Snow white mock orange

Snow White Mockorange flowers

Snow White Mockorange flowers

(Photo courtesy of NetPS Plant Finder)

Height: 6 feet

Spread: 5 feet

Sunlight:

Hardiness Zone: 4b

Other Names: Snow White Sensation Mockorange

Description:

A stunning flowering shrub covered in lovely citrus scented double white blooms in late spring and repeats in summer; fades to the background the rest of the year, use in conjunction with other plants; very adaptable, keeps a rounded shape

Ornamental Features

Snow White Mockorange is clothed in stunning clusters of fragrant white flowers at the ends of the branches in late spring. It has dark green foliage throughout the season. The serrated oval leaves do not develop any appreciable fall color. The fruit is not ornamentally significant.

Landscape Attributes

Snow White Mockorange is a dense multi-stemmed deciduous shrub with a more or less rounded form. Its average texture blends into the landscape, but can be balanced by one or two finer or coarser trees or shrubs for an effective composition.

This is a high maintenance shrub that will require regular care and upkeep, and should only be pruned after flowering to avoid removing any of the current season’s flowers. It has no significant negative characteristics.

Snow White Mockorange is recommended for the following landscape applications;

  • Mass Planting
  • Hedges/Screening
  • General Garden Use

Planting & Growing

Snow White Mockorange will grow to be about 6 feet tall at maturity, with a spread of 5 feet. It tends to fill out right to the ground and therefore doesn’t necessarily require facer plants in front, and is suitable for planting under power lines. It grows at a fast rate, and under ideal conditions can be expected to live for approximately 30 years.

This shrub does best in full sun to partial shade. It prefers to grow in average to moist conditions, and shouldn’t be allowed to dry out. It is not particular as to soil type or pH. It is highly tolerant of urban pollution and will even thrive in inner city environments. This particular variety is an interspecific hybrid.

Sizes Available:

2′ Potted

Mock Orange Bushes: How To Grow And Care For Mock Orange Shrub

For stunning citrus fragrance in the garden, you can’t go wrong with the mock orange shrub (Philadelphus virginalis). This late spring-blooming deciduous bush looks great when placed in the border, used in groups as screening or simply as a stand-alone specimen plant. They even make excellent cut flowers indoors.

Mock Orange Plants

Though it’s not a true orange, its name supposedly derives from the fragrant white flowers which in some varieties are thought to resemble that of orange blossoms. And while the blooming of this lovely shrub is short (only about a week or two), you can still enjoy the dark green foliage of mock orange plants.

Mock orange bushes come in many varieties, ranging in height from 4-8 feet or more.

Growing Conditions for Mock Orange Shrubs

Mock orange shrubs are hardy in Zones 4-8. They enjoy areas with full sun to partial shade and moist, well-drained soil. Adding compost to the soil will help improve most issues.

When planting mock orange bushes, dig your planting hole deep enough to accommodate all of the roots. Be sure to spread the roots out and add soil halfway, tamping it down before adding in the remaining soil. Water well after planting.

Care of Mock Orange Bush

Your mock orange shrub will require consistent moisture until it’s established, and though it is somewhat drought tolerant, the bush prefers to be kept in moist conditions. Mulching the area around the shrub will help the soil retain moisture and minimize watering needs.

Mock oranges are not usually heavy feeders, though a water-soluble, all-purpose fertilizer may be used in late winter/early spring as needed if you feel the plant is not growing as well as it should.

Annual pruning will keep the plant looking good and help with maintaining its shape. Since the shrub blooms on the previous year’s growth, pruning needs to be done soon after the blooming period in early summer. Simply prune off the growth just above the outer-facing buds on stems that have finished flowering. Overgrown shrubs can be pruned back by a third, though this may reduce flowering next season.

Minnesota Snowflake Mockorange flowers

Minnesota Snowflake Mockorange flowers

(Photo courtesy of NetPS Plant Finder)

Minnesota Snowflake Mockorange in bloom

Minnesota Snowflake Mockorange in bloom

(Photo courtesy of NetPS Plant Finder)

Height: 8 feet

Spread: 6 feet

Sunlight:

Hardiness Zone: 4a

Description:

A large, rounded shrub smothered in delightfully fragrant, large double white flowers in early summer; wonderful in bloom, recedes to the background the rest of the year, best used in a composition with other plants; very adaptable and hardy

Ornamental Features

Minnesota Snowflake Mockorange is clothed in stunning clusters of fragrant white flowers at the ends of the branches in late spring. It has green foliage throughout the season. The serrated oval leaves do not develop any appreciable fall color. The fruit is not ornamentally significant.

Landscape Attributes

Minnesota Snowflake Mockorange is a dense multi-stemmed deciduous shrub with an upright spreading habit of growth. Its relatively coarse texture can be used to stand it apart from other landscape plants with finer foliage.

This is a relatively low maintenance shrub, and should only be pruned after flowering to avoid removing any of the current season’s flowers. It has no significant negative characteristics.

Minnesota Snowflake Mockorange is recommended for the following landscape applications;

  • Mass Planting
  • Hedges/Screening
  • General Garden Use

Planting & Growing

Minnesota Snowflake Mockorange will grow to be about 8 feet tall at maturity, with a spread of 6 feet. It tends to be a little leggy, with a typical clearance of 2 feet from the ground, and is suitable for planting under power lines. It grows at a fast rate, and under ideal conditions can be expected to live for approximately 30 years.

This shrub does best in full sun to partial shade. It prefers to grow in average to moist conditions, and shouldn’t be allowed to dry out. It is not particular as to soil type or pH. It is highly tolerant of urban pollution and will even thrive in inner city environments. This particular variety is an interspecific hybrid.

Miniature Snowflake Mockorange

Planting & Care for Deciduous Shrub – Mock Orange

Preparation

  • The Miniature Snowflake Mock Orange has a compact, dwarf habit to this flowering shrub.
  • Its flowers are a double white and extremely fragrant! T
  • hese beautiful flowers are expected in June.
  • This is a disease resistant plant and extremely hardy in the landscape.
  • This plants matures size is around 2-3′ tall and wide.
  • The Mock Orange shrub is ideal for windswept, hillside gardens and for tolerating salty breezes, mock orange thrives almost anywhere.
  • All flower best in full sun.
  • Thriving in moist soils- acid, sand, chalk or heavy clay. It is best to enrich poor patches with bulky organic matter dug in several months before planting.
  • Plant March-May or October-November.

Opening Plant Material

  • Bare Root – Cut open the bundle (top and roots are tied) and separate all the plants. Soak roots in buckets of water until planted. Each plant type will be labeled separately for identification. Do not expose the roots to sun. They should never dry out. Keep roots covered. All bare-root plants must be trimmed when planted.
  • Containers – Completely saturate all container plants by putting in a larger container of water until stops bubbling, remove. Now ready to plant. Dig a hole no deeper than the depth of the container and 6″ or more, making sure it’s wider on the sides.

Planting Bare Root

  • Plant Bare root in fall. A good indicator if you can still plant is if the ground is still workable you’re good to go. If a hard frost is expected be sure to hold off on planting.
  • Dig a hole at least 6″ wider and the same depth as the root mass. The crown or graft of the plant should be slightly higher than ground level where it was grown at the nursery.
  • Trim off the broken roots and branches.
  • Place fertilizer packets in hole (if purchased). Do not place other fertilizers in the planting hole. *Use Our Recommended Fertilizer.
  • Spread the roots and fill halfway with soil, then water until soil settles completely saturating the soil and planting pit.
  • Re-adjust plant and fill the hole with the rest of the soil.
  • Back fill the balance of the soil and water well.
  • See our link below “Handling & Planting Guidelines” for illustrations on planting.

Planting containers

  • Slide plant from pot by tapping on the bottom of the pot.
  • With shovel or knife trim bottom 2″ off of the root ball for plants in plastic containers.
  • Rotate the plant to the proper position. Never lift or move plants by the tops.
  • Place the root ball in the hole.
  • Notice where the base of the trunk flairs out from the tree. This is called the root flair. This root flair should show when the tree is planted. If necessary, add soil under the ball so the root flair is exposed.
  • Place fertilizer packets into the bottom of the hole (if purchased). *Use Our Recommended Fertilizer.
  • Backfill the hole with soil, making sure the top of the root ball is visible and slightly higher than the soil around it.
  • Firm the soil around the plant. Water well to settle soil around the root ball.

Pruning – After Planting

  • Bare Root – Prune ALL bare root plants to reduce transplant shock and ensure success. Pruning should occur either before or as soon after planting as possible. All pruning should be done with a sharp pruning shears.
  • Containers – Although it is not essential for containers to be pruned after planting, a light pruning for shape, to remove any broken branches from shipping, or to thin out a heavily branched plant will help in the transplanting process and in the appearance of your new planting.

Pruning – Through-out the Season

  • Prune in August – when blooms fade, cut back flowered shoots to current year stems, which will perform the following year.

Watering – After Planting

  • Plants typically take approximately 6 weeks to establish new roots in your soil. During this period, water plants as often as every 2-4 days at the start and at least a minimum of once per week.
  • Beyond the 6 week establishment period, water once per week, unless rains occur.
  • Stick your finger into the soil around 3” to check soil moisture.

Watering – Through-out the Season

  • After the first season, plants should only be watered during extended periods without rain.
  • How do you know if your plants need water? The easiest way to tell is to touch the soil around the roots. If it is moist, there is no need to water. If it is dry, give it a good soaking with the hose end (no nozzle) watering the soil only, not the leaves.
  • Stick your finger into the soil around 3” to check soil moisture.

Go to our “Plant Features & Video Tab” for more information & tips on caring and maintaining this plant.

Mock Orange

Mock Orange

These deciduous shrubs are the real deal when it comes to scent. Like the orange blossoms they resemble (they aren’t relatives), these flowers have a lovely fragrance. In fact, that is the most common reason they are planted. However, not all 40 species have the signature scent, so shop while they are in bloom so you can smell them.

genus name
  • Philadelphus
light
  • Part Sun,
  • Sun
plant type
  • Shrub
height
  • 3 to 8 feet,
  • 8 to 20 feet
width
  • Up to 6 feet
flower color
  • White
foliage color
  • Blue/Green,
  • Gray/Silver
season features
  • Spring Bloom
problem solvers
  • Deer Resistant,
  • Drought Tolerant,
  • Good For Privacy
special features
  • Low Maintenance,
  • Fragrance,
  • Good for Containers
zones
  • 3,
  • 4,
  • 5,
  • 6,
  • 7,
  • 8
propagation
  • Layering,
  • Seed,
  • Stem Cuttings

Mock Orange Care Must-Knows

Mock orange shrubs don’t require much special care. Plant in well-drained soil, preferably amended with loam and organic matter. They prefer evenly moist soil, especially during summer. They will not tolerate wet or poorly drained soil. For the most impressive blooms and fragrance, plant mock oranges in full sun.

Though it is not necessary to prune mock orange, trimming them controls their somewhat wild appearance. Pruning should be done immediately after the plant flowers. To maintain the size of your shrub, cut to about a third the height each spring. This encourages branching, too. As plants age, some of the mature woody stems can become less productive and unsightly. These can be cut back to the base to encourage new growth, improve air circulation, and let in sunlight.

Learn how to prune shrubs like a pro.

More Varieties of Mock Orange

‘Belle Etoile’ mock orange

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Philadelphus x lemoinei ‘Belle Etoile’ is a beautiful single flowered variety that is slightly more dwarf than the straight species at 5-6 feet tall. Zones 4-8

‘Galahad’ mock orange

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Philadelphus ‘Galahad’ produces small, glossy leaves and medium-sized fragrant white flowers on a plant that grows 8 feet tall and wide. Zones 4-7

‘Miniature Snowflake’ mock orange

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Philadelphus ‘Miniature Snowflake’ is a dwarf from that grows only 3 feet tall. It bears lots of double white, fragrant flowers in spring. Zones 5-8

‘Minnesota Snowflake’ mock orange

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Philadelphus ‘Minnesota Snowflake’ bears very large, double flowers that are fragrant, on an upright, well-branching plant growing to 8 feet tall. Very cold hardy. Zones 3-7

Philadelphus lewisii

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Philadelphus lewisii is the native mock orange, reaching 6 to 7 feet tall, with single, fragrant white blossoms. Zones 4-8

Virginal mock orange

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Philadelphus virginalis produces large, semidouble white blooms are sweetly fragrant and resemble white roses when in bud. It grows 8 feet tall and 6 feet wide. Zones 5-8

Garden Plans For Mock Orange

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Mock-orange is a very beautiful shrub that blooms abundantly in spring and at the beginning of summer.

Main Mock-orange facts

Name – Philadelphus
Family – Hydrangeaceae
Type – shrub
Height – 3 to 10 feet (1 to 3 m)
Exposure – full sun, part sun
Soil – ordinary
Foliage – deciduous
Flowering – June

Planting, pruning and caring for mock-orange support its development and help avoid diseases.

  • Read also: Irresistible mock-orange

Planting mock-orange

It is a good idea to plant your mock-orange in fall but you can also plant in spring if you’re able to water regularly the first year after planting.

  • Choose a mostly sunny spot, but not too hot.
  • Mock-orange even tolerates part sun only, especially in warm areas.
  • It likes light and well drained soil, and hates waterlogged soil.
  • Follow our tips on planting shrubs.

Propagating mock-orange, technique and timing

Mock-orange is easy to propagate through cuttings, it is even the easiest way overall to produce new mock-orange trees.

  • Propagate your cuttings from hard wood during the month of February.
  • Propagate your cuttings from young shoots in spring and until June.

>Here are our tips on preparing cuttings from shrubs.

Pruning and caring for mock-orange

Mock-orange, if properly settled in, only requires quite little care and attention.

How to trim mock-orange

Mock-orange best copes with being pruned every year, so that young branches have a chance of growing and old wood is eliminated.

  • After the blooming, prune the year’s new growth back to half its length.
    That helps renew the vigor of your mock-orange and stimulate the next blooming.
  • Cut at their base the oldest branches more or less every 3 years.
  • Also eliminate dead stems and any weak ones you might see.

Watering mock-orange

As for watering, mock-orange must be watered in case of high temperatures and/or of extended dry spell.

  • It signals that it needs water when the leaves start drooping slightly and feel softer to the touch.

Potted mock-orange must normally be watered much more often than that planted in the ground.

  • Water as soon as the soil is dry down to about an inch (a couple centimeters).

All year long, it is important to clear around the foot of the mock-orange to remove weeds and ensure the water drains well around the roots.

To grow a magnificent mock-orange

Adding all-purpose fertilizer in spring will boost growth, blooming and make the leafage magnificent.

Learn more about mock-orange

This very beautiful shrub blooms in June, but often even starts in May.

It then emits a persistent and appealing fragrance in the entire garden, and also has the advantage of being quite hardy.

It only requires very little care, and can make do in any spot of your garden.

Mock-orange gave rise to many different hybrids, either with simple or double flowers, for the greatest pleasure of the eyes and the nose!

Expect your mock-orange, whatever the species, to grow more and more sparse as years go by.

A few of the most interesting mock-orange varieties

  • Philadelphus burfordensis – White and fragrant flowers in June-July
  • Philadelphus coronarius – Cream-white blooming, very fragrant, in June
  • Philadelphus purpureomaculatus ‘Belle étoile’ – White flower with a red spot in the center
  • Philadelphus virginalis ‘Natchez’ – Large white flower, fruity fragrance

Insects, parasites and mock-orange shrub diseases

Mock-orange isn’t often sick, and resists particularly well to most fungus and diseases.

However, it can happen that parasites will attack it, like aphids and mealybugs or scale insects.

  • Here is how to keep aphids away.
  • And here is how to fight scale insects.

Smart tip about mock-orange

Mock-orange will love it if you give it fertilizer in spring, especially when you feel it weakening.

See also:

  • Irresistible mock-orange
  • Setting up a flowered hedge
  • Shrubs that bloom in spring
  • Calendar showing when shrubs bloom
  • Hedges, great barriers against diseases and insects!

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