Kalanchoe tomentosa panda plant

Cactus and Succulents forum: Why are my panda plant’s leaves curling?


I rescued this plant back in August, and I noticed recently that its younger leaves have begun to curl under. I don’t believe the plant is necessarily sick, but I am under the impression I am not fulfilling its needs. It’s about three meters from a tall window (I moved it to take the picture), though I believe it only receives direct sun for maybe one to two hours in the morning, at most. I also water it very sparingly, in relatively small quantities. On average it probably gets watered one to three times a month. Is it possible that I’m underwatering it? Would that cause the leaves to do this?
I also am curious about the shape of my plant. My kalanchoe has always been kind of stalky like this since I got it, and I was wondering if it is healthy for the plant to be like this. Most kalanchoe I’ve seen are a lot fuller, and shorter. Is it recommended that I do something about this as well? I don’t mind it’s appearance being tall and stalky, so long as the plant is ok.
Any opinions/suggestions are much appreciated. I don’t have the best luck with succulents, so I’d like to do my best to look out for this little guy.
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Kalanchoe Tomentosa

This native to Madagascar species from the kalanchoe genus makes a nice addition to any succulent plant collection, grown indoors.

The panda plant being a succulent type species grows thick leaves for water storage purposes, which means watering less often for the grower. These leaves are covered in tiny hairs that give the plant a velvety look and feel.

How it looks: The kalanchoe tomentosa grows up to approximately 1.5 ft with a thick stem that produces branches and many groups of leaves, once it matures. When they’re pruned well they have a kind of tree or bush look about them and can produce branches growing below pot level (now suitable for growing in a hanging basket).

The furry leaves I mentioned are grayish green in color that have brown spotted tips. These leaves are mainly oval shaped, although your likely to see a few leaves randomly grow in whatever shape and form they want to.

Flowering: Although this plant can flower within it’s natural habitat – it’s rare to see flowers bloom indoors, so it’s grown for primarily it’s foliage within homes or offices. I have never seen one of these flower, but if your lucky enough then you will see lovely small tubular shaped flowers bloom at the tips of the branches.

Displaying: Once the panda plant matures they look fantastic placed within a hanging basket or sitting with a conservatory. A conservatory is ideal because they do like their bright light and some sun. Whilst they’re still small and growing, then near windows and on shelves which receive enough sunlight are good spots for displaying them.

Leaf Curl On Rubber Plants: What Causes Rubber Plant Leaves To Curl

Rubber plant (Ficus elastica) is a distinctive plant easily recognized by its upright growth habit and thick, glossy, deep green leaves. Rubber plant thrives outdoors in USDA plant hardiness zones 10 and 11, but it is grown as an indoor plant in most climates. Although the plant is relatively trouble-free, it can fall prey to various pests and diseases that can cause leaf curl on rubber plants. What causes rubber plant leaves to curl? There are several possible reasons.
Why Do Rubber Tree Leaves Curl?
Below are some of the most common reasons for leaf curl on rubber plants:
Chemical exposure – Rubber plants are susceptible to gas fumes, pesticides and other chemicals, even when toxicity levels are indiscernible by humans. Similarly, contaminants in garden soil or potting soil may cause leaf curl on rubber plants. Repotting in fresh soil may be necessary. Improper watering – Both over- and under-watering can cause leaf curl on rubber plants. Allow the soil to dry slightly between watering, then water deeply, using room temperature water, until water leaks through the drainage hole. If the soil feels moist, wait another day or two before watering. Even less water is needed during fall and winter, but don’t allow the soil to become bone dry. Low humidity – Indoor rubber tree plant leaves curling may be a result of dry indoor air. A humidity tray can raise the moisture level around the plant. To make a humidity tray, place a layer of gravel or pebbles in a shallow tray or dish, then set the pot on the pebbles. Add water to the tray to keep the pebbles consistently wet, but don’t allow the bottom of the pot to touch the water, as moisture can leach up the drainage hole and rot the plant.
Pests – Small insects, such as aphids, spider mites and scale, may be what causes rubber tree leaves to curl. Inspect the plant carefully, especially the undersides of leaves and the points where leaves meet the stems. Most pests are easily controlled by spraying with insecticidal soap spray. Commercial products are best because they are carefully formulated for use on plants. If you make your own spray, a mild solution is best. Be sure soap is free of color, fragrance and other additives that may harm the plant. Don’t spray the plants during hot weather or when the sun is directly on the leaves. Environmental changes – A temperature change or a sudden move to another room may be responsible for a rubber plant with curling leaves. Watch out for excessive heat and cold, and protect the plant from drafts and cold windows. Rubber plants prefer bright, indirect light. Hot afternoon light may be too intense.
Cleaning products – Avoid commercial leaf shine products, which can clog the pores and cause leaf curl on rubber plants. A moist cloth safely removes dust and keeps leaves shiny.

Scientific Name

Kalanchoe tomentosa Baker

Common Names

Panda Plant, Panda Bear Plant, Pussy Ears, Plush Plant

Scientific Classification

Family: Crassulaceae
Subfamily: Sedoideae
Tribe: Kalanchoeae
Genus: Kalanchoe

Description

Kalanchoe tomentosa is a beautiful succulent shrub, up to 3.3 feet (1 m) tall, with erect, basally woody stems and fleshy furry leaves. The leaves are green with brown spots on margins and at tips, up to 3.2 inches (8 cm) long and 1 inch (2.5 cm) wide. Flowers are small, green, yellow-brown to purple, and appear in summer atop long stalks.

Hardiness

USDA hardiness zones 9a to 11b: from 30 °F (−1.1 °C) to 50 °F (+10 °C).

Photo via pinterest.com

How to Grow and Care

Locate the indoor Panda Plant in medium to bright light. As with most succulents, the soil should be allowed to dry between waterings. In fact, watering is a limited part of Panda Plant care. When you do water, do so completely while giving the plant the infrequent drink.

You will find humidity is not an issue when learning how to grow a Panda Plant successfully. The average room provides enough humidity for this easy-care, furry plant. The indoor Panda Plant can live for many years in these conditions.

Move it outside during spring and summer, if desired, but provide protection from the hot afternoon sun. Fertilize during these months with a balanced houseplant food mixed at half strength as a part of Panda Plant care.

When you are growing Panda Plants, you will likely find more areas in the home that would benefit from one of these plants.

Propagation of the Panda Plant is easy and an inexpensive way to get more of the plants. Root leaves of the plant in spring or summer in sandy potting soil or a perlite mixture.

Learn more at How to Grow and Care for a Panda Plant (Kalanchoe tomentosa).

Origin

Kalanchoe tomentosa is native to Madagascar.

Cultivars

  • Kalanchoe tomentosa ‘Chocolate Soldier’

Links

  • Back to genus Kalanchoe
  • Succulentopedia: Browse succulents by Scientific Name, Common Name, Genus, Family, USDA Hardiness Zone, Origin, or cacti by Genus

Photo Gallery

Photo via sproutabl.comPhoto via plantsarethestrangestpeople.blogspot.comPhoto via plantsrescue.com

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Kalanchoe eriophylla Hils. & Bojer ex Tul.

Snow White Panda Plant, Blue Kalanchoe

Synonyms

Cotyledon pannosa

Family: Crassulaceae
Subfamily: Sedoideae
Tribe: Kalanchoeae
Genus: Kalanchoe

Kalanchoe eriophylla is a dwarf, perennial succulent, up to 4 inches (10 cm) tall, branching at the base to form a dense mat. All parts of the plant are covered with long hairs. These hairs give the otherwise green leaves a silvery-white shimmer. The leaves turn deep crimson when grown in the winter sun. Very pretty, pale pink, 4-petaled flowers with yellow centers appear in early spring.

Photo via soduorou.com

USDA hardiness zones 10a to 11b: from 30 °F (−1.1 °C) to 50 °F (+10 °C).

Kalanchoe care is minimal but be cautious about light levels. Strong southern light can burn the tips of the leaves. Place pots in partial sun to light shade areas when growing Kalachoes.

The flowering varieties are highly rewarding for their colorful and long-lasting flowers. They prefer bright, sunny locations, especially in the summer growing season. During the winter, consider a south-facing window. Water moderately throughout the summer and reduce watering in the winter. Let the soil surface dry out between waterings, and in the winter, the plant can almost dry out. Watch the fleshy leaves for signs of water distress. They prefer warmth. Don’t let fall below 55 ºF (13 ºC). An ordinary potting soil mix is fine. Feed bi-weekly in the summer with a liquid fertilizer, or use slow-release pellets.

These small plants require repotting every few years. When repotting, take additional care in handling as the leaves are somewhat brittle and can snap easily. Clay pots work exceptionally well for planting Kalanchoes. Ensure pots can drain well, and saucers can empty easily.

Learn more at How to Grow and Care for Kalanchoe.

Kalanchoe eriophylla is native to central Madagascar.

  • Back to genus Kalanchoe
  • Succulentopedia: Browse succulents by Scientific Name, Common Name, Genus, Family, USDA Hardiness Zone, Origin, or cacti by Genus

Photo via cact.czPhoto via llifle.comPhoto via cact.cz

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Panda Plant Care – How To Grow a Panda Plant Indoors

The indoor panda plant is a hardy succulent that makes an interesting addition to the houseplants you grow indoors. Often a favorite of children, growing Kalanchoe panda plants are a good specimen to locate in a child’s room as part of the décor. Keep reading to answer the question of what is Kalanchoe tormentosa and how to grow a panda plant indoors.

What is a Panda Plant (Kalanchoe Tomentosa)?

More than 100 varieties of Kalanchoe grow in the wilds of Africa and other parts of the Old World. Kalanchoe tomentosa grows wild on the island of Madagascar. In its native environment, growing Kalanchoe panda plants have a woody base and reach several feet. As an indoor plant, however, panda plant growth is limited by the size of the container, usually reaching only 1 to 2 feet in height and 2 feet around.

Further information on growing Kalanchoe panda plants says the velvety appearance of the leaves is created by hairs that spring up in trichomes, deflecting light and limiting transpiration. Brownish red markings on leaf edges, along with the white-silvery hairs, are similar to the fur of a panda bear. Tomentosa means densely woolly or velvety. The plant is also commonly called pussy ears as well.

How to Grow a Panda Plant

Locate the indoor panda plant in medium to bright light. As with most succulents, soil should be allowed to dry between waterings. In fact, watering is a limited part of panda plant care. When you do water, do so completely while giving the plant the infrequent drink.

You’ll find humidity is not an issue when learning how to grow a panda plant successfully. The average room provides enough humidity for this easy-care, furry plant. The indoor panda plant can live for many years in these conditions.

Move it outside during spring and summer, if desired, but provide protection from hot afternoon sun. Fertilize during these months with a balanced houseplant food mixed at half strength as a part of panda plant care.

Propagating Indoor Panda Plant

When you’re growing Kalanchoe panda plants, you’ll likely find more areas in the home that would benefit from one of these plants. Propagation of the indoor panda plant is easy and an inexpensive way to get more of the plants.

Root leaves of the plant in spring or summer in a sandy potting soil or a perlite mixture. New roots develop and the plant will grow new leaves, at which time it should be transferred into a new container.

Blooms are rare when growing Kalanchoe panda plants indoors. If you wish to grow a Kalanchoe with regular indoor blossoms, look to the cultivar Kalanchoe blossfeldiana hybrids.

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