Japanese white lilac tree

Japanese Lilac Information: What Is A Japanese Lilac Tree

Japanese tree lilac (Syringa reticulata) is at its best for two weeks in early summer when the flowers bloom. The clusters of white, fragrant flowers are about a foot long and 10 inches wide. The plant is available as a multi-stemmed shrub or a tree with a single trunk. Both forms have a lovely shape that looks great in shrub borders or as specimens.

Growing Japanese lilac trees near a window allows you to enjoy the flowers and fragrance indoors, but make sure you leave plenty of room for the tree’s 20-foot spread. After the flowers fade, the tree produces seed capsules that attract songbirds to the garden.

What is a Japanese Lilac Tree?

Japanese lilacs are trees or very large shrubs that grow to a height of up to 30 feet with a spread of 15 to 20 feet. The genus name

Syringa means pipe, and refers to the plant’s hollow stems. The species name reticulata refers to the network of veins in the leaves. The plant has a naturally attractive shape and interesting, reddish bark with white markings that give it year-round interest.

The trees bloom in clusters that are about 10 inches wide and a foot long. You might be reluctant to plant a flowering tree or shrub that takes up so much space in the garden but blooms for only two weeks, but the timing of the blossoms is an important consideration. It blooms at a time when most spring-bloomers are through for the year and summer-bloomers are still budding, thus filling in a gap when few other trees and shrubs are in flower.

The care of Japanese lilac tree is easy because it maintains its lovely shape without extensive pruning. Grown as a tree, it only needs an occasional snip to remove damaged twigs and stems. As a shrub, it may need renewal pruning every few years.

Additional Japanese Lilac Information

Japanese tree lilac is available as container-grown or balled and burlapped plants at local garden centers and nurseries. If you order one by mail, you will probably get a bare root plant. Soak bare root trees in water for a few hours and then plant them as soon as possible.

These trees are very easy to transplant and rarely suffer transplant shock. They tolerate urban pollution and thrive in any well-drained soil. Given a location in full sun, Japanese tree lilacs seldom suffer from insect and disease problems. Japanese tree lilacs are rated for USDA plant hardiness zones 3 through 7.

Japanese Tree Lilac in bloom

Japanese Tree Lilac in bloom

(Photo courtesy of NetPS Plant Finder)

Japanese Tree Lilac flowers

Japanese Tree Lilac flowers

(Photo courtesy of NetPS Plant Finder)

Height: 25 feet

Spread: 20 feet

Sunlight:

Hardiness Zone: 3a

Description:

One of the finest small specimen trees available, with frothy upright panicles of creamy white flowers in early summer; interesting steel-gray bark and a neat, upright habit, a perfect choice for smaller home landscapes; full sun and well-drained soil

Ornamental Features

Japanese Tree Lilac features showy plumes of fragrant creamy white flowers rising above the foliage from late spring to early summer. It has dark green foliage throughout the season. The pointy leaves do not develop any appreciable fall color. The fruit is not ornamentally significant. The smooth dark red bark adds an interesting dimension to the landscape.

Landscape Attributes

Japanese Tree Lilac is a multi-stemmed deciduous tree with an upright spreading habit of growth. Its average texture blends into the landscape, but can be balanced by one or two finer or coarser trees or shrubs for an effective composition.

This tree will require occasional maintenance and upkeep, and should only be pruned after flowering to avoid removing any of the current season’s flowers. It is a good choice for attracting butterflies to your yard, but is not particularly attractive to deer who tend to leave it alone in favor of tastier treats. It has no significant negative characteristics.

Japanese Tree Lilac is recommended for the following landscape applications;

  • Accent
  • Shade

Planting & Growing

Japanese Tree Lilac will grow to be about 25 feet tall at maturity, with a spread of 20 feet. It has a low canopy with a typical clearance of 5 feet from the ground, and is suitable for planting under power lines. It grows at a medium rate, and under ideal conditions can be expected to live for 40 years or more.

This tree should only be grown in full sunlight. It prefers to grow in average to moist conditions, and shouldn’t be allowed to dry out. It is not particular as to soil type or pH. It is highly tolerant of urban pollution and will even thrive in inner city environments. This species is not originally from North America.

Gertens Sizes and Prices

Japanese tree lilac, Syringa reticulata ‘Ivory Silk’

Scientific Name

Syringa is from the Greek syrinx, which means “pipe” and refers to the hollow stems; reticulata means “netted” or “net-veined” and refers to the leaf venation.

Common Name

Japanese tree lilac is named for Japan and the tree-like form.

COUNTRY OF ORIGIN AND NATIVE HABITAT

Japanese tree lilac is native to northern Japan. Plants are found growing on cliffs and in scrub, usually on limestone. The Olive or Oleaceae family also contains privet and forsythia. Syringa has about 30 species of trees and shrubs native to Europe and Asia. Japanese tree lilac is the only species that attains a tree-like form and size.

CONSERVATION INFORMATION

Not native to Kentucky

DESCRIPTION

Growth Habit and Form

The habit is graceful, with spreading branches that form an oval to rounded crown. Plants can be grown as large shrubs or small trees. Japanese tree lilac grows 20 to 30 feet tall with a spread of 15 to 25 feet.

Leaves

Leaves are simple, opposite, entire, ovate, and 3 to 6 inches long, half as wide, with long, tapered tip. The medium to dark green leaves are slightly fuzzy beneath. The deciduous leaves turn pale greenish-brown in autumn before dropping.

Flowers

Flowers are creamy-white and borne in long panicles up to 12 inches long at the ends of the branches. The somewhat fragrant flower clusters bloom in early summer and remain attractive for 1 to 2 weeks. Pollination is by insects, including hawk moths.

Fruits

The fruit is a brown, warty, dry capsule that is ¾ inch-long. Capsules contain 2 winged seeds. The capsules appear in large clusters that remain on the plant through winter. The fruit is a cluster of capsules containing seeds that are scattered by wind.

Bark

Bark and stems are glossy reddish-brown, with numerous lenticels. Bark resembles cherry bark; older trees develop scaly, grayish plates.

Wild and Cultivated Varieties

‘Ivory Silk’ was selected in 1973 by Sheridan Nursery in Ontario, Canada. It is a little smaller than the species with a height of up to 20 feet. Trees bloom at a young age and are compact with a dense, rounded form. It is a prolific bloomer that makes an excellent street tree or specimen.

HORTICULTURE

Landscape Use

Japanese tree lilac adapts well to difficult or urban sites. Trees are excellent for use as specimens, in group planting as a screen, and as street trees.

Hardiness Zone

Hardy in USDA Zones 3 to 7.

Growth Rate

Moderate growth rate.

Cultivation and Propagation Information

Growth is best on moist, well-drained, fertile soils and full sun. Japanese tree lilac is adaptable to a variety of soils in full sun sites. Trees are easily transplanted and adaptable to poor, compacted or dry soils. Japanese tree lilac tolerates some drought and prefers cool summers. Propagation is by seed or softwood cuttings.

Diseases and Insects

Few; susceptible to scale and borers but is the most trouble-free lilac.

Wildlife Considerations

Japanese lilac trees provide homes and shelter for wildlife.

Maintenance Practices

Japanese tree lilac is the most trouble-free lilac.

TRADITIONAL AND MODERN USES

Japanese tree lilac was introduced into cultivation in 1876.

May is a great time of the year, the weather is beginning to warm up more often and our plants are really getting growing. One of my favorites of the spring is the Lilac shrub with the wonderfully scented flowers. There is actually a tree form of a lilac, the Japanese Tree Lilac, that could be planted in your landscape as well for more impact.

Japanese Tree Lilac, Syringa reticulata, is a small tree with large clusters of white flowers. It grows up to 20-30 feet tall and 15-25 feet wide which allows it to be used in more locations due to the smaller size. Japanese Tree Lilac produces large panicles of creamy white flowers against the dark green foliage in late spring to early summer. The flowers are fragrant, but not to the extent that common lilac shrubs are, the scent is often compared to a Privet shrub. The leaves are opposite, 2-4 inches long and 1-3 inches wide, and are present on the tree early in the year, often by late March. The fruit produced on a Japanese Tree Lilac is a warty, dry capsule that is ¾ inches long and appears in the fall for further interest. Another interesting trait of the Japanese Tree Lilac is the smooth, gray bark that has very noticeable lenticels, the corky spot on the bark that allows for gas exchange through the trunk, similar to the bark of a cherry tree.

Japanese Tree Lilac can be grown as an understory tree or as a specimen tree. It grows best in full sun but will tolerate part shade found in an understory condition. It is a very adaptable tree and will tolerate Acid or Alkaline soils as well as the street conditions including salt spray in the winter months. Japanese Tree Lilac will even tolerate drought conditions; however, it is a tree that is not tolerant of poor drainage areas. Most often, Japanese Tree Lilac is planted as a specimen tree in a landscape for additional flowering interest.

There are many good varieties to choose from when looking at Japanese Tree Lilac, other than going with the straight species. ‘Golden Eclipse’ is an interesting choice that is more compact and the leaves develop a golden edge as the season progresses. ‘Ivory Silk’ is a compact choice as well, that is sturdy and compact with a dense form and it blooms at a younger age than some of the other varieties. If you want to add a longer season of interest, you can plant ‘Ivory Silk’ and Signature together. Signature flowers 1-2 weeks later than ‘Ivory Silk’ and has smaller, more rounded flower clusters.

Japanese Tree Lilac is not a great choice for wildlife, however it does have value as a nesting location for many songbirds, according to North Dakota State University.

Spring is an inviting season for many to go outdoors and enjoy nature. With a tree like Japanese Tree Lilac, it becomes even more enjoyable to go outside to view the wonderful, large, white panicles of flowers on a small tree. The size of this tree makes it suitable for many locations, and its adaptability helps it in many more ways. So the next time you look for a small tree, look for a Japanese Tree Lilac.

Japanese lilac tree colorado

2020-02-02 00:57

Trees Japanese Lilac Tree Maximize. Send to a friend Print; Add to my wishlist. Japanese Lilac Tree. Syringa reticulata. A flower factory in spring! One of our favorite lilacs is now available. Known for the profusion of perfect, creamywhite fragrant flowers and cherrybrown bark, the Lilac Tree isColorado Tree Coalition leading Colorado’s efforts to preserve, renew, and enhance community forests. japanese lilac tree colorado

TREES FOR COLORADO SPRINGS SUITABLE AS STREET TREES Printed on recycled paper Japanese Tree Lilac Xeriscape Colorado! The reference used for tree names is the Manual of Woody Landscape Plants by Michael A. Dirr LONGEVITY:

Japanese tree lilac (Syringa reticulata) is at its best for two weeks in early summer when the flowers bloom. The clusters of white, fragrant flowers are about a foot long and 10 inches wide. The plant is available as a multistemmed shrub or a tree with a single trunk. Prolific bearer of fragrant creamy white flowers in late spring. Rigid branches form a small tree or large shrub. Deep green leaves turn a golden yellow in fall. Makes an excellent specimen. Hardy to 30F Maximum Elevation: 7, 000 ft.japanese lilac tree colorado The Japanese Tree Lilac can be trained into a large shrub, or allowed to grow taller into a small, multitrunk tree. Either way it is covered with fragrant, creamy

Ivory Silk Tree Lilac in bloom

Ivory Silk Tree Lilac in bloom

(Photo courtesy of NetPS Plant Finder)

Ivory Silk Tree Lilac flowers

Ivory Silk Tree Lilac flowers

(Photo courtesy of NetPS Plant Finder)

Height: 20 feet

Spread: 14 feet

Sunlight:

Hardiness Zone: 3a

Description:

A first rate accent tree adorned with frothy upright panicles of creamy white flowers in July; interesting steel-gray bark and a dense, upright habit, an ideal choice for small home landscapes; needs full sun and well-drained soil; non-suckering

Ornamental Features

Ivory Silk Tree Lilac features showy plumes of fragrant creamy white flowers rising above the foliage from late spring to early summer. It has dark green foliage throughout the season. The pointy leaves do not develop any appreciable fall colour. The fruit is not ornamentally significant. The smooth dark red bark adds an interesting dimension to the landscape.

Landscape Attributes

Ivory Silk Tree Lilac is a dense multi-stemmed deciduous tree with an upright spreading habit of growth. Its average texture blends into the landscape, but can be balanced by one or two finer or coarser trees or shrubs for an effective composition.

This is a relatively low maintenance tree, and should only be pruned after flowering to avoid removing any of the current season’s flowers. It is a good choice for attracting butterflies to your yard, but is not particularly attractive to deer who tend to leave it alone in favor of tastier treats. It has no significant negative characteristics.

Ivory Silk Tree Lilac is recommended for the following landscape applications;

  • Accent

Planting & Growing

Ivory Silk Tree Lilac will grow to be about 20 feet tall at maturity, with a spread of 14 feet. It has a low canopy with a typical clearance of 5 feet from the ground, and is suitable for planting under power lines. It grows at a medium rate, and under ideal conditions can be expected to live for 40 years or more.

This tree should only be grown in full sunlight. It prefers to grow in average to moist conditions, and shouldn’t be allowed to dry out. It is not particular as to soil type or pH. It is highly tolerant of urban pollution and will even thrive in inner city environments. This is a selected variety of a species not originally from North America.

For property owners who want a medium to small sized ornamental tree with large luscious blossoms and incredible fragrance, Japanese Tree Lilac may be an excellent choice. Japanese Tree Lilacs have a long track record of being very hardy for use in our harsh upper Midwest climate, and are versatile in their ability to grow in many different soil types.

Japanese Tree Lilacs are used in landscapes as both single stem trees and clump forms with multiple stems, depending on the look desired by the designer and owner. Where alkaline soils dominate a site, Japanese Tree Lilacs are especially useful, since they share with the larger lilac family the ability to prosper in high soil pH conditions. The biggest need when planting them in alkaline soils (often clay) is to assure good drainage. Lilacs of every kind will decline and die in poorly drained soils.

While the common Japanese Tree Lilac matures to 25’to 30′ tall by 25′-30′ wide, and is an excellent choice for the landscape, several variety selections have been brought to market which offer a more compact size, heavier flowering, and a seedless version is also available.

‘Ivory Silk’ Japanese Tree Lilac grows to about the same 25′ height as the common form, but a noticeably smaller spread of about 15 feet, making it useful for narrower spaces.

‘Ivory Pillar’ Japanese Tree Lilac is slightly narrower, rated at 10’to 15′ tall by only 10′-12′ wide, with abundant blossoms, and like the other varieties, is very tolerant of difficult urban conditions.

‘Snow Dance’ Japanese Tree Lilac is a recently released variety that appears to have the most desirable characteristics of all the cultivars currently available. Rod Bailey made this selection for its propensity to bloom very heavily, bloom more evenly from one year to the next, and perhaps most notably, ‘Snow Dance’ Japanese Tree Lilac is seedless. The lack of seed formation after the prolific blossoms fade gives ‘Snow Dance’ Japanese Tree Lilac a more handsome look throughout late summer, fall and winter. ‘Snow Dance’ also expresses a slightly shorter and broader shape with a size rating of 18′ tall by 20′ wide.

For best success, plant the Japanese Tree Lilac of your choice in a location with plenty of sunlight and good drainage.

The Japanese Tree Lilacs are in full bloom now at the nursery. Stop in and take in the beauty (and fragrance!)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *