Plant that looks like pineapple

The plant consists of stocky leaves whorled around a central stem. In a healthy pineapple plant, the tapered, swordlike leaves can grow up to about 5 feet (1.5 meters) long.

The pineapple fruit grows out of the top of the central stem. The fruit is actually the result of dozens of individual fruit-producing flowers that have fused into a single fruit, which is capped with a “crown” sporting numerous short leaves.

Unlike most fruits, pineapples are not grown from seeds. Common commercial varieties of pineapples are “self-incompatible,” meaning that the plants’ pollen cannot fertilize members of the same variety. So unless different varieties are grown next to one another and flower simultaneously, the plant will produce a seedless fruit that develops without fertilization.

When removed, the crown of the pineapple fruit contains small roots. If it’s planted into the ground (or a pot), a new fruit-producing plant will grow.

Additionally, the plant’s “suckers” (side shoots that grow in between the leaves of the main stem) and slips (tiny plantlets that grow out from the base of the pineapple fruit) can produce new plants when replanted.

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Plant Name

Scientific Name: Pandanus tectorius

Synonyms: Pandanus chamissonis, P. douglasii, P. menziesii, P. odoratissimus

Common Names: Hala, Tahitian Screwpine, Pu Hala, Screw Pine, Textile Screwpine, Thatch Screwpine, Pandanus, Pandan, Tourist Pineapple, Pineapple Tree

Plant Characteristics

Duration: Perennial, Evergreen

Growth Habit: Tree

Hawaii Native Status: Native (indigenous)

Flower Color: Cream or whitish

Height: Up to 50 feet (15 m) tall, but usually less

Description: The plants are dioecious with male and female flowers on separate plants. The tiny male flowers are in dense, pendant clusters and surrounded by large, creamy white bracts. The female flowers are in rounded, pineapple-like flower heads. The female flowers are followed by rounded, also pineapple-like fruit heads composed of multiple wedge-shaped fruits. The individual fruit segments have a green top and a yellow, orange, or red base. Tourists and others unfamiliar with Hala may mistake the fruit heads for pineapples, but this plant is unrelated to pineapples. The leaves are dark green, sword-shaped, bent, edged with small, sharp spines, spirally arranged, and densely clustered at the branch tips. Some varieties have variegated or smooth-edged leaves. The plants have a slender, upright, branched trunk with brown, ringed bark and a cone of distinctive stilt or prop roots at the base.

Here in Hawaii, Hala grows in the coastal lowlands, often near the edge of the ocean. The fruit is buoyant, salt water tolerant, and can spread to new land areas by ocean current.

This is the only Pandanus species found in Hawaii. The similar and related ‘Ie’ie (Freycinetia arborea) grows as a clinging vine instead of a tree like Hala.

Special Characteristics

Canoe Plant – Although this plant was already here, different cultivated varieties of Hala were brought to Hawaii by the ancient Polynesians in their canoes. The plants were used for a variety of medicinal purposes. The fruit was eaten and used to make leis. The roots were used for cordage. The leaves were used as thatch and stripped of their spiny edges and woven or plaited into mats, pillows, sails, baskets, hats, sandals, and fans. Many of these items are still commonly made and sold here in Hawaii.

Edible – The fruits are edible, and some cultivated varieties have tastier fruit. The seeds and the fleshy, fibrous, colorful base of the ripe fruit segments, known as phalanges or “keys” can be eaten either raw or cooked.

Fragrant – The male flowers are sweetly fragrant and attract bees.

Classification

Kingdom: Plantae – Plants
Subkingdom: Tracheobionta – Vascular plants
Superdivision: Spermatophyta – Seed plants
Division: Magnoliophyta – Flowering plants
Class: Liliopsida – Monocotyledons
Subclass: Arecidae
Order: Pandanales
Family: Pandanaceae – Screw-pine family
Genus: Pandanus L. f. – screwpine
Species: Pandanus tectorius Parkinson ex Zucc. – Tahitian screwpine

More About This Plant

Hawaii County Distribution Map

Pineapple Lily

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Pineapple Flowers Stock Photos and Images

(2,645) Narrow your search: Vectors | Black & white | Page 1 of 27

  • Eucomis pallidiflora Pole – Evansii, Giant Pineapple Lily flowers
  • Eucomis. Eucomis (pineapple flowers)
  • Pineapple Flowers or Pineapple Lilies, Eucomis vandermerwei, Hyacinthaceae, South Africa
  • Eucomis is a genus of African bulbs in the asparagus family, commonly referred to as pineapple flowers or pineapple lilies.
  • view of pineapple flowers
  • Close-up Of Drink Amidst Pineapple And Flowers On Table
  • Top view of Pineapple lily or Eucomis or Pineapple flowers bulbous perennial flowering plant with basal rosettes of leaves with stout stem covered
  • Pineapple with flowers
  • Pineapple flower (Eucomis bicolor) with flowers at the top, but forming seedpods below and with the characteristic tuft of leaves above
  • Pineapple Florets on a young fruit. Purple flowers sprout from a young pineapple fruit as it matures in an Azorian Greenhouse
  • Close-up of pineapple flowers Sdlg Aldzw FF103. Eucomis Sdlg Aldzw FF103
  • Eucomis genus of African hyacinth family Hyacinthaceae commonly referred to as pineapple flowers or pineapple lily lilly
  • A gluten free, pineapple and coconut layer cake with passion fruit curd. Decorated with dried pineapple flowers and displayed on a handmade plate.
  • fresh pineapple fruit with purple flowers in indonesian orchard
  • Flowers of Pineapple Weed / Matricaria discoidea.
  • Pineapple, a bromeliad, with tiny mauve flowers, bright red bracts & spiny leaves growing in sub-tropical home garden in Queensland Australia
  • Pineapple and bougainvillea flowers
  • Colony of Pineapple flowers, Eucomis autumnalis, on the slopes of the Sentinel, Drakensberg Mountain, South Africa
  • Pineapple flower – Eucomis comosa
  • Close up shot of cute small Pineapple, saw in Flower Market of Los Angeles
  • Eucomis (pineapple flowers) unsupported flower spikes
  • Edible July flowers of the pineapple guava, Acca sellowiana
  • The Pineapple Guava (Feijoa sellowiana) is a shrub native to Australia & New Zealand.My plant flowers but as yet has never produced fruit.
  • view of pineapple flowers exotic vietnam
  • Close up of Achillea millefolium ‘Pineapple Mango’, Yarrow, Tutti Frutti Series. Pink and white flowers. June.
  • Pineapple lily or Eucomis or Pineapple flowers bulbous perennial flowering plant with basal rosettes of leaves with stout stem covered in star shaped
  • pineapple flowers solated on white background
  • Close up of Pineapple Lily (Eucomis comosa)
  • Pineapple Florets on a young fruit. Purple flowers sprout from a young pineapple fruit as it matures in an Azorian Greenhouse
  • Eucomis in autumn, Kirstenbosch botanic garden, Capetown, South Africa
  • Pineapple Guava – Feijoa sellowiana
  • A gluten free, pineapple and coconut layer cake with passion fruit curd. Decorated with dried pineapple flowers and displayed on a handmade plate.
  • Pineapple flowers grow in tropical forest. Kadidiri island. Togean Islands. Central Sulawesi. Indonesia
  • Pineapple weed / Matricaria discoidea plant in flower – the yellow flowers almost look like small pineapples.
  • Pineapple, a bromeliad, with tiny mauve flowers, bright red bracts & spiny leaves growing in sub-tropical home garden in Queensland Australia
  • Beautiful bouquet of roses, carnations, decorative pineapple and other flowers in red package isolated on white background.
  • Colony of Pineapple flowers, Eucomis autumnalis, on the slopes of the Sentinel, Drakensberg Mountain, South Africa
  • Pineappleweed or wild chamomile, Maricaria discoidea, rayless flowers and leaves, Berkshire, June
  • Decorated food on a festive table
  • Eucomis (pineapple flowers) close up of flower spike
  • Edible July flowers of the pineapple guava, Acca sellowiana
  • The Pineapple Guava (Feijoa sellowiana) is a shrub native to Australia & New Zealand.My plant flowers but as yet has never produced fruit.
  • Pineapple Type Flower
  • Pineapple (Ananas comosus), inflorescence
  • Geum ‘Pineapple Crush’ flowers.
  • pineapple flowers solated on white background
  • Pineapple lily ‘Eucomis Reuben’ plant flowers
  • Fruit Flowers Bouquet
  • Eucomis in autumn, Kirstenbosch botanic garden, Capetown, South Africa
  • Pineapple Guava – Feijoa sellowiana
  • Sliced pineapple and coconut layer cake with passion fruit sauce. Decorated with pineapple flowers.
  • Orchid ; dendrobium densiflorum called pineapple orchids ; Kalimpong ; West Bengal ; India
  • Pineappleweed / Matricaria discoidea growing in waste area of arable field. Flowers taste and smell of pineapple. Foraging concept.
  • Pineapple
  • Beautiful bouquet of roses, carnations, decorative pineapple and other flowers in red package isolated on white background.
  • Colony of Pineapple flowers, Eucomis autumnalis, on the slopes of the Sentinel, Drakensberg Mountain, South Africa
  • Flowering pineapple weed, Matricaria discoidea, annual arable weed inm waste ground, Berkshire, August
  • Decorated food on a festive table
  • Eucomis. Eucomis (pineapple flowers)
  • Edible July flowers of the pineapple guava, Acca sellowiana
  • Pineapple flower
  • The Bismarck Palm Tree and Gardens – Pineapple Tree – Luxembourg Palace
  • Float in Haarlem Bloemencorso flower parade pineapple The Netherlands 2007
  • Pineapple Guava (Acca sellowiana) tree in flower, Stoke Newington, London N16
  • Fresh pineapple flowers isolated on white background
  • Pineapple lily ‘Eucomis Reuben’ plant flowers
  • Fruit Flowers Bouquet
  • eucomis autumnalis pineapple lily white petals flowers green leaves foliage bulbs exotic tropical pineapples summer
  • Calibrachoa Cultivars Aloha Kona Pineapple
  • Pineapple blossom (Ananas comosus)
  • Fresh Tropical fruit basket in supermarket
  • Macro flowers of Pineapple Weed / Matricaria discoidea which has the smell / aroma and taste of pineapple. Sometimes foraged as wild food for flavour.
  • Pineberry flower / Fragaria ananassa
  • An image of pineapple growing in wild on Fiji island. Little red flowers hanging from above in foreground.
  • Colony of Pineapple flowers, Eucomis autumnalis, on the slopes of the Sentinel, Drakensberg Mountain, South Africa
  • Flowering pineapple weed, Matricaria discoidea, annual arable weed in waste ground, Berkshire, August
  • Decorated food on a festive table
  • Eucomis pineapple flower close up of flowers UK September
  • Upright spikes of dark red and white flowers contrast with bronze foliage of the half-hardy bulb, Eucomis comosa ‘Sparkling Burgundy’
  • Christmas wreath crafted with a pineapple, oranges, pine cones and flowers, Hanging on a dark door. Colonial Williamsburg annual competition display.
  • Pineapple flower, Ananas comosus, Oahu, Hawaii, USA
  • Eucomis bicolor. Two coloured pineapple lily.
  • Pineapple plant growing in the Quito Botanical Gardens, Quito, Ecuador
  • Decoration with fruits and flowers in beach bar in Jabalpur
  • Pineapple lily ‘Eucomis Reuben’ plant flowers
  • Fruit Flowers Bouquet
  • Ornamental pineapple Ananas comosus variegatus new shoot growing out from top of flower
  • Eucomis comosa, Pineapple flower
  • Eucomis pallidiflora Pole – Evansii, Giant Pineapple Lily flowers
  • Fresh Tropical fruit basket in supermarket
  • Macro flowers of Pineapple Weed / Matricaria discoidea which has the smell / aroma and taste of pineapple. Sometimes foraged as wild food for flavour.
  • Pineberry flower / Fragaria ananassa
  • Pima Pineapple Cactus Coryphantha robustispina var. robustispina Pima County, Arizona, United States Flowers Cactaceae Also know as Robustspine Be
  • Colony of Pineapple flowers, Eucomis autumnalis, on the slopes of the Sentinel Drakensberg Mountain, South Africa
  • Eucomis comosa Sparkling Burgundy,Pineapple lily,racemes,raceme, red-purple, leafy bract,bracts,flower,flowers,flowering,RM Floral
  • Decorated food on a festive table
  • Eucomis pineapple flower close up of flowers UK September
  • Edible flowers of the pineapple guava, Acca sellowiana
  • Red Bromeliad tropical plant colorful flower blooming in spring season at Bromeliad market,Aechmea fasciata, Urn plant, Bromeliaceae, guzmania, Bromel
  • Pineapple flower, Ananas comosus, Oahu, Hawaii, USA

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Pineapple Lilies

SERIES 22 Episode 08

The Pineapple Lily – Eucomis, is a plant that deserves a place in any garden – be it grand or small and ‘cottagey’ commonly known as the Pineapple Lily. The common name of these plants comes from the unusual topknot on the top of this tall spike of flowers. They really are quite spectacular.

They’re actually a bulb that comes from East Africa where they get summer rains, so you do need to water them a bit over the summer months, but they die down to nothing in winter and then these beautiful, broad leaves emerge from the ground in spring and then they flower in late summer going into autumn.

They come in this beautiful pink colour, a white form and there are new forms that have got beautiful burgundy foliage and burgundy flowers.

They’re easy to grow. The only thing they do need is good drainage and reasonable soil. If they get wet feet in winter, the bulbs are likely to rot, however if you buy one in a pot, it can be planted out at any time of year. They also make great long-term pot plants in a reasonable sized pot. Let the foliage die down naturally and be careful of snails attacking the new foliage when it emerges in springtime.

One of the things I love about these flowers is they actually have a beautiful, sweet perfume and they make brilliant long-lasting cut flowers. They’ll last for several weeks in a vase.

Believe it or not, traditionally the bulbs of these plants were actually used as a food source, but I think they’re much too beautiful to eat. Why not plant some in your garden and enjoy their spectacular flowers.

Further information: Plant Profile

THE PINEAPPLE LILY

Make a statement with Pineapple Lillies in your summer garden. These exotic summer blooms are available in several different varieties, ranging in colors of pale green, purple, white, pinks and burgundy. Two of our favorites are ‘Twinkle Stars’ and ‘Sparkling Rosy’. The plant has a base rosette of long lance-shaped leaves. It’s flowers are on a long spike, topped with a tuft of smaller leaves. These leaves and the appearance of the flower spike make the flower head look like a pineapple, thus it’s name.

Pineapple Lilies grow from bulbs. They may be planted directly in the ground or in pots. They grow best in a well-drained, fertile, sandy soil. Use a mixture of sandy loam, well-rotted manure, and sand. If the soil is not well drained, the bulbs will rot, especially in the winter. Protect the bulbs with one to two inches of mulch in the winter months and they will return each summer in July.

Water the plants well once they are planted. Pineapple lilies need constant moisture in the summer. Cut back on watering in the winter, as too much water will cause the bulbs to rot. A dressing of compost will help keep the soil fertile.

Pineapple lilies will tolerate a partly shady area in the garden. However, they bloom best when they get at least 6 hours of sun per day. Give them midday shade, though, as they may wilt if exposed to the noonday sun. If they wilt, water them quickly and thoroughly and they should perk up again.

Pineapple lilies start to form flower buds in July and reach their peak in August, filling your garden with tall spikes of colorful and exotic flowers! And, these gorgeous blooms make a super attractive, long-lasting cut flower.

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