Red and yellow Apple

Apple Facts

  • The crabapple is the only apple native to North America.
  • Apples come in all shades of reds, greens, and yellows.
  • Two pounds of apples make one 9-inch pie.
  • Apple blossom is the state flower of Michigan.
  • 2,500 varieties of apples are grown in the United States.
  • 7,500 varieties of apples are grown throughout the world.
  • 100 varieties of apples are grown commercially in the United States.
  • Apples are grown commercially in 36 states.
  • Apples are grown in all 50 states.
  • Apples are fat, sodium, and cholesterol free.
  • A medium apple is about 80 calories.
  • Apples are a great source of the fiber pectin. One apple has five grams of fiber.
  • The pilgrims planted the first United States apple trees in the Massachusetts Bay Colony.
  • The science of apple growing is called pomology.
  • Apple trees take four to five years to produce their first fruit.
  • Most apples are still picked by hand in the fall.
  • Apple varieties range in size from a little larger than a cherry to as large as a grapefruit.
  • Apples are propagated by two methods: grafting or budding.
  • The apple tree originated in an area between the Caspian and the Black Sea.
  • Apples were the favorite fruit of ancient Greeks and Romans.
  • Apples are a member of the rose family.
  • Apples harvested from an average tree can fill 20 boxes that weigh 42 pounds each.
  • The largest apple picked weighed three pounds.
  • Europeans eat about 46 pounds of apples annually.
  • The average size of a United States orchard is 50 acres.
  • Many growers use dwarf apple trees.
  • Charred apples have been found in prehistoric dwellings in Switzerland.
  • Most apple blossoms are pink when they open but gradually fade to white.
  • Some apple trees will grow over 40 feet high and live over 100 years.
  • Most apples can be grown farther north than most other fruits, because they blossom late in spring, minimizing frost damage.
  • It takes the energy from 50 leaves to produce one apple.
  • Apples are the second most valuable fruit grown in the United States. Oranges are first.
  • In colonial time, apples were called winter banana or melt-in-the-mouth.
  • The largest U. S. apple crop was 277.3 million cartons in 1998.
  • Apples have five seed pockets or carpels. Each pocket contains seeds. The number of seeds per carpel is determined by the vigor and health of the plant. Different varieties of apples will have different number of seeds.
  • World’s top apple producers are China, United States, Turkey, Poland and Italy.
  • The Lady or Api apple is one of the oldest varieties in existence.
  • Newton Pippin apples were the first apples exported from America in 1768, some were sent to Benjamin Franklin in London.
  • In 1730, the first apple nursery was opened in Flushing, New York.
  • One of George Washington’s hobbies was pruning his apple trees.
  • America’s longest-lived apple tree was reportedly planted in 1647 by Peter Stuyvesant in his Manhattan orchard and was still bearing fruit when a derailed train struck it in 1866.
  • Apples ripen six to ten times faster at room temperature than if they were refrigerated.
  • A peck of apples weight 10.5 pounds.
  • A bushel of apples weights about 42 pounds and will yield 20-24 quarts of applesauce.
  • Archeologists have found evidence that humans have been enjoying apples since at least 6500 B.C.
  • The world’s largest apple peel was created by Kathy Wafler Madison on October 16, 1976, in Rochester, NY. It was 172 feet, 4 inches long. (She was 16 years old at the time and grew up to be a sales manager for an apple tree nursery.)
  • It takes about 36 apples to create one gallon of apple cider.
  • Apples account for 50 percent of the world’s deciduous fruit tree production.
  • The old saying, “An apple a day, keeps the doctor away.” This saying comes from an old English adage, “To eat an apple before going to bed, will make the doctor beg his bread.”
  • Don’t peel your apple. Two-thirds of the fiber and lots of antioxidants are found in the peel. Antioxidants help to reduce damage to cells, which can trigger some diseases.
  • In 2005, United States consumers ate an average of 46.1 pounds of fresh apples and processed apple products. That’s a lot of applesauce!
  • Sixty-three percent of the 2005 U.S. apple crop was eaten as fresh fruit.
  • In 2005, 36 percent of apples were processed into apple products; 18.6 percent of this is for juice and cider, two percent was dried, 2.5 percent was frozen, 12.2 percent was canned and 0.7 percent was fresh slices. Other uses were the making of baby food, apple butter or jelly and vinegar.
  • The top apple producing states are Washington, New York, Michigan,Pennsylvania, California and Virginia.
  • In 2006, 58% of apples produced in the United States were produced in Washington, 11% in New York, 8% in Michigan, 5% in Pennsylvania, 4% in California and 2% in Virginia.
  • In 2005, there were 7,500 apple growers with orchards covering 379,000 acres.
  • In 1998-90 the U.S. per capita fresh apple consumption was around 21 pounds.
  • In 2005, the average United States consumer ate an estimated 16.9 pounds of fresh market apples
  • Total apple production in the United States in 2005 was 234.9 million cartons valued at $1.9 billion.
  • In 2006/2007 the People’s Republic of China led the world in commercial apple production with 24,480,000 metric tons followed by the United States with 4,460,544 metric tons.
  • In 2006/2007 commercial world production of apples was at 44,119,244 metric tons.
  • Almost one out of every four apples harvested in the United States is exported.
  • 35.7 million bushels of fresh market apples in 2005 were exported. That was 24 percent of the total U.S. fresh-market crop.
  • The apple variety ‘Red Delicious’ is the most widely grown in the United States with 62 million bushels harvested in 2005.
  • Many apples after harvesting and cleaning have commercial grade wax applied. Waxes are made from natural ingredients.
  • National Apple Month is the only national, generic apple promotion conducted in the United States. Originally founded in 1904 as National Apple Week, it was expanded in 1996 to a three-month promotional window from September through November.
  • On August 21, 2007 the GoldRush apple was designated as the official Illinois’state fruit. GoldRush is a sweet-tart yellow apple with a long shelf life. The apple is also the state fruit of Minnesota, New York, Vermont, Washington and West Virginia.

Source Apple Statistics:

Most fruit lovers know that of all the fruits out there, apples enjoy the distinction of having the greatest variety. They are the nearly the only fruit or vegetable in the grocery aisle where variety is a major selling point. Apples can taste sweet or tart, be snappy or mushy, hold their shape when cooked or just fall apart. There are literally thousands of varieties of apples, with nearly 100 in common cultivation.

If you were to plant the seeds of an apple, you are very likely to end up with something that is not like the fruit it came from. I recently saw a picture of the actual fruit produced from seedlings that all came from the same tree. The fruit were incredibly diverse ranging in color from gold to red, and from small to large (I couldn’t taste them, but would be willing to bet that the taste was equally inconsistent). So if apples don’t grow reliably from seed, how do apple growers produce a consistent product?

The answer was discovered over a hundred years ago as growers tried to “move” varieties from one place to another. It turns out that apples are very tough plants and they can be grafted easily. The graft is accomplished by taking tender bud wood (called the scion) from the desired plant, and inserting it into a freshly cut slit under the bark of the host apple tree. When done correctly, the cells of the host and scion merge nicely at the graft, and allow the scion to continue growing into an exact replica of its original parent. This is a kind of clonal reproduction that guarantees that there is no change to the variety over time. A variation of this on small nursery trees is called budding, and it is pretty much the only way that apples are propagated today.

If we look back at the apples in common usage 200 years ago, they are typically soft, have thick skins, have rough patches on their skin called russetting, have a very short window for harvest, don’t store well, and generally wouldn’t compete well with today’s varieties in the grocery aisle. But once there was a good solution in place to maintain and exactly propagate a variety, there was a lot of effort put into breeding.

Apple breeding is a very long term process taking anywhere between 15-30 years for results of a cross to be well understood. New varieties usually come about in 3 ways: sexual crossing between existing varieties; volunteer seedlings that are “found”; and genetic mutations of existing apple wood.

Sexual crossing is a slow process because even with parent seeds from the same apple, the “child” trees may yield apples that are very different from each other. Each seed must be grown to a mature tree before only the best trees are kept for future crosses or commercial propagation. For example, the popular variety Honeycrisp was actually bred in the 60’s, so long ago that records of its exact parentage have been lost. Nonetheless, this is the process whereby almost all brand new varieties are grown. It is a slow, expensive process that is leading the industry to some major changes. More about that in my next post.

The second method mentioned is where seedlings trees are identified as being somehow worthy of saving. An example of this is the variety “York” which is still considered an excellent baking and processing apple. It was found growing near York PA nearly 100 years ago, and saved.

The third method is very often used to improve an existing variety. It is pretty common in an orchard to come upon a limb that acts a little differently than the rest of the tree. Its apples may ripen earlier, or they may be redder, or they may taste a little different. These “sports” are often identified by alert growers, and cuttings shipped to nurseries to serve as a cultivar of the parent variety. This can cause a variety to change fairly quickly due to human-selected preferences in a variety.

For example, throughout the second half of the 20th century, Red Delicious was continuously selected for improvements to color and shape, such that the most modern strains are almost always 100% dark red with a pointy shape; unfortunately the selection process also diminished the flavor of America’s favorite apple variety. Gala has also changed: what started as a red blush over a yellow base has now been selected to be another red apple. Fortunately, the taste has remained unchanged.

Future posts will examine the future of apple breeding.

Golden Apple

Golden Apple

The golden apple is a special food item that bestows beneficial effects.

The enchanted golden apple is a rare variant of the golden apple that has stronger effects.

Obtaining

Crafting

Ingredients Crafting recipe
Gold Ingot +
Apple

Natural generation

Golden apples can be found in 2.5% of stronghold altar chests, 4.3% of big underwater ruins chests, 21.8% of dungeon chests, all igloo chests, 23.5% of desert temple chests, 28.2% of chest minecarts in Mineshafts, and 21.8% of woodland mansion chests, all in stacks of 1.

In Bedrock Edition, they can be found in 2.4% of stronghold altar chests and 21.5% of woodland mansion chests in stacks of 1.

Enchanted golden apples can be found in 3.1% of dungeon chests, 2.6% of desert temple chests, 1.4% of chest minecarts in Mineshafts, and 3.1% of woodland mansion chests, all in stacks of 1.

In Bedrock Edition, they can be found in 3.1% of woodland mansion chests in stacks of 1.

Usage

See also: Hunger management

To eat a golden apple, press and hold use while it is selected in the hotbar. Both restore 4 () points of hunger and 9.6 hunger saturation.

The regular golden apple provides:

  • Absorption I for 2 minutes (providing 4 points of absorption health)
  • Regeneration II (1 every 25 ticks, × 0.4 per second) for 5 seconds (long enough to heal 4 points of damage).

The enchanted golden apple provides:

  • Absorption IV for 2 minutes (providing 16 × 8 points of absorption health)
  • Regeneration level II in Java Edition or V in Bedrock Edition for 30 seconds (in Java Edition, 1 is restored every 25 ticks, × 0.4 per second) for 20 seconds (long enough to heal 16 × 8 points of damage; in Bedrock Edition, 1 is restored every 6 ticks, × 1.66 per second)
  • Fire Resistance I for 5 minutes
  • Resistance I (20% reduced damage from all sources except the void) for 5 minutes

Golden apples can be eaten even when the player’s hunger bar is full.

Curing zombie villagers

Main article: Zombie Villager § Curing

A regular golden apple and a potion of Weakness can be used to convert a zombie villager into a regular villager.

Horses

Both types of golden apples can be used to improve the chances of taming a horse by 10%, for breeding horses and for speeding up the growth of baby horses by 4 minutes.

Crafting ingredient

Name Ingredients Crafting recipe
Banner Pattern Thing Paper +
Enchanted Golden Apple

Sounds

Data values

ID

Java Edition:

Item Namespaced ID
Golden Apple golden_apple
Enchanted Golden Apple enchanted_golden_apple

Bedrock Edition:

Item Namespaced ID Numeric ID
Golden Apple golden_apple 322
Enchanted Apple appleenchanted 466

Achievements

Main article: Achievements

Icon Achievement In-game description Actual requirements (if different) Availability Xbox points earned Trophy type (PS)
Xbox PS Bedrock Nintendo
Overpowered Eat a Notch apple Eat an enchanted golden apple. Yes Yes Yes Yes 30G Silver
Zombie Doctor Cure a zombie villager. Throw a splash potion of weakness at a zombie villager and give it a golden apple (by facing the zombie and pressing the use key with a golden apple in your hand) Xbox One Yes Yes Yes 40G Gold
Xbox 360 Alt 20G
Fruit on the Loom Make a banner using an enchanted apple stencil. Make a banner using an enchanted apple. No PS4 Yes No 20G Bronze

Advancements

Main article: Advancements

Icon Advancement In-game description Parent Actual requirements (if different) Namespaced ID
Zombie Doctor Weaken and then cure a Zombie Villager We Need to Go Deeper Throw a splash potion of weakness at a zombie villager and give it a golden apple (by facing the zombie and pressing the use key with a golden apple in your hand), then wait for the villager to be cured. story/cure_zombie_villager
Husbandry The world is full of friends and food Eat anything that can be eaten. husbandry/root
A Balanced Diet Eat everything that is edible, even if it’s not good for you A Seedy Place Eat each of these 39 foods. Other foods are ignored for the advancement. husbandry/balanced_diet

Video

Note: This video is outdated; since version JE 1.6.1, golden apples now require gold ingots and since version JE 1.9, enchanted golden apples are now uncraftable.

History

Java Edition Infdev
February 23, 2010 A player named JTE put a crafting recipe for golden apples as a joke at the bottom of a crafting guide he made. The recipe used gold ingots instead of gold blocks.
20100227 Added golden apples.
Golden apples heal a full 20 × 10 health points, making them the best food in the entire game.
Golden apples are crafted with an apple and eight blocks of gold.
20100625-2 Golden apples can now be rarely found in dungeons.
Java Edition Beta
1.8 Pre-release Due to the addition of hunger, golden apples have now been changed so that they restore 10 (), instead of 20 × 10 health points, but also give Regeneration for 30 seconds.
Java Edition
1.0 Beta 1.9 Prerelease 2 Golden apples have now been given ‘glint’ (animated purple glow) when viewed from the player’s inventory, and its tooltip has now changed from the standard white to a magenta color.
Beta 1.9 Prerelease 3 Golden apples can now be found in the new stronghold altar chests.
1.1 11w48a Golden apples are now easier to craft. Standard apples are now able to very rarely drop from oak leaves, meaning that players no longer have to venture into strongholds/dungeons to find one.
? Golden apples have now been changed, so that they now restore 4 () and give only 4 seconds of Regeneration.
The crafting recipe of golden apples has now been modified, requiring 8 gold nuggets instead of 8 blocks of gold to craft. Although its natural spawn is rare, it is easier to obtain through crafting.
1.3.1 12w21a Added enchanted golden apples.
Enchanted golden apples highly resemble the golden apple prior to 1.1.
Enchanted golden apples have Regeneration IV (30 seconds), Resistance (5 minutes) and Fire Resistance (5 minutes).
Enchanted golden apples can be crafted with 8 blocks of gold,
Enchanted golden apples shine like an enchanted item and have a purple tooltip while the standard golden apple’s tooltip changed to blue. However, the standard golden apple’s effects remain unchanged.
1.4.2 12w32a Golden apples can now be fed to a zombie villager with the Weakness debuff causing them to revert to villagers after a delay of about 3 minutes.
1.6.1 13w23a Normal golden apples now use 8 gold ingots instead of 8 gold nuggets.
The Regeneration effect of normal golden apples has now been slowed down.
13w23b Normal golden apples now give the player Health Boost for 1:30 and Regeneration II for 0:10. This temporarily gives the player 4 extra base health points, and it heals a total of 4 health points.
13w24b The Health Boost effect has now been replaced with Absorption, lasting 1:30. Enchanted golden apples now give the player Absorption as well, and Regeneration IV has now been increased to Regeneration V.
? Absorption from golden apples now lasts 2:00.
1.8 14w06a Crafting an enchanted golden apple now gives the player the achievement “Overpowered”.
1.9 15w37a The Regeneration effect from normal golden apples has now been reduced to Regeneration I (from II in Java Edition 1.8).
Enchanted golden apples now give Regeneration II (down from V) and Absorption IV (up from I), in addition to the unchanged Resistance and Fire Resistance effects. The duration of the Regeneration effect has now also been decreased to 20 seconds.
15w43a A single golden apple can now sometimes be found in igloo chests.
15w43b A single golden apple is now always found in igloo chests.
15w44a Enchanted golden apples are now uncraftable, making them no longer renewable.
The Regeneration effect from normal golden apples has now been returned to Regeneration II, as it had been in 1.8.
The average yield of normal golden apples from dungeon chests has now been increased.
Normal golden apples have now been added to desert temple and mineshaft chests.
Enchanted golden apples have now been added to dungeon, desert temple and mineshaft chests.
1.11 16w39a Normal and enchanted golden apples are now found in the new woodland mansion chests.
1.13 17w47a The names and IDs have now been split into golden apple and enchanted golden apple.
Prior to The Flattening, this item’s numeral ID was 322.
18w09a Golden apples (non-enchanted) can now generate in the chests of underwater ruins.
1.14 18w43a The texture for golden apples has now been changed.
The texture for enchanted golden apples has now been changed.
Pocket Edition Alpha
0.12.1 build 1 Added golden apples and enchanted golden apples.
build 3 A crafting recipe has now been added for golden apples.
build 4 A crafting recipe has now been added for enchanted golden apples.
Pocket Edition
1.1.0 alpha 1.1.0.0 Enchanted golden apples are now known as “Enchanted Apple”.
Bedrock Edition
1.2.0 ? Enchanted apples now give Absorption IV rather than Absorption I.
1.2.13 ? Enchanted golden apples are now uncraftable, making them no longer renewable.
1.4.0 beta 1.2.20.1 Golden apples can now generate in the chests of underwater ruins.
? Enchanted apples now gives Regeneration V rather than IV.
1.10.0 beta 1.10.0.3 Enchanted apples are no longer used to craft patterns on banners directly, but are now used to craft Thing banner patterns.
The texture for golden apples has now been changed.
The texture for the enchanted golden apple has now been changed.
Legacy Console Edition
TU1 CU1 1.0 Patch 1 Added golden apples.
TU5 Due to the addition of hunger, golden apples have been changed, so that they restored 10 () instead of 20 × 10 health points, but also give Regeneration for 30 seconds.
TU14 1.04 Added enchanted golden apples.
TU19 CU7 1.12 Golden apples now give extra “Absorption” health for a short period.
1.90 The texture for golden apples has now been changed.
The texture for the enchanted golden apple has now been changed.
New Nintendo 3DS Edition
0.1.0 Added golden apples and enchanted golden apples.

Issues

Issues relating to “Golden Apple” are maintained on the bug tracker. Report issues there.

Trivia

  • The damage tag of any enchanted apple obtained in Bedrock Edition is 1.

Gallery

  • A comparison of the two golden apple variations.

  • The effects of consuming an enchanted golden apple.

  • A chest in a stronghold containing a golden apple.

  • A golden apple found in a dungeon.

Notes

  1. Called the Enchanted Golden Apple in Java Edition and Enchanted Apple in Bedrock Edition, and referred to as a Notch Apple in the “Overpowered” achievement.

Items

View at: Template:Items/content

Photo: Noam Cohen (Reshot)

We all have opinions on the best apples, but these are the correct opinions. My qualifications: I have eaten a lot of apples. I’ve been lucky enough to taste antique varieties of apples and experimental research varieties of apples. If you would like to know the best grocery store apples, I can tell you about them. If you want the truly best apples, these are harder to find, but I can tell you which ones to look for.

The Best Grocery Store Apples

1. The expensive ones in the fancy bag. These are “club apples” with trademarked names where the growers have to maintain membership in a sort of club to be able to grow them. One of the club’s requirements is that they be really good about quality control, so they tend to be good varieties that show up at the store in excellent condition. I’ve never been disappointed by one of these. SweeTango are one such brand.

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2. Honeycrisp. Sorry, honeycrisp. You’re tasty but you’re way too big, so you can’t have the number one spot. You don’t fit in anybody’s apple slicers, and the club apples are usually just a little bit crisper, a little bit juicier, a little bit sweeter.

3. Pink Lady. Third place is tough to fill; if the Pink Ladies are past their prime, they could easily be surpassed by one of the runners-up below.

Honorable mentions: Empire, Fuji, Gala, Jazz

The Best Pie Apples

1. Granny Smith. This apple has a combination of qualities that make it unsuited for casual snacking: it’s too tart, too dry, too unbalanced. Our food and beverage editor Claire Lower likes these with salt; I believe this is a good apple that requires a partnership to shine. It’s good with cheese, too. And it’s especially good in pies, where its tartness gets balanced by sugar, and its dryness means it’s easy to make a good-textured pie that will never get soupy.

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2. Golden delicious. This is a very distant second, but Claire notes that it’s performed well in pie baking tests. Get ‘em fresh, though, because a sad, out-of-season golden delicious is no fun.

Honorable mentions: any tart apple you like, including Jonagold, MacIntosh, or the snacking apples listed elsewhere. Mutsu, also known as Crispin, has a similar flavor as Golden Delicious and would probably do well.

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The Best Lesser-Known Apples

These aren’t likely to show up in your local supermarket, but keep an eye out at farmer’s markets and any place you find weird specialty produce.

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1. Roxbury Russet. This is a small green apple with rough (“russeted”) brown patches. It looks ugly. It tastes amazing, tart and juicy.

2. Arkansas Black. Another kind of ugly one: these are deep red and darken to nearly black in storage. In other words, they look like apples that have gone bad and mealy. But take a bite and whoa they are crisp and juicy and perfect, even after being in storage for weeks or months.

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3. Cox’s Orange Pippin. This is a weird apple but I think everybody should try it once. It has a fruity flavor that tastes almost exactly like orange Pez candy. I can’t explain it; this apple variety dates to 1830, so the flavor is entirely natural, unlike the (shudder) Grapple.

Honorable Mentions: Ashmead’s Kernel, Zabergau Reinette, Liberty, Northern Spy, Winesap

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The Worst Apple

Just a note to acknowledge that we all hate Red Delicious, the apple that is good at looking like an apple but no good at tasting like one.

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However, to get that wet cardboard flavor, we need to achieve a few things. First, it should be one of the thick-skinned, dark red offspring that are popular now, not the original Delicious apple that was more stripey and, records imply, actually delicious.

It should also have been picked before it was fully mature, and kept in controlled-atmosphere storage for months. Set it out in a convenience store fruit basket, and it will earn its spot as dead last on our list. Do not attempt to pick a Red Delicious fresh from a tree, or any nonsense like that. It would totally screw up our ranking.

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  • The crabapple is the only apple native to North America.
  • Apples come in all shades of reds, greens, and yellows.
  • Two pounds of apples make one 9-inch pie.
  • Apple blossom is the state flower of Michigan.
  • 2,500 varieties of apples are grown in the United States.
  • 7,500 varieties of apples are grown throughout the world.
  • 100 varieties of apples are grown commercially in the United States.
  • Apples are grown commercially in 36 states.
  • Apples are grown in all 50 states.
  • Apples are fat, sodium, and cholesterol free.
  • A medium apple is about 80 calories.
  • Apples are a great source of the fiber pectin. One apple has five grams of fiber.
  • The pilgrims planted the first United States apple trees in the Massachusetts Bay Colony.
  • The science of apple growing is called pomology.
  • Apple trees take four to five years to produce their first fruit.
  • Most apples are still picked by hand in the fall.
  • Apple varieties range in size from a little larger than a cherry to as large as a grapefruit.
  • Apples are propagated by two methods: grafting or budding.
  • The apple tree originated in an area between the Caspian and the Black Sea.
  • Apples were the favorite fruit of ancient Greeks and Romans.
  • Apples are a member of the rose family.
  • Apples harvested from an average tree can fill 20 boxes that weigh 42 pounds each.
  • The largest apple picked weighed three pounds.
  • Europeans eat about 46 pounds of apples annually.
  • The average size of a United States orchard is 50 acres.
  • Many growers use dwarf apple trees.
  • Charred apples have been found in prehistoric dwellings in Switzerland.
  • Most apple blossoms are pink when they open but gradually fade to white.
  • Some apple trees will grow over 40 feet high and live over 100 years.
  • Most apples can be grown farther north than most other fruits, because they blossom late in spring, minimizing frost damage.
  • It takes the energy from 50 leaves to produce one apple.
  • Apples are the second most valuable fruit grown in the United States. Oranges are first.
  • In colonial time, apples were called winter banana or melt-in-the-mouth.
  • The largest U. S. apple crop was 277.3 million cartons in 1998.
  • Apples have five seed pockets or carpels. Each pocket contains seeds. The number of seeds per carpel is determined by the vigor and health of the plant. Different varieties of apples will have different number of seeds.
  • World’s top apple producers are China, United States, Turkey, Poland and Italy.
  • The Lady or Api apple is one of the oldest varieties in existence.
  • Newton Pippin apples were the first apples exported from America in 1768, some were sent to Benjamin Franklin in London.
  • In 1730, the first apple nursery was opened in Flushing, New York.
  • One of George Washington’s hobbies was pruning his apple trees.
  • America’s longest-lived apple tree was reportedly planted in 1647 by Peter Stuyvesant in his Manhattan orchard and was still bearing fruit when a derailed train struck it in 1866.
  • Apples ripen six to ten times faster at room temperature than if they were refrigerated.
  • A peck of apples weight 10.5 pounds.
  • A bushel of apples weights about 42 pounds and will yield 20-24 quarts of applesauce.
  • Archeologists have found evidence that humans have been enjoying apples since at least 6500 B.C.
  • The world’s largest apple peel was created by Kathy Wafler Madison on October 16, 1976, in Rochester, NY. It was 172 feet, 4 inches long. (She was 16 years old at the time and grew up to be a sales manager for an apple tree nursery.)
  • It takes about 36 apples to create one gallon of apple cider.
  • Apples account for 50 percent of the world’s deciduous fruit tree production.
  • The old saying, “An apple a day, keeps the doctor away.” This saying comes from an old English adage, “To eat an apple before going to bed, will make the doctor beg his bread.”
  • Don’t peel your apple. Two-thirds of the fiber and lots of antioxidants are found in the peel. Antioxidants help to reduce damage to cells, which can trigger some diseases.
  • In 2005, United States consumers ate an average of 46.1 pounds of fresh apples and processed apple products. That’s a lot of applesauce!
  • Sixty-three percent of the 2005 U.S. apple crop was eaten as fresh fruit.
  • In 2005, 36 percent of apples were processed into apple products; 18.6 percent of this is for juice and cider, two percent was dried, 2.5 percent was frozen, 12.2 percent was canned and 0.7 percent was fresh slices. Other uses were the making of baby food, apple butter or jelly and vinegar.
  • The top apple producing states are Washington, New York, Michigan,Pennsylvania, California and Virginia.
  • In 2006, 58% of apples produced in the United States were produced in Washington, 11% in New York, 8% in Michigan, 5% in Pennsylvania, 4% in California and 2% in Virginia.
  • In 2005, there were 7,500 apple growers with orchards covering 379,000 acres.
  • In 1998-90 the U.S. per capita fresh apple consumption was around 21 pounds.
  • In 2005, the average United States consumer ate an estimated 16.9 pounds of fresh market apples
  • Total apple production in the United States in 2005 was 234.9 million cartons valued at $1.9 billion.
  • In 2006/2007 the People’s Republic of China led the world in commercial apple production with 24,480,000 metric tons followed by the United States with 4,460,544 metric tons.
  • In 2006/2007 commercial world production of apples was at 44,119,244 metric tons.
  • Almost one out of every four apples harvested in the United States is exported.
  • 35.7 million bushels of fresh market apples in 2005 were exported. That was 24 percent of the total U.S. fresh-market crop.
  • The apple variety ‘Red Delicious’ is the most widely grown in the United States with 62 million bushels harvested in 2005.
  • Many apples after harvesting and cleaning have commercial grade wax applied. Waxes are made from natural ingredients.
  • National Apple Month is the only national, generic apple promotion conducted in the United States. Originally founded in 1904 as National Apple Week, it was expanded in 1996 to a three-month promotional window from September through November.
  • On August 21, 2007 the GoldRush apple was designated as the official Illinois’state fruit. GoldRush is a sweet-tart yellow apple with a long shelf life. The apple is also the state fruit of Minnesota, New York, Vermont, Washington and West Virginia.

Source Apple Statistics:

There are over 2,500 varieties of apples grown in the United States, with 75,000 varieties grown worldwide. However, commercially there are only 100 varieties grown in the States. The U.S. is the second largest producer of the fruit in the world, following China. Poland, Italy and France round out the rest of the top apple production countries.

While commercially the fruit is grown in 36 states, apples are actually grown in all 50 states. The top producing states include Washington, New York, Michigan, Pennsylvania, California and Virginia. The apple blossom is actually the state flower of Michigan. The average orchard in the U.S. is about 50 aces. The average tree can fill 20 boxes that weigh 42 pounds each, and with about 300 trees per acre, that’s a lot of apples.

Apples come in all the shades of reds, yellows and greens, as well as a wide range of sizes. The top 10 varieties produced in the United States are Red Delicious, Gala, Granny Smith, Fuji, Golden Delicious, Honeycrisp, McIntosh, Rome, Cripps Pink, and Empire. The crabapple is the only variety that is native to North America. The Lady apple is one of the oldest varieties still around today.

Americans consume an average of 115 pounds of the fruit, either fresh or processed, per year. In 2015 the average American consumed about 1.6 gallons of apple juice, over 10 pounds of fresh apples, and over 3 pounds of canned, dried or frozen apples. About 67% of the fruit grown in the U.S. is for fresh consumption, while 33% is used for apple products, such as juices, applesauce, and slices.

Roughly 1 in every 4 apples grown in the U.S. is exported to places like Mexico, Canada, India, Taiwan, United Arab Emirates, Hong Kong, Vietnam, Indonesia, Saudi Arabia, and Thailand. The fresh fruit is also imported to help keep grocery shelves stocked before our fall harvest.

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In Maine, other varieties are gaining in popularity as people’s tastes and eating habits change. Cortland, Macoun and now Honeycrisp Two lesser-known varieties, Black Oxford and Brock, originated in Maine.

Eighty-four farms produce about one million bushels of apples each year on 2000 acres. The average size of an apple orchard in Maine is 20 acres, with some being smaller than one acre and the largest growing apples on 320 acres. In response to growing interest in organic food, four apple farms in Maine now produce and sell organically-grown apples.

Most apple trees are propagated by bud grafting, a technique that joins two plants into one. Since apples do not come true-to-type from seed, and do not readily form roots on cuttings, they are grafted onto easy-to-root stocks that serve as the root system. Through grafting, one can obtain another plant that has the same traits as the original plant from which it was obtained. To bud graft, one inserts a bud between the bark and wood of a stem on another tree. Once the bud heals, the shoot above it is cut off, and the bud grows into a shoot that will eventually become the upper part of the tree. This part of the tree is called the scion. The rootstock remains distinct from the scion.

Yellow Apple Trees – Growing Apples That Are Yellow

When we think of an apple, it is most likely the shiny, red fruit like the one from which Snow White took a fateful bite that comes to mind. However, there is something very special about the slightly tart, crisp bite of a yellow apple. There aren’t very many of these tasty fruits, but the few yellow apple cultivars available really stand out. If you are looking for apple trees with yellow fruit, read on for some outstanding varieties.

Choosing Yellow Apple Varieties

Apple harvest means pies, cider, and delicacies like fruit and cheese pairings. Most of the commercially grown apples that are yellow are chance seedlings or sports of other varieties. Some of the classics, such as Jonagold, may be very familiar but others are relatively new yellow apple varieties. There are some real gems in the list, one of which may fit your garden needs.

Classic Apples That are Yellow

It is often safest to go with tried and true varieties. The following is a list of oldies but goodies that you will recognize from your childhood:

  • Jonagold – A mix of Jonathan and Golden Delicious. Use fresh or in cooking.
  • Crispin – Has been a staple since the 1960’s. Good in pies but any other purpose as well.
  • Golden Delicious – Slices were in my lunch box daily for years. Butter and honey flavor.
  • Newtown Pippin – Named by Thomas Jefferson.
  • Rhode Island Greening – A classic American variety that has been planted since 1650.

Each of these yellow apple cultivars have been around for decades and may be residing in the form of a frozen pie or canned sauce at your home currently. All are economically important yellow apple trees and heavily exported.

Newer Apple Trees with Yellow Fruit

Almost every fruit industry is constantly breeding and doing trials of new varieties and apples are no exception. Many of these were actually discovered by accident but some were carefully bred to eliminate certain traits, such as blushing, for a perfectly yellow apple:

  • Blondee – Creamy flesh and bright, pure yellow skin. Bred from Gala.
  • Criterion – A happy accident from Golden Delicious. Sweet smelling, juicy fruits.
  • Gingergold – An early season fruit.
  • Golden Supreme – From Golden Delicious but produces a tarter apple.
  • Silken – A nother early apple. Nearly translucent skin.

Imported Yellow Apple Varieties

Washington State and several other temperate regions in the United States are big apple producers but they aren’t the only place apples flourish. Yellow apple trees are being developed in Asia, the Netherlands, France and many other countries and locales.

Breeding apples that are yellow isn’t high on the list, but there are still several delicious varieties:

  • Belle de Boskoop – From the Netherlands. Good for any uses
  • Gravenstein – A classic from Denmark with traditional flavor
  • Alderman apple – Probably from Scotland, 1920’s
  • Antonovka – Small fruits originating from Russia
  • Medaille d’Or – A classic French variety used in ciders

There are over 750 varieties of apple with numerous golden yellow varieties. These were just a few but your local extension office can help you decide which varieties are best suited to your region.

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