Sedum rupestre ‘angelina’

Sedum floriferum ‘Weihenstephaner Gold’

stonecrop Interesting Notes

Genus name from Latin sedo meaning to sit, refering to manner in which plants “sit” on walls; common name refers to manner in which many species live on stoney ledges; except for spurium native to Caucasus and ternatum native to eastern U.S., mostly native to Asia; many species have been reassigned by some authorities to the genus Hylotelephium. – Dr. Leonard Perry, Professor, University of Vermont

If only all plants were as easy to grow as Sedums, then gardeners would clothe the suburbs in unbroken chains of color and life. They pack considerable water reserves in their succulent, spongy leaves, which not only helps them in times of drought, but also makes them exceptionally easy to root from cuttings broken off the plants in summer and stuck anywhere you want a new plant to grow. Some of the small creeping species can even be crumbled up and cast about like seeds. They will sprout up quickly as a thick groundcover — what a heady feeling that can be for the underconfident gardener. There are several thick-crowned, clumping Sedums in our flora, and a number of the low, creeping types that fill in spaces between larger plants or crevices in rocks or cliffs. They all produce broccoli-shaped or flat-spreading flower heads with upward-facing, starry-crystalline blooms that must be tireless nectar producers, for the flowers are covered with satisfied insects. They seem especially attractive to hoverflies, whose larvae are important aphid predators in the garden. Many of the creeping types are evergreen or semievergreen, with leaves of many shapes, sizes and colors. They make adaptable low groundcovers for the rock garden, ledge, or between paving stones. – William Cullina, The New England Wild Flower Society Guide to Growing and Propagating Wildflowers, p. 188

Scientific Name

Sedum rupestre ‘Angelina’

Common Names

Angelina Stonecrop, Golden Sedum

Synonyms

Sedum ‘Angelina’

Scientific Classification

Family: Crassulaceae
Subfamily: Sedoideae
Tribe: Sedeae
Subtribe: Sedinae
Genus: Sedum

Description

Sedum rupestre ‘Angelina’ is a low-growing, mat-forming, evergreen perennial, up to 5 inches (12.5 cm) tall, with a brilliant golden-yellow foliage. The needle-like leaves turn reddish-orange in fall and winter. Clusters of vibrant yellow, star-shaped flowers appear in summer on up to 8 inches (20 cm) long stems.

Hardiness

USDA hardiness zones 5a to 9b: from −20 °F (−28.9 °C) to 30 °F (−1.1 °C).

How to Grow and Care

When growing Sedums, keep in mind that this plants need very little attention or care. They will thrive in conditions that many other plants thrive in, but will do just as well in less hospitable areas. They are ideal for that part of your yard that gets too much sun or too little water to grow anything else. A common name for Sedum is Stonecrop, due to the fact that many gardeners joke that only stones need less care and live longer.

Sedum is easily planted. For shorter varieties, simply laying the plant on the ground where you want it to grow is normally enough to get the plant started there. They will send out roots from wherever the stem is touching the ground and root itself. If you would like to further ensure that the plant will start there, you can add a very thin covering of soil over the plant.

For taller varieties, you can break off one of the stems and push it into the ground where you would like to grow it. The stem will root very easily and a new plant will be established in a season or two.

Learn more at How to Grow and Care for Sedum.

Origin

Sedum rupestre ‘Angelina’ is a yellow-leaved cultivar of Sedum rupestre.

Links

  • Back to genus Sedum
  • Succulentopedia: Browse succulents by Scientific Name, Common Name, Genus, Family, USDA Hardiness Zone, Origin, or cacti by Genus

Photo Gallery

Photo via budgetplants.comPhoto via nhmountainhiking.comPhoto via okanaganxeriscape.org

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Sedum rupestre ‘Angelina’ (Golden Sedum) – An evergreen rapidly growing plant to 2 to 5 inches tall with a prostrate, creeping habit. Its needle-like, succulent foliage is lime green in spring that ages to a brilliant golden-yellow color that is topped off with yellow star shaped flowers in June and July on 6 to 8 inch stems. In fall the foliage takes on an orange hue. Plant in full sun to partial shade in well-drained soil and irrigate occasionally – can handle periods of drought but looks best with periodic watering . This plant is very hardy and can be used in all garden zones in California (Hardy to USDA Zone 3). It is an easy, tough plant that is great in hanging baskets, rock gardens, raised planters, in containers or as a groundcover so long as drainage is adequate. Though this plant has proven itself elsewhere, it seems to only lasts a couple years in the ground here in the mediterranean climate of California. We recommend this plant for use in containers or for a tough short lived accent planting. Sedum rupestre is a species that ranges through central and western Europe from sand dunes near sea level up to 7,000 feet in the Pyrenees Mountains and was introduced in the Middle Ages to Ireland as a salad crop. This plant was discovered by Mr. Christian Kress of Sarastro Nursery in Austria. Mr. Kress saw the plant in a private garden while vacationing in Croatia and he named it Angelina, after the wife of owner of the garden. This plant long had a US Plant Patent pending but the application was filed in 2002, just as the patent office was changing rules regarding prior sales and plant patents. This plants patent fell victim to these rule changes and the patent was formally abandoned in September 2008. We have been selling this plant since 2003. The information on this page is based on research conducted in our nursery library and from online sources as well as from observations made of this plant as it grows in our nursery, in the nursery’s garden and in other gardens that we have observed it in. We also will incorporate comments received from others and always appreciate getting feedback of any kind from those who have additional information, particularly if this information is contrary to what we have written or includes additional cultural tips that might aid others in growing Sedum rupestre ‘Angelina’.

Sedum rupestre ‘Angelina’

If only all plants were as easy to grow as Sedums, then gardeners would clothe the suburbs in unbroken chains of color and life. They pack considerable water reserves in their succulent, spongy leaves, which not only helps them in times of drought, but also makes them exceptionally easy to root from cuttings broken off the plants in summer and stuck anywhere you want a new plant to grow. Some of the small creeping species can even be crumbled up and cast about like seeds. They will sprout up quickly as a thick groundcover — what a heady feeling that can be for the underconfident gardener. There are several thick-crowned, clumping Sedums in our flora, and a number of the low, creeping types that fill in spaces between larger plants or crevices in rocks or cliffs. They all produce broccoli-shaped or flat-spreading flower heads with upward-facing, starry-crystalline blooms that must be tireless nectar producers, for the flowers are covered with satisfied insects. They seem especially attractive to hoverflies, whose larvae are important aphid predators in the garden. Many of the creeping types are evergreen or semievergreen, with leaves of many shapes, sizes and colors. They make adaptable low groundcovers for the rock garden, ledge, or between paving stones. – William Cullina, The New England Wild Flower Society Guide to Growing and Propagating Wildflowers, p. 188

Sedum ‘Angelina’

Cover some ground with the bright yellow leaves of Sedum ‘Angelina’ (Sedum rupestre ‘Angelina’). This low-growing sedum is perennial in Zones 5 to 9, where it grows to a whopping 3 to 6 inches tall. It’s a toe-tickling succulent with a host of names: Jenny’s stonecrop, crooked yellow sedum, stone orpine and prickmadam. Most commonly, though, this colorful groundcover is known as Sedum ‘Angelina’.
Botanically, the name Sedum rupestre gives a clue about the habitat this low-growing perennial prefers. “Rupestre” means rock-loving, which is definitely true for Sedum ‘Angelina’. In its native habitat, Sedum ‘Angelina’ typically grows on rocky or stony ledges, where stems can easily tumble over edges and dangle in mid-air.
In the garden, Sedum ‘Angelina’ is a natural fit for rock gardens or slopes, where soil is lean and drains well. In these environments, Sedum ‘Angelina’ stems crawl along the ground, rooting as they go. Use caution planting Sedum ‘Angelina’ in rock gardens filled with alpine plants, because if conditions are ideal, Sedum ‘Angelina’ can easily overtake slow-growing alpines.
The leaves on Sedum ‘Angelina’ are needle-like—almost spiky—and glow a brilliant gold. In autumn, as temperatures start to tumble, leaf tips don a ginger-orange tint that lingers through winter. In mild regions, Sedum ‘Angelina’ foliage stages a spectacular display year-round with its colorful foliage. Stems fill in thickly to form a mat, creating a blanket of color up to 24 inches across.
Plants flower in summer, opening star-shaped yellow blooms. The flowers aren’t highly prominent simply because they blend in with gold leaves. Like other sedums, the blooms on Sedum ‘Angelina’ beckon pollinators, so take care when using this groundcover along pathways where barefeet may wander.
In the garden, consider using Sedum ‘Angelina’ in areas where you don’t typically water, like in streetside plantings or on slopes. You’ll likely need to water young plants when you tuck them into the landscape, until they’re established and actively growing. Once they’re established, though, too much water will quickly kill Sedum ‘Angelina’. This is a drought-tolerant plant that’s perfect for xeriscape or low water-use landscapes. It’s a good choice for planting beneath wide house eaves where rain doesn’t typically fall.
Count on Sedum ‘Angelina’ to give deer and rabbits the brush-off. Like other sedums, this one has leaves that offer a peppery, spicy flavor that critters don’t enjoy. The leaves are edible and can be used in salads or on sandwiches. They make a pretty topping for canapes and create an eye-catching garnish for dips or stuffed baby bell peppers.
Sedum ‘Angelina’ sedum also works well in containers. It makes a beautiful display in a hanging basket and can easily play the spiller role in container gardens. In containers, use either a standard soilless mix designed for pots or a succulent-type planting mix.

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