Picture of maiden grass

Eulalia, Maiden Grass, Zebra Grass, Chinese Silvergrass ‘My Fair Maiden’

Category:

Ornamental Grasses and Bamboo

Perennials

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Herbaceous

Foliage Color:

Unknown – Tell us

Height:

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Spacing:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 °C (-10 °F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 °C (-5 °F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 °C (0 °F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 °C (5 °F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 °C (10 °F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 °C (15 °F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 °C (20 °F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

Where to Grow:

Grow outdoors year-round in hardiness zone

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Cream/Tan

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown – Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown – Tell us

Bloom Time:

Late Summer/Early Fall

Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Unknown – Tell us

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Ornamental Maiden Grasses: How To Grow Maiden Grass

Miscanthus sinensis, or maiden grass, is a family of ornamental plants with a clumping habit and graceful arching stems. This group of grasses has added appeal in late summer with spectacular plumes and in fall with bronze to burgundy colored foliage.

Miscanthus maiden grass is easy to care for and hardy in USDA zones 5 to 9. There are numerous maiden grass varieties with different sizes and foliage colors. Bring one of these elegant grasses into your home landscape for powerful dimension, color and movement.

Miscanthus Maiden Grass

Maiden grass thrives in full sun and may get 6 feet wide with a 10 foot spread.

The grass requires well-drained soil, but is tolerant of excess moisture, dry conditions, acidic soils and even hard clay sites.

Ornamental maiden grass is excellent used in containers, but more commonly planted in groups or as a border or along the edges of beds. Miscanthus maiden grass has a very regal appeal and provides elegant décor to flank the front entry or along the driveway. Just remember how tall and wide the grass will get and give it enough room to mature.

How to Grow Maiden Grass

Propagation of ornamental maiden grasses is through division. You may dig up a mature plant in early spring before new growth has appeared. Cut the root base into two to four sections and plant each as a new plant.

You can do this every three years or more, but it is important to do it when the center of the plant is showing signs of dying out. This is an indicator that it is time to divide the grass. Rejuvenated plants result from division and they have a tighter clumping habit.

If you want to know how to grow maiden grass from seed, get ready for a wait. Sow seeds indoors in a flat with a lid. Keep the soil in the flat lightly moist and place the flat in a warm area at least 60 F. (16 C.). The baby sprouts will grow slowly and you will not have a Miscanthus maiden grass big enough to plant outside for at least a year. Your best bet is to find a buddy with a grass and cut out a piece for yourself.

Maiden Grass Care

Maiden grass care couldn’t be simpler. The plants have no known pest or disease problems, except rust. Rust is a fungal disease that is transmitted to leaves when water splashes onto them.

Water the plants from under the foliage and when the leaf blades will have time to dry off quickly.

Maiden Grass Varieties

‘Condensatus’ is a variety that can get 8 feet tall and has coarse foliage. ‘Gracillimus’ is a delicately leaved cultivar with a more upright growth habit. For colorful displays, ‘Purpurescens’ is red in summer and purplish red in fall, while ‘Silver Feather’ has shimmering whitish silver inflorescences.

There are variegated varieties with horizontal yellow or white stripes, or vertical stripes along the leaf margins. Compact types are usually only 3 to 4 feet tall and suitable for containers. Do a little research on the many maiden grass varieties and choose the right one for your garden location.

Welcome To The Blog That Gives You The Plant Grower’s Perspective!

What Are The Best Ornamental Grasses For Creating A Screen

Ornamental grasses can be used for a variety of reasons, but one reason people may overlook is using them as a living screen. Many people think of using evergreens as living screens, which they do work well for, but several grasses can be a great alternative and take up less room too. Let’s say you live in a neighborhood where the houses are fairly close together. You have a patio off the back of your house that you love to use for entertaining. One of your neighbors seems to always be out on his patio every time you want to be out on yours. You have a flowerbed along the patio between the two of you, but it is only four feet wide. You think to yourself “what can I plant in that narrow of a space to screen out my neighbor?” You run through a list of Holly, Arborvitae, Yews, Junipers, and Boxwoods, but they either get too big, grow too slow, or are too prickly.Then it hits you “ I’ll use grasses!” They won’t be there in the winter, but you probably won’t be out on your patio very much in the winter either.

In this blog I will go over a few grasses that would work great in a situation like I described above. All of these grasses should be cut down to about four inches in late February or early March.

Maiden Grass – Miscanthus sinensis ‘Gracillimus’

This is probably the most used of all the taller varieties of ornamental grasses. Maiden Grass has a narrow green leaf blade with a white stripe down the center of the blade. Even though it has the white stripe it is not considered a variegated grass because you really don’t notice the stripe unless you uncurl the blade and look for it. Maiden gets five to six feet tall and four to five feet wide. It is a clumping grass so each year it comes back the clump will expand a little more. It gets a plume in late September that comes out a maroon tone and then turns a creamy silver before turning brown by the end of the fall. Although the grass turns brown in late fall, it is still attractive enough to leave alone until late February. Maiden Grass is extremely versatile and hardy. It will grow best in full sun and can grow in about any soil.

Morning Light Grass – Miscanthus sinensis ‘Morning Light’

This is almost exactly like Maiden Grass except it doesn’t get as tall and it is variegated. Morning Light only gets about four feet tall and three to four feet wide. It has the same narrow blade as Maiden, bu t this one has two white stripes on the outside of the blade. It is a very attractive grass and would work well in an area that Maiden might be a little too big for.

Plume Raven Grass-Saccharum ravennae

Plume Raven is the Pampas grass of zone five. It has a wider blade than Maiden and is a little more pale green. The grass gets six to eight feet tall and four to six feet wide, but it shoots up a plume in September that gets up to twelve feet high. The plume is purplish when it first comes out then it turns to a silvery color before turning brown in late fall. Most people leave the grass until they trim it in the spring, but because it gets so large it can also become a little messy by February.

Zebra Grass – Miscanthus sinensis ‘Zebrinus’

Zebra grass is variegated but unlike the Morning Light that has the stripe running with the blade, Zebra has a horizontal yellow stripe. The blade is wider than Maiden and a brighter green too. The horizontal stripes are sporadically spaced up and down the blade. Zebra grass gets five to eight feet tall and four to six feet wide. It has a light pink plume that shoots up just above the grass in late August. The grass and plume turn brown in late fall. Zebra grass can tend to be floppy, but it makes a different looking screen or accent plant.

Japanese Silver Grass – Miscanthus sinensis ‘Cosmopolitan’

Overall size and leaf blade size this one is right there with the Zebra grass. Japanese Silver grass has a white and green variegated blade with the stripes running vertically up and down the blade. It gets about six feet tall and four to six feet wide with a silvery colored plume that shoots up in late September. Also like the Zebra grass this one can tend to be floppy, but because of the colorful foliage it is a great grass to brighten up an area.

Big Blue Stem Grass – Andropogon gerardii

If you like to use natives this one is for you. Big Blue Stem is native to Missouri. It gets four to six feet tall and two to three feet wide. When it comes up in the spring the leaf blades are bluish in color, but they turn more to green by summer and then to bronze in fall. The seed heads are very unique on this grass. They rise above the grass in September and are kind of like a plume, but are in three parts. Some people describe the plumes of Big Blue Stem as looking like a turkeys foot. The plumes are purplish in color and then turn to brown. Another difference in this grass versus the others I have described is that the others are all clumping grasses where as this one is more of a spreader. It can be easily controlled, but actually would work great in an area where you have an erosion problem because it has such an extensive root system.

These six grasses are all great for the Midwest. They all are very hardy, will grow in just about any kind of soil, work best in full sun but can take some shade too, and they all can make an excellent living screen.

Fall for Ornamental Grasses


Maiden grass plumes add texture to fall landscapes.

Cindy Haynes
Extension Horticulturist
Iowa State University

Every year as we enter the fall season, I realize how much I admire ornamental grasses in the landscape. They offer color, texture, movement and a bit of sophistication to the garden. Grasses also combine easily with woody and herbaceous perennials.

Finding just the right grass, however, can be intimidating; many different species and cultivars are used in home landscapes. Below are some of the many ornamental grasses readily available and suitable for Iowa gardens.

Start Small
For smaller spots in the landscape, try adding one or more of the species below to your collection of small shrubs, herbaceous perennials or annuals.

Dwarf Blue Fescue – (Festuca ovina var. glauca) The dwarf fescues are one of the smallest of the ornamental grasses, staying under one foot tall. Several cultivars, such as ‘Elijah Blue’, have metallic-gray foliage and mounding habits.

Dwarf Fountain Grass – (Pennisetum alopecuroides) Although some species will reach 4 to 5 feet in height, the dwarf types like ‘Hameln’ generally stay below 2 or 3 feet. Their “foxtail” like plume is an attractive feature in late summer and early fall.

Blue Oat Grass – (Helictotrichon sempervirens) This grass reaches 3 feet in height and has beautiful blue-gray, fine-textured leaf blades. It is stunning throughout most of the season and combines well with most herbaceous perennials.

Little Bluestem – (Schizachyrium scoparium) Little Bluestem is a native grass that is often underused in the landscape. Plants reach 2 to 3 feet in height and have dark-gray foliage. Look for cultivars like ‘The Blues’ for more bluish summer foliage and reddish fall color.

Go Tall
If you are looking for a grass with a little more “presence” or “stature” in the garden, the listing below will get you started.

Feather Reed Grass (Calamagrostis actuiflora var. stricta) is one of the most popular ornamental grasses grown today. Plants are 4 to 6 feet in height and have dark green leaves and narrow, tan plumes in early summer. ‘Karl Foerster’ is a popular cultivar that is noted for its adaptability and attractive plumes. Also look for ‘Overdam’, a cultivar with variegated foliage.

Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) is a native grass that is becoming more popular in landscapes. The plants are durable, reach 4 to 6 feet in height, and are available in many different cultivars. ‘Heavy Metal’ and ‘Shenandoah’ have dark metallic summer foliage and reddish fall color. ‘Dallas Blues’ has blue-gray summer foliage that also turns a good orange-red in fall. The open plumes of ‘Strictum’ begin to bloom earlier than other cultivars, but remain showy throughout the season.

Maiden Grass (Miscanthus sinensis) cultivars also are primary players in the ornamental grass market. Their heights of 5 to 7 feet make them perfect backdrops to showcase other perennials. Many of the cultivars from this species are noted for ornamental foliage and late display of flower plumes. Look for the green and white striped leaves of ‘Variegata’ or check ‘Strictus’ or ‘Zebrinus’ for leaves with yellow stripes across the blade. Other cultivars worthy of mention are ‘Gracillimus’ for its narrow dark green leaves, or ‘Morning Light’ for its narrow greenish white leaves. ‘Silberfeder’ offers a striking display of plumes earlier in the season. Several other Miscanthus species are equally suitable for Iowa gardens. Look for Miscanthus sinensis var. pupurescens for great reddish fall color. Try Miscanthus floridulus ‘Giganteus’ if you want plants that will reach more than 10 feet in height.

Ravenna Grass (Erianthus ravennae) is often called Hardy Pampas Grass. It commands attention when in flower in late summer because it often reaches over 10 feet in height. This is a wonderful grass to add drama in the landscape, or to hide an unsightly view.

Maintenance Tips for Growing Ornamental Grasses
• Most ornamental grasses thrive in sunny sites with well-drained soils, so plan and plant accordingly. Check the labels carefully for mature size and site preferences.
• After planting, water well as needed to get plants established. Unlike your lawn, watering after establishment is needed only in times of drought.
• Ornamental grasses rarely need fertilizer. Once a year or once every other year, scatter some granular fertilizer around them in the spring. Otherwise, save the fertilizer for your lawn.
• Don’t cut back ornamental grasses in the fall. Many will stand for a large part of the winter. Even tan and dead, they are quite attractive after a snowfall.
• Clean up or cut back ornamental grasses in early spring before the new growth appears.
• Division is sometimes necessary to keep ornamental grasses thriving in the landscape. If you notice the center of your grass is not as full as before, it may be time to divide it. Division is best done in early spring when the new growth appears.

While these ornamental grasses make great additions to any garden, don’t stop with the ones on this list. Consider many of the other prairie natives like Side Oats Gramma (Bouteloua curtipendula) or Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardii). Or consider non-natives like Tufted Hair Grass (Deschampsia caepitosa) or Moor Grass (Molina species). Annual grasses, such as Purple Fountain Grass (Pennisetum species), work well in containers and in open spots in the landscape. By this time next year, you too will be impressed with what a few ornamental grasses can do to add interest to any landscape.

Maiden Grass Miscanthus Sinensis Stock Photos and Images

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  • Malepartus maiden grass (Miscanthus sinensis Malepartus), Poaceae.
  • Red Silver Maiden Grass Miscanthus sinensis ‘Rotsilber’
  • Cinese silver grass – Miscanthus sinensis
  • Maiden grass (Miscanthus sinensis), Poaceae.
  • miscanthus sinensis adagio maiden grass chinese silver grass ornamental grasses foliage green
  • Pet dog splashing in the Humber river in a Toronto Park in Autumn with Pampas Grass
  • Chinese Silver Grass, Eulalia Grass, Maiden Grass, Zebra Grass, Porcupine Grass (Miscanthus sinensis), variety: Gracillimus
  • miscanthus sinensis adagio maiden grass chinese silver grass ornamental grasses foliage green
  • Variegated Maiden Grass / Miscanthus sinensis Variegatus
  • Miscanthus sinensis ‘Zebrinus’ (Japanese silver grass), against blue sky
  • Variegated maiden grass (Miscanthus sinensis Variegatus), Poaceae.
  • Ornamental grass background. Detail of Maiden Grass (Miscanthus Sinensis) in the fall. Graceful arching stems with beautiful bronze color.
  • Red Silver Maiden Grass Miscanthus sinensis ‘Rotsilber’
  • Morning Light maiden grass (Miscanthus sinensis Morning Light), Poaceae.
  • Showy Dwarf Maiden Grass, Miscanthus sinensis ‘Ferner Osten’
  • Ornamental Graziella Maiden Grass (miscanthus sinensis)
  • Variegated maiden grass (Miscanthus sinensis Variegatus), Poaceae.
  • Disabled carer mature couple at Wisley Horticultural Gardens, with husband carer attending wife in wheelchair, who is taking a garden photograph in late winter sunshine of ornamental grasses miscanthus sinensis ‘autumn light’ Grass Maiden… Sunny Autumn Garden Backlit Glasshouse in background Surrey UK
  • Maiden grass (Miscanthus sinensis ‘Morning Light’). Photographed at Daniel Stowe Garden, North Carolina, USA.
  • Little Fountain Maiden grass (Miscanthus sinensis Kleine Fontaene), Poaceae.
  • Cinese silver grass – Miscanthus sinensis
  • Black and White Detailed Image of Maiden Silvergrass (Miscanthus sinensis) in Seed, Detail Isolated Against a Blurred Background.
  • Ornamental Grasses miscanthus sinensis ‘autumn light’ Grass Maiden Sun Sunny Autumn Garden Backlit
  • Cinese silver grass – Miscanthus sinensis
  • miscanthus sinensis adagio maiden grass chinese silver grass ornamental grasses foliage green
  • Chinese silver grass / Miscanthus sinensis Giganteus
  • Cinese silver grass – Miscanthus sinensis
  • botany, Chinese silver grass (Miscanthus sinensis), Additional-Rights-Clearance-Info-Not-Available
  • Cinese silver grass – Miscanthus sinensis
  • Chinese silver grass (Miscanthus sinensis) and a blue sky in a Yorkshire garden, England
  • botany, Chinese silver grass (Miscanthus sinensis), Additional-Rights-Clearance-Info-Not-Available
  • Cinese silver grass – Miscanthus sinensis
  • Chinese Silver Grass, Maiden Grass, Zebra Grass, Susuki Grass, Porcupine Grass, Miscanthus sinensis ‘Ferner Osten’, Poaceae.
  • Close up of a Backlit wild white Pampas grass flower head with morning sun
  • Close up of the grass Miscanthus sinensis ‘Nippon’
  • Chinese Silver Grass, Maiden Grass, Zebra Grass, Susuki Grass, Porcupine Grass, Miscanthus sinensis ‘Ferner Osten’, Poaceae.
  • Zebra grass or Miscanthus sinensis or Maiden silvergrass or Korean uksae or Chinese silver grass or Eulalia grass or Maiden grass or Susuki grass
  • Close up of the grass Miscanthus sinensis ‘Malepartus’
  • Maiden grass Gracillimus (Miscanthus sinensis Gracillimus), Poaceae.
  • MISCANTHUS sinensis ‘Kaskade’ Maiden Grass, tall perennial, ornamental grass close view autumn
  • miscanthus sinensis dixieland plant portraits green white stripes variegated leaves foliage ornamental grasses summer Dwarf
  • Feathery seed-heads of the ornamental grass Miscanthus sinensis ‘Memory’ in Winter.
  • Tall Chinese silver grass (Miscanthus sinensis) against a clear blue sky in a summer garden
  • miscanthus sinensis dixieland plant portraits green white stripes variegated leaves foliage ornamental grasses summer Dwarf
  • Feathery seed-heads of the ornamental grass Miscanthus sinensis ‘Memory’ in Winter.
  • Tall Chinese silver grass (Miscanthus sinensis) against a blue summer sky
  • miscanthus sinensis dixieland plant portraits green white stripes variegated leaves foliage ornamental grasses summer Dwarf
  • Feathery seed-heads of the ornamental grass Miscanthus sinensis ‘Memory’ in Winter.
  • Miscanthus sinensis ‘Cosmopolitan’
  • Miscanthus sinensis Blutenwunder Blooming Wonder Maiden Grass fully hardy perennial herbaceous grass flowers blooms blossoms
  • Feathery seed-heads of Miscanthus sinensis ‘Rotfeder’ in Winter
  • Close up of backlit wild Miscanthus Pampas grass flower heads with morning sun
  • Miscanthus sinensis ‘Cosmopolitan’
  • Feathery seed-heads of Miscanthus sinensis ‘Rotfeder’ in Winter
  • Miscanthus sinensis
  • Miscanthus sinensis ‘Cosmopolitan’
  • The seed heads of eulalia ‘Morning Light’ (Miscanthus sinensis ‘Morning Light’) against a blue sky
  • Miscanthus sinensis
  • Chinese Silver grass, Miscanthus sinensis, growing in a botanical garden Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA.
  • The seed heads of eulalia ‘Morning Light’ (Miscanthus sinensis ‘Morning Light’) against a blue sky
  • Miscanthus sinensis Gracillimus , seed head, florescence
  • Chinese Silver grass, Miscanthus sinensis, growing in a botanical garden Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA.
  • The seed heads of eulalia ‘Morning Light’ (Miscanthus sinensis ‘Morning Light’) against a blue sky
  • Miscanthus sinensis ‘Positano’
  • Miscanthus sinensis
  • The seed heads of eulalia ‘Morning Light’ (Miscanthus sinensis ‘Morning Light’) against a blue sky
  • Miscanthus sinensis ‘Positano’
  • Miscanthus sinensis
  • The seed heads of eulalia ‘Morning Light’ (Miscanthus sinensis ‘Morning Light’) against a blue sky
  • gros plan d’un jeune plumeau de miscanthus sinensis andersson poacerae, close-up of a young duster of miscanthus sinensis andersson poacerae,
  • Miscanthus sinensis
  • The seed heads of eulalia ‘Morning Light’ (Miscanthus sinensis ‘Morning Light’) against a blue sky
  • Chinaschilf – Chinese silver grass 01
  • Miscanthus sinensis
  • Miscanthus sinensis ‘Silberspinne’
  • Miscanthus sinensis
  • Miscanthus sinensis, Miscanthus, Chinese SIlver Grass
  • Miscanthus sinensis ‘Silberspinne’
  • Miscanthus sinensis
  • Miscanthus sinensis, Miscanthus, Chinese SIlver Grass
  • Miscanthus sinensis ‘Silberspinne’
  • Miscanthus sinensis
  • Miscanthus sinensis ‘Malepartus’
  • Miscanthus sinensis, Miscanthus, Chinese SIlver Grass
  • Miscanthus sinensis
  • Miscanthus sinensis ‘Cosmopolitan’
  • Miscanthus sinensis with frost
  • Miscanthus sinensis, Miscanthus, Chinese SIlver Grass
  • An unidentified decorative grass with fluffy flower spikes that is probably a variety of Miscanthus
  • Miscanthus sinensis with frost
  • Backlit wild white Pampas grass flower heads in morning light
  • Miscanthus sinensis, maiden grass, chinese silver grass in sunset. Close up view
  • Miscanthus sinensis with frost
  • Miscanthus sinensis, maiden grass, chinese silver grass in sunset. Close up view
  • Miscanthus sinensis ‘Ferner Osten’ in Royal Botanic Gardens in Kew in London, United Kingdom
  • Miscanthus sinensis with frost
  • Chinese Silver Grass, Eulalia Grass, Maiden Grass, Zebra Grass, Porcupine Grass (Miscanthus sinensis)
  • Miscanthus sinensis (Japanese silver grass), flower heads and leaves, close-up
  • Miscanthus sinensis with frost
  • Chinese Silver Grass, Eulalia Grass, Maiden Grass, Zebra Grass, Porcupine Grass (Miscanthus sinensis)

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