Isolepis fiber optic grass

Fiber-optic grass

Fiber Optic Grass

Often found growing in wet places or peaty areas near the sea, fiber optic grass is native to western and southern Europe, British Isles, North Africa, the west coast of North America, Australia, and New Zealand. Although it looks like a grass, fiber optic grass is an evergreen species in the sedge family. This bright green, grass-like plant gets its name from its resemblance to a fiber optic lamp—multiple stems with tiny flower spikes at the tips. This easy-to-grow plant grows upright when it is young, then spills gracefully over the edges of containers or garden walls as it matures. When temperatures drop, the foliage may change from the bright green to yellow or brown.

genus name
  • Isolepis cernua
light
  • Part Sun,
  • Sun
plant type
  • Annual,
  • Perennial
height
  • 6 to 12 inches
width
  • From 6 to 12 inches
flower color
  • White
foliage color
  • Blue/Green
problem solvers
  • Deer Resistant
special features
  • Low Maintenance,
  • Good for Containers
zones
  • 10,
  • 11
propagation
  • Division,
  • Seed

Colorful Combinations

Fiber optic grass retains its verdant green color all season long. It adds soft texture to containers and garden borders and requires little maintenance as long as it remains moist. On the tips of its leaves, fiber optic grass develops small seeds and flowers. These tiny flowers are cone-shape and begin white or silver, eventually turning tan or brown. The plants bloom year-round in warm climates. It is a delicate perennial and grown as an annual in colder climates. Fiber optic grass also works well when grown as a houseplant in a sunny window. Its small stature also makes it a perfect choice for miniature or fairy gardens.

See the top plants for fairy gardens here.

Fiber Optic Grass Care Must-Knows

Ideally, fiber optic grass prefers full sun and plenty of moisture—it will turn brown if allowed to dry out. Fiber optic grass can handle some shade but will become much looser in habit. When using fiber optic grass in a water garden, place in water and gradually increase the level. This gradual adjustment to the water allows the roots to get used to being constantly submerged. If planting near the water’s edge, place fiber optic grass no more than 2 inches above the soil.

Discover more ways to use ornamental grasses in your landscape.

Fiber optic grass is easy to start from seed and will self-seed under the proper conditions. It is also easy to propagate when it outgrows its container. Just divide the plant into pieces and replant in the desired area or container. Spring is the best time to divide a plant that was overwintered outside. Remedy a too long and lanky plant with a simple “haircut.” Fiber optic grass is deer-resistant and does not typically have pest issues.

See more of our favorite ornamental grasses.

More Varieties of Fiber Optic Grass

‘Live Wire’ fiber optic grass

This variety of Isolepis bears arching, rich green leaves on a 12-inch-tall mound.

Plant Fiber Optic Grass With:

Few gardens should be without the easy charm of snapdragons. They get their name from the fact that you can gently squeeze the sides of the intricately shaped flower and see the jaws of a dragon head snap closed. The blooms come in gorgeous colors, including some with beautiful color variations on each flower. Plus, snapdragons are an outstanding cut flower. Gather a dozen or more in a small vase and you’ll have one of the prettiest bouquets around.Snapdragons are especially useful because they’re a cool-season annual, coming into their own in early spring when the warm-season annuals, such as marigolds and impatiens, are just being planted. They’re also great for fall color.Plant snapdragon in early spring, a few weeks before your region’s last frost date. Deadhead regularly for best bloom and fertilize regularly. Snapdragons often self-seed in the landscape if not deadheaded, so they come back year after year, though the colors from hybrid plants will often will be muddy looking. In mild regions, the entire plant may overwinter if covered with mulch.Shown above: ‘Rocket Red’ snapdragon

Gerbera daisies are so perfect they hardly look real. They bloom in nearly every color (except true blues and purples) and produce fantastically large flowers on long, thick, sturdy stems. They last for a week or more in the vase, making them a favorite of flower arrangers.This tender perennial will last the winter in only the warmest parts of the country, Zones 9-11. In the rest of the country, it is grown as an annual. It does well in average soil; it likes soil kept evenly moist but not overly wet. Fertilize lightly.

What would we do without impatiens? It’s the old reliable for shade gardens when you want eye-popping color all season long. The plants bloom in just about every color except true blue and are well suited to growing in containers or in the ground. If you have a bright spot indoors, you may be able to grow impatiens all year as an indoor plant.

Why did fiber optic grass lose its sparkle? | The Sacramento Bee

Garden Detective: Fiber optic grass, actually a sedge, gets its nickname from its distinctive seed heads. HANDOUT Bee File Photo

Experts tackle readers’ garden questions.

Q: I had a new patio garden installed in late March. I have a very narrow yard around three sides of my urban home. Most of the plants – gardenia, camellia, citrus, feijoa, rosemary, mondo grass and herbs – are all doing very well. However, I also had quite a few fiber optic grass plants put in. Some are doing well, but some are very brown, stressed and struggling. I’m not sure if it’s overwatering, underwatering or some other factor. The most beautiful of these plants is right next to some that are struggling. Any ideas appreciated!

Michele McCormick, Sacramento

Bee garden writer Debbie Arrington: Fiber optic grass (Isolepsis cernua) is actually a sedge, not a true grass. And it’s a “water plant”; it needs a lot more moisture than your other selections (except for maybe the gardenia).

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Fiber optic grass gets its nickname because of its look. It produces small round seed heads at the end of its long blades, giving this sedge the look of a fiber-optic novelty lamp.

Isolepsis grows naturally in bogs and along streams or ponds. It needs soil that’s always moist, never completely dry. If the soil dries out, the plant quickly turns brown and goes dormant (or dies). It also needs full sun; if shaded, it becomes thin and lanky – and brown, too. Isolepsis is considered a tender perennial and needs protection from heavy frost, which also will cause it to brown.

Is your garden on drip irrigation? If so, the failing plants may not be getting enough water. You may need to hand water those struggling plants (every other day in summer) until they bounce back. The brown plants may be trimmed back to encourage new growth.

If they don’t respond to more irrigation, then it’s time to replace them with something else.

The Bee’s Debbie Arrington is a consulting rosarian and lifelong gardener. [email protected], 916-321-1075, @debarrington

Garden questions?

Questions are answered by master gardeners at the UC Cooperative Extension services in Sacramento and Placer counties. Send questions to Garden Detective, P.O. Box 15779, Sacramento, CA 95852. Send email to h&[email protected] Please put “Garden Detective” in the subject field and include your postal address. To contact UC Extension directly, call:

Fiber Optic Grass Isolepis Cernua Seeds

Fiber Optic Grass Isolepis Cernua is a tender perennial ornamental grass that belongs to the sedge family and native to many regions of the world, including North and South America. Fiber Optic Grass seeds germinate in 2-3 weeks, and also called Fairy Lights, Bullrush, Live Wire Grass, and Scirpus Cernuus this highly attractive ornamental grass is grown as a perennial in USDA zones 8-11 and as an annual in colder regions. Fiber Optic Grass grows about 8 inches tall forming dense tufts of tread-like, fresh-green leaves and flowering with silver-white to cream colored very small pin head like flowers. The flower spikes resemble “fiber optic” strands, and they appear throughout of season.

Fiber Optic Grass offers nice textural contrast with flowering plants, so this ornamental grass is ideal for adding texture to flower borders, mixed containers and pots, hanging baskets, and Live Wire Grass is considered to be an evergreen perennial plant when it is grown indoors, so that makes Fiber Optic Grass a popular houseplant. Since Scirpus Cernuus likes to grow in moist soil, the plant is often planted along ponds and grown in water gardens. Isolepis Cernua seeds need light to germinate, so after surface sowing the seeds cannot be covered with soil.

PLANT PROFILE
Season: Perennial/Annual
Height: 8 Inches
Bloom Season: Spring/Summer/Fall
Environment: Sun/Partial Shade
Soil Type: Average/Poor/Moist
USDA Zones: 8-11 (As Perennial) All Regions of North America (As Annual)

PLANTING INSTRUCTIONS
Sow Indoors: Winter
Sow Outdoors: Spring
Seed Depth: Surface sowing – press seeds slightly into the soil
Germination Time: 14-21 Days

Fiber Optic Grass

Botanical Name: Isolepis cernua aka Scirpus cernuus

Fiber Optic Grass is a fountain-like ornamental grass with small, silvery white flowers at the tips. Its resemblance to fiber optic wire lends its common names, including Live Wire Grass.

If you like unusual indoor plants, you’ll want to add this ornamental sedge to your collection. It’s a fun plant to have around.

Growing in a clumping mound, it spills over the sides of a container as it grows, making it ideal for a tall planter or even a hanging pot. Eye-catching on its own, this decorative grass also adds texture among a display of foliage and flowering plants.

You’ll find fiber optic grass for sale in garden centers and online nurseries in spring and summer. Plants are inexpensive, and you can also buy seeds. Sowing seeds is easy (see Propagation below).

CAUTION: Both the plant and seeds are poisonous if eaten. Keep it away from children and pets if there is any chance they may play with or ingest them. It can also cause skin irritation.

Perennial and evergreen, this showy grass is an easy-care house plant. Keep it warm and moist, give it sunlight, and you can expect blooms from spring through fall.

Water generously. Don’t allow the soil to dry out. Foliage will turn yellow then brown when it gets too dry. Water thoroughly and often to keep the soil at least evenly moist at all times. Fiber Optic Grass is native to marsh areas, so it doesn’t mind soggy soil.

Repot in spring, moving up to a container 1 size larger every 2-3 years, or when it becomes crowded. Spring is also a good time to divide the plant, if you want.

Fiber Optic Grass Care Tips

Origin: Southern Europe and Northern Africa

Height: Up to 1 ft (30 cm)

Light: Bright light to full sun

Water: Keep the soil moist or wet at all times. Constantly moist soil is needed to keep I. cernua healthy and thriving. Native to marshlands, this is one plant you can’t overwater.

Humidity: Moderate room humidity (around 40-50% relative humidity).

Temperature: Average to warm room temperatures (65-80°F/18-27°C) year-round. If you put this tender ornamental out on the patio for the summer, it can take the heat, but bring it back indoors when the temperature drops. It won’t tolerate frost.

Soil: Peat moss-based mix, such as African violet potting mix.

Fertilizer: Feed monthly spring through fall with a balanced liquid fertilizer diluted by half.

Propagation: Sow seed in spring, barely covering the seeds. Keep the soil warm (around 70°F/21°C) and constantly moist. Mature plants can be divided and potted separately.

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Fiber optic grass, Isolepis cernua

Fiber optic grass is a fun plant (even though it isn’t really a grass), that most people acquire because of its unusual appearance. Isolepis cernua (=Scirpus cernuus), in the sedge family (Cyperaceae), is a variable evergreen species with a mop-like tuft of fine green stems. It is found in wet places, growing as a marginal water plant or in sandy or peaty areas near the sea in its native range of western and southern Europe, the British Isles, North Africa, the west coast of North America (California to British Columbia and Alaska), and Australia and New Zealand.

Native Isolepis cernua growing on the rocky coastline near Mendocino, CA

Fiber optic grass in a mixed container

This bright green, grass-like plant has small flower spikes at the stem tips reminiscent of those fiber optic lamps, hence the common name (it doesn’t change colors like the electric version, though). It is sometimes marketed as “Livewire”, “Live Wire” or “Fairy Lights”. These easy-to-grow plants grow upright as a young plant and then gracefully droop as they mature. The 10-12” clumps of fine, glossy, hair-like leaves can reach a spread of 20″ at maturity. The foliage may yellow as temperatures drop in fall or turn brown if the plant doesn’t receive enough moisture.

The small terminal flower heads of fiber optic grass

Tiny flowers are produced on the tip of each leaf. The cone-shaped terminal inflorescences begin a white or silver color, but eventually turn tan or brown. The plants will bloom year-round.

I. cernua is a tender perennial (zones 8-11) generally grown as an annual in cold climates, but it can be kept as a houseplant in a sunny window or greenhouse over the winter. Bring it indoors before freezing temperatures occur and set the pot in a shallow tray of water.

Fiber optic grass grows best in full sun with plenty of moisture. Do not allow it to dry out or the foliage will turn brown. It can be planted in containers, in the ground, or kept in a water garden or pond. It will tolerate some shade, but will become lankier under those conditions.

Fiber optic grass is great as a novelty!

Grow these plants as specimens to show their unique character, or plant as accents among other plants grown for foliage or flowers. Combine it with other moisture-loving annuals in boxes or pots, or grow it in its own container in a grouping of potted plants. Try it as an underplanting with dark-leaved elephant ears (Colocasia esculenta ‘Black Magic’ or other cultivars). Place it on the edge of borders or beds, or between rocks at water’s edge drooping over or into the water. For a novelty conversation piece, use it to top a “head” container! The fine texture of this plant is a good contrast to plants with coarse leaves, and its mounded habit is a good foil for upright plants and spiky flowers. Fiber optic grass is a good addition to container water gardens.

Fiber optic grass is a good addition to container water gardens

If you plan to use this plant in a water garden, gradually increase the water level it sits in unless you purchased it from an aquatic plants display. This will allow the roots to become accustomed to being submerged. In a water garden it combines well with horsetails (Equisetum), dwarf papyrus, and cannas (but it best to keep each in separate pots). It can be planted on the water’s edge or in the shallows of ponds, positioned so that the water level is no more than 2” above the soil. The leaves trailing in the water will provide shelter for frogs and fish.

Young self-seeded fiber optic grass plants

I. cernua is easy to grow from seed (and will readily self seed under the right conditions – I still have seedlings coning up in the cracks between flagstones two years after growing a plant in a container set on the flagstone patio), but is faster and easier to propagate vegetatively. Divide when it outgrows its container. Just chop it into pieces and replant. (It is best to do this only in spring if the plants are to be overwintered outdoors.)

A trimmed fiber optic grass plant shows new growth

If it gets too long and lanky, give it a haircut and it will grow right back (I found this out after a raccoon or other animal raided the water garden and sheared my plant to the ground; it regrew to look just fine within a few weeks). Now I cut the plants back to a few inches after dividing them in the spring and they quickly put out new growth. Avoid shearing in winter when the plant is not growing, however. This plant has few pest problems and is resistant to deer. Mealybugs may infest it indoors if not submerged in water.

– Susan Mahr, University of Wisconsin – Madison


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Grass Isolepis cernua ‘Live Wire’

Isolepsis Cernua is commonly referred to as Live Wire or Fiber-optic Grass. A member of the Sedge family, this ornamental is widely used in containers and in landscaping mixed with colorful bedding plants. The Live Wire is a bit more delicate than the Carex. Its foliage may start to yellow when temperatures dip to 45° F. The slender grassy tendrils grow in a thick clump and curl over to make a unique spray of color resembling a fountain. Delicate silvery flowers appear atop its tiny stems, making it appear as a tuft of tiny fiber-optic threads. They are fantastic in containers alone, edging a pathway, or with beautiful mounds of color or as a center, surrounded by color. Whatever your choice, this plant is fairly easy to please.

Height

6-8 Inches

Spread

18-20 Inches

Homeowner Growing
& Maintenance Tips

Live Wire tolerates full sun to partial shade and prefers moist to wet soil. It could even be used waterside for interest since it likes to be kept moist. It may be moved indoors during the Winter months and put back out in the Spring.

Interesting Notes

  • Unique beauty for Spring, Summer and Fall landscape
  • Delicate green foliage to frame beds and containers
  • Heat and light tolerant
  • Division should be done in early Spring months

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Characteristics & Attributes

Attributes

Focal Point
Great Foliage
Border or Bed
Indoor Forcing
Container
Rock Garden
Edging
Purchase Size(s):

Quart
Exposure

Partial Shade
Foliage Color

Green
Season of Interest (Flowering)

Spring
Summer
Fall
Soil Moisture Preference

Moist

Fiber Optic Grass

Fiber Optic Grass

(Photo courtesy of NetPS Plant Finder)

Height: 12 inches

Spacing: 15 inches

Sunlight:

Hardiness Zone: 8b

Other Names: Live Wire Grass

Description:

This interesting plant lookes like a rush but it is a sedge, a beautiful mounded form with tiny silver flowers on the end resembling fiber optics, great for the perpetually wet or boggy area, it provides an interesting fine texture

Ornamental Features

Fiber Optic Grass is covered in stunning silver pea-like flowers at the ends of the stems from early summer to mid fall. Its tiny threadlike leaves emerge light green in spring, turning green in color throughout the season. The fruit is not ornamentally significant.

Landscape Attributes

Fiber Optic Grass is an herbaceous perennial grass with a shapely form and gracefully arching stems. It brings an extremely fine and delicate texture to the garden composition and should be used to full effect.

This is a relatively low maintenance plant, and should be cut back in late fall in preparation for winter. It has no significant negative characteristics.

Fiber Optic Grass is recommended for the following landscape applications;

  • Mass Planting
  • Border Edging
  • General Garden Use
  • Container Planting
  • Bog Gardens

Planting & Growing

Fiber Optic Grass will grow to be about 12 inches tall at maturity, with a spread of 18 inches. When grown in masses or used as a bedding plant, individual plants should be spaced approximately 15 inches apart. It grows at a medium rate, and under ideal conditions can be expected to live for approximately 4 years.

This plant does best in full sun to partial shade. It prefers to grow in moist to wet soil, and will even tolerate some standing water. It is not particular as to soil type or pH. It is somewhat tolerant of urban pollution. This species is not originally from North America. It can be propagated by division.

Fiber Optic Grass is a fine choice for the garden, but it is also a good selection for planting in outdoor pots and containers. It is often used as a ‘filler’ in the ‘spiller-thriller-filler’ container combination, providing a mass of flowers against which the thriller plants stand out. Note that when growing plants in outdoor containers and baskets, they may require more frequent waterings than they would in the yard or garden.

What Is Fiber Optic Grass: Tips On Growing Fiber Optic Grasses

Sprays of slender foliage and bright flower tips create a look of electric excitement on fiber optic grass. What is fiber optic grass? Fiber optic grass s not really a grass but is actually sedge. It is useful around moist spaces and ponds. The plant is easy to grow and has few pest or disease problems. Ornamental fiber optic grass is also deer resistant, which makes it a great addition to gardens prone to these often pesky plant eaters.

What is Fiber Optic Grass?

The plant is hardy in USDA plant hardiness zones 8-11. It can be potted up and moved indoors in other areas or just enjoy it as an annual.

Ornamental fiber optic grass forms a mound with sprays of errant stems springing from the center of the plant like a punk hairdo. The ends of the stems have tiny white flowers that give the overall effect of little lights at the end of the foliage.

The plant is native to Western and Southern Europe and found in

sandy to peaty zones, often near the sea or other water bodies. Try growing fiber optic grass in a container or water garden.

Growing Fiber Optic Grass

Plant the grass in a mixture of potting soil and peat moss for container plants. The grass grows best in full sun to partial sun.

If you want to use it as part of a water garden, allow the roots to sit in deeper and deeper water levels to acclimate. The plant can be trimmed back if it sustains cold or other types of damage. Cut it to within 2 inches of the ground and it will re-sprout within a couple of weeks.

Divide ornamental fiber optic grass every two to three years and plant each section for more of this interesting grass.

Growing fiber optic grass from seed is easy. Simply sow in flats with a light dusting of soil. Keep the flat covered and moderately moist in a bright warm area. Allow the seedlings to grow a substantial root system before transplanting them.

Fiber Optic Plant Care

If you want a spectacular plant for soggy situations that brings grace and movement to any bed or display, ornamental fiber optic plant is a great choice. This is a low maintenance grass that just needs consistent moisture and good light to perform well.

Re-pot or divide the plant in spring. Plants in the lower zones benefit from a layer of mulch around the root zone to protect them from cold snaps.

Feed monthly with a half dilution of plant food up until fall. Then suspend food during the winter. Not much more is needed for fiber optic plant care.

Ornamental fiber optic grass can be overwintered in the colder zones. Bring the plant indoors to a draft free room with moderate light. Water once per week and keep a fan going to prevent humidity build up and the promotion of fungal issues.

Fiber Optic Grass

Fiber Optic Grass

(Photo courtesy of NetPS Plant Finder)

Height: 12 inches

Spacing: 15 inches

Sunlight:

Hardiness Zone: 8b

Other Names: Live Wire Grass

Description:

This interesting plant lookes like a rush but it is a sedge, a beautiful mounded form with tiny silver flowers on the end resembling fiber optics, great for the perpetually wet or boggy area, it provides an interesting fine texture

Ornamental Features

Fiber Optic Grass is covered in stunning silver pea-like flowers at the ends of the stems from early summer to mid fall. Its tiny threadlike leaves emerge light green in spring, turning green in color throughout the season. The fruit is not ornamentally significant.

Landscape Attributes

Fiber Optic Grass is an herbaceous perennial grass with a shapely form and gracefully arching stems. It brings an extremely fine and delicate texture to the garden composition and should be used to full effect.

This is a relatively low maintenance plant, and should be cut back in late fall in preparation for winter. It has no significant negative characteristics.

Fiber Optic Grass is recommended for the following landscape applications;

  • Mass Planting
  • Border Edging
  • General Garden Use
  • Container Planting
  • Bog Gardens

Planting & Growing

Fiber Optic Grass will grow to be about 12 inches tall at maturity, with a spread of 18 inches. When grown in masses or used as a bedding plant, individual plants should be spaced approximately 15 inches apart. It grows at a medium rate, and under ideal conditions can be expected to live for approximately 4 years.

This plant does best in full sun to partial shade. It prefers to grow in moist to wet soil, and will even tolerate some standing water. It is not particular as to soil type or pH. It is somewhat tolerant of urban pollution. This species is not originally from North America. It can be propagated by division.

Fiber Optic Grass is a fine choice for the garden, but it is also a good selection for planting in outdoor pots and containers. It is often used as a ‘filler’ in the ‘spiller-thriller-filler’ container combination, providing a mass of flowers against which the thriller plants stand out. Note that when growing plants in outdoor containers and baskets, they may require more frequent waterings than they would in the yard or garden. Be aware that in our climate, this plant may be too tender to survive the winter if left outdoors in a container. Contact our store for more information on how to protect it over the winter months.

Lawn grasses and short growing green plants that spread and blanket that ground-love them. I like how restful their uniform surface is to the eye. I like how they hug and describe the sculpture of the ground beneath them. They make a fine surface on which to play croquet or throw the ball to the dogs. Grass makes a cool cushiony spot for a brief respite on a summer afternoon. Lawn grasses are willing, and grow vigorously. They genially put up with any interloper. I do nothing to mine beyond a weekly cut. If your cut grass is weedy, fine. Just take the trouble to water it. Low and green is presentable. The uncut, the freely flowing and growing version of grass-we know them as ornamental grasses. They look so great, come the beginning of September.

I like grass-in all of its forms. I like it cut short, a beautifully textured skin over the ground. Beautifully or intricately sculpted ground benefits from a covered of cut grass. I like small growing grasses in containers. Their insouciant habit is a breath of fresh air. Big growing grasses speak strongly to free.

Ornamental grasses are slow to emerge from the ground in my spring. Eventually they begin to grow. Eventually they may attain great height and mass. Their individually thin blades are a celebration of that natural phenomena we call wind. Grasses move. A big wind in any field of uncut grass makes for a concert. A spring with adequate water endows every blade of grass with that delicious green color. You know-grass green. This picture-panicum virgatum-or panic grass. The common name I am sure refers to the fact that it moves in the slightest breeze. Free to move-how good this feels.

The panic grass in the previous picture matures like this- given the beginning of September. Individual plants go to seed. Each plant throws multiple seed heads, which mature over the course of the fall. Each seed-a dot. The view of so many dots moving-rhythmic-mesmerizing. Some seeding grasses provide grain-food. What the grains from grasses do to feed people-extraordinary. The individual stalks sort out their needs for light and space-they successfully coexist.

Miscanthus sinensis is a big growing crown growing grass that needs lots of room to represent. I see them most frequently in commercial plantings where they have every bit of the space they need to mature. The windswept summer foliage gains momentum in late summer. This large patch of miscanthus, no doubt from a single plant put in the ground years ago, is in its beautiful plumes stage.


Grass blades are slender-wispy. Lots of grass blades in concert are sparkly-each blade catches the light in a different way. Thousands of blades catch the light and the wind differently. Ornamental grasses behind a planting of boxwood-everyone benefits. Should you have a mind to include grass in your landscape, site them where the late day sun will illuminate them. Give them lots and lots-and even more space. Face them down with an plant that makes their airy statement look all the more ethereal.

I do think that ornamental grasses recall and represent nature in its wild state. I do think that the term ornamental grasses is a misnomer. The grass primeval would be a more accurate description.. Grasss in all of its forms has a handsome heartiness that leavens the landscape.

Fiber optic grass is a very small and dense growing thatch of a grass. The name “fiber optic” is easy to understand-the 21st century is littered will all manner of various technologies. An enthusiastically growing small scale grass-how easy is this to like? Everything paired with it looks better.

We live in a very large country. The USA covers a vast amount of ground. We grow grain-grasses- in equally vast quantities. What does this mean to me, a gardener in charge of a very small urban lot? Plenty. My emotional attachment to ornamental grasses is considerable. I like the flow of them- the big gestures. I like anything graceful and natural. I like the music that is the wind. I especially like them planted in mass.

I took this picture outside a doctor’s office on a very busy 4 lane street just a few miles from my home. The grasses seeding were spectacular.

A patch of grass-most gardeners go for this. Every gardener interprets this patch differently. Some gardeners revere their lawn while all else in the landscape suffers. Odd this. I am just as likely to see a clump of ornamental grass in a perennial garden. I often see an interpretation of the waves of grain in commercial landscapes. This clump of miscanthus grass in the lawn-I cannot speak to the intent of this gardener. Do I need to? This freely representing patch of grass-simply beautiful.

The lemon grass in my rose garden container is coming on strong. I have not touched this community in weeks. The voice so strong that is the grass-getting louder.

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