Norway maple tree facts

Norway maple (Not recommended)

Tree & Plant Care

Avoid pruning in early spring as maples are ‘bleeders’ and will lose large amounts of sap.
Adapted to a wide range of soils and environments. Tolerates pollution well.

Disease, pests, and problems

This maple is prone to girdling roots. Norway maple tends to self sow and become weedy.
Verticillium wilt (fungus) is a potential serious problem. Anthracnose is a common leaf disease.
Tar spot is becoming very common on this species.

Native geographic location and habitat

Native to Europe.

Bark color and texture

Bark is gray and fairly tightly ridged and furrowed.

Leaf or needle arrangement, size, shape, and texture

Simple leaves in pairs (opposite); 3 to 6 inches long. Leaves are slightly broader than those of sugar maple.
The 5 lobed leaves are dark green in summer. Fall color is not reliable. It can range form yellow-green to a nice yellow.

Flower arrangement, shape, and size

Small, pale yellow flowers in upright, rounded clusters.
Inconspicuous by themselves, but very showy when the whole tree is in flower.

Fruit, cone, nut, and seed descriptions

Fruit are winged seeds in pairs (samaras); each wing is 1-2 inches long and the two wings are spread at a wide angle.
Green, maturing to brown.

Norway Maple Tree Stock Photos and Images

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  • Acer Platanoides ‘Goldsworth purple’. Norway Maple tree new leaves in spring. UK
  • Norway maple tree (Acer platanoides) in autumn colours
  • Norway Maple tree in full autumn peak. (Acer platanoides)
  • Acer Platanoides ‘Goldsworth purple’. Norway Maple tree in flower. UK
  • Norway maple tree (Acer platanoides) in a hedgerow in Autumn Nottinghamshire, England, UK
  • Norway maple tree, acer platanoides, in spring blossom and leaf, Suffolk, England
  • Norway Maple Tree Flowers, Acer platanoides, Sapindaceae
  • Chartreuse flower clusters on a Norway Maple tree in Spring in Toronto Canada against a clear blue sky
  • Norway Maple tree, Acer platanoides, flowers
  • Close up of seeds still attached to a branch of a Emerald Queen Norway Maple tree in early spring with leaves in the beginning stages of opening
  • Norway Maple Tree (Acer platanoides) in Autumn.
  • Flowering Norway Maple Acer platanoides
  • NORWAY MAPLE TREE IN WINTER (ACER PLATANOIDES) / PENNSYLVANIA
  • Tree-top of Norway Maple (Acer Platanoides) with Yellow Leaves in Autumn, Czech Republic
  • Branch of Norway maple tree with spotted leaves afflicted by a disease in a forest in summer season
  • Norway Maple tree with brilliant autumn colors of reds, oranges and yellows
  • Acer platanoides ‘Norway Maple’
  • Flowering maple tree, probably Acer platanoides Norway maple in springtome
  • Norway maple (Acer platanoides) young leaves and flowers in spring, Wiltshire, UK, May.
  • Norway Maple tree Acer platanoides in Autumn
  • Norway maple tree (Acer platanoides) in autumn colours
  • Norway Maple tree in full autumn bloom. (Acer platanoides )
  • Acer Platanoides palmatifidum flowers. Norway Maple tree. UK
  • Underneath the branches of Autumn leaves on a Norway Maple tree (Acer platanoides) with other bare trees in the background, England, UK
  • Norway maple tree, acer platanoides, in spring blossom and leaf, Suffolk, England
  • norway maple tree isolated on white background
  • Chartreuse flower clusters on branches of a Norway Maple tree in Spring in Toronto Canada against a clear blue sky
  • Norway Maple tree, Acer platanoides, early spring leaves and flowers
  • Norway maple tree (Acer platanoides), Brandenburg, Germany
  • Norway Maple tree (Acer platanoides) in Autumn.
  • Norway maple tree leaves and daylight in background
  • NORWAY MAPLE TREE IN SPRING (ACER PLATANOIDES) / PENNSYLVANIA
  • Tree-top of Norway Maple (Acer Platanoides) with Yellow Leaves in Autumn, Czech Republic
  • Branch of Norway maple tree with spotted leaves afflicted by a disease in a forest in summer season
  • Norway maple (Acer platanoides), tree with yellow leaves in autumn, Germany, Bavaria
  • Herbarium Norway maple tree. Leaves, buds Norway maple isolated on white
  • Flowering maple tree, probably Acer platanoides Norway maple in springtome
  • Norway maple buds (Acer platanoides) in spring. Dorset, UK, April.
  • Norway Maple tree Acer platanoides in Autumn
  • Norway maple tree (Acer platanoides) leaf in autumn colours on white background
  • Norway Maple tree in full autumn bloom. (Acer platanoides )
  • Acer Platanoides palmatifidum. Norway Maple tree canopy in autumn
  • Underneath tree foliage. Looking up at Fall leaves on a Norway Maple tree (Acer platanoides) against a blue sky, England, UK
  • Close up of Norway maple tree, acer platanoides, in spring blossom and leaf, Suffolk, England
  • norway maple tree isolated on white background
  • Branches of a Norway Maple tree cultivar Crimson King with orange flowers in Spring Toronto Canada against a clear blue sky
  • Norway maple trees Acer platanoides in autumn color
  • ‘Helicopter’ seeds on a Norway maple tree
  • Norway maple (Acer planoides), close up
  • Norway maple tree leaves and daylight in background
  • NORWAY MAPLE TREE IN FALL (ACER PLATANOIDES) / PENNSYLVANIA
  • Norway maple Acer sp young tree protected with a plastic tube with kale growing between the rows
  • Branch of Norway maple tree with spotted leaves afflicted by a disease in a forest in summer season
  • Norway maple (Acer platanoides), blooming tree, Germany
  • Tree-top of Norway Maple (Acer Platanoides) with Yellow Leaves in Autumn, Czech Republic
  • Winged seeds from maple, probably Acer platanoides Norway maple, photographed in Norway
  • Norway maple tree (Acer platanoides) bud breaking, Dorset, UK, March
  • Norway Maple tree Acer platanoides in Autumn
  • Norway maple tree (Acer platanoides) in autumn colours
  • Norway Maple tree in full autumn bloom. (Acer platanoides )
  • Acer Platanoides ‘Goldsworth purple’. Norway Maple tree flowering in spring
  • Underneath Fall leaves of a Norway Maple tree (Acer platanoides) with other bare trees in the background, Nottinghamshire, England, UK
  • Norway maple tree, Acer platanoides, in green grass field Suffolk, England
  • top view of norway maple tree isolated on white background
  • Yellow green flower clusters on branches of a Norway Maple tree in Spring in Toronto Canada against a clear blue sky
  • Acer platanoides, Norway maple leaves in autumn colors, Czech Republic
  • Acer platanoides drummondii, a Norway maple with spectacular foliage.
  • Deep red Norway Maple or Acer platanoides in its late summer foliage
  • norway maple tree isolated on white background
  • NORWAY MAPLE TREE IN SUMMER (ACER PLATANOIDES) / PENNSYLVANIA
  • Norway Maple (Acer platanoides), flowering tree.
  • Branch of Norway maple tree with spotted leaves afflicted by a disease in a forest in summer season
  • Norway maple (Acer platanoides), blooming tree, Germany
  • Tree-top of Norway Maple (Acer Platanoides) with Yellow Leaves in Autumn, Czech Republic
  • Flowering maple tree with bumblebee, probably Acer platanoides Norway maple in springtime
  • Leaves of Norway maple tree close up.
  • Norway Maple tree Acer platanoides in Autumn
  • Norway maple tree (Acer platanoides) in autumn colours
  • Norway Maple tree in full autumn bloom. (Acer platanoides )
  • Acer Platanoides ‘Goldsworth purple’. Norway Maple tree flowering in spring
  • Autumn leaves falling from a Norway Maple tree (Acer platanoides) with other bare trees in the background, Nottinghamshire, England, UK
  • Norway maple tree, acer platanoides, National arboretum, Westonbirt arboretum, Gloucestershire, England, UK
  • top view of norway maple tree isolated on white background
  • Yellow red flowers on a Norway Maple tree cultivar Crimson King in Spring Toronto Canada against a clear blue sky
  • Norway Maple, Acer platanoides, flowers,
  • Acer platanoides drummondii, a Norway maple with spectacular foliage.
  • Maple tree leaves in Estonia
  • Globe Norway Maple
  • NORWAY MAPLE TREE IN WINTER (ACER PLATANOIDES) / PENNSYLVANIA
  • Norway Maple (Acer platanoides), flowering tree on a roadside.
  • Branch of Norway maple tree with spotted leaves afflicted by a disease in a forest in summer season
  • Norway maple (Acer platanoides), Maple tree leaves lying under tree, Germany, Bavaria
  • Leaves from a Acer platanoides Drummondii Tree
  • Norway Maple (Acer platanoides)
  • Bark of a Maple Tree Closeup
  • Norway Maple tree Acer platanoides in Autumn
  • Norway maple tree (Acer platanoides) in autumn colours
  • Norway Maple tree in full autumn bloom. (Acer platanoides )
  • Acer Platanoides ‘Goldsworth purple’. Norway Maple tree flowering in spring
  • Autumn trees. Underneath the Autumn leaves of a Norway Maple tree with other bare trees in the background, England, UK

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Don’t blame Norway.

The invasion of the Norway maple tree on U.S. soil is definitely not the fault of the Norwegians. This tree’s name is somewhat of a misnomer, since the tree hails from a larger geographic area, including much of Europe and Asia.

Its presence here could be blamed on a single individual. John Bartram was a Philadelphia botanist, explorer and naturalist who imported this plant from London in 1756. He helped popularize it and sold it from his nursery to notable citizens such as George Washington and Benjamin Franklin.

While Norway maples were found in many private gardens, it wasn’t until the mid 1950s that this tree’s popularity truly blossomed. After the death of American elm trees from Dutch elm disease, Norway maples became the shade tree and street tree of choice and are now found in many town centers and along many main streets in our communities.

But, Norway maples have a dark side. These trees are now considered invasive and the importation and sale of this formerly beloved tree has been banned in Massachusetts and many other states.

And for good reason, since Norway maple has all the qualities of a neighborhood bully. It is a long-lived and fast-growing tree, obtaining heights of 100 feet and living from 60 to 200 years. Both shade and pollution tolerant, this maple’s survival is almost assured. Norway maple’s large, leafy canopy shades out other plants and, due to its root structure, no other plants can grow below it. Its winged seeds, called samaras, fly effortlessly on the wind and can thus easily be spread. It has reseeded itself so easily that it is now considered naturalized. The Norway maple tree’s final fatal blow is its allelopathy. Allelopathic plants emit chemicals that prevent other plants from germinating and growing.

Another advantage that helps Norway maples outcompete its plant neighbors but also endears it to me, is that it blooms and leafs out early. No matter its dastardly reputation among botanists, I somehow find myself taken with it around this time every year. While the native oaks seem reluctant to stir from their winter ways, the Norway maples show signs of life and color.

Their pale green and yellow flowers give way to early leaves and signs of botanical joie de vivre.

Identifying Norway maples is easy, though they resemble other maples. Look for their milky sap when pulling off a leaf. Clear sap indicates sugar maples. Note that both varieties can be tapped for syrup, though the latter is the clear winner since the Norway variety is not as sweet and 30 per cent more sap is needed to make syrup.

Though it may be the first, happily it won’t be the last plant bursting to life with the turn of the season, and with it, our spirits will be lifted. For all those who have been longing for winter’s end, the blooming of the Norway maples will surely affect our mood! As the writer Harriet Ann Jacobs knew, “The beautiful spring came; and when Nature resumes her loveliness, the human soul is apt to revive also.”

Suzan Bellincampi is director of the Felix Neck Wildlife Sanctuary in Edgartown, and author of Martha’s Vineyard: A Field Guide to Island Nature.

The Very Yellow ‘Princeton Gold’ Norway Maple


‘Princeton Gold’ Norway Maple

By Jeff Iles
Department of Horticulture
Iowa State University

Have you ever considered the plight of landscape plants blessed/cursed with yellow foliage? Are they at all self-conscious of their appearance or do they display their leaves proudly and unashamedly? I mean, it’s pretty difficult to blend into the background when your leaves are screaming, “look at me!”

And imagine the sarcastic questions, insensitive jabs and snide comments from neighboring woody plants. “Hey, Mr. Yellow Leaves, are you sick or something?” “What’s the matter, can’t handle our soil pH?” “Looks like somebody got up on the wrong side of the fertilizer spreader.” Or, “Yo, chlorotic boy, would you mind turning your leaves off. We’re trying to sleep over here!” But all of the barbs and insults would be worth it, or at least they’d be tolerable if you were a ‘Princeton Gold’ Norway maple. Now there’s a tree that seems very comfortable in its own skin.

Acer platanoides ‘Princeton Gold’ (Norway maple) was introduced to the nursery and landscape trade in 1987 by the legendary William Flemer III of Princeton Nurseries, Princeton, N.J. Apparently Bill was in the right place at the right time, and on one of his trips through the propagation house, spied an unusual, yellow-leaved Norway maple seedling growing amongst a sea of green-leaved seedlings, and the rest, as they say, is history.

‘Princeton Gold’ Norway maple develops a pleasing oval crown, and is predicted to grow approximately 35 feet tall and 30 feet wide. But it’s the eye-popping, grab you by the shirt collar, fluorescent yellow foliage that has everyone talking. In fact, the early spring foliage is so bright you can spot a tree from miles away. Even the slightly toned-down, yellowish-green summer foliage easily commands your attention in a mostly green landscape.

Does ‘Princeton Gold’ have any significant problems? Well, it’s not the fastest growing of trees, but as you know, a deliberate growth rate often is a good thing. I’ve also noticed some leaf scorch (yellow leaves seem to invite this kind of damage). To reduce the risk of scorch, situate ‘Princeton Gold’ where it will receive protection from the hot, afternoon sun. Examples of preferable sites include eastern or northern exposures, courtyards or places that receive filtered shade.

So, how do you use a big, yellow-leaved shade tree in the landscape? As with most decisions of this kind, it really is a matter of taste. Personally, I don’t know if I could stomach an entire street lined with ‘Princeton Gold’. At first, it might be kind of fun, kind of like wearing yellow pants to work. But after a while, the novelty would wear off. No, instead I think ‘Princeton Gold’ is the perfect accent plant. Use a lone specimen to jazz up the city park, a grouping of three or five along a golf course fairway to give the golfers something else to complain about, or sprinkle them through a new housing development just to make things interesting.

Now folks, before I close, I must issue a word of caution. Once you start using yellow-leaved plants in the landscape, you might find it difficult to stop. But never fear, there are plenty of great landscape plant choices to experiment with. A few of my favorites are listed below:

Golden Nugget™ barberry
Sunsation® barberry
Sunjoy™ Gold Pillar barberry
Tiger Eyes™ cutleaf sumac
‘Golden Elf’ spirea

Trees Top 10

The Norwegian Forest and Landscape Institute

The institute is conducting research and providing information about the forest, soils, outfields and landscapes.

Many of us have a favorite tree that evokes memories of spring or winter, of childhood or of lost love. We remember the wind caressing the treetops or insects buzzing around weeping willows.

Do you have a favorite memory? A favorite tree? Or a favorite forest?

Here are the Norwegian top ten trees:

1. Birch Betula pubescens and B. pendula are the most common tree species in Norway. We find birch all over the country, from the coast up to the alpine tree-line, and as far north as Finnmark county. This is a useful tree that is suited for interior panelling and construction of furniture. It is however most popular as firewood.

2. Norway spruce Picea abies is the economically most valuable tree species in Norway. It is commonly used for construction materials in building houses. Spruce is a realatively recent immigrant and has so far spread through the south-eastern part to mid-Norway.

3. Scots pine Pinus sylvestris is also well suited for construction materials and for laminated wood. Pine wood is popular for panelling and flooring in houses and may be impregnated for increased resistance against fungus attacks. The pine arrived early to the country as the ice retreated and has spread to all parts of Norway.

4. Red alder Alnus incana is a pioneer tree species. It is commonly found on barren ground, such as land slides, and flood banks. The red alder is a fast growing tree and as such the wood is rather porous. However, red alder is becoming increasingly popular for interior paneling.

5. Rowen Sorbus aucuparia is exposed to browsing by moose. In some areas, this has affected regeneration of the species. Rowen reaches seldom more than 10 metres in height and older trees grow rather crooked. The berries, however are valuable, especially as essential food supply for birds migrating in the fall.

6. Aspen Populus tremula is known as a resource for production of matches. The wood is a poor cunductor of heat and is thus well suited for sauna benches. Aspen was in former days commonly used for outside panelling and interior panels of aspen preserves its nice, light colur.

7. Goat willow Salix caprea is well known for its soft, silky catskins that appear in early spring. The wood is tenacious and often crooked, of little value for construction, but all right as firewood – and for willow flutes.

8. Oak Quercus robur and Q. petraea is the king of the forests. This majestic tree may grow very old and big. The oldest oak tree in Norway is 1000 years of age. Oak is one of the so-called “noble” tree-species in Norway, that is, they are dependant on a warm climate and grow only in the southern part of the country.

9. Common hazel Corylus avellana is more renowned for its nuts rather than the wood. The growth form is more like a bush than a tree, usually with several stems coming from one root. When a stem reaches 5 cm in breast height, it is recorded as a tree in the inventory.

10. Bird cherry Prunus padus is the tree of the spring. The scent of bird cherry flowering in may is a welcome notice of summer. The wood is used for knife handles and such, but is otherwise of minor value. The growth form resembles that of hazel; many shoots from one root, so considerable numbers exceed 5 cm dbh.

All photos by John Yngvar Larsson of the Norwegian Forest and Landscape Institute.

Read the Norwegian version of this article at forskning.no

Related content

Norway Maple

Back to Invasive Plant Photos and Information

Norway Maple
(Acer platanoides)


Photo: Rob Routledge, Sault College, Bugwood.org

About Norway Maple: An Invasive Plant in Maryland

Life cycle/information: Norway maple (Acer platanoides) is a broadleaf deciduous tree that grows up to 50+ feet in height and produces copious amounts of seeds and dense shade. Native to Eurasia, it was introduced to the United States in the 1750’s. It was used as a street tree due to its fast-growing nature and tolerance of poor soils and air pollution. In some communities, it was planted heavily when American elms were lost to Dutch Elm Disease. The dense shade of these trees reduces light availability for forest understory plants. The dense root system alters nutrient availability and impedes the growth of other species, resulting in lower plant diversity.

Norway maple flowers. Photo: Jan Samanek, Phytosanitary Administration, Bugwood.org

Growth habit: Norway maples produce dark green, deciduous leaves with 5-7 sharply pointed lobes. The leaves are opposite of each other along the stem. Greenish-yellow flowers in clusters are produced in April-May. Young bark is smooth. Mature bark is gray-brown with shallow, interlacing ridges and furrows. Fall color is yellow.

Norway maples can be distinguished from other maples by a white milky sap that exudes when a leaf petiole (stem) is detached from the tree.


Norway maple petioles exude white sap. Photo: Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org

Reproduction: Large quantities of paired winged seeds (samaras) are produced. The “wings” of the samara spread widely to nearly 180 degrees. Seeds mature in September-October and often remain on the tree into winter. Spreads to new areas by seeds and vegetative reproduction.


Norway maple seeds. Photo: Paul Wray, Iowa State University, Bugwood.org
Conditions that favor growth: Tolerates a wide variety of light and soil conditions. Seedlings establish quickly in deciduous forests.

Photo: Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org

What to plant instead: Red maple (Acer rubrum)

Controlling Norway Maple

References and Resources

  • Dirr, Michael A. 2009. Manual of Woody Landscape Plants: Their Identification, Ornamental Characteristics, Culture, Propagation and Uses, Sixth Edition.
  • Kaufman, Sylvan Ramsey & Wallace Kaufman. 2007. Invasive Plants: Guide to Identification and the Impacts and Control of Common North American Species.
  • Sarver, Matthew, Amanda Treher, Lenny Wilson, Robert Naczi, Faith B. Keuhn. 2008. Mistaken Identity? Invasive Plants and Their Native Look-alikes. Delaware Department of Agriculture.
  • Swearingen J., B. Slattery, K. Reshetiloff, and S. Zwicker. 2010. Plant Invaders of Mid-Atlantic Natural Areas, 4th ed. National Park Service and U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Washington, DC. 168pp.

Compiled by Christa Carignan, reviewed by Debra Ricigliano, University of Maryland Extension, 10/2018.

Norway Maple Tree Info: Learn How To Grow Norway Maple Trees

If you are seeking a beautiful medium to large sized maple tree, look no further than the Norway maple. This lovely plant is native to Europe and western Asia, and has become naturalized in some areas of North America. In some regions, growing a Norway maple tree can be a problem where it self-seeds and displaces other native vegetation. With good care and careful management, however, this tree can be a good shade or standalone specimen. Learn how to grow Norway maple trees and enjoy their ornamental classic look and ease of care.

Norway Maple Tree Info

Maple trees are classics of the landscape genre. Norway maple (Acer platanoides) has made its own place in the culture and is a common shade tree that resembles sugar maples. The plant has several seasons of interest and retains a compact crown and dense growth. Norway maple has high tolerance to pollution and is adaptable to many soils including clay, sand or acidic conditions. This elegant tree is a useful addition to the landscape, provided some care is taken to minimize seedlings, which are rampant the following season.

The Norway maple was introduced by John Bartram to Philadelphia in 1756. It quickly became a popular shade tree due to its

adaptability and attractive form. However, in some areas of the United States, it has begun to replace native populations of maples and may be invasive from the northeastern U.S. south to Tennessee and Virginia. It is also a plant of concern in the Pacific Northwest.

Trees can grow up to 90 feet in height and have nicely rounded, compact crowns. Young trees have smooth bark, which becomes black and furrowed with age. The fall color is bright gold but one of the types of Norway maple trees, Crimson King, develops deep reddish fall tones. One of the important items of Norway maple tree info is regarding its root system. Roots can become a hazard due to the huge number of surface roots the plant produces.

How to Grow Norway Maple Trees

Acer platanoides is hardy to United States Department of Agriculture zones 4 to 7. This remarkably adaptable tree performs well in either full sun or partial shade. While it prefers well drained, moist soil, it is drought tolerant for short periods of time, although some leaf drop may occur.

Growing a Norway maple tree may require some training when the tree is young to help it develop a good strong central leader and stout scaffold. Plants transplant easily with little effect on the root system or foliage. Norway maple has good resistance to storm and ice damage and has a vigorous growth rate.

These trees, if carefully managed, can quickly become attractive focal points of the shade garden.

Norway Maple Tree Care

One of the highlights of Norway maple tree care is managing the samaras, or seed fruits. These winged fruits can catch the wind and navigate far away from the parent tree. They germinate readily and can become an issue in rural settings or near native woods. Pruning at the end of the season, just before the samaras turn brown, can prevent wild seedlings from becoming a pest.

Other management is limited to supplemental watering in hot summers, once a year fertilizing with a good balanced food in early spring, and removing any damaged or diseased wood. These trees have few of the classic maple issues and are quite fine if left alone most of the time. While this adds to their popularity, caution should be observed in some regions where the plant is considered invasive.

Variegated Norway Maple

Variegated Norway Maple

(Photo courtesy of NetPS Plant Finder)

Variegated Norway Maple foliage

Variegated Norway Maple foliage

(Photo courtesy of NetPS Plant Finder)

Height: 40 feet

Spread: 35 feet

Sunlight:

Hardiness Zone: 4a

Description:

An unusual and interesting variety that makes a great landscape focal point; a dense shade tree known for a well shaped crown and straight trunk; green and white foliage changes to yellow with a tinge of pink in the fall

Ornamental Features

Variegated Norway Maple has attractive white-variegated light green foliage throughout the season. The lobed leaves are highly ornamental and turn an outstanding yellow in the fall. Neither the flowers nor the fruit are ornamentally significant.

Landscape Attributes

Variegated Norway Maple is a dense deciduous tree with a more or less rounded form. Its relatively coarse texture can be used to stand it apart from other landscape plants with finer foliage.

This tree will require occasional maintenance and upkeep, and should only be pruned in summer after the leaves have fully developed, as it may ‘bleed’ sap if pruned in late winter or early spring. It has no significant negative characteristics.

Variegated Norway Maple is recommended for the following landscape applications;

  • Shade

Planting & Growing

Variegated Norway Maple will grow to be about 40 feet tall at maturity, with a spread of 35 feet. It has a high canopy with a typical clearance of 7 feet from the ground, and should not be planted underneath power lines. As it matures, the lower branches of this tree can be strategically removed to create a high enough canopy to support unobstructed human traffic underneath. It grows at a medium rate, and under ideal conditions can be expected to live to a ripe old age of 100 years or more; think of this as a heritage tree for future generations!

This tree should only be grown in full sunlight. It prefers to grow in average to moist conditions, and shouldn’t be allowed to dry out. It is not particular as to soil type or pH. It is highly tolerant of urban pollution and will even thrive in inner city environments. This is a selected variety of a species not originally from North America.

Gertens Sizes and Prices

#20 container – $259.00
* Sizes and availability are subject to change. Please check with the store for specific details.

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