Mexican tarragon companion planting

Contents

Quick Guide to Growing Tarragon

  • Plant tarragon in spring after the last frost. This flavorful plant grows well in both in-ground gardens and containers.
  • Space tarragon plants 18 to 24 inches apart in partial shade to full sun with fertile, well-drained soil with a pH of 6.5 to 7.0.
  • Before planting, get your soil right by mixing in several inches of aged compost or other rich organic matter.
  • Encourage excellent growth by regularly feeding with a water-soluble plant food.
  • Even though tarragon is drought-tolerant, check soil moisture every few days and water when the top inch of soil becomes dry.
  • Once your plants are established, harvest sprigs once they are large enough for use.

Soil, Planting, and Care

Although grown as an annual in most of the country, Mexican tarragon is a half-hardy perennial in warmer regions, where it comes back vigorously from the roots in spring. In climates where it never dies down from frost, keep it trimmed.

Start with strong young tarragon plants from Bonnie Plants®, the company that has been helping home gardeners succeed for over a century. When planting, space plants 18 to 24 inches apart so they will have room to grow to their full size.

Plants need full sun or partial shade and must have well-drained soil. Given that, they grow easily and without fuss. Improve the nutrition and texture of your existing soil by mixing a few inches of aged compost-enriched Miracle-Gro® Performance Organics™ All Purpose In-Ground Soil in with the top layer. Growing tarragon in pots? Fill them with Miracle-Gro® Performance Organics™ All Purpose Container Mix, which also contains nutrient-rich compost.

Although drought-tolerant, tarragon will be fuller and bloom best if kept moist, so water thoroughly whenever the top inch of soil is dry. In tandem with planting in great soil, be sure to feed tarragon regularly for best growth. Miracle-Gro® Performance Organics™ All Purpose Plant Nutrition is an excellent choice, as it feeds both your plants and the beneficial microbes in the soil that help your garden flourish. (Be sure to follow label directions.) It’s worth noting that if stems fall over and touch the ground, they will take root, causing plants to spread. Tarragon also reseeds.

The first part of our comparison was easy and basic. We ate fresh leaves of both plants from the garden. What we discovered by doing this held true for the remaining paces we put these two herbs through.

Finding #1: French Tarragon numbs the tip of the tongue while Spanish Tarragon stimulates the sweet taste buds. We added both herbs fresh to rice and boiled. Spanish Tarragon gave the rice a pleasant slightly anise flavor. French Tarragon was too strong for the subtly flavored rice and left us asking for salt.

Try 2 Tablespoons freshly chopped Spanish Tarragon with one-half cup brown rice.

Finding #2: Since the acquisition of the bread machine, all herbs tested for flavor usually find their way into bread. We used a Basic white French bread with no added sugar.

As a member of the herb blend, Fines Herbes, French Tarragon has traditionally been added at the end of cooking so that the flavor will not cook away. This just did not prove to be true. As with the rice, we learned that French Tarragon holds up well to prolonged cooking.

But, unless you like pepper in your bread leave out the French Tarragon. And, since the Spanish Tarragon lost almost all of its flavor, we discovered here are two herbs better suited to foods other than bread.

Finding #3: We already knew French Tarragon was great with our vinegar based potato salad. So this next challenge was for Spanish Tarragon.

A little bit of Tarragon Heaven

Finding #4: The bland flavor of potatoes is enhanced greatly by the addition of Tarragon. French Tarragon gives this potato salad a spicy kick, and Spanish Tarragon contributed more of a fruity taste. Both are good, but different. Try both! The amount of Spanish Tarragon should be increased to 3 Tablespoons.

The last test was a little different. We made brownies!

Finding #5: Spanish Tarragon adds a special taste to chocolate that is subtle yet very right. Try 3 Tablespoons freshly chopped Spanish Tarragon to a recipe using 4 ounces of unsweetened chocolate.

French Tarragon was lost to the overpowering chocolate and yet the brownies had an odd off taste. Again, we learned that French Tarragon is easily overpowered.

While Spanish Tarragon may not be as spicy as French Tarragon, it can be used in most recipes calling for Tarragon with more than satisfactory results. It is definitely easier to grow and provides much more per plant to work with.

Other unusual Marigolds are the fragrant, culinary perennial Tagetes nelsonii, referred to as the Citrus Scented Marigold, and the beautiful ornamental perennial Tagetes lemonii. Learn more about these Tagetes and other unusual herbs.

What Is Mexican Tarragon: How To Grow Mexican Tarragon Herb Plants

What is Mexican tarragon? Native to Guatemala and Mexico, this perennial, heat-loving herb is grown primarily for its flavorful licorice-like leaves. The marigold-like flowers that show up in late summer and autumn are a delightful bonus. Most commonly called Mexican marigold (Tagetes lucida), it is known by a number of alternate names, such as false tarragon, Spanish tarragon, winter tarragon, Texas tarragon or Mexican mint marigold. Read on for all you need to know about growing Mexican tarragon plants.

How to Grow Mexican Tarragon

Mexican tarragon is perennial in USDA plant hardiness zones 9 through 11. In zone 8, the plant is usually nipped by frost, but grows back in spring. In other climates, Mexican tarragon plants are often grown as annuals.

Plant Mexican tarragon in well-drained soil, as the plant is likely to rot in wet soil. Allow 18 to 24 inches between each plant; Mexican tarragon is a large plant that can reach 2 to 3 feet tall, with a similar width.

Although Mexican tarragon plants tolerate partial shade, the flavor is best when the plant is exposed to full sunlight.

Keep in mind that Mexican tarragon may reseed itself. Additionally, new plants are generated whenever the tall stems bend over and touch the soil.

Caring for Mexican Tarragon

Although Mexican tarragon plants are relatively drought tolerant, the plants are bushier and healthier with regular irrigation. Water only when the surface of the soil is dry, as Mexican tarragon won’t tolerate consistently soggy soil. However, don’t allow the soil to become bone dry.

Water Mexican tarragon at the base of the plant, as wetting the foliage may lead to various moisture-related diseases, especially rot. A drip system or soaker hose works well.

Harvest Mexican tarragon plants regularly. The more often you harvest, the more the plant will produce. Early morning, when the essential oils are well distributed through the plant, is the best time to harvest.

Mexican tarragon requires no fertilizer. Pests are generally not a concern.

It’s easy to become overwhelmed when planning a new garden or improving an existing one. We talk consistently about permaculture, organic gardening techniques and ways to improve crop yields regardless of how much (or little) space you have available.

So let’s look at companion planting; what it actually is, why it’s beneficial and finally, just how easy it is to accomplish at home without years of gardening experience.

In this guide you’ll find a list of 67 common vegetables, herbs, flowers and fruit trees with their companion plants as well as antagonistic plant enemies that can actually hinder their development.

(Want to know about three companion plants that absolutely LOVE each other? Click to grab How to Grow the 3 Sisters Garden)

What is Companion Planting?

As John Jeavons writes in his excellent book How to Grow More Vegetables, a scientific definition of companion planting is: “The placing together of plants having complementary physical demands.”

He goes on giving a more accurate, living, and spiritual description:

Companion planting is the growing together of all those elements and beings that encourage life and growth; the creation of a microcosm that includes vegetables, fruits, trees, bushes, wheat, flowers, weeds, birds, soil, microorganisms, water, nutrients, insects, toads, spiders, and chickens.

Before we jump into the good stuff, keep in mind that while Nature has perfected companion planting over billions of years, it’s still an experimental field for us humans.

Much more research is needed to understand the intricate relationships between plants and other living organisms. So don’t see this as an exact science, but more as an exploration guide for your own learning.

Why Companion Planting?

No discussion about companion planting would be complete without first tearing apart our current monoculture (single crop planting) ideas about gardening. Think about it…whenever you drive through rural America you are likely to encounter countless fields filled with row after row of a single crop.

Corn is a perfect example.

Granted, most of us don’t have access to acres upon acres to grow our crops, but believe it or not monoculture is never beneficial.

In the past, farmers decided that focusing on a single crop was the best way to reap maximum profits. Sometimes, farmers would change which crop they focused on depending on current market prices. If the price of a bushel of corn went down, for instance, a farmer might decide to switch to soybeans or some other crop offering a higher profit potential.

Unfortunately, monoculture farming leads to a variety of problems. Increased disease, pests and artificial fertilizers have all become commonplace in the commercial farming industry. Let’s pick on corn again for a moment. Corn requires more nutrients (particularly nitrogen) than practically any other commercial crop grown in the United States.

If a farm concentrates solely on cultivating corn, where does the necessary nitrogen come from every year? In most cases, the answer is chemical fertilizers.

There is, however, a much simpler solution. A solution that our ancestors understood intimately. Not only does companion planting offer protection from diseases and pests, it also maintains healthy soil without the use of potentially harmful chemicals.

The Benefits of Companion Planting

Companion planting mimics nature. By growing crops together that naturally complement one another, many of the problems associated with conventional farming methods are avoided. The result is a healthy, high-yield garden that is much easier to maintain.

Did you know, for instance, that by planting tomatoes near asparagus you practically eliminate the threat of asparagus beetles destroying your crop? Or that by planting onions in between lettuce or cabbage, rabbits are more likely to leave them alone?

If you plant marigolds in rows of bean plants, Mexican bean beetles won’t show up and in general, marigolds are an effective form of nematode control (although the effect becomes more powerful each successive year marigolds are planted).

Another example of pest control is planting pumpkin within rows of corn. As the large vines and leaves of pumpkin plants flourish, they offer a physical protection barrier from corn-eating pests including raccoons.

Pest control isn’t the advantage to companion planting. Many plants are nitrogen-fixers. These plants – such as clover and alfalfa – only get about 5% of required nutrients from the soil. The rest comes from nitrogen in the air which these crops store in their root systems. This additional nitrogen is absolutely necessary for the growth of other crops including corn.

There are thousands of other beneficial plant companionships that science is only just beginning to understand, but experience has proven that they work for various reasons.

The idea is to stop thinking about gardening in the conventional sense and attempt (as much as possible) to mimic the way crops grow in nature.

The forest garden, or “food forest”, is the ultimate example of companion planting

For instance, in many climate zones within the United States, it’s possible to plant multiple crops in the same area depending on the time of the year. This is accomplished by understanding the requirements of your crops. Heavy feeders like, tomatoes and cabbage should be followed by legumes to help the soil recover from the demands of heavy feeders.

Finally, light feeders such as root vegetables, herbs, bulbs and protective flowers (marigolds and nasturtiums) can be added before starting the cycle over the following season. Understanding these relationships means you can effectively double – or even triple – current yields from even a small backyard garden.

Companion Planting Case Study:
The Three Sisters Garden

A perfect example of companion planting is the “three sisters garden”, which is a combination of corn, pole beans, and squash that has been grown together by Native Americans for centuries (possibly longer).

Think about what each plant needs to grow into a healthy vegetable.

  1. Corn requires plenty of space to grow.
  2. Beans need a support system for the stalks to grow straight.
  3. Both squash and corn thrive on nitrogen, which typically does not flourish in sandy soils.

Now, let’s think about how the vegetable compensate for their growing deficiencies.

  • Corn offers string beans the sturdy support to grow straight. Think of a cornstalk as a naturally developing trellis that ensures string beans remain upright.
  • String beans absorb nitrogen from the surrounding air and replenish nitrogen-deficient soil. The upward growing vegetables also act as a bind that keeps the Three Sisters close together, further enhancing the space you have to grow other crops or raise livestock.
  • Sprawling squash creates copious amounts of mulch that cools and moistens the soil.
  • Squash leaves also contain prickly stems that thwart the best attempt of critters such as raccoons from enjoying sumptuous meals.

(Want to know about three companion plants that absolutely LOVE each other? Click to grab How to Grow the 3 Sisters Garden)

Now, corn, squash and pole beans are not the only plants that establish this kind of symbiotic relationship, as you will see below there are many others.

By combining a variation of fast- and slow-growing crops, nitrogen-fixers, edibles and aromatic herbs, and stacking plants with non-conflicting root zones and heights, it is entirely possible to double the annual yield of your current garden.

As an added benefit, planting a cover crop of white clover, alfalfa or a similar nitrogen-fixer in the off-season helps to replenish essential nutrients required by your crops during planting season. That’s companion planting over the longer term.

So let’s take a look at the plants…

Companion Planting Charts

I have not one but two charts for you. As you can see by these companion planting charts, and the plant index in the next section, there are quite a few combinations that work very well together.

The first chart is brought to you by Afristar Foundation, “a public benefit organisation that develops projects and strategies promoting Green Futures centered on a nature-based economy.”

The companion planting chart by Afristar Foundation. Right-click and “Save” to download PDF

The second chart is brought to you by the Yayasan IDEP Foundation, “a local Indonesian NGO based in Bali – Indonesia, founded in 1999, that develops and delivers training, community programs and media related to sustainable development through Permaculture, and Community-based Disaster Management.”

This chart contains a lot of information, and with that many plants in a single spreadsheet I find that it can get a bit… messy.

The companion planting chart by the IDEP Foundation. Right-click and “Save” to download PDF

Companion Planting Plant Index

If you want to jump around, use the “top” links to get back to the shortcuts.

Apple top

Apple Companions

  • Marigolds
  • Garlic
  • Lemon Balm
  • Chives
  • Leeks
  • Nasturtium
  • Clover
  • Daffodils
  • Comfrey

Apple Antagonists

  • Grass
  • Potato
  • Walnut

Marigolds repel many harmful insects. The allium family of plants (garlic, onion, shallots, etc) repels fruit tree borers. Lemon balm attracts bees to help pollinate the apple blossoms. Both grass and potatoes will compete with the apple tree for the same nutrients.

Apricot top

Apricot Companions

  • Basil
  • Nasturtiums
  • Sunflower

Apricot Antagonists

  • Grass
  • Tomato
  • Peppers

Apricots are threatened by many insects which are repelled by the companion plants. These plants also attract the bees needed for pollination. Apricots are extremely sensitive to a fungus that often affects peppers.

Aspargus top

Asparagus Companions

  • Basil
  • Parsley
  • Tomato
  • Dill
  • Coriander
  • Comfrey
  • Nasturtiums

Asparagus Antagonists

  • Onion
  • Potato
  • Gladiolas
  • Garlic

The combination of asparagus and basil may attract beneficial lady bugs to your garden. Alliums (onion, garlic, etc) and potatoes are strong competitors for the same nutrients.

Basil top

Basil Companions

  • Chamomile
  • Anise
  • Tomato
  • Pepper
  • Oregano
  • Asparagus
  • Grape Vine
  • Petunias

Basil Antagonists

  • Rue

Basil is a great companion for many plants. It repels mosquitoes, flies, and other garden pests. Chamomile and anise help increase the flavor of basil.

Beans top

Bean Companions

  • Beets
  • Cucumbers
  • Carrots
  • Lettuce
  • Okra
  • Potato
  • Spinach
  • Dill
  • Cabbage
  • Chard
  • Eggplant
  • Peas
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Corn
  • Grape Vine
  • Savory
  • Borage
  • Marigold
  • Radish
  • Mint
  • Rosemary
  • Onion
  • Squash

Bean Antagonists

  • Tomatoes
  • Peppers
  • Alliums

Beans add nitrogen to the soil making it beneficial for many plants but harmful to the ones that don’t need too much nitrogen.

Broad Beans top

Broad Bean Companions

  • Cabbage
  • Corn
  • Lettuce

Broad Bean Antagonists

  • Garlic
  • Onion
  • Chive
  • Shallot
  • Fennel
  • Sunflowers

Bush Beans top

Bush Bean Companions

  • Celery
  • Strawberry
  • Cucumber
  • Soybeans
  • Grains
  • Beets
  • Cabbage
  • Carrot
  • Cauliflower
  • Corn
  • Marigolds
  • Potato
  • Savory

Bush Bean Antagonists

  • Soybean
  • Alfalfa
  • Fennel
  • Garlic
  • Leeks
  • Onion
  • Shallot

Climbing Beans top

Climbing Bean Companions

  • Cabbage
  • Corn
  • Radish
  • Marigold
  • Potato

Climbing Bean Antagonists

  • Beet
  • Sunflower
  • Fennel
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Kohlrabi
  • Garlic
  • Onion
  • Shallot
  • Leeks

Beets top

Beet Companions

  • Lettuce
  • Garlic
  • Kohlrabi
  • Onion
  • Shallot
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Beans (bush)
  • Swiss Chard
  • Cabbage
  • Mint

Beet Antagonists

  • Climbing Beans
  • Tomato
  • Mustard

Beets add many essential minerals to the soil. They grow especially well with kohlrabi. They become more flavorful when grown near garlic.

Borage top

Borage Companions

  • Strawberry
  • Tomato
  • Squash
  • Beans (all)
  • Cucumber
  • Fruit Trees
  • Cabbage

Borage Antagonists

  • None

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Borage attracts bees for pollination. It also helps nearby plants become more resistant to disease. It benefits for nearly all plants. Strawberries are its best companion.

Broccoli top

Broccoli Companions

  • Beet
  • Lettuce
  • Turnip
  • Dill
  • Mustard
  • Onion
  • Tomato
  • Chamomile
  • Carrot
  • Marigold
  • Mint
  • Nasturtiums
  • Rosemary
  • Thyme
  • Sage

Broccoli Antagonists

  • Strawberry
  • Peppers
  • Climbing Beans

Broccoli repels wireworms.

Brussels Sprouts top

Brussels Sprout Companions

  • Sage
  • Thyme
  • Beans (all)
  • Beets
  • Carrot
  • Chamomile
  • Dill
  • Marigolds
  • Mint
  • Onion
  • Nasturtiums
  • Rosemary

Brussels Sprout Antagonists

  • Strawberries

Cabbages top

Cabbage Companions

  • Beans (all)
  • Chamomile
  • Tomato
  • Celery
  • Marigolds
  • Nasturtiums
  • Dill
  • Coriander
  • Onion
  • Beets
  • Mint
  • Rosemary
  • Sage
  • Thyme
  • Lettuce
  • Garlic
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Swiss Chard
  • Spinach

Cabbage Antagonists

  • Grape Vine
  • Rue
  • Strawberry

Cantaloupe top

Cantaloupe Companions

  • Chamomile
  • Savory
  • Corn

Cantaloupe Antagonists

  • None

Chamomile top

Chamomile Companions

  • Cauliflower
  • Broccoli
  • Onion
  • Cabbage
  • Cucumber
  • Most Herbs

Chamomile Antagonists

  • Mint

Growing chamomile near herbs will give them richer flavor and more nutrient content. Mint tends to crowd out chamomile.

Carrots top

Carrot Companions

  • Rosemary
  • Onion
  • Lettuce
  • Garlic
  • Shallot
  • Chive
  • Tomato
  • Beans (all)
  • Leek
  • Rosemary
  • Sage
  • Peas

Carrot Antagonists

  • Dill
  • Parsnip
  • Radish

Tomatoes grow much better near carrots but may make carrots smaller.

Cauliflower top

Cauliflower Companions

  • Spinach
  • Sunflower
  • Peas
  • Beans (all)
  • Broccoli
  • Celery
  • Marigold
  • Cabbage
  • Swiss Chard
  • Tomato
  • Brussels Sprouts

Cauliflower Antagonists

  • Rue
  • Strawberry

Growing spinach and cauliflower together benefits both pants tremendously.

Celery top

Celery Companions

  • Tomato
  • Bush Beans
  • Cauliflower
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Cabbage

Celery Antagonists

  • Corn
  • Potato
  • Parsnip

Cherry top

Cherry Companions

  • Alliums
  • Marigold
  • Spinach

Cherry Antagonists

  • Grass
  • Potato

Chervil top

Chervil Companions

  • Broccoli
  • Lettuce
  • Radish

Chervil Antagonists

  • None

Chervil improves the flavor of lettuce, broccoli, and radish. It also repels aphids.

Chives top

Chive Companions

  • Apple
  • Carrot
  • Rose
  • Grape Vine
  • Tomato
  • Broccoli
  • Cabbage
  • Mustard
  • Cauliflower
  • Strawberry

Chive Antagonists

  • Beans (all)
  • Peas

Chive repels aphids and other pests.

Coriander top

Coriander Companions

  • Cabbage
  • Spinach
  • Lettuce
  • Tomato
  • Anise
  • Beans (all)
  • Peas

Coriander Antagonists

  • Dill

Coriander and dill cross-pollinate too easily, ruining both plants.

Corn top

Corn Companions

  • Squash
  • Climbing Beans
  • Potato
  • Soybeans
  • Cucumber
  • Sunflower
  • Dill
  • Peas
  • Parsley
  • Potato
  • Mustard
  • Pumpkin
  • Melons

Corn Antagonists

  • Tomato
  • Celery

The “Three Sisters” technique was used by many Native Americans. They grew squash, corn, and climbing beans together to benefit all three “sisters.”

Cucumber top

Cucumber Companions

  • Kohlrabi
  • Radish
  • Sunflower
  • Beans (all)
  • Lettuce
  • Nasturtiums
  • Chamomile
  • Marigold
  • Peas
  • Beets
  • Carrot
  • Dill
  • Onion
  • Garlic
  • Celery
  • Spinach
  • Corn
  • Cabbage

Cucumber Antagonists

  • Potato
  • Sage and many other herbs

Cucumber repels ants and raccoons. Radishes repel cucumber beetles.

Dill top

Dill Companions

  • Broccoli
  • Cabbage
  • Fennel
  • Beans (all)
  • Corn
  • Radish
  • Sunflower
  • Lettuce
  • Onion
  • Eggplant
  • Cucumber

Dill Antagonists

  • Coriander
  • Carrot
  • Tomato

Dill is one of the few plants that grow well with fennel.

Fennel top

Fennel Companions

  • Dill
  • Eggplant
  • Basil

Fennel Antagonists

  • Tomato
  • Coriander
  • Beans (most)

Fennel attracts beneficial lady bugs and repels aphids. It inhibits the growth of most plants and can kill many so its best to be grown away from others.

Marigold top

Marigold Companions

  • Most Plants
  • Tomato
  • Pepper
  • Apricot
  • Beans (all)
  • Rose
  • Cucumber
  • Squash
  • Potato
  • Zucchini
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Cabbage
  • Onion
  • Garlic
  • Chive
  • Shallot

Marigold Antagonists

  • None

Marigolds repel many different pests and are a beneficial companion to almost every plant. Many gardeners suggest planting marigolds everywhere.

Fruit Trees top

Fruit Tree Companions

  • Onion
  • Borage
  • Nasturtiums
  • Garlic
  • Chive
  • Shallot
  • Tansy
  • Marigold
  • Lemon Balm
  • Mustard
  • Marjoram
  • Dandelions

Fruit Tree Antagonists

  • Grass

Grass is an aggressive competitor with most species of fruit trees.

Garlic top

Garlic Companions

  • Cucumber
  • Rose
  • Tomato
  • Broccoli
  • Beets
  • Peas
  • Cabbage
  • Lettuce
  • Tarragon
  • Celery
  • Potato
  • Fruit Trees

Garlic Antagonists

  • Peas
  • Grape Vine
  • Beans (all)

Garlic and other alliums are beneficial to many plants. They repel aphids, slugs, rabbits and other common pests.

Grape Vine top

Grape Vine Companions

  • Basil
  • Beans (all)
  • Peas
  • Chives
  • Mustard
  • Oregano
  • Peas
  • Geraniums
  • Blackberries

Grape Vine Antagonists

  • Cabbage
  • Garlic
  • Radish

Kale top

Kale Companions

  • Beets
  • Celery
  • Spinach
  • Marigold
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Nasturtiums
  • Aromatic Herbs

Kale Antagonists

  • Grape Vine
  • Beans (all)
  • Strawberry

Kohlrabi top

Kohlrabi Companions

  • Cucumber
  • Thyme
  • Sage
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Beets
  • Onion
  • Aromatic Herbs

Kohlrabi Antagonists

  • Climbing Bean
  • Pepper
  • Tomato
  • Fennel

Lettuce top

Lettuce Companions

  • Broccoli
  • Beans (Bush & Climbing)
  • Carrot
  • Beets
  • Onion
  • Radish
  • Kohlrabi
  • Dill
  • Cucumber
  • Strawberry
  • Thyme
  • Coriander
  • Nasturtiums
  • Parsnips

Lettuce Antagonists

  • Cabbage
  • Parsley
  • Celery

Cabbage stunts the growth of lettuce and decreases the flavor.

Marjoram top

Marjoram Companions

  • All Plants
  • Squash
  • Beans (all)
  • Eggplant

Marjoram Antagonists

  • None

Marjoram will improve the yield of many vegetable crops and increase the flavor of most herbs.

Mustard top

Mustard Companions

  • Mulberry
  • Grape Vine
  • Fruit Trees
  • Beans (all)
  • Broccoli
  • Cabbage
  • Radish
  • Cauliflower
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Turnip
  • Alfalfa

Mustard Antagonists

  • None

Mustard is especially beneficial to most species of fruit tree. It stimulates their growth.

Mulberry top

Mulberry Companions

  • Alliums
  • Marigold
  • Grass

Mulberry Antagonists

  • None

Mulberry is one of the few plants that can be grown with grass.

Nasturtium top

Nasturtium Companions

  • Apple
  • Beans (all)
  • Cabbage
  • Squash
  • Tomato
  • Fruit Trees
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Radish
  • Cucumber
  • Pumpkin
  • Potato

Nasturtium Antagonists

  • Cauliflower

Nasturtium repels many common garden pests.

Onions top

Onion Companions

  • Carrot
  • Strawberry
  • Chamomile
  • Beets
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Lettuce
  • Parsnip
  • Pepper
  • Cucumber
  • Dill
  • Marigold
  • Tomato
  • Savory
  • Broccoli

Onion Antagonists

  • Peas
  • Lentils
  • Asparagus

Onions help berries resist disease and keep carrot flies away in addition to other pests.

Oregano top

Oregano Companions

  • All Plants
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Cucumber

Oregano Antagonists

  • None

Oregano is beneficial to most plants as it repels pests and increases humidity if allowed to spread through crops.

Parsley top

Parsley Companions

  • Asparagus
  • Rose
  • Tomato
  • Corn
  • Apple

Parsley Antagonists

  • Onion
  • Garlic
  • Chive
  • Shallot
  • Lettuce
  • Mint

When grown near roses, parsley makes the roses more fragrant.

Parsnips top

Parsnip Companions

  • Bush Beans
  • Pepper
  • Potato
  • Radish
  • Fruit Trees

Parsnip Antagonists

  • Carrot
  • Celery

Blend 3 parsnips with 1 liter of water. Let sit overnight and then strain into a spray bottle. This makes a natural pesticide that is toxic to most pests.

Peas top

Pea Companions

  • Corn
  • Carrot
  • Eggplant
  • Turnip
  • Cauliflower
  • Garlic
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Mint
  • Cucumber
  • Beans (all)

Pea Antagonists

  • Chive
  • Potato
  • Onion

Peas add nitrogen to the soil. Plant them with plants that require a lot of nitrogen.

Peppers top

Pepper Companions

  • Basil
  • Tomato
  • Sunflower
  • Carrot
  • Eggplant
  • Onion
  • Parsley
  • Okra
  • Marjoram
  • Mustard
  • Geraniums
  • Petunias

Pepper Antagonists

  • Beans (all)
  • Kale
  • Apricot
  • Fennel
  • Kohlrabi
  • Brussels Sprouts

A fungus that is common to peppers can ruin apricot trees so keep these away from each other.

Pennyroyal top

Pennyroyal Companions

  • Cabbage
  • Kale
  • Cauliflower

Pennyroyal Antagonists

  • None

Pennyroyal is highly toxic to cats. If you have cats, it’s best to leave this out of your garden.

Potato top

Potato Companions

  • Beans (all)
  • Horseradish
  • Thyme
  • Basil
  • Cabbage
  • Corn
  • Eggplant
  • Marigold
  • Peas
  • Broccoli
  • Corn
  • Onion
  • Garlic
  • Clover

Potato Antagonists

  • Carrot
  • Pumpkin
  • Tomato
  • Cucumber
  • Sunflower
  • Squash
  • Apple
  • Cherry
  • Raspberry
  • Walnut

Potatoes should be kept away from many plants as they compete for the same resources and can easily spread disease.

Pumpkin top

Pumpkin Companions

  • Corn
  • Squash
  • Nasturtium
  • Beans (all)
  • Oregano
  • Radish

Pumpkin Antagonists

  • Potato

Nasturtium (as well as marigold and oregano) repel squash bugs and other pests that commonly infest pumpkin crops.

Radish top

Radish Companions

  • Chervil
  • Lettuce
  • Nasturtium
  • Squash
  • Eggplant
  • Cucumber
  • Peas
  • Beans (all)
  • Melons

Radish Antagonists

  • Grape Vine
  • Brussels Sprout
  • Turnip

Radishes can help many plants either by repelling pests or attracting those pests to themselves rather than the other crops.

Rosemary top

Rosemary Companions

  • Cabbage
  • Beans (all)
  • Sage
  • Carrot
  • Sage
  • Broccoli

Rosemary Antagonists

  • Tomato

Rosemary is sensitive to cold weather. Do not plant outdoors if you live in plant hardiness zone 6 or colder.

Roses top

Rose Companions

  • Garlic
  • Rose
  • Parsley
  • Chive
  • Marigold

Rose Antagonists

  • None

Rue top

Rue Companions

  • Fruit Trees
  • Lavender
  • Carrot

Rue Antagonists

  • Basil
  • Broccoli
  • Cabbage

Rue deters quite a lot of pests but it should generally be kept separate from most other plants

Sage top

Sage Companions

  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Carrot
  • Rosemary
  • Cabbage
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Tomato
  • Strawberry
  • Marjoram
  • Beans (all)

Sage Antagonists

  • Cucumber
  • Onion
  • Rue

Sage repels pests and attracts beneficial insects.

Savory top

Savory Companions

  • Beans (all)
  • Onion
  • Melon

Savory Antagonists

  • None

Savory attracts bees for pollination and repels some pests.

Silverbeet top

Silverbeet Companions

  • Beets
  • Cherry
  • Lavender

Silverbeet Antagonists

  • Basil

Soybeans top

Soybean Companions

  • Corn
  • Sunflower
  • Asparagus
  • Potato

Soybean Antagonists

  • Beans (all)
  • Onions
  • Garlic

Soybeans add nitrogen to the soil. This is beneficial for plants that need a lot of nitrogen but overkill for those plants that don’t need as much.

Spinach top

Spinach Companions

  • Strawberry
  • Peas
  • Beans (all)
  • Celery
  • Cauliflower
  • Eggplant
  • Peas
  • Beans
  • Broccoli

Spinach Antagonists

  • None

Peas and beans provide natural shade for spinach which it needs.

Squash top

Squash Companions

  • Borage
  • Corn
  • Beans (all)
  • Okra
  • Radish
  • Marigold
  • Nasturtium
  • Tansy

Squash Antagonists

  • Potato

Squash are highly susceptible to many pests. Marigolds and nasturtiums help repel some of these.

Strawberry top

Strawberry Companions

  • Borage
  • Spinach
  • Thyme
  • Bush Beans
  • Onion
  • Lettuce
  • Sage

Strawberry Antagonists

  • Cabbage
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Tomato
  • Potato
  • Eggplant
  • Pepper
  • Melons
  • Okra
  • Mint
  • Rose

Thyme increases the yield of your strawberry crop and helps them grow more quickly.

Stinging Nettle top

Stinging Nettle Companions

  • Chamomile
  • Tomato
  • Marjoram
  • Mint
  • Broccoli
  • Sage

Stinging Nettle Antagonists

  • None

Stinging nettle repels aphids.

Sunflower top

Sunflower Companions

  • Pepper
  • Corn
  • Soybeans
  • Cucumber
  • Tomato
  • Swan Plant

Sunflower Antagonists

  • Climbing Beans
  • Garlic
  • Potato

Sunflowers repel aphids and attract other pests away from nearby crops.

Swiss Chard top

Swiss Chard Companions

  • Bush Beans
  • Kohlrabi
  • Onion
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Radish
  • Turnip

Swiss Chard Antagonists

  • Climbing Beans

Tarragon top

Tarragon Companions

  • All Plants
  • Eggplant
  • Tomato
  • Pepper

Tarragon Antagonists

  • None

It is recommended to plant tarragon throughout your garden as the scent repels most pests and seems to enhance the flavor and growth of any crop grown near it.

Thyme top

Thyme Companions

  • All Plants
  • Cabbage
  • Potato
  • Brussels Sprout
  • Eggplant
  • Strawberry
  • Tomato

Thyme Antagonists

  • None

Thyme attracts the beneficial syrphidae which preys on aphids.

Tomato top

Tomato Companions

  • Aspargus
  • Basil
  • Garlic
  • Beans (all)
  • Oregano
  • Rose
  • Brocolli
  • Cabbage
  • Celery
  • Pepper
  • Marigold
  • Borage
  • Parsley
  • Coriander
  • Chive
  • Carrot
  • Eggplant
  • Sage
  • Thyme
  • Mint
  • Mustard
  • Rosemary
  • Stinging Nettle

Tomato Antagonists

  • Corn
  • Dill
  • Potato
  • Fennel
  • Kohlrabi
  • Walnut

Growing basil near tomatoes will increase your tomato yield. Dill attracts pests that feed on tomatoes.

Turnips top

Turnip Companions

  • Broccoli
  • Peas
  • Cabbage

Turnip Antagonists

  • Potato
  • Radish
  • Carrot
  • Mustard

Turnips should not be planted near other root vegetables as they will compete for the same resources.

Yarrow top

Yarrow Companions

  • Most Plants (especially aromatic)
  • Apricot
  • Chervil
  • Grape Vine

Yarrow Antagonists

  • None

Yarrow attracts many beneficial insects and acts as a natural fertilizer.

Zucchini top

Zucchini Companions

  • Corn
  • Marjoram
  • Parsnip

Zucchini Antagonists

  • Potato

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In Washington, PA, Joaquin Clark and Rigoberto Medina Learned About Companion Planting Chives

These peoples domesticated squash 8,000 to 10,000 years back, then maize, then common beans, forming the 3 Siblings farming method. The cornstalk acted as a trellis for the beans to climb, and the beans repaired nitrogen, benefitting the maize. Buddy planting was extensively promoted in the 1970s as part of the organic gardening motion. It was encouraged for practical reasons, such as natural trellising, however generally with the concept that various species of plant might grow more when close together. It is also a method frequently utilized in permaculture, together with mulching, polyculture, and changing of crops. Companion planting can operate through a variety of mechanisms, which might in some cases be combined.

For example, nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus) is a food plant of some caterpillars which feed mainly on members of the cabbage family (brassicas); some garden enthusiasts claim that planting them around brassicas protects the food crops from damage, as eggs of the bugs are preferentially laid on the nasturtium. Nevertheless, while lots of trap crops have successfully diverted bugs off of focal crops in small scale greenhouse, garden and field experiments, just a little part of these plants have been shown to reduce bug damage at larger commercial scales. Current research studies on host-plant finding have actually revealed that flying insects are far less successful if their host-plants are surrounded by any other plant or even “decoy-plants” made of green plastic, cardboard, or any other green product. The host-plant finding procedure takes place in phases: The first stage is stimulation by odours particular to the host-plant.

However bugs avoid landing on brown (bare) soil. So if just the host-plant exists, the bugs will quasi-systematically find it by simply arriving at the only green thing around. This is called (from the viewpoint of the pest) “proper landing”. When it does an “inappropriate landing”, it flies off to any other close-by patch of green.

The number of leaf-to-leaf flights varies according to the insect types and to the host-plant stimulus received from each leaf. The bug should accumulate sufficient stimuli from the host-plant to lay eggs; so it must make a specific number of consecutive ‘proper’ landings. Hence if it makes an ‘inappropriate landing’, the assessment of that plant is unfavorable, and the insect must begin the process anew. Hence it was shown that clover utilized as a ground cover had the very same disruptive effect on 8 bug types from 4 different pest orders.

Easy decoys made of green cardboard also interrupted proper landings just as well as did the live ground cover. Some companion plants help prevent bug bugs or pathogenic fungis from harming the crop, through chemical means. For example, the odor of the foliage of marigolds is claimed to hinder aphids from feeding upon neighbouring plants. Buddy plants that produce copious nectar or pollen in a veggie garden (insectary plants) may assist encourage greater populations of advantageous insects that control insects, as some beneficial predatory insects just consume bugs in their larval kind and are nectar or pollen feeders in their adult type.

The red trees in the background supply shade; those in the foreground have been pruned to allow complete direct exposure to the sun. Some crops are grown under the protective shelter of various type of plant, whether as wind breaks or for shade. For example, shade-grown coffee, particularly Coffea arabica, has generally been grown in light shade produced by scattered trees with a thin canopy, permitting light through to the coffee bushes but protecting them from overheating. Suitable Asian trees consist of Erythrina subumbrans (tton tong or dadap), Gliricidia sepium (khae falang), Cassia siamea (khi lek), Melia azedarach (khao dao sang), and Paulownia tomentosa, a beneficial lumber tree. Systems in usage or being trialled consist of: Square foot gardening attempts to protect plants from many regular gardening problems, such as weed problem, by packing them as closely together as possible, which is helped with by utilizing companion plants, which can be closer together than normal. Forest gardening, where buddy plants are intermingled to create a real ecosystem, replicates the interaction of as much as 7 levels of plants in a forest or woodland. Organic gardening makes regular use of companion planting, given that many other methods of fertilizing, weed reduction and bug control are forbidden. ^ Mc Clure, Susan (1994 ).

Archived from the initial on October 16, 2013. Obtained September 2, 2013. ^ Mt. Pleasant, J. (2006 ). “The science behind the 3 Sis mound system: An agronomic evaluation of an indigenous farming system in the northeast”. In Staller, J. E.; et al. (eds.). Histories of maize: Multidisciplinary approaches to the prehistory, linguistics, biogeography, domestication, and development of maize.

In 43147, Carolyn Mcneil and Lizbeth Odonnell Learned About Companion Planting For Zucchini

Flowers, Sweets and a Nice Place to Stay: Courting Beneficials to Your Nursery”. Oregon State University. Retrieved 11 February 2013. ^ Rice, Robert (2010 ). “The Ecological Advantages of Shade-Grown Coffee: The Case for Going Bird Friendly”. Smithsonian. ^ Winston, Edward; Jacques Op de Laak Tony Marsh, Herbert Lempke and Keith Chapman.

West Coast Seeds uses its standards to companion planting to you as suggestions remembering, each garden is unique and all of the factors must enter into factor to consider while planning your garden, consisting of but not limited too sun exposure, weather, ecology, pollinators, insect population, the soil, water system and historic plant and harvest efficiency and planning as well.

Lessening Risk: Boosts odds of higher yields even if one crop stops working or you are effected by natural challenges such as weather condition, insects or disease, the general yield of your plot may be increased by limiting the spread and preventing a monoculture rather focus on polyculture or simulating the very best natural development patterns and diversity.

Trap Cropping: Companion planting is likewise the supreme natural bug management, you may keep away undesirable pests that might be attracted to one crop however pushed back by the other and this will help in protecting the otherwise appealing victim, this is referred to as trap cropping. Positive hosting: By planting in distance to plants which produce a surplus of nectar and pollen, you can increase the population of beneficial pests that will manage your hazardous bug population.

In 15206, Eduardo Butler and Jazmyn Harmon Learned About Fruit Tree Companion Planting

Plant a row far from the garden to draw cabbage moths far from Brassica crops. Do not plant near radishes. Alyssum– Very attractive to pollinators, and useful as a mulch to keep weeds down between rows. Alyssum offers shelter for ground beetles and spiders. See also Companion Planting with Umbelifers.

Brings in predatory ground beetles. Ammi – This lovely flower brings in lacewings, ladybird beetles, and parasitic wasps. Plant Ammi as a basic bug control plant in your garden. See also Buddy Planting with Umbelifers. Asparagus– Plant with asters, basil, cilantro, dill, cilantro, marigolds, nasturtiums, oregano, parsley, peppers, sage, and thyme.

Basil– Will enhance vigour and flavour of tomatoes, planted side-by-side. Also excellent with asparagus, oregano, and peppers. Basil assists ward off aphids, asparagus beetles, termites, flies, mosquitoes, and tomato horn worm. Broad beans– Exceptional for fixing nitrogen in the soil. Prevent planting near onions. Bush & Pole beans– All beans repair nitrogen in the soil.

Avoid planting near chives, garlic, leeks, and onions. Pole beans and beets stunt each other’s growth. Soya beans– Great for fixing nitrogen, and functioning as a mulch versus weeds. Grow with corn. Soya beans ward off Japanese beetles and chinch bugs. Beets– Beet greens and scraps are excellent for the compost, returning recorded manganese and iron to the soil by means of the composting procedure.

Add cut mint leaves as a mulch for beets. Avoid planting beets near pole beans. Borage– Excellent all around companion plant. Borage prevents tomato hornworm and cabbage moth caterpillars, and is particularly good planted near tomatoes and strawberries. Borage is very appealing to pollinators, so plant it around squash, melons, and cucumbers for enhanced pollination.

Borage is deer-proof. Brassicas (broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, collards, kale, kohlrabi, turnip)– All benefit from chamomile, dill, mint, rosemary, and sage. Prevent planting near eggplants, peppers, potatoes, or tomatoes. These 4 plants are in the Solanum household, and they all prefer relatively acidic soil at p H 5.5-6.5, while Brassicas want more neutral soil at p H 6.5-7.0.

Buckwheat absorbs nutrients that are not offered to other plants, and can then be composted or tilled under, launching those nutrients in available kinds. Buckwheat flowers are attractive to pollinators along with beneficial predatory bugs: hover flies, pirate bugs, tachinid flies, and ladybird beetles. It supplies shelter for ground beetles.

Plant Calendula with tomatoes and asparagus. Calendula
Companion Planting Resources

Companion Planting Articles

  • ‘The aniseed herbs, chervil, tarragon and fennel seem especially appropriate for summer.’
  • ‘We live in an apartment, and although we do grow some things – mint, sage, thyme, tarragon, rosemary – rhubarb is not one of them.’
  • ‘Line the base of the steamer with lettuce leaves and scatter with the basil, tarragon and rosemary.’
  • ‘Flat-leaf parsley, chervil or tarragon all work nicely in there, too.’
  • ‘Harvest culinary and medicinal herbs like lemon balm, mint, French tarragon, summer savory and basil before they go to seed.’
  • ‘The salad garden grows colorful lettuce, basil, tarragon and trellised peas.’
  • ‘I usually have a pot of parsley on the kitchen windowsill, as well as some tarragon and thyme.’
  • ‘A whisper of herbs – rosemary and tarragon – perfume this wine, along with the flavor of melons.’
  • ‘But if you harvest hardy woody perennials such as thyme, savory, and tarragon heavily now, you can weaken the plants.’
  • ‘Choose five of the following fresh herbs: flat-leaf parsley, chives, mint, chervil, basil, dill, tarragon.’
  • ‘Or why not make a large frittata with eggs and ricotta, and spice it up with bacon and a herb such as basil, tarragon or chervil?’
  • ‘The choice of herb tends to be decided by availability but in an ideal world, it would be a mix of flat-leaf parsley, chives and tarragon.’
  • ‘Dill, lemon balm, chives, tarragon are just a few examples.’
  • ‘Chanterelles are also fantastic in risottos and pasta dishes, and marry well with flat-leaf parsley or tarragon.’
  • ‘Also I couldn’t find tarragon and chervil, so I just used mesclun salad greens with a bit of edible flowers.’
  • ‘Garden-fresh smells abound, with tarragon, coriander and, you guessed it, Colorado tree moss.’
  • ‘I like mine with tarragon, curry powder and a light dash of hot sauce.’
  • ‘French tarragon and chives in particular benefit from a cool period.’
  • ‘I picked up Thai basil this week which I cannot grow and a couple of French tarragon plants to replace the ones that the slugs had for lunch one day last week.’
  • ‘In a food processor, combine the panko bread crumbs and tarragon leaves and pulse until combined.’

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