Newport flowering plum trees

Newport Plum Info: Learn How To Grow A Newport Plum Tree

According to the Arbor Day Foundation, properly placed trees in the landscape can increase property values up to 20%. While large trees can also provide us with shade, reduce heating and cooling costs and provide beautiful texture and fall color, not every urban yard has the space for one. However, there are many small ornamental trees that can add charm, beauty and value to small properties.

As a landscape designer and garden center worker, I often suggest smaller ornamentals for these situations. Newport plum (Prunus cerasifera ‘Neportii’) is one of my first suggestions. Continue reading this article for Newport plum info and helpful tips on how to grow a Newport plum.

What is a Newport Plum Tree?

The Newport plum is a small, ornamental tree that grows 15-20 feet (4.5-6 m.) tall and wide. They are hardy in zones 4-9. This plum’s popular attributes are its light pink to white flowers in spring and its deep purple colored foliage throughout the spring, summer and fall.

Depending on region, rose-pink Newport plum blooms appear all over the trees rounded canopy. These buds open to pale pink to white flowers. Newport plum blooms are especially important as nectar plants for early pollinators like the mason bee and monarch butterflies migrating north for summer breeding.

After the blooms fade, Newport plum trees produce small 1-inch (2.5 cm.) diameter plum fruits. Because of these small fruits, Newport plum falls in to a group commonly known as cherry plum trees, and Newport plum is often referred to as Newport cherry plum. The fruit is attractive to birds, squirrels and other small mammals, but the tree is seldom bothered by deer.

Newport plum fruits can be eaten by humans as well. However, these trees are mostly grown as ornamentals for their aesthetic flowers and foliage. One specimen Newport plum in the landscape will not produce a lot of fruit anyway.

Caring for Newport Plum Trees

Newport plum trees were first introduced by the University of Minnesota in 1923. Its history beyond that has been hard to trace, but it is believed that they are native to the Middle East. Although it is not a native to the U.S., it is a popular ornamental tree throughout the country. Newport plum is rated the most cold hardy of the cherry plum trees, but it grows well in the south too.

Newport plum trees grow best in full sun. They will grow in clay, loam or sandy soil. Newport plum can tolerate slightly alkaline soil but prefer acidic soil. In acidic soil, the ovate purple foliage will achieve its best color.

In spring, new foliage and branches will be a red-purple color, which will darken to a deeper purple as the foliage matures. The downside to growing this tree is that its purple foliage is very attractive to Japanese beetles. However, there are many homemade Japanese beetle remedies or natural products that can control these damaging insects without harming our beneficial pollinators.

Newport Flowering Plum

Beautiful Flowers add Color to Your Landscape

Purple Foliage Adds Contrast
Plum-purple leaves make this tree a winner if you’re looking to add a surprising blast of color that defies the norm in the summer months. The Newport Flowering Plum comes alive in the spring with sweet, delicate light pink flowers. It’s the perfect set-up for what’s to follow…bronze colored leaves that darken to a deep purple as the temperatures rise throughout the summer months.
Low Maintenance/Cold Hardy
Climate is not an issue for the Newport. It’s one of the hardiest and most reliable purple-leaf plums. Extreme climate conditions are no problem. This Plum is adaptable to various soil types and will thrive in full sun from Zones 4-10.

No Limits on Location
The Newport Flowering Plum looks amazing when planted as a centerpiece in a garden or flower bed, but this tree requires no accompanying plants, bushes or shrubs to make a statement. While it is quite impressive in any setting, it can stand it’s own as an ornamental, growing in an attractive round form, reaching up to 30 feet tall and 25 feet wide. There are no limits to where you plant it. It does well in the middle of your yard, on the corner of your landscape, and for extra special spark – purchase a few and line them in a row to create a spectacular border.

Order Now
This is a very popular tree and unfortunately, we run out of stock often. That’s because we nurture them at our nursery, and although we have 42+ acres, there is only so much space to dedicate to each of our products. We do the work here so that when they’re delivered to you, they are ready to thrive. If you have any reservations about the health of our trees that we ship, scroll down to see what our customers have to say. We’re very proud of our ability to deliver strong trees that you can plant upon delivery!

Fast Growing Trees flowering plum trees flowering trees large trees Planting Kit shade trees spring blooming plants street trees Tree Spikes //cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0059/8835/2052/products/Newport-Flowering-Plum-450w.jpg?v=1549657083 //cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0059/8835/2052/products/Newport-Flowering-Plum-2-450w.jpg?v=1549657083 //cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0059/8835/2052/products/Newport-Flowering-Plum-3-450w.jpg?v=1549657083 13940765556788 3-4 ft. 59.95 59.95 //cdn.shopify.com/s/assets/no-image-2048-5e88c1b20e087fb7bbe9a3771824e743c244f437e4f8ba93bbf7b11b53f7824c.gif https://www.fast-growing-trees.com/products/newport-plum?variant=13940765556788 OutOfStock 3-4 ft. 13940765589556 4-5 ft. 79.95 79.95 //cdn.shopify.com/s/assets/no-image-2048-5e88c1b20e087fb7bbe9a3771824e743c244f437e4f8ba93bbf7b11b53f7824c.gif https://www.fast-growing-trees.com/products/newport-plum?variant=13940765589556 OutOfStock 4-5 ft. 13940765622324 5-6 ft. 119.95 99.95 //cdn.shopify.com/s/assets/no-image-2048-5e88c1b20e087fb7bbe9a3771824e743c244f437e4f8ba93bbf7b11b53f7824c.gif https://www.fast-growing-trees.com/products/newport-plum?variant=13940765622324 InStock 5-6 ft. 13940765655092 6-7 ft. 119.95 119.95 //cdn.shopify.com/s/assets/no-image-2048-5e88c1b20e087fb7bbe9a3771824e743c244f437e4f8ba93bbf7b11b53f7824c.gif https://www.fast-growing-trees.com/products/newport-plum?variant=13940765655092 OutOfStock 6-7 ft.

Prunus cerasifera ‘Newportii’: Newport Cherry Plum1

Edward F. Gilman and Dennis G. Watson2

Introduction

Growing 15 feet high and wide, Newport Cherry Plum forms a rounded silhouette of dark purple foliage. The new leaves unfold as light bronze-purple but quickly change to red or red-purple. `Newport’ Cherry Plum has pale bluish-pink springtime flowers which are followed by one-inch-diameter, dull purple fruits. It is said to be one of the hardiest purple-leaved plums but is also quite common throughout the South.

Figure 1.

Middle-aged Prunus cerasifera ‘Newportii’: Newport Cherry Plum

General Information

Scientific name: Prunus cerasifera Pronunciation: PROO-nus sair-uh-SIFF-er-uh Common name(s): Newport Cherry Plum, Newport Purple-Leaf Plum Family: Rosaceae USDA hardiness zones: 4B through 7B (Fig. 2) Origin: not native to North America Invasive potential: little invasive potential Uses: specimen; container or planter; Bonsai; shade Availability: not native to North America Figure 2.

Range

Description

Height: 15 to 18 feet Spread: 15 to 20 feet Crown uniformity: symmetrical Crown shape: round, vase Crown density: dense Growth rate: slow Texture: medium

Foliage

Leaf arrangement: alternate (Fig. 3) Leaf type: simple Leaf margin: serrate Leaf shape: ovate, elliptic (oval), obovate Leaf venation: pinnate, brachidodrome Leaf type and persistence: deciduous Leaf blade length: less than 2 inches, 2 to 4 inches Leaf color: purple/red Fall color: purple Fall characteristic: showy Figure 3.

Foliage

Flower

Flower color: white/cream/gray, pink Flower characteristics: showy

Fruit

Fruit shape: round Fruit length: 1 to 3 inches Fruit covering: fleshy Fruit color: purple Fruit characteristics: attracts birds; not showy; fruit/leaves a litter problem

Trunk and Branches

Trunk/bark/branches: branches don’t droop; not showy; typically one trunk; thorns Pruning requirement: little required Breakage: resistant Current year twig color: reddish, brown Current year twig thickness: thin Wood specific gravity: unknown

Culture

Light requirement: full sun Soil tolerances: clay; sand; loam; slightly alkaline; acidic; well-drained Drought tolerance: moderate Aerosol salt tolerance: moderate

Other

Roots: not a problem Winter interest: no Outstanding tree: no Ozone sensitivity: unknown Verticillium wilt susceptibility: susceptible Pest resistance: sensitive to pests/diseases

Use and Management

Very popular due to the unusual leaf color, many gardeners want one of these things in their yard. But one plant really attracts attention to an area, and it can be overpowering in a small landscape creating a cramped feeling. Due to the strong effect, best used in a large-scale landscape as a single specimen, not in a row or mass planting. It makes a nice, small ornamental near the deck or patio but locate it far enough away so dropping fruit will fall on the lawn or in a groundcover bed. It is often short-lived.

`Newport’ Cherry Plum should be grown in full sun on well-drained, acid soil to bring out the richest leaf color. It tolerates slightly alkaline soil. Tolerant of moderate heat and drought, it often succumbs to borers on poor, compacted soil.

Propagation is by cuttings.

Pests

This Cherry Plum is susceptible to aphids, borers, scales, mealy bugs, and tent caterpillars.

Diseases

Canker and leaf spots may infect this tree.

Footnotes

This document is ENH-667, one of a series of the Environmental Horticulture, UF/IFAS Extension. Original publication date November 1993. Revised December 2006. Reviewed February 2014. Visit the EDIS website at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu.

Edward F. Gilman, professor, Environmental Horticulture Department; Dennis G. Watson, former associate professor, Agricultural Engineering Department, UF/IFAS Extension, FL 32611.

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. For more information on obtaining other UF/IFAS Extension publications, contact your county’s UF/IFAS Extension office.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, UF/IFAS Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A & M University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Nick T. Place, dean for UF/IFAS Extension.

Plums are delicious fruits that belong to the genus Prunus (stone fruits).

They may have been one of the first fruits domesticated by humans.

Plum remains have been found in Neolithic age archaeological sites along with olives, grapes and figs.

Plum has many species, and taxonomists differ on the count. Depending on the taxonomist, between 19 and 40 species of plum exist. From this diversity only two species, the hexaploid European plum (Prunus domestica) and the diploid Japanese plum (Prunus salicina and hybrids), are of worldwide commercial significance.

Plum trees are grown on every continent except Antarctica. They are most commonly planted in temperate zones.

The average lifespan for cultivated plum trees is 10 to 15 years.

The commercially important plum trees are medium-sized, usually pruned to 5–6 meters (16-20 feet) height. Without pruning, the trees can reach 12 meters (39 feet) in height and spread across 10 meters (33 feet).

Some plum varieties have leaves that are oblong in shape with a pointed tip while others have oval leaves that are serrated on the edges. Leaves are usually 5 to 10 centimeters (2 to 4 inches) long and green in color.

The flower buds on most varieties are borne on short spurs or along the terminal shoots of the main branches. Each bud may contain from one to five flowers, two or three being most common, and often give an appearance of densely packed, showy flower clusters when the trees are in full bloom.

Fruits are usually of medium size, between 2.5 and 7.5 centimeters (1 and 3 inches) in diameter, globose to oval. The flesh is firm and juicy. The fruit’s peel is smooth, with a natural waxy surface that adheres to the flesh. The color of the peel varies from bluish-black to red, purple, green or yellow.

The plum is a drupe or stone fruit, meaning its fleshy fruit surrounds a single hard seed.

Like most fruit, plums are low in calories, protein and fats.

Plums contain an assortment of healthy components, vitamins and minerals. They are an excellent source vitamin C. Plums are also a good source of vitamin A, vitamin K, vitamin B1, B2, B3, B6, B9 and vitamin E. The minerals present in them include potassium, fluoride, phosphorous, magnesium, iron, calcium and zinc. They are also filled with dietary fiber, sorbitol and isatin.

The health benefits of plums include relief from indigestion, influenza infection, and anxiety-related problems.

The antioxidant power of plums also helps in treating ailments such as osteoporosis, macular degeneration, cancer, diabetes, obesity and slow the development of Alzheimer’s disease.

Plums also contain anthocyanin and quercetin, beneficial for preventing brain cell breakdown.

Plums have a low glycemic index, so eating plums can help you control your blood sugar and reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes according to the Dietitians of Canada.

Plums are widely eaten fresh as a dessert fruit. The taste of the plum fruit ranges from sweet to tart.

Plums can be cooked as compote or jam, or baked in a variety of pastries.

In the Balkans, especially in Serbia plum is converted into an alcoholic drink named slivovitz (Serbian: šljivovica). Šljivovica is the national drink of Serbia in domestic production for centuries, and plum is the national fruit.

Plum liquor, also known as “plum wine”, is popular in both Japan and Korea, and is also produced in China. Plum wine is normally made with distilled liquor and soaked with plum.

In central England, a cider-like alcoholic beverage known as plum jerkum is made from plums.

Plum varieties that can be dried without resulting in fermentation are called prunes. Such plums have firm flesh and contain high levels of sugar, qualities that favour their being preserved by drying, which is done in dehydrators or in the sun.

China is the world’s leading producer of plums accounting for about half of world production. Other major producers are Romania, Serbia, and Iran.

The Serbian plum is the third most produced in the world.

There are also species of New World origin such as Prunus americana. However, while these were utilized by Native Americans, most cultivated plums in the United States are the Japanese or
European species.

The plum is a member of the rose family and is a close relative of peaches, apricots and cherries.

The plum blossom or meihua, along with the peony, are considered traditional floral emblems of China.

The plum tree was significant in Chinese mythology. It was often carved on jade and was associated with wisdom.

The name plum derived from Old English plume or “plum, plum tree,” which extended from Germanic language or Middle Dutch, prume, and Latin, prunum.

“You can’t evoke great spirits and eat plums at the same time.” – George William Russell

Prunus cerasifera ‘Thundercloud’: ‘Thundercloud’ Cherry Plum1

Edward F. Gilman and Dennis G. Watson2

`Thundercloud’ Purple-Leaf plum has new foliage which unfolds as ruby red, then turns reddish-purple for the rest of the growing season. Its fast growth rate and upright to upright-spreading nature quickly forms a 15 to 25-foot-tall, dense silhouette. The small, white to light pink, fragrant springtime flowers, which usually appear before the leaves unfold, are followed by a heavy crop of edible, one-inch-diameter purple fruits.

Figure 1.

Middle-aged Prunus cerasifera ‘Thundercloud’: ‘Thundercloud’ Cherry Plum

Credit:

Ed Gilman

Scientific name: Prunus cerasifera Pronunciation: PROO-nus sair-uh-SIFF-er-uh Common name(s): ‘Thundercloud’ Cherry Plum, `Thundercloud’ Purple-Leaf Plum Family: Rosaceae USDA hardiness zones: 5A through 8A (Fig. 2) Origin: not native to North America Invasive potential: little invasive potential Uses: specimen; container or planter; shade Availability: not native to North America Figure 2.

Range

Very popular due to the unusual leaf color, many gardeners want one of these things in their yard. But one plant really attracts attention to an area, and it can be overpowering in a small landscape creating a cramped feeling. Due to the strong effect, best used in a large-scale landscape as a single specimen, not in a row or mass planting. It makes a nice, small ornamental near the deck or patio but locate it far enough away so dropping fruit will fall on the lawn or in a groundcover bed. Do not rely on this tree to be around for a long time since decline often begins by the time the tree is 10 to 15-years-old.

Purple-Leaf Plum should be grown in full sun to bring out the richest color of the leaves. Leaves turn almost green in shade and loose the characteristic purple which the buyer is usually looking for. Well-drained soil with an acid pH is preferred but it will grow on slightly alkaline soil. Tolerant of moderate heat and drought, it often succumbs to borers on poor, compacted soil.

Propagation is by cuttings.

This Cherry Plum is susceptible to aphids, borers, scales, mealy bugs, tent caterpillars and many others. It is not a pest-free plant.

Canker and leaf spots.

This document is ENH-668, one of a series of the Environmental Horticulture, UF/IFAS Extension. Original publication date November 1993. Revised December 2006. Reviewed February 2014. Visit the EDIS website at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu.

Edward F. Gilman, professor, Environmental Horticulture Department; Dennis G. Watson, former associate professor, Agricultural Engineering Department, UF/IFAS Extension, Gainesville, FL 32611.

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. For more information on obtaining other UF/IFAS Extension publications, contact your county’s UF/IFAS Extension office.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, UF/IFAS Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A & M University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Nick T. Place, dean for UF/IFAS Extension.

Thundercloud Plum

Looking for a wonderful tree that will deliver long-lasting color to your garden over three seasons? Thundercloud Plum (Prunus cerasifera ‘Thundercloud’) is one of the top accent trees planted in the country.

With a neat, tidy, rounded form and very pretty ornamental features, this mid-sized, deciduous tree is a delight from spring through fall. The upright spreading branch structure is well shaped, and the tree is well known for its broad, spreading canopy. The light bark is textured for added interest.

When it wakes up from its winter sleep, Thundercloud Plum bursts out with a billow of light pink and white blossoms, reminiscent of a cherry tree in full bloom. This flowering Plum variety really provides a spectacular display against the silvery gray branches.

People will slow down to gaze in amazement as they drive past this tree. What a welcome sign of spring!

But the real show starts soon after the flowers bloom. We think the real genius of the Thundercloud is in the purple leaved foliage. It makes such a bold statement. The ruby red and purple color foliage retains its appeal throughout the season until fall.

Now, this is an ornamental plum, so fruit isn’t the main draw here. Even so, it will sometimes bear small edible fruits for you in the summer. They are edible, and quite often the fruit is used to make jams, jellies and preserves. However, if you can’t be bothered, simply leaves them on the tree. Your local songbirds will visit to help you enjoy them!

Add some outstanding color to your landscape and buy a couple of these great cherry plum trees today!

How to Use Thundercloud Plum in the Landscape

You’ll definitely want to let the glistening deep plum ruby reddish-purple foliage take center stage in a garden bed. This tree is truly a prima donna, let her shine!

With its fast growth rate, it fills these roles in a short amount of time.

This tree is a perfect featured lawn tree.

They look great framing your house when selected for a landscape accent tree.

With its low height and wide spreading canopy, it makes it a great screen tree to block an unwanted view as well as an accent tree for a naturalized spot in the garden. Incorporate them into a planting bed or raised berm planting. Plant 3, 5 or 7 to make a naturalized grouping, or use them along a property line as a lovely screen tree.

At the edge of a property, their deep, delicious leaves draw your eye. This color pushes back the sense of visual space, making your yard look larger.

Include comfy seating nearby. You’ll cherish the opportunity to study the blossoms in spring and the lovely color that lasts throughout the growing seasons.

#ProPlantTips for Care

Thundercloud Plum grows fast and is a true low maintenance tree. It is very hardy and will thrive just about anywhere. For the best purple leaf color, plant it in full sun – the leaves will be a chartreuse green if planted in too much shade.

Plant in full sun in well-draining, slightly acidic soil. Elevate or mound your planting if drainage is a concern. This will ensure a quick adjustment to the Thundercloud’s new location.

The tree is moderately drought tolerant once established. For best performance in the hottest climate Growing Zones, it loves a good layer of mulch. Spread a thick layer of Pine bark or “pathbark” mulch all around the base of the tree, but be sure to leave space around the trunk. Mulching in all areas helps the Thundercloud grow healthier.

You won’t need to prune the Thundercloud Flowering Plum other than light cleanup. It’s best to prune right after flowering in the spring. Consider spraying with Bonide Fruit and Nut RTU Hose End just after bloom to keep your tree in tip-top shape for the summer.

Planting Tips

Plant your tree at the same depth it grew in. Keep the soil lines even with your planting hole. Too deep hurts this plant, as it needs well drained soils.

To your backfill soil removed from the planting hole, add Dr. Earths Acid Lovers Organic and Natural Planting Mix in a ration of 2 to 1. Use Nature Hills Root Booster under the root system for the best results to get your Thundercloud off to a good start.

Watch your watering in the first year to ensure that the tree is getting the right amount of water. Always check with your finger to the knuckle just before you are ready to water to see how wet the soil is. If it is moist, delay your watering a day or two.

In hotter climates, always be aware of mid-summer heat spikes and apply a little more water when they occur.

You’ll love this dramatic, but easy care selection. Order today!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *