Silver lace vine plants

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Silver Lace Vine Care: How To Grow A Silver Lace Vine

Silver lace plant (Polygonum aubertii) is a vigorous deciduous to semi-evergreen vine that can grow up to 12 feet in one year. This drought tolerant vine twists its way around arbors, fences or porch columns. Beautiful, fragrant white flowers adorn this low maintenance plant in the summer and fall. This vine, also known as fleece vine, thrives in USDA planting zones 4-8. Continue reading to learn more about how to grow a silver lace vine in your garden.

How to Grow a Silver Lace Vine

Growing silver lace vines is easy. Plants can be started with 6-inch tip cuttings taken in the spring or early summer. Prepare a planting mix of half sand and half perlite. Water the planting medium thoroughly and poke a hole for the cutting with your finger.

Arch a piece of sturdy wire over the top of the pot. Remove the leaves from the lower two-thirds of the cutting and dip the cut end in rooting hormone. Place the cutting into the planting hole. Attach a plastic bag over the arch so that the bag does not touch the cutting.

Locate the cutting in a place where it will receive indirect light and keep the soil moist. The cutting should form roots within three weeks.

Harden the new plant off in a protected area outside before transplanting. Then plant the new vine in a location that receives morning sun and afternoon shade. Keep the young plant well watered until established.

Silver vine plants can also be started from seed. Collect seeds from the vine plant and store them in a paper bag until you are ready to plant. Soak seeds in water overnight for best germination.

Care of Silver Lace Vine

Silver lace vine care is easy, as these adaptable plants require very little care once established and are not overly picky about the soil they are grown in. However, this vine can quickly become invasive in some areas unless growth is restricted or contained on a self-standing arbor or fence.

Trim the vine before new spring growth emerges, removing any dead wood and cutting it back for size. The vine will handle severe pruning if done in early spring. Soak garden clippers in hydrogen peroxide before clipping and discard cuttings.

Provide fertilizer sparingly during the growing season.

The growing and care of silver lace vines is simple enough for just about anyone. These beautiful vines will make a stunning addition along an arbor or trellis in the garden, filling the area with its intoxicating fragrance.

Silver Lace Vine (Polygonum Aubertii) 40 seeds

Russian vine is a rampant, deciduous, woody vine that produces a profusion of small white flowers in summer and fall. Hailing from Afghanistan, Pakistan and nearby surrounds in central Asia, it likes to spread via rhizomes, or its underground stems. This twiner has glossy, mid-green, heart-shaped leaves that have bronze tones when young. Showy masses of greenish-white flowers appear from late summer to fall, followed by pinkish-white fruit. It is deciduous in cooler regions, and can be evergreen and flower as early as spring in areas with mild winters.
Situate Russian vine in a sun to partial shade location. It tolerates all but the wettest soils and in very dry gardens it would do better in a soil that is deep and fertile, otherwise the nutritive value of soil does not need to be outstanding. It can become quite invasive (both in the garden and in nature) and may need severe pruning each winter to keep it in bounds or a large structure to support it. Russian vine is well suited for covering banks or extremely-strong pergolas or unsightly landscape features. (info source: Learn2Grow.com)
Genus – Polygonum
Species – Aubertii
Common name – Silver Lace Vine
Pre-Treatment – Not-required, but recommended
Hardiness zones – 4 – 8
Height – 10′-80′ / 3 – 24(30) m
Plant type – Vines and climbers
Vegetation type – Deciduous
Exposure – Full Sun, Partial Sun
Growth rate – Fast
Soil PH – Acidic, Neutral, Alkaline
Soil type – Clay, laom, Sand, well drained
Water requirements – Average Water
Landscape uses – Very fast growing vine
Germination rate – 94%
Bloom season – Late Summer, Early Fall
Leaf / Flower color – Green / White, Light Pink, Light Green

Plant of the Week: Vine, Silver Lace

The University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture does not promote, support or recommend plants featured in “Plant of the Week.” Please consult your local Extension office for plants suitable for your region.

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Plant of the Week

Silver Lace Vine
Latin: Fallopia baldschuanica

Silver lace vine is a late summer blooming vine that grows quickly to cover fences and trellises.

Choosing a vine for the garden is a tricky business. The perfect vine would be one that is beautiful, easy to grow and stops at the end of the trellis. The stopping part – or perhaps more accurately failing to stop – is a critical feature to consider when introducing any vine into the garden. Silver lace vine (Fallopia baldschuanica)is a beautiful vine but it does have a wild heart.

Silver lace vine is a member of the smartweed family, and as such is often included in that group under the synonym name Polygonum aubertii. It is a fast-growing, semi-woody perennial that climbs by twining or will scamper across the ground or low growing shrubbery. It starts re-growth early and climbs to a height of 12 to 15 feet in the season. Old vines can attain 25 feet or more in height. Its heart shaped leaves are up to two inches long; they die with the first hard freeze without displaying any fall color.

In late summer and early fall masses of white, fragrant flowers are produced in terminal clusters. Individual flowers are about one-fifth of an inch across, five-petaled and, on female flowers, produce fluted wings on the small, triangular ovary. These wings are often tinged with green or, as the fruit ripens, red. Vines bloom over a two-month period and drop spent blossoms during this period, so it might not be a good choice over patios and other hard surfaces.

The silver lace vine has an identity crisis. As a war-time refugee – in this instance it was collected in Central Asia during the late 19th century when Great Britain and Russia were locked in a conflict called “the Great Game” – its place in proper society has been in question. Today American forces are fighting in the same region.

Albert von Regel, serving as a doctor for the Russian Army, collected seeds of the vine in 1882 in Turkestan and sent it to his father, who was the director of the botanic garden in St. Petersburg. In 1896 the plant was first listed in the catalog of France’s most famous nurseryman, Victor Lemoine. About that same time a missionary named Georges Aubert sent seeds he collected in Tibet back to France, where it was named Polygonum aubertii in his honor. Later the two species were determined to be the same and the great name confusion began.

While silver lace vine is the most commonly encountered name for the species, it also goes by names such as mile-a-minute vine, Russian vine and China fleece flower. Botanists, depending on their views on lumping or splitting, separate the dozen or so climbing Asian species out into the genus Fallopia or retain the traditional name Polygonum.

Silver lace vine is an easily grown deciduous vine well-suited for covering fences, arbors or other garden structures. Though an aggressive spreader, it shouldn’t be confused with wisteria. It does best in full sun locations and is most vigorous in fertile, well-cared for sites. One easy way of controlling its rampant spread is to plant it in more difficult locations and allow it to fend for itself.

Any vine with the potential for escaping its trellis should be planted where its spread to adjacent areas can be controlled. Severe pruning at any season can be used to control spread. It is hardy from zones 4 through 8. Japanese beetles are the most serious pest of this plant.

By: Gerald Klingaman, retired
Extension Horticulturist – Ornamentals
Extension News – October 9, 2009

The University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture does not maintain lists of retail outlets where these plants can be purchased. Please check your local nursery or other retail outlets to ask about the availability of these plants for your growing area.

Here’s How to Take Care of a Silver Lace Vine

Thinking of growing silver lace vine in your garden? What a lovely idea. This eager-to-grow plant works well for spaces that require additional aesthetic, like fences, brick walls, and archways. Let’s take a look at how to take care of one.

Particularly known for its showy green foliage and small, fragrant flowers, this plant, also known as polygonum aubertii, is native to China. It belongs to the Fallopia baldschuanica family. It is known to be hardy in most climates in the United States. The flowers put up a show of light green hues with white, and a tinge of pink. Also, it can grow to a staggering 30 feet tall, where it reaches about 12 feet high, within a year. A landscape that is begging for attention will get just that, by planting a silver lace vine.

Care Instructions

  • The spot that you choose to plant this, should receive full sunlight for at least 6 hours a day. However, if you reside in a place where temperatures rise to 90° F, then it is better to choose a partially-shaded location, when the plant is in its growing season.
  • The soil must be rich in nutrients and well-drained for the vine to grow as desired. Also, the acidity of the soil should be within the pH range of 5-8. It is important to keep the soil moist, especially when the climate’s dry; do not water the soil to a point where it’s soaking wet. It should be damp to the touch.
  • During the growing season, the soil has to be kept moist as the silver lace vine rapidly soaks up water. During warmer months, you may have to test if the soil is moist or not. You can do this by digging up a little soil (an inch deep) from the pot and trying to mold it into the shape of a ball. If it retains its shape, then it’s a sign that the plant has adequate moisture, otherwise, it’ll mean your vine needs more water.
  • Once you notice that your vine has attained a height of 1 foot, the next step is to fertilize it. A balanced fertilizer is required during this time, and again when it begins to bud.
  • Mulching the soil with organic compost (1-2 inches thick), will help the plant absorb moisture, nutrients, and prevent a weed invasion.

Pruning Instructions

Given the invasive nature of the vine, pruning it becomes a necessity, lest it may overtake other vegetation in the garden or yard, and spread in places where it is not required. So, a strict pruning schedule should be outlined. Early spring is considered to be an ideal time for this process. Check for any diseased shoots or leaves. Now the shears that you are going to use must be dipped in a solution, containing 10% alcohol and water. Then, get rid of the diseased shoots, and cut the portion from where the damage begins.

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Remember to dip the shears in the solution every time you make a cut, to prevent the disease from spreading to other parts. If you prune the vine ⅓ to ½ its size before it buds, then it will help prevent an overgrowth. Trim the vines that are growing in opposite directions, this will prevent them from getting entangled.

Propagation Instructions

With the help of seeds, cuttings, division, or layering, you can help the vine propagate without much sweat. If you go for the division, then remember, spring is the best time to do it. And if cuttings are your choice, then place them in a pot, keep them moist and treat them with a rooting hormone. If you should have any doubt with this process, then there would be nothing better than consulting an experienced gardener.

Fortunately, the silver lace vine is not prone to develop many diseases, except the annoying presence of Japanese beetles or aphids. Simply spraying the plant with soapy water is enough to knock these pests off. And to prevent them from coming back, you can spray the vine with a dormant oil.

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Silver lace vine identification and control

Silver lace vine (Fallopia baldschuanica, syn. Polygonum aubertii) is a fast-growing perennial vine that has been found to escape cultivation and grow rampantly up and over other vegetation including even very tall trees. It has clusters of small white flowers, twining or trailing stems and somewhat arrowhead-shaped leaves. It looks similar to bindweed but with clusters of much smaller flowers and woody stems.
It is sold as a “fast-growing screen” and it will grow aggressively to cover over structures and other plants. It is closely related to Japanese knotweed and has been known to hybridize with that species in Great Britain. Silver lace vine is native to China, Russia, Kazakhstan and other parts of western Asia. It is also called Russian-vine, Bukhara fleeceflower, silver fleeceflower vine, Chinese fleecevine, Chinese bindweed and mile-a-minute vine.
In King County, known escaped populations of silver lace vine mostly occur in developed areas in and around Seattle, near where it has been planted or dumped as yard waste. Although the populations are few in number, they are large in size and would be difficult to control without harming other vegetation. Limiting further spread of this plant is the key to avoiding significant impacts.

Legal Status in King County, Washington

Silver lace vine is classified as a Weed of Concern by the King County Noxious Weed Control Board and is not on the Washington State Noxious Weed List. Property owners are not required to control it, although control is recommended in areas being restored to native plants. People are encouraged to avoid planting silver lace vine in King County. Alternatives are recommended in the Garden Wise booklet, available for download or by contacting the noxious weed program. For more information on the legal status of noxious weeds in King County, see Noxious weed lists and laws.

Identification (see below for additional photos)

  • Perennial vine with long, twisting stems that are reddish-green in color, woody near the base, 25 to 35 feet long (up to 10 meters).
  • Leaves somewhat arrowhead-shaped, pointed oval to nearly triangular in shape, 1.5 to 4 inches long on twisting leaf stalks (petioles), alternate, untoothed and simple.
  • Flowers are in branched clusters (panicles) that are slender, drooping or spreading, with numerous small white flowers, each cluster 6-8 inches long.
  • New growth is reddish in color.
  • Blooms mid-summer to early fall (August-September), fragrant, attract honeybees.
  • Individual flowers are under ½ inch (1 cm), hang on short stalks (pedicels), have five petal lobes and are white to greenish or pale pink, sometimes turning bright pink as the fruits develop.
  • Fruits are pinkish, somewhat triangular shaped and fairly conspicuous in the fall.
  • Seeds shiny black three-sided achenes (a hard, dry fruit that doesn’t split open at maturity).
  • Look-alikes to silver lace vine also found in western Washington:
    • Hedge bindweed (Calystegia sepium or Convolvulus sepium)
    • Black bindweed (Fallopia convolvulus)
    • Bittersweet nightshade (Solanum dulcamara)
    • Old man’s beard (Clematis vitalba)

Toxicity

Like many other plants in the knotweed family, silver lace vine contains oxalates that if eaten in large amounts may cause kidney disease or low calcium or magnesium levels in livestock, dogs or other animals.

Habitat and impact

Silver lace vine is found growing on fences, hillsides, trees and on other vegetation in a variety of habitats. It tolerates a wide range of soil conditions and is most abundant in full sun to part shade. Because it grows over other plants, it can suppress their growth and weigh them down. It is highly branched and difficult to remove from other plants without injuring them. It grows over low-lying vegetation as well as climbing high into trees and growing over the tops of tall plants, even other invasive plants such as blackberry and knotweed.

Growth and reproduction

Silver lace vine grows by twining, with stems and leaf stalks twisting around other vegetation or physical structures like fences. Silver lace vine spreads by seed, rhizomes and stem cuttings, similar to the large, invasive knotweed species that it is related to. Blooms in summer and early fall. It is fast growing and can increase in size by 15 feet in a single year.

Control

Prevention and cultural methods To prevent the spread of silver lace vine, do not dump fragments in yard waste piles and avoid planting it where it can escape into natural areas. Where possible, use alternative, non-invasive species in landscapes. For existing populations, monitor areas around the edges to prevent further spread.

Manual control Physical removal is difficult because the plant twists around other plants and structures. It can re-grow from stem fragments and rhizomes so take care to remove all plant parts and dispose of them in a yard waste bin or in a similar contained area where plant fragments won’t be able to re-grow.

Mechanical methods Cutting silver lace vine does not control it. Plants will readily re-grow after even hard pruning.

Chemical control It is unknown which herbicides are most effective on this plant. Because it is closely related to invasive knotweed, products that are effective on knotweed may be effective on silver lace vine such as glyphosate or imazapyr. However, because silver lace vine grows on other vegetation, it might not be possible to treat it chemically without damaging plants it is growing on. To be selective, pull vines away from other plants before spraying or wipe herbicide onto foliage. Because this is a perennial vine with rhizomes, it may be most effective to spray plants when they are in bud or early flower or later in the season when seeds starts to form. The key to control is to move herbicides into the rhizomes so a slow-acting herbicide may be the most effective.

Know before you spray! Some products are limited to certain sites and land uses and may be restricted in some cases. Always read the label carefully to make sure the product is safe and appropriate for your site and intended land use. Use the recommended rates and timing for your site. Avoid spraying where there is a chance that herbicide will enter a waterway or wetland unless you are using a state-approved aquatic herbicide and have a permit and license to do so. Some local jurisdictions restrict herbicide use in certain areas, so make sure to refer to the local regulations regarding herbicide use.

Disposal of plant material Plants can be disposed of in yard waste bins. Do not dispose of plants in natural areas where they can spread from yard waste piles.

Additional information on silver lace vine

  • Washington State Noxious Weed Board Monitor Plants
  • Burke Herbarium Image Collection
  • The Morton Arboretum
  • University of Connecticut Plant Database
  • Go Botany, New England Native Plant Trust

What to do if you find this plant in King County, Washington

Silver lace vine is not a regulated noxious weed in King County so property owners aren’t required to control it. However, it can become invasive and is very difficult to control once it escapes into natural areas, so it would be helpful to report locations to the property owner or public agency responsible for the area. To report locations online, use our Report a Weed form or download King County Connect on your Android device.

Additional silver lace vine photos

Photo by Phil Renfrow

20 SILVER LACE VINE Polygonum Aubertii Silverlace White Flower Seeds

DESCRIPTION:
NAME: Silver Lace Vine
OTHER COMMON NAMES: Silverlace Vine / Fleece Vine / Mile-A-Minute Vine
SCIENTIFIC NAME: Polygonum Aubertii / Bilderdykia Aubertii / Fallopia Aubertii
COLOR: White
PLANT SEEDS: Outdoors after frost / Indoors weeks before last frost
BLOOM TIME: Spring – Fall
HARDINESS ZONE: 4 – 9 (& zone 3 with heavy mulch)
PLANT HEIGHT: 15 – 20’ (Vine/Climber)
PLANT SPACING: 15 – 20’
LIGHT REQUIREMENTS: Sun – Part Shade
SOIL & WATER PREFERENCES: Average
QUANTITY: 20 Seeds
OTHER: There are not enough good things I can say about the Silver Lace Vine! It is one of the fastest growing vines around but is not invasive. This vine can grow as much as 20-30’ in one season, or 1 ½’ per week! It is an excellent choice for trellises, arbors, walls, or covering up a less desirable structure. The Silver Lace Vine is easy to grow, and is tolerant of many conditions including dryness & salt (coastal conditions), and virtually requires no care. They also tolerate pruning very well, but pruning is not necessary unless you wish to keep them small. These vines are very ornamental and have a long bloom period. The 6” sprays of fragrant white flowers seem to absolutely smother the vine and attract butterflies, while birds enjoy the cover of their branches. They also make an excellent cut flower!
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Is silver lace vine an unwelcome invasive plant? – Knowledgebase Question

Your local county extension should be able to tell you if this vine is a problem or concern in your local area, or not. It is certainly capable of seeding about and can become a nuisance in a garden setting and in some areas shows invasive tendencies to where it displaces native plants.
It is very aggressive and very large and sprawling, generally too large for home gardens. It does not do well with companion plants, it is too aggressive and will indiscriminately overwhelm its neighbors. You would also need to maintain it regularly to keep it on the fence and not reaching outward from both root shoots and also spreading on the ground. On the other hand, it would be suited to the application you described in terms of size and vigor and fast coverage. In the long run, though, you might regret it.
In your area (your zip code places you in USDA winter hardiness zone 6B) this plant will be deciduous. It will probably die back extensively due to winter damage as well, requiring it to be cut down and the dead stems removed from the fencing each spring. With chain link, this is a very labor intensive job. For this reason alone I would not recommend it.
Vines are by nature large and aggressive plants, especially the types that will handle adverse situations and cover a large area. Campsis radicans and wisteria have similar drawbacks to the above, although since they do not need to be cut back annually they are very large and heavy and could damage the fence. I would typically recommend a native plant such as Virginia creeper for this type of situation, however it too has some of the same liabilities as the above. It is also deciduous and can require some maintenance to keep it on the fence rather than spreading elsewhere. Birds will carry and plant the seeds in the area as well.
Depending on the context, you may not want to use a perennial vine, you might prefer to use annual vines such as morning glories.
Or, you might look into shrubs instead. Your local county extension and professionally trained nurseryman should be able to help you evaluate the growing conditions and identify some shrubs that would be suited to the site and you could see if any of them would meet your design goals and budget. I hope this helps.

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Silver Lace Vine Invasive new post

  • Silver Lace Vine – Polygonum aubertii | American Meadows
    • Flowering Vine Types and How to Use Them
    • Q&A: Is my silver lace vine dying? – Landscape Ontario
    • Silver Lace Vine – Monrovia – Silver Lace Vine
    • Silver Lace Vine – Houzz
  • Here’s How to Take Care of a Silver Lace Vine
    • Fallopia – Wikipedia
    • Silver Lace Vine / Russian Vine – Polygonum (Fallopia …
    • Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board
    • Silver lace vine | The Morton Arboretum
    • The Silver Lace Plant – Growing Silver Lace Vines In The …
    • Fallopia baldschuanica – Wikipedia
  • Polygonum aubertii (SIlver Lace Vine) – invasive? Says it …
    • Fallopia baldschuanica – Plant Finder
    • Is silver lace vine an unwelcome invasive plant …
    • Silver Lace Vine (Polygonum aubertii) in Burlington …
    • Information on Silver Lace Vine | Garden Guides
    • Silver Lace Vine – Burgess Seed & Plant Co.
    • Silver lace vine identification and control: Fallopia …
    • Vine, Silver Lace
  • Silver Lace Vine Invasive more:

    Silver Lace Vine – Polygonum aubertii | American Meadows

    Growing to be about 120-180” tall (10-13’), This dramatic vine boasts clumps of small, fragrant, creamy-white blooms offset by deep green foliage. Silver Lace Vine is vigorous, adaptable to many types of gardens and fast-growing. It will thrive in sun and partial shade and makes a lovely cut flower. A beautiful addition to any garden! Invasive; Silver Lace Vine is recommended for the following landscape applications; General Garden Use; Planting & Growing. Silver Lace Vine will grow to be about 40 feet tall at maturity, with a spread of 24 inches. As a climbing vine, it tends to be leggy near the base and should be underplanted with low-growing facer plants. It should be …

    Flowering Vine Types and How to Use Them

    The fact that silver lace vine can grow and produce its white blooms in shade makes planting it a temptation for gardeners not blessed with a sunny locale. But you should resist the temptation to grow silver lace vine; it may turn out to be an invasive species. drought tolerant. Silver lace vine spreads by rhizomes and can be difficult to control. In Europe, this plant has formed hybrids with Himalayan knotweed (P. polystachyum), another invasive knotweed. Silver lace vine is currently on the state noxious weed board’s monitor list. DESCRIPTION: Silver lace vine is a perennial deciduous vine in the …

    Q&A: Is my silver lace vine dying? – Landscape Ontario

    Q. I am not sure if my silver lace vine growing on an arbor at the front of my house is dying or not. I planted the vines last year and it gets about a half day of sunlight. Within the last month, not all of the leaves have started to turn orange. It\’s almost like it thinks it\’s the fall. The leaves aren\’t brittle or falling off. (Zone 5b … Here’s a picture from another angle: Turns out silver lace vine is also called Mile-a-Minute, growing up to 40 feet in a season. In some parts of the country, its relatives in the Polygonum family, also known as Mile-a-Minute vine, are considered noxious invasives (though not this particular ornamental).

    Silver Lace Vine – Monrovia – Silver Lace Vine

    Monrovia’s Silver Lace Vine details and information. Learn more about Monrovia plants and best practices for best possible plant performance. Invasive; Silver Lace Vine is recommended for the following landscape applications; General Garden Use; Planting & Growing. Silver Lace Vine will grow to be about 40 feet tall at maturity, with a spread of 24 inches. As a climbing vine, it tends to be leggy near the base and should be underplanted with low-growing facer plants. It should be …

    Silver Lace Vine – Houzz

    Does anyone have any experience with the attractiveness of the Silver Lace Vine to bees. The vine Polygonum auberti is related to Japanese Knotweed-Polygonum cuspidatum. It is said to grow quickly and flower midsummer through frost. I purchased some Knotweed honey when in Pennsylvania several years … Also known as Silver Lace Vine or Fleece Vine, it was discovered by French missionary Georges Aube, for which it is named, in the 20th century in China. Fast grower – can reach 12′ in the first year – and requires a very strong support system. The leaves are 2-2.5″ long and are sometimes tinged with

    Here’s How to Take Care of a Silver Lace Vine

    Thinking of growing silver lace vine in your garden? What a lovely idea. This eager-to-grow plant works well for spaces that require additional aesthetic, like fences, brick walls, and archways. Let’s take a look at how to take care of one. Vines to use cautiously are five leaf akebia (akebia quinata), trumpet vine (campsis radicans), English Ivy (Hedera helix), wisteria (wisteria floribunda), and silver lace vine (polygonum aubertii). These vines quickly outgrow their space and may try to take over the whole garden. Silver lace vine care is easy, as these adaptable plants require very little care once established and are not overly picky about the soil they are grown in.Trim the vine before new spring growth emerges, removing any dead wood and cutting it back for size. The vine will handle severe pruning if done in early spring.

    Fallopia – Wikipedia

    Fallopia is a genus of about 12 species of flowering plants in the buckwheat family, often included in a wider treatment of the related genus Polygonum in the past, and previously including Reynoutria. The genus is native to temperate and subtropical regions of the Northern Hemisphere, but species have been introduced elsewhere. Invasive and Exotic Vines . The following species have been listed on an invasive species list or noxious weed law in North America. For more information on each species, including the listing sources, images, and publication links, click on the species.

    Silver Lace Vine / Russian Vine – Polygonum (Fallopia …

    Silver Lace Vine. Silver lace vine is a popular but somewhat controversial twining climber due to its extremely vigorous growth habit. This makes it an ideal plant to cover extensive areas quickly, but it can also grow too vigorously! For a fast-growing vine to cover your fence or trellis, try using silver lace vine. This deciduous vine is very easy to propagate. Often propagation is accomplished by cuttings or layering; however, it is possible to grow this vine from seed. Learn more here. Silver lace plant is a vigorous

    Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board

    • Like the invasive vines, this is a robust climber. • It takes full sun to partial shade. • Like silver lace vine and old man’s beard, Sweet Autumn clematis blooms from summer to fall. • This climber grows up to 20 feet tall. USDA zones 5-9. Image courtesy of Monrovia Nursery ‘Lemon Lace’ is noted for its lemon yellow foliage, red stems, foamy white flowers and somewhat restrained growth habit. It is a sport of the species (Fallopia baldschaunica), but is thankfully somewhat less invasive. This is, however, a vigorous, adaptable, fast-growing, deciduous, twining vine that typically grows 15-20’ (to 6’ in one …

    Silver lace vine | The Morton Arboretum

    Silver lace vine is a beautiful flowering vine, but it is an aggressive grower and is becoming an invasive plant in some areas. Review of risks should be undertaken before selecting this vine for planting sites. I’ve had a 1 gallon silver-lace vine in it’s original container since last summer, when my husband’s heart attack and subsequent surgery put the ka-bash on my gardening. Even with neglect, it has grown and survived, even flowering, on my zone 9 patio. I’m planning to get it set out on the pergola after our present 85 degree heat wave subsides. Will report its progress. Silver Lace Vine is gorgeous on Stocking Hall right now. It’s related to Japanese Knotweed, that we now know about, and can, like that, become invasive. Let’s hope it can be kept in place, so we can enjoy it in the future as well.

    The Silver Lace Plant – Growing Silver Lace Vines In The …

    Silver lace plant (Polygonum aubertii) is a vigorous deciduous to semi-evergreen vine that can grow up to 12 feet in one year. This drought tolerant vine twists its way around arbors, fences or porch columns. Beautiful, fragrant white flowers adorn this low maintenance plant in the summer and fall Invasive terrestrial plants. This is an educational list of plants that can be invasive in natural areas. Some plants are regulated by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture as Noxious Weeds and that is noted in their descriptions. *Indicates early detection of invasive terrestrial plants. Amur maple. Amur silver grass. Birdsfoot trefoil …

    Fallopia baldschuanica – Wikipedia

    Fallopia baldschuanica (syn. Polygonum baldschuanicum) is an Asian species of flowering plant in the knotweed family known by several common names, including Russian-vine, Bukhara fleeceflower, Chinese fleecevine, mile-a-minute and silver lace vine. Special Note: This species has demonstrated an invasive tendency in Connecticut, meaning it may escape from cultivation and naturalize in minimally managed areas. For more information, . For more information, .

    Polygonum aubertii (SIlver Lace Vine) – invasive? Says it …

    Polygonum aubertii (SIlver Lace Vine) – invasive? Says it grows 12-15 feet the first year. Zones 5-7. Visit. Discover ideas about Silver Lace Vine. silver lace vine grows first year. Silver Lace Vine Fast Growing Vines Climbing Vines Growing Grapes Growing Plants Aquaponics Plants Aquaponics System Grapevine Growing … Invasive; Silver Lace Vine is recommended for the following landscape applications; General Garden Use; Planting & Growing. Silver Lace Vine will grow to be about 40 feet tall at maturity, with a spread of 24 inches. As a climbing vine, it tends to be leggy near the base and should be underplanted with low-growing facer plants. It should be …

    Fallopia baldschuanica – Plant Finder

    Fallopia baldschuanica, commonly called silver lace vine, is a vigorous, adaptable, fast-growing, deciduous, twining vine that typically grows 25-35’ (12-15’ in one year). Ovate leaves (to 3.5” long) emerge tinged with red, but mature to a bright green. Masses of small, fragrant, creamy white flowers in profuse, narrow panicles cover the … Silver lace vines are easy-growing vines that can thrive in locations from full sun to shade, as long as the soil is kept moist and provides the vine with enough nutrients. The vines are incredibly fast growers, which climb vigorously, growing more than 20 feet during each growing season and covering a lot of ground …

    Is silver lace vine an unwelcome invasive plant …

    Last year I talked with some people at our local TLC Nursery and they recommended several vines, silver lace being one of them. However, I’ve been doing some research lately that implys that it is a very unwelcome, invasive plant that should be avoided. Is this true? Are there any plants that can be planted along side silver lace vine that it … Silver Lace Vine makes a great grounds cover, erosion control vine to fence climber. Blooms all summer through autumn. Planting & Growing Silver Lace Vine will grow to be about 40 feet tall at maturity, with a spread of 24 inches. As a climbing vine, it tends to be leggy near the base and should be underplanted with low-growing facer plants.

    Silver Lace Vine (Polygonum aubertii) in Burlington …

    Invasive; Silver Lace Vine is recommended for the following landscape applications; General Garden Use; Planting & Growing. Silver Lace Vine will grow to be about 40 feet tall at maturity, with a spread of 24 inches. As a climbing vine, it tends to be leggy near the base and should be underplanted with low-growing facer plants. It should be … If it is a white-flowered kind of clematis that you are after, you have several options other than autumn clematis and virgin’s bower. One is so similar to sweet autumn clematis that it almost does not count as an alternative: namely, C. vitalba (30 to 40 feet tall and suited to zones 4 to 9), which is invasive.

    Information on Silver Lace Vine | Garden Guides

    The silver lace vine is a fast-growing, deciduous vine that grows approximately 10 feet in length in one season. The plant is native to China and is hardy in USDA growing zones 4 through 8. Silver lace vine produces bright green foliage with small, fragrant flowers that range in color from light green to white with a … Invasive Species – Invasive Vines … Black Swallow-wort . Cynanchum louiseae (Vincetoxicum nigrum) Black swallow-wort, also known as dog-strangling vine, is a perennial vine with shiny, oval to heart-shaped leaves with pointed tips. Silver Lace Vine Plants For Sale | Polygonum Aubertii (Fragrant) Silver Lace vine is a fast growing plant that can reach 20 to 30 feet at maturity and can grow up to 12 feet in one year. This deciduous to semi-evergreen vine produces huge numbers of tiny fragrant flowers in arching sprays throughout the summer and early autumn months. New …

    Silver Lace Vine – Burgess Seed & Plant Co.

    The Silver Lace Vine grows up to 12′ the very first year. Our photograph shows two plants planted in early June blooming in September of the same year. Hardy, carefree vines are covered with thousands of light fleecy flower sprays from mid-September until fall. The Silver Lace Vine is a perfect cover for porches, breezeways and fences … The silver lace vine is a wonderful addition to the Fall garden. I love this vine now and hate it all summer as it winds its invasive tendrils over my deck. The birds love it too. As the migrating visitors come to our bird feeder they also spend some time nestled in the vine. So put up with its tangled intrusive ways in the summer for its …

    Silver lace vine identification and control: Fallopia …

    Silver lace vine (Fallopia baldschuanica, syn. Polygonum aubertii) is a fast-growing perennial vine that has been found to escape cultivation and grow rampantly up and over other vegetation including even very tall trees. It has clusters of small white flowers, twining or trailing stems and somewhat Ecology: Winter Creeper is shade tolerant and will form dense ground cover. The invasive vine colonizes by vine growth and seeds that are spread by birds, small mammals, and water. Plant Control: Mature stands of Winter Creeper can be difficult to control. Use clippers to sever any vines that have attached themselves to tree trunks. If needed … Akebia quinata is an invasive deciduous to evergreen climbing or trailing vine that invades forested areas throughout the eastern United States. The twining vines are green when young, turning brown as they age. Foliage The leaves are palmately compound with up to five, 1.5-3 in. (2.5-7.6 cm) long, oval leaflets. Flower

    Vine, Silver Lace

    Silver lace vine (Fallopia baldschuanica)is a beautiful vine but it does have a wild heart. Silver lace vine is a member of the smartweed family, and as such is often included in that group under the synonym name Polygonum aubertii. It is a fast-growing, semi-woody perennial that climbs by twining or will scamper across the ground or low … Fastest growing vine known! The Silver Lace Vine grows up to 12 feet the very first year. Our photograph shows two plants planted in early June blooming in September of the same year. Hardy, carefree vines are covered with thousands of light fleecy flower sprays from mid-September until fall. The… Vines are plants with long, long stems that make their way up in the world by clinging to or twining around a support. As long as there is something sturdy to mount, true vines can do it alone, or with minimal help. There are a handful of other plants that we call vines—Bougainvillea and climbing

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