Rowallane’ berries and flowers in Summer.
  • Japanese snowball, Viburnum plicatum, close up of the flower head
  • Japanese snowball bush
  • . VVeigelia Viburnum Opulus {High Bush Cranberry). The white flowers in June are followed in autumn by bright scarlet berries, which are very attractive until very late in winter. 60 cts. each. — Opulus Sterilis {Snowball or Guelder Rose). The popular white snow- ball, filled with large pendant balls of white flowers in May. 60 cts. each. — Plicatutn (Japan Snowball). One of the choicest hardy Shrubs, with healthy dark foliage; the perfect balls of pure white flowers are borne in great profusion in May. $1.00 each. — Tomentosum {Single Japanese Snowball). Beautiful dark green leaves, turning t
  • Branches of flowering viburnum plicatum mariesii
  • Viburnum beetle (Pyrrhalta viburni) severe damage to Viburnum plicatum foliage
  • Viburnum plicatum var. tomentosum ‘Popcorn’, Caprifoliaceae, Doublefile Viburnum, Japanese Snowball Bush, kalina, Japan, Korea,
  • Viburnum plicatum mariesii in flower
  • Viburnum plicatum shrub with fresh foliage
  • Close-up of a flowering Viburnum lentago Tree (Viburnum lentago)
  • . Descriptive catalogue of ornamental trees, shrubs, vines, evergreens, hardy plants and fruits. Nurseries (Horticulture) Pennsylvania Catalogs; Trees Seedlings Catalogs; Ornamental shrubs Catalogs; Flowers Catalogs; Fruit Catalogs; Nurseries (Horticulture); Trees; Ornamental shrubs; Flowers; Fruit. Viburnum plicatum Japanese Snowball. The Japanese Snowball is one of the few popular shrubs that combine beautiful flowers with rich and ornamental foliage, and that are always used when there is room for but a few of the choicest kinds. This attractive Snowball forms an upright- growing bush of be
  • Japanese snowball, Viburnum plicatum, close up of the flower head
  • Japanese snowball bush
  • . Viburnum Snowball (M) Opulus (High Bush Cran- berry). (§) .White flowers in June followed in au- tumn by bright scarlet berries which are very attractive until late in winter. Size 3 feet. 75c each. — Sterilis (Snowball, Guel- der Rose). <§) The popular white Snowball. Has large pendent balls of white flowers in May. Size 2 to 3 feet, 75c each. Plicatum (Japanese Snow- ball). One of the choicest hardy shrubs. Fine dark foliage. The perfect balls of pure white flowers are borne in great profusion in May. Size 2 to 3 feet, 75 c each.
  • Viburnum plicatum var. tomentosum ‘Popcorn’, Caprifoliaceae, Doublefile Viburnum, Japanese Snowball Bush, kalina, Japan, Korea,
  • Viburnum plicatum shrub with fresh foliage
  • Close-up of a flowering Viburnum lentago Tree (Viburnum lentago)
  • . Descriptive catalogue of ornamental trees, shrubs, vines, evergreens, hardy plants and fruits. Nurseries (Horticulture) Pennsylvania Catalogs; Trees Seedlings Catalogs; Ornamental shrubs Catalogs; Flowers Catalogs; Fruit Catalogs; Nurseries (Horticulture); Trees; Ornamental shrubs; Flowers; Fruit. Viburnum plicatum Japanese Snowball. The Japanese Snowball is one of the few popular shrubs that combine beautiful flowers with rich and ornamental foliage, and that are always used when there is room for but a few of the choicest kinds. This attractive Snowball forms an upright- growing bush of be
  • Japanese snowball, Viburnum plicatum, close up of the flower head

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Culture Notes
Japanese Snowball grows well in sun to partial shade and any moist soil. The plant transplants well, has a moderate growth rate and grows to a mature height and spread of 8 to 10 feet in many landscapes, but can get larger, especially in spread. The white flowers occur in ball-shaped clusters produced in late spring. Foliage takes on a dark maroon color in September and October.
This plant is sterile and produces no fruit. In contrast to the var. tomentosum, flowers hang from the branches in a more-or-less random fashion.
Planting and establishing shrubs
The most common cause of young plant failure is planting too deep. Plant the root ball no deeper than it was in the nursery. In most instances, the root flare zone (point where the top-most root in the root ball originates from the trunk) should be located just above the landscape soil surface. Sometimes plants come from the nursery with soil over the root flare. If there is soil over this area, scrape it off. The planting hole should be at least twice the width of the root ball, preferably wider. In all but exceptional circumstances where the soil is very poor, there is no need to incorporate anything into the backfill soil except the loosened soil that came out of the planting hole. Never place ANY soil over the root ball. If a row or grouping of plants is to be installed, excavating or loosening the soil in the entire bed and incorporating organic matter enhances root growth and establishment rate.
Weed suppression during establishment is essential. Apply a 3-inch thick layer of mulch around the plant to help control weed growth. Keep it at least 10 inches from the trunk. If you apply it over the root ball, apply only a one or two inch layer. This allows rainwater and air to easily enter the root ball and keeps the trunk dry. Placing mulch against the trunk or applying too thick a layer above the root ball can kill the plant by oxygen starvation, death of bark, stem and root diseases, prevention of hardening off for winter, vole and other rodent damage to the trunk, keeping soil too wet, or repelling water. Regular irrigation through the first growing season after planting encourages rapid root growth, which is essential for quick plant establishment.

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