Pictures of eucalyptus tree leaves

Eucalyptus: California Icon, Fire Hazard and Invasive Species

Fifteen major fires roared through 9,000 acres of the East Bay Hills between 1923 and 1992, incinerating some 4,000 homes and killing 26 people. The Oakland “Tunnel” fire, considered the worst in California history, caused an estimated $1.5 billion in damage, destroyed more than 3,000 homes and killed 25 people. Following the Oakland fire, disaster experts urged large landowners in the East Bay Hills to work together to manage vegetation to prevent another catastrophic wildfire, says Tom Klatt, who manages environmental projects for UC Berkeley and serves on the UC Fire Mitigation Committee.

“Blue gum eucalyptus is one of the most fire-intensive plants,” says Klatt. Trees not only put a lot of fuel on the ground as they shed bark, leaves and twigs, but in intense fires, volatile compounds in foliage cause explosive burning. “Once bark catches fire, it gets blown ahead of the flame front and drops burning embers by the tens of thousands per acre in the urban community.”

A 1923 fire started at Inspiration Point ran through the eucalyptus trees until it hit the ridgeline at Grizzly Peak, then came down to University and Shattuck before the wind finally changed direction, Klatt says. “It took out 568 homes on the north side of the Berkeley campus in two hours.”

Despite the fire risk, the plan remains contentious. Some residents worry about the use of pesticides, some feel eucalyptus’ flammability is overstated and others who consider the trees cultural icons view the plans as an attack on a species that’s been here so long we should consider it native. (For the record, the California Native Plant Society defines “native” as any species that predated European contact.) Predicting how an introduced species will behave is complicated by the fact that ecological effects are difficult to observe—and may only appear when it’s too late to control.

Ecological impacts of eucalyptus
Evidence of the trees’ impacts on East Bay ecosystems is relatively scarce. A 2002 study of the Berkeley hills found similar numbers and diversity of species in eucalyptus and native woodlands, but the species themselves were different. Monarchs use groves in Point Pinole as resting spots and several bird species, including herons and egrets, nest in eucalyptus in and near the tree-removal project areas, though how their use affects their reproductive success isn’t clear. (Klatt says that though he hasn’t seen nests in the UCB project areas, the law requires that they take steps to protect nesting birds and any species under state and federal protection.)

More evidence comes from the Central Coast. At a 2004 workshop on the blue gum’s impact on the ecology of coastal ecosystems, researchers reported conflicting effects. Eucalyptus stands can provide habitat for birds near cities and water bodies, and for overwintering monarch butterflies. But the trees change the composition of insect and bird communities as they invade: the loss of native trees that grow along rivers could spell trouble for neotropical migratory songbirds and for species that nest in tree cavities. And when eucalyptus leaves enter streams, aquatic macroinvertebrate communities change, altering the food chain, likely because the chemical content of eucalyptus leaves differs from native foliage.

Blue oak (Quercus douglasii) — off Highway 101 in California. Though oak woodlands sustain more wildlife species than any other landscape, only 4 percent of the state’s woodland habitats are protected. The vast majority remain in private hands. (Photo: Peter O’Malley)

By the time the eucalyptus trees were planted in the East Bay, typically in 12 foot by 12 foot plots, most native woodlands and perennial native grasslands had already been converted to annual European grasslands, says forest ecologist Joe McBride, professor of environmental science, policy and management at the University of California at Berkeley. “And certainly by now a number of species are using those trees but they were here before the eucalyptus was planted, using oak woodlands, riparian woodlands and redwood forests in the East Bay. They just spread to eucalyptus and Monterey pines when the trees grew big enough. These populations aren’t going to disappear if eucalyptus is removed.”

But removal has proven difficult. “After two previous removal efforts in the 1970s and again in the 1980s, the trees have grown back,” Klatt says. Successful eradication requires at least 10 years of maintenance and drizzling about 2 ounces of diluted herbicide directly to the cut stump immediately after felling a tree, he explains. “If you do it within the first three minutes, we see 95 percent to 98 percent success with a single treatment.” But if the trees resprout, more applications will be needed.

The plan aims to selectively cut eucalyptus while leaving bay, oaks and other native trees in the understory. “The more understory we preserve, the faster it recovers,” says Klatt. The plan also calls for retaining all the cut wood as chips for erosion control and moisture retention, and to encourage native regrowth, aided by birds and squirrels that plant acorns in chip beds.

McBride hasn’t seen evidence of eucalyptus’ invasive tendencies in the East Bay Hills but worries about its combustible nature. “We imported this plant from Australia but we didn’t import the normal fungus that decays the litter in Australia,” he says. Accumulations of bark and leaf litter under eucalyptus stands have measured up to 100 tons per acre, compared to about 3 tons per acre for coast live oaks. “It’s an enormous increase.”

Selected for flammability?
So how does the blue gum act in its native environment? For David Bowman, a forest ecologist at the University of Tasmania in Australia, the question isn’t whether the trees are native or non-native—it’s whether they’re dangerous. “Looking at the eucalyptus forest outside my window in Tasmania, I see a gigantic fire hazard.”

At very high temperatures, eucalypt species release a flammable gas that mixes with air to send fireballs exploding out in front of the fire. With eucalyptus, you see these ember attacks, with huge bursts of sparks shooting out of the forests, Bowman says. “It’s just an extraordinary idea for a plant.”

Though it’s difficult to prove, Bowman suspects the trees evolved to be “uber flammable.” Sixty million years ago eucalyptus species hit on a way to recover from intense fire, he explains, using specialized structures hidden deep within their bark that allow rapid recovery through new branches, instead of re-sprouting from the roots like other trees. “They have this adaptive advantage of not having to rebuild their trunk. Whether their oil-rich foliage is also an adaptation, we don’t know.”

If you aren’t familiar with the idea of a plant designed to burn in its life cycle, you can get fooled by its beauty and nice smell, Bowman says. “But on a really hot day, those things are going to burn like torches and shower our suburbs with sparks. And on an extremely hot day, they’re going to shoot out gas balls.”

With tiny pinhead seeds that germinate only in disturbed soils, the trees really aren’t good invaders, Bowman says–with one exception. “Fire opens up the woody capsules that hold the seeds, which love growing on freshly burned soil. Give a hillside a really good torching and the eucalyptus will absolutely dominate. They’ll grow intensively in the first few years of life and outcompete everything.”

The evolutionary dimensions of fire ecology are controversial, Bowman allows. “But if eucalyptus are these evolutionary freak plants that massively increase fire risk,” he says, it raises a troubling question: Are these intense fires a consequence of climate change or the interaction of climate and biology? “If it’s the latter, then what the hell have humans done? We’ve spread a dangerous plant all over the world.”

*****

Executive summary of the project.

Herbicides for Weed Control in Eucalyptus Culture1

Anna Osiecka and Patrick Minogue2

Introduction

Eucalyptus is a diverse genus with over 700 species, most of which are native to Australia. Numerous Eucalyptus species and hybrid clones have been introduced in temperate climates throughout the world and grown as ornamental trees as well as for fuel and fiber. There is renewed interest in planting this fast-growing tree in the southeastern United States for mulch, pulpwood, and bio-energy. However, several silvicultural challenges exist, and competing vegetation control is a significant one.

Young Eucalyptus trees are very sensitive to the adverse effects of plant competition, especially in the initial months after planting. The photographs below illustrate the effect of weed competition on the growth of Eucalyptus urograndis five months after an April planting of six-week-old rooted cuttings in Quincy, Florida.

Figure 1.

When grown without weed control, Eucalyptus urograndis is approximately two feet tall at five and a half months after planting in a study at Quincy, Florida.

Credit:

Anna Osiecka, UF/IFAS

Figure 2.

In the same Quincy study, E. urograndis grown with near complete weed control is nine to ten feet tall at the same age.

Credit:

Anna Osiecka, UF/IFAS

Currently, directed applications of the herbicide glyphosate are widely used, but this herbicide is non-selective and requires very careful application and shielding of trees in order to avoid injuring or killing Eucalyptus plantings. Because glyphosate does not provide residual weed control, frequent repeated applications are necessary, resulting in significant costs to growers. Development of weed resistance is also an issue with repeated applications of the same herbicide.

This publication provides a list of herbicides with different active ingredients labeled for weed control in Eucalyptus plantings for various use sites (plantations, ornamentals, etc.) as described by herbicide labels (Tables 1 and 2). It gives examples of products for each active ingredient, but it is not meant to be all-inclusive. Inclusion of a product trade name in this publication does not constitute an endorsement of a product or a company because other products manufactured by different companies might be equally suited for the intended use. It must be noted, however, that two herbicides with the same active ingredient can have very different labels and use patterns. For example, Alligare SFM 75 is labeled for Eucalyptus (supplemental labeling), while DuPont Oust® XP is not, even though both contain 75% sulfometuron methyl active ingredient. It is essential that the herbicide you choose is specifically labeled for Eucalyptus culture in Florida (personal communication, Charlie Clarke, Florida Department of Pesticide Registration, November 30, 2009).

Guide Information

This publication is a general guide and is not intended to provide specific treatment recommendations. The user must always read and follow the label instructions for a specific product being used. Herbicide labels are accessible at CDMS (all accessed December 5, 2012). Failure to follow the directions for use and precautions on the labels may result in poor weed control or tree injury and may be a violation of the law. The effectiveness and safety of the use of a particular herbicide in a given situation greatly depends on many factors (Osiecka and Minogue 2011) including the Eucalyptus species, stage of growth and weeds to be controlled. If repeated applications are needed, the maximum use rate per year and the minimum interval between applications must be observed.

Table 1. Herbicide Listing by Active Ingredient, Trade Name, and Use

Table 1 lists the active ingredients, trade names and manufacturers for various herbicides labeled for Eucalyptus culture and the ranges of labeled application rates for different uses, including site preparation prior to planting, herbaceous weed control (HWC) as a directed spray (applied directly to target weeds without contacting Eucalyptus), or HWC over-the-top (OTT) of Eucalyptus using a selective herbicide to which the species is tolerant. The appropriate herbicide application rate depends on crop-tree tolerance to the herbicide and the weed species present, their stage of growth, and density. Soil characteristics such as texture and acidity (pH) are important in determining the appropriate selective herbicide rate for those herbicides absorbed by plants from the soil (soil-active herbicides). It is always advisable to use the lowest rate that will provide an acceptable level of weed control for a specific situation.

All glyphosate products are non-selective and can be applied either for site preparation prior to planting or as a carefully directed spray to weeds after planting. Unlike other products labeled for Eucalyptus culture, glyphosate is effective in controlling established weeds, but it provides no residual control. Pre-emergent herbicides such as sulfometuron methyl may be mixed with glyphosate to provide residual weed control. However, herbicides with residual soil activity must be used according to the labeled herbicide rate and application frequency restrictions to avoid Eucalyptus injury from root uptake.

Only herbicides with physiological selectivity can be applied over-the-top of Eucalyptus trees, and their application must be carefully calibrated to ensure that the precise amount of active ingredient per acre is applied. Healthy trees, free of stress from transplanting or drought are most tolerant to over-the-top herbicides. Generally, it is advisable to wait two weeks after planting seedlings or rooted cuttings so that trees recover from the stress of transplanting before applying herbicides over-the-top. Selectivity is enhanced if the amount of spray contacting the tree foliage is minimized by using drop nozzles or off-center nozzle systems. While label directions for some herbicides, such as oxyfluorfen, state that this herbicide can be applied only to dormant trees, many labels state that applications should not be made over-the-top of Eucalyptus during the flush of new growth. Herbicide injury is more detrimental to Eucalyptus grown for ornamental purposes than to Eucalyptus grown for fiber.

Pre-emergent herbicides are soil-active, and many of these herbicides must be applied before weed emergence because they kill only germinating weeds (e.g., pendimethalin). Other pre-emergent herbicides also provide control when applied post-emergence of weeds (sulfometuron methyl), but generally the best results are obtained when weeds are small. Since soil-active herbicides are absorbed by plant roots, they should not be applied after Eucalyptus transplanting until soil is firmly settled around the roots. Rainfall or hand watering after transplanting will help to settle the soil. In addition, soil-active, pre-emergent herbicides must be made available in the soil solution to “activate” them after application, usually by rain or irrigation. For optimum weed control, some require quick activation (e.g., Snapshot 2.5 TG within 3 days), while others are less sensitive to degradation on the soil surface and allow for a larger window (e.g., 3–4 weeks for GoalTender®). Shallow cultivation (mixing herbicide into the upper 1–2 inches of soil) can also activate some herbicides (e.g., Snapshot® 2.5 TG), while deeper cultivation after application usually reduces effectiveness because the herbicide concentration is reduced.

Post-emergent herbicides may be absorbed by the roots and foliage (e.g., sulfometuron methyl), or only by the foliage (e.g., glyphosate). Complete and uniform spray coverage on weed foliage and the addition of a surfactant may improve absorption and the performance of foliar-active herbicides. Several important selective herbicides used for weed control in Eucalyptus (sulfometuron methyl, oxyfluorfen, flumioxazin) have both soil and foliar activity and can be used either pre- or post-emergence, but applications of these herbicides are most effective when made to weeds at a seedling stage and their effectiveness diminishes as the weeds mature.

Weed composition is the first factor to consider when choosing a herbicide. Non-selective herbicides can kill a broad spectrum of weed species when used at an appropriate rate. Some selective herbicides (e.g., oxyfluorfen and sulfometuron methyl) control both grasses and broadleaf weeds at rates tolerated by Eucalyptus, while others are effective only against grasses (e.g., fluazifop-P-butyl and sethoxydim) or broadleaves (e.g., clopyralid). The effectiveness of some herbicides is limited to annual weeds, which as a rule are easier to control then the perennials. Perennial vines and woody plants are most difficult to control, and few selective herbicide options are available for Eucalyptus culture. These plants should be controlled prior to planting.

Table 2. Herbicide Listing by Labeled Eucalyptus Taxa and Sites

Table 2 provides Eucalyptus taxa for which the listed herbicides have been labeled. Some labels mention only the genus Eucalyptus, while others specify species or even cultivars. It is possible that some herbicides could be applied to other Eucalyptus species in addition to the ones listed in Table 2. However, we have observed that different Eucalyptus taxa may exhibit different tolerance to herbicides labeled generally for Eucalyptus. It is advisable to first test the herbicide on a small number of plants at a specific site and stage of growth to determine selective herbicide rates for a particular Eucalyptus variety.

Since different taxa within the genus Eucalyptus can be used for forestry or ornamental objectives, both forestry and horticultural herbicides have been included in this publication. A herbicide cannot be legally used on a site for which it is not labeled. Moreover, it cannot be used in a state for which it has not been registered. While most herbicides are registered country-wide, some have state-wide exclusions (e.g., SFM 75), and others are registered in a specific state (e.g., Assure® II) or even specific counties (e.g., Clopyralid 3). Therefore, it is imperative to carefully read labels before deciding on a herbicide for a specific purpose.

Additional Resources

The following additional resources (all accessed December 4, 2015) can be helpful in developing herbicide prescriptions for vegetation management in Eucalyptus:

  • Crop Data Management Systems (CDMS) can be searched for herbicide labels and material safety data sheets (MSDS).

  • CDMS Label Search (a free service of CDMS) allows for a more advanced herbicide search following free registration.

  • National Pesticide Information Retrieval System (NPIRS) includes information about herbicides either currently or previously licensed for distribution and sale in each state.

  • UF/IFAS Extension agents can be contacted at the county Extension offices with specific questions regarding herbicides.

  • County Foresters of Florida Forest Service can be contacted for advice and technical assistance.

  • Pesticide Information Office (PIO) at the University of Florida provides information, educational programs, and materials related to herbicides.

Reference

Osiecka, A. and P. J. Minogue. 2014. Considerations for Developing Effective Herbicide Prescriptions for Forest Vegetation Management. FOR 273. Gainesville: University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fr335

Tables

Table 1.

Herbicides labeled for weed control in Eucalyptus culture (products in bold are labeled for Eucalyptus plantations).

Table 2.

Herbicides labeled for the culture of various Eucalyptus species at different registered use sites (products in bold are labeled for Eucalyptus plantations).

Common name

Trade name

Labeled species

Labeled use sites

clopyralid

CleanSlate®1

Eucalyptus spp.

Eucalyptus tree plantations1

clopyralid

Clopyralid 32

Eucalyptus spp.

Eucalyptus tree plantations

clopyralid

Stinger®3

Eucalyptus spp.

Eucalyptus tree plantations3

clopyralid

Transline®4

Eucalyptus spp.

Eucalyptus tree plantations4

dithiopyr

Dimension® 2EW

E.citriodora

Field-grown ornamentals

flumioxazin

SureGuard®

Eucalyptus spp.

Field-grown deciduous tree species

fluazifop-P-butyl

Fusilade® II

E. microtheca, E. polyanthemos, E. rostrata5, E. rudis, E. spathulata; directed spray: E. citriodora, E. nicholii

Field-grown ornamentals

glyphosate

Accord® XRT

Eucalyptus spp.

Forestry site preparation

glyphosate

Accord® XRT II

Eucalyptus spp.

Forestry site preparation

glyphosate

Buccaneer®

Eucalyptus spp.

Non-food tree crops; ornamentals; forestry site prep

glyphosate

Buccaneer Plus®

Eucalyptus spp.

Non-food tree crops; ornamentals

glyphosate

Honcho®Plus

Eucalyptus spp.

Non-food tree crops

glyphosate

Razor®Pro

Eucalyptus spp. will be added to the label

Forestry and ornamental vegetation management

glyphosate

Roundup PowerMax®

Eucalyptus spp.

Non-food tree crops

glyphosate

Roundup WeatherMax®

Eucalyptus spp.

Non-food tree crops

isoxaben

Gallery® 75 Dry Flowable

E. camaldulensis, E. cinerea, E.microtheca, E. sideroxylon

Field-grown ornamentals

isoxaben+trifluralin

Snapshot® 2.5 TG

E. camaldulensis, E. cinerea, E.microtheca, E. sideroxylon

Field-grown ornamentals

oryzalin

Oryzalin 4 PRO

E. camaldulensis, E. cinerea, E.nicholii, E. sideroxylon

Field grown ornamentals

oryzalin+benefin

XL 2G

E. camaldulensis, E. cinerea, E.nicholii, E. sideroxylon

Field-grown ornamentals

oxyfluorfen

Galigan® 2E

E. camaldulensis, E. pulverulenta, E. viminalis

Eucalyptus plantings

oxyfluorfen

Galigan® H20

E. camaldulensis, E. pulverulenta, E. viminalis

Eucalyptus plantings

oxyfluorfen

Goal®2XL

Eucalyptus spp.

Eucalyptus plantings

oxyfluorfen

GoalTender®

Eucalyptus spp.

Eucalyptus plantings

oxyfluorfen

Oxyflo 2EC

Eucalyptus spp.

Eucalyptus plantings

oxyfluorfen

OxyStar™ 2E

Eucalyptus spp.

Eucalyptus plantings

pendimethalin

Pendulum® 2G

E. sideroxylon ‘Rosea’

Ornamentals; tree plantations site prep and maintenance

pendimethalin

Pendulum® 3.3 EC

E. sideroxylon ‘Rosea’

Ornamentals; tree plantations site prep and maintenance

pendimethalin

Pendulum® AquaCapTM

E. cinerea, E. sideroxylon ‘Rosea’

Ornamentals; tree plantations; pulpwood and fiber farms

quizalofop P-ethyl

Assure® II6

Eucalyptus spp.

Eucalyptus plantations (Hawaii)6

simazine

Princep® Liquid

Eucalyptus spp.

Shelterbelts

simazine

Simazine 4L

Eucalyptus spp.

Shelterbelts

sulfometuron

SFM 757

Eucalyptus spp.

Eucalyptus site preparation and release7

sulfometuron

Spyder®7

Eucalyptus spp.

Eucalyptus site preparation and release7

1 Not registered for Eucalyptus tree plantations in Florida; not registered in some counties in New York state.

2 Restrictions in some states; in Florida can be used only in Bay, Bradford, Calhoun, Escambia, Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Hamilton, Jackson, Jefferson, Lafayette, Leon, Liberty, Madison, Okaloosa, Santa Rosa, Suwannee, Taylor, Wakulla, Walton, and Washington counties.

3 Not registered for Eucalyptus tree plantations in Florida.

4 Registered for Eucalyptus tree plantations in all states except Florida.

5 E. rostrata is a synonym for E. camaldulensis.

6 Registered for Eucalyptus plantations in Hawaii only.

7 Not registered for Eucalyptus plantings in California.

Footnotes

This document is FOR310, one of a series of the School of Forest Resources and Conservation Department, UF/IFAS Extension. Original publication date February 2013. Revised September 2015. Reviewed February 2019. Visit the EDIS website at https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu for the currently supported version of this publication.

Anna Osiecka, senior biological scientist; and Patrick J. Minogue, assistant professor of silviculture, School of Forest Resources and Conservation, North Florida Research and Education Center; UF/IFAS Extension, Gainesville, FL 32611.

The use of trade names in this publication is solely for the purpose of providing specific information. UF/IFAS does not guarantee or warranty the products named, and references to them in this publication do not signify our approval to the exclusion of other products of suitable composition. All chemicals should be used in accordance with directions on the manufacturer’s label.

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. For more information on obtaining other UF/IFAS Extension publications, contact your county’s UF/IFAS Extension office.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, UF/IFAS Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A & M University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Nick T. Place, dean for UF/IFAS Extension.

Eucalyptus Leaves Stock Photos and Images

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  • A Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) feeding on eucalyptus leaves. It is a marsupial native to Australia
  • A koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) feeds on eucalyptus leaves, Yanchep National Park, Western Australia, Australia.
  • Dry gum (eucalyptus) leaves lying on the ground
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  • Frost on leaves of Eucalyptus niphophila (= Eucalyptus pauciflora ssp. niphophila) // givre sur feuilles d’Eucalyptus niphophila
  • Eucalyptus Tree’s blue leaves
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  • Eucalyptus Branches Closeup
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  • Close up of a koala feeding on the eucalyptus leaves, San Diego Zoo, San Diego, California, USA.
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  • Frost on leaves of Eucalyptus niphophila (= Eucalyptus pauciflora ssp. niphophila) // givre sur feuilles d’Eucalyptus niphophila
  • Cute koala eating its favorite snack of eucalyptus leaves
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  • Pattern of ovate young Eucalyptus leaves growing in spring the Royal National Park, Sydney, Australia
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  • Eucalyptus leaves isolated on white background. Myrtaceae
  • Eucalyptus twig with buds
  • A koala, Phascolarctos cinereus, in The Australian Reptile Park near Sydney Australia
  • Closeup of grey-green eucaluptus leaves in closeup with blurred treed background in Western Australia.
  • Eucalyptus leaves and flowers close-up
  • Feminine wedding desktop stationery mockup with blank greeting card, dry eucalyptus leaves, silk ribbon and golden binder clip on white table background. Flat lay, top view. Styled stock photo.
  • High Angle View Of Eucalyptus Leaves And Chestnuts In Container On Wooden Table
  • Beautiful teenage Koala munching on Eucalyptus leaves.
  • Dried eucalyptus leaves isolated on white background

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Search Results for Eucalyptus Leaves Stock Photos and Images

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  • Eucalyptus leaves hand drawn seamless vector
  • Eucalyptus tree branches leaves seamless pattern vector
  • Eucalyptus tree green branches leaves element set vector
  • Eucalyptus seeded silver tree leaves branches set vector
  • Eucalyptus silver dollar green branches leaves vector
  • Eucalyptus sprig with green leaves isolated on vector
  • Eucalyptus green leaves icon on white background vector
  • Watercolor eucalyptus leaves vector
  • Eucalyptus leaves set vector
  • Eucalyptus branch with leaves and oil in bowl vector
  • Eucalyptus leaves vector
  • Eucalyptus leaves and flowers hand drawn vector
  • Eucalyptus globulus vintage vector
  • Eucalyptus diversicolor vintage vector
  • Eucalyptus rostrata vintage vector
  • Eucalyptus leaves frame on white background vector
  • Eucalyptus leaves pattern seamless background for vector
  • Collection of eucalyptus leaves flowers vector
  • Eucalyptus leaves and seeds vector
  • Eucalyptus branch and raw mint leaves cartoon vector
  • Eucalyptus leaves branch black and white vector
  • Eucalyptus tree leaves jungle botanical vector
  • Eucalyptus Isolated leaves on white vector
  • Eucalyptus twigs hand drawn seamless pattern vector
  • Colorful seamless pattern with eucalyptus branches vector
  • Set of greenery leaves herb and succulent vector
  • Eucalyptus Isolated leaves vector
  • Watercolor eucalyptus leaves and branches vector
  • Eucalyptus plants rustic foliage branches and vector
  • Wedding invitation with leaves succulent vector
  • Border and frame with leaves and succulent vector
  • Set of greenery leaves and succulent vector
  • Seamless pattern of eucalyptus leaves greenery vector
  • Eucalyptus gunnii silver dollar greenery gum vector
  • Floral business card design with eucalyptus leaves vector
  • Seamless pattern of eucalyptus palm fern leaves vector
  • Seeded eucalyptus green branches leaves seeds fr vector
  • Greenery pattern eucalyptus seamless wedding vector
  • Watercolor card with green eucalyptus vector
  • Watercolor wreath with green eucalyptus vector
  • Watercolor bouquet with green eucalyptus vector
  • Wedding invitation with leaves succulent a vector
  • Wedding invitation card with leaves and vector
  • Seamless background of green eucalyptus leaves vector
  • Floral design card with watercolor eucalyptus vector
  • Branches with leaves silver dollar eucalyptus vector
  • Eucalyptus silver dollar greenery gum tree vector
  • Wedding floral invite card with eucalyptus leaves vector
  • Card with eucalyptus green branches leaves vector
  • Eucalyptus silver dollar vector
  • Set protea flowers eucalyptus and leaves vector
  • Eucalyptus plants greenery nature branches and vector
  • Hand drawn eucalyptus background herbal pattern vector
  • Floral card with leaves eucalyptus brunia fern vector
  • Floral card with leaves eucalyptus fern and vector
  • Border with leaves and succulent vector
  • Eucalyptus branches with blue and silver leaves vector
  • Wreath with colorful eucalyptus leaves vector
  • Roses and eucalyptus leaves seamless pattern vector
  • Beautiful of branches and leaves of eucalyptus vector
  • Sample of branches with eucalyptus leaves is a vector
  • Floral card with eucalyptus green leaves frame vector
  • Floral card with green eucalyptus fern leaves vector
  • Eucalyptus tree natural branches seamless pattern vector
  • Watercolor eucalyptus leaves and branches vector
  • Eucalyptus word logo with leaves drop and funnel vector
  • Wreath with flowers and leaves isolated on white vector
  • Beautiful festive frame with green leaves of vector
  • A frame with green leaves of a vector
  • Beautiful corner frame with green leaves of vector
  • Eucalyptus silver zerin cineraria greenery gum vector
  • 3d spray bottle with eucalyptus oil blob branch vector
  • Eucalyptus oil in bowl plant branch and plate vector
  • Set of eucalyptus inflorescence on light vector
  • Greeting card with eucalyptus round green leaves vector
  • Eucalyptus leaves and herbal tea vector
  • Eucalyptus ficifolia vintage vector
  • Floral wreath with green eucalyptus leaves frame vector
  • Set of eucalyptus branches isolated on white vector
  • Floral wreath with green eucalyptus leaves flower vector
  • Eucalyptus silver dollar green branches leaves vector
  • Big collection of branch and eucalyptus vector
  • Silhouette of Eucalyptus with leaves Medicinal vector
  • Eucalyptus leaf and branch autumn spring vector
  • Floral design set with eucalyptus leaves frames vector
  • Elegant seamless pattern with eucalyptus vector
  • Eucalyptus leaves and seeds square pattern vector
  • Invitation with eucalyptus leaves modern vector
  • Koala bear with eucalyptus leaves isolated on vector
  • Isolated clipart eucalyptus vector
  • Branch with green leaves willow eucalyptus or vector
  • Turquoise eucalyptus leaves on purple background vector
  • Eucalyptus tree leaves black and white vector
  • Seamless floral pattern in vintage style Leaves an vector
  • Collection of various eucalyptus branches with vector
  • Botanical with leaves Boxwood vector
  • Set decorative elements vector
  • Eucalyptus flowers and leaves medical herbs set vector
  • Wedding invitation card eucalyptus design vector
  • Card with beautiful twigs with leaves wedding vector

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