Iceberg rose for sale

The best rose guide setting out 22 different types of roses. In the United States alone, over 1.3 billion roses are purchased on Valentine’s Day. While many roses are grown in the USA, over 1 billion of those roses are imported. The rose became synonymous with Valentine’s Day via Greek mythology. It’s said that rose bushes grew on the ground where Aphrodite (goddess of love) shed tears and the spilt blood of her lover Adonis. Read full rose guide here.

Just in the United States alone, over 1.3 billion roses are purchased on Valentine’s Day. While many roses are grown in the USA, over 1 billion of those roses are imported.

The rose became synonymous with Valentine’s Day via Greek mythology. It’s said that rose bushes grew on the ground where Aphrodite (goddess of love) shed tears and the spilt blood of her lover Adonis .

The rose is perhaps the most well-known flower in the world. People grow them in the yard, create spectacular rose gardens and of course they’re given as bouquets for all kinds of events and holidays. My cousin works at a rose-growing farm which has huge greenhouses dedicated to growing roses. He gave me a tour a few times; it’s a very interesting operation. The amount of roses an efficient greenhouse can grow is incredible.

Whether you wish to plant a rose garden or buy roses, one thing you might want to know is that there are many different types of roses. We set them out in this extensive rose guide.

Species Roses


Also known as wild roses, these roses have been growing in the wild for hundreds of thousands of years and they are rarely sold through nursery stores but instead can be found throughout the country in various fields.

Old Garden Roses

These roses existed before the year 1867 as this is the year the first hybrid tea rose, called the “La France,” was developed. Below are the 15 groups of roses that fit under this category.

Blush roses

Also known as Rosa blush ramblers, these roses are found in older cottage gardens and are nearly thorn-free. Attractive and healthy, blush roses have light green leaves and smell sweet and extraordinary. They are usually light pink in color and make excellent climbing roses, which is why they are often used in arbors or pergolas. They can grow up to 15 feet in height and do best in zones 5-10. The roses open up in early spring and have a cluster look that is very attractive.

Antique climbing roses

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These roses were introduced in the 1860s and have a large number of berry-like rose hips, or fruit, as well as a great aroma. In fact, if you’re curious about whether or not a certain rose is truly an “old” type, all you have to do is smell it because antique roses have a wonderful aroma that sticks around for a while. It blooms in late summer or early fall and comes in several different sub-categories, including:

    • Antique Moss Rose, a beautiful pink-and-white variety
    • Ballerina shrub roses, which have smaller petals and are usually light pink in color
    • Blush Noisette rose, which has medium-sized white petals
    • Fantin Latour antique rose, which is usually white with light pink intertwined in the petals
    • Jacques Cartier rose, a white and pink variety
    • Lady Banks climbing roses, which have smaller petals and come in various colors
    • Marie Pavie rose, which is also white
    • Mermaid climbing roses, which have white petals separated by some space
    • Rosa Canina rose, which is a white rose containing pink highlights on its edges
    • Rosa Foetida rose, a bi-color rose that is usually bright orange and yellow
    • Rosa Mutabilis roses, which have longer petals than most other types of roses
    • Rosa Variegata Di Bologna roses, pink-and-white roses that everyone loves
    • Rose De Rescht roses, or Portland roses, which are dark pink in color and have small petals
    • Rugosa Hansa rose, a dark pink variety that is certain to catch your attention
    • Sally Holmes climbing roses, which are small and white in color
    • Sombreuil climbing antique rose, a white variety that is quite large
    • Wild roses, which also have larger petals than many other roses
    • Zephirine Drouhin climbing rose, which is dark pink and small

Gallica roses

These roses flower once in the summertime and they have rich, dark-red single blooms. They originate from an old rose group from Europe and Asia and they are considered by many to be the nicest type of old garden roses.

Damask roses

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Also called Celsiana Damask roses, these flowers originated from Damascus and bloom only once during the summer months. They are a cross between two other varieties of roses and have a lovely light pink-and-white color.

Centifolia, or Province roses

These roses were developed by hybridists in the Netherlands during the 1600s and bloom once in the summer. They are a beautiful shade of pink and include varieties such as the cabbage rose.

  1. Andrewsii Moss roses

    Developed in the 17th century, the foliage on these roses, which have pink petals and a yellow center, resembles moss, hence their name. Just as many other types of roses, the Moss rose flowers just once a year.

Alba Maxima rose

With beautiful, large, white petals, the Alba rose has bluish-green foliage and blooms once a year. An example of this type of rose is the White Rose of York. Instead of white, some of them are pale pink in color.

Louis Phillippe China rose

Known as the modern garden rose of today, there were once four varieties of this type of rose. They were brought into the United States in the 18th and 19th centuries by people from eastern Asia and China. The ones brought in at that time flowered several times a year, including throughout the entire summer and into the fall.

Etoile de Lyon tea rose

Known simply as the tea rose, it is a mix between two scented roses from China and is repeat-flowering. Their blooms are light yellow in color, graceful, and extremely attractive. What makes them a little different than other types of roses is their aversion to extra-cold weather, which means that they are more successfully grown in areas such as the South and California.

Souvenir de la Malmaison Bourbon rose

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Also known as the Bourbon rose, this was one of the first roses from China that bloomed multiple times per year. Because the cross-creation originated in the Indian Ocean on the Ile de Bourbon, it was obvious what they had to name it.

Hybrid Perpetual roses

Including the Baronne Prevost rose, these are all derived from Bourbon roses and were very popular in Victorian England. Pink in color, they are the result of intense hybridization in various open fields.

  1. Sweet briar rose

    These roses are pink and white in color, have smaller and wider petals than some of the other types of roses, and originate from the late 19th century. Sweet briar roses have apple-scented leaflets that smell wonderful and this is the feature most rose lovers like the most.

Ayrshire roses

Officially known as the Splendens Arvensis Ayrshire rose, it derives from a European hedge rose that is a type of trailing rose. One of the most unique features of the Ayrshire rose is that they do not repeat-bloom.

Laevigata roses

Also called the Cherokee Laevigata rose, it has leaves that are green and thick and thorns that are shaped similarly to hooks. They flower only once a year and are indigenous to the South. Wide, white petals surround a yellow center, and they originate from China. More specifically, they are a small type of old roses.

Sempervirens roses

These roses can hold their foliage during the winter months and bloom only one time. They have white petals that almost resemble clovers and small yellow centers. Known as an evergreen rose by many people, these roses are descendants of R. sempervirens.

Modern Garden Roses

These are the roses developed since the year 1867 and they include most of the roses you find today in people’s gardens. They usually start blooming in late spring and bloom until the fall, and they are either:

    • Single – no more than 8 petals
    • Semi-double – 8-20 petals
    • Double – 20 petals
    • Fully double – 30 or more petals

Most modern flowers come in designs that include cupped, rounded, pompon, flat and open, quartered-rosette, high-centered, and urn-shaped. Modern garden roses come in seven different sub-groups, described as follows.

Climbers

These roses have thick, dark leaves and come in a variety of forms. They are wonderfully scented and many bloom only once during the summer. After they bloom, it is best to prune them as soon as the flowering is done but do not prune them the following spring. Some, however, are repeat-flowering and these flower on new wood. The repeat-flowering types should be pruned either in early spring or late winter. They are great for garden structures such as arbors, fences, trellises, etc. and adapt easily to what they’re climbing on. They have arching stiff canes and their foliage is glossy. They are truly spectacular and the more they grow, the more they can climb your structures so they are the perfect roses to show off whenever you wish to do so.

Shrub roses

The most popular type of shrub rose is the Knockout rose, which is usually dark pink or red in color and is considered the best shrub rose by many experts. These roses have even won numerous honors by organizations that evaluate and review different types of roses. Because of their versatility, shrub roses can be used in balconies of condos or apartments and even in patios if you place them in containers first. With flowers that come in clusters, these roses are bushy and are a repeat-flowering type of rose. They flower on new wood. They can be used as hedges, borders, and flower beds of all sizes and types and they are the perfect flower to plant alongside other types of plants. Shrub roses come in a wide variety of colors and types, including English roses and the La Sevillana shrub roses. You can find shrub roses in pink, white, and even red. Below are just a few of their varieties:

    • Abraham Darby rose
    • Ballerina rose
    • Bonica rose
    • Carefree Delight rose
    • Carefree Wonder rose
    • Champlain rose
    • Cuthbert Grant rose
    • Darlows Enigma rose
    • Fair Bianca rose
    • Flower Carpet rose
    • Henry Hudson rose
    • John Cabot rose
    • Linda Campbell rose
    • Morden Blush rose
    • Penelope rose
    • Square rose
    • William Shakespeare 2000 rose

Miniature roses, or mini roses

A very versatile type of rose, many people choose them either for their unique look or because they only have a certain amount of space to plant their roses. Mini roses can be grown in containers or used for edging and you can plant them in groups in flower beds or in smaller landscape areas as groundcovers. Usually, mini roses grow to no more than 15 inches in height, although a few varieties grow up to 30 feet. Mini roses include:

    • Child’s Play, a variegated pink and white variety
    • Cinnamon Girl, in dark brown, or cinnamon color
    • Denver’s Dream, bright orange in color
    • Hot Tamale, in bright pink and can be dotted with yellow
    • Innocence, an elegant rose that is white in color
    • Jilly Jewel, a pink variety
    • Sorcerer, a beautiful red rose
    • Sun Sprinkles, a beautiful shade of yellow
    • Twinkling Lights, this rose is bright yellow and has large petals
  1. Hybrid tea rose bushes

    With long stems and a tall, upright appearance, these roses have large leaves, large foliage, and one large bloom found on the top of each stem. They are long-lasting flowers, which contributes to their popularity, and have wonderful aromas. Many are even resistant to disease and some of the many types include:

    • Black Magic
    • Chrysler Imperial
    • Double Delight
    • First Prize
    • Fragrant Cloud
    • Lincoln
    • Olympiad
    • Peace
    • Touch of Class

Polyantha roses

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These are flowering rose bushes made up of small flower petals that come in large clusters.

Floribunda roses

A continuously blooming type of rose, the flower is hardy and consists of clusters of flowers that are full and bushy. In fact, large clusters are what these roses are known for. Although deadheading encourages more growth, the flower is able to continuously produce full, thick clusters almost all the time.

Grandiflora roses

These are tall, vigorous plants whose pink flowers grow either singly or in clusters. The Queen Elizabeth rose is one of the most popular and it is especially attractive when used in the middle of an island bed and surrounded by other flowers that are in colors such as pink or blue. This rose grows between five and eight feet and does well as a centerpiece because of its large size. If it is surrounded by colorful and smaller flowers, it looks especially beautiful.

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Roses have been celebrated for centuries for their beauty, fragrance and to represent something. You simply can’t be concluded that a particular rose is the most beautiful one in the world. Because, among the 100+ species of rose, none is lacking in beauty. But, some of them truly deserve to come in the top positions when talking about the beauty. Here the list of 10 of most beautiful roses for your garden.

10 Joseph’s Coat Rose

credit of image : lomilia wikimedia

If you are looking for a beautiful climbing rose for your garden, then Joseph’s coat can be the best choice for you. In fact, no other climbing roses are as colorful as Joseph’s coat rose. It produces medium blossoms of orange-red shaded with golden color. It grows well on fences and arbors in your garden.

This rose plant is disease free and reach up to 8-10 feet in height. You should plant is a location that provides full Sun. Watering is also important throughout the growing season. Joseph’s coat rose is a continual blooming plant. The brilliant multicolored flowers will appear repeatedly from spring through summer. The flowers are also light, fruity fragrance.

Additional Info

  • Class : Climber, floribunda.
  • Flower type – Semi double.
  • Flower color : Red, pink, orange, yellow and gold.
  • Blooming season : Spring, summer.
  • Caring : Watering is important, especially in the growing season. Fertilize the plant every two weeks.

9 Michelangelo Rose

credit of image :georges seguin wikimedia

With the large buttery-yellow flowers, the Michelangelo rose has an excellent, old-fashioned look. Under normal conditions, its flowers open 5 inches across. In each bloom also has 40-45 petals. The Michelangelo rose also renowned for its intense lemony fragrance. It is a good choice for making bouquets.

To plant the Michelangelo rose, choose a location where it gets partial Sun. The plant grows up to 4 feet. Make sure it gets moderate watering. The beautiful, buttery-yellow blooms will appear from mid-spring to fall.

See Also:

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8 Winchester Cathedral

It is a repeat blooming English rose that bears attractive cupped white flowers. This medium sized roses opens 2.25 inches across with 80-85 petals. Apart from its beauty, the Winchester cathedral is also renowned for its strong fragrance. It produces a pleasant fragrance with hints of almond blossom and honey.

The Winchester cathedral is a disease-resistant plant. It also grows and bloom well over a long period. The seeds should be planted in a part of your garden where it gets partial Sun. The plant grows 1.2 meters in height. The first flower will appear in Summer and it blooms repeatedly until the fall.

  • Category : English rose.
  • Flower type : Fully double.
  • Flower color : White.
  • Blooming season : Summer to fall.
  • Caring : Partial Sun and moderate watering.

7 Red Eden

credit of image : alexey ivanov flickr

The Red Eden is an amazing climbing rose with large, old-fashioned bright red flowers. A single blossom of a Red Eden has an average diameter of 5 inches and it contains up to 110 petals. The Red Eden roses are also one among the best-scented roses in the world. It spread intense, mild classic rose fragrance.

Red Eden is a healthy and a continual blooming rose plant. This beautiful climbing rose suited well for the fences. The caring for Red Eden rose is pretty simple. The plant needs full Sun and moderate watering. You should also prune the plant before the leaves coming out. The blooming of Red Eden rose will start in the spring and continues until the end of summer.

  • Category : Climbing.
  • Flower type : Fully double.
  • Flower color : Bright red.
  • Blooming season : Spring through summer.
  • Caring : Fully sun, moderate watering and pruning before the growth of leaves.

6 Albrecht Durer

credit of image :huhu uet wikimedia

An attractive rose plant with large, peach blended orange flowers. The intensity of the orange color of this rose changes with the weather. In the winter season, this rose look deep pink rather than orange. The fragrance of Albrecht Durer rose is as famous as its beauty. It produces nose pleasing, intense fruity fragrance.

You can plant this rose on small containers. It will grow up to a height of 90 cm. Pruning and moderate watering are very important for Albrecht Durer rose.

  • Class : Hybrid tea.
  • Flower color : Orange.
  • Blooming : Continual blooming.
  • Caring : Moderate watering and pruning are important.

5 Victor Hugo

The Victor Hugo rose is among the most beautiful red roses in the world. It produces large blooms of dark red with 25-30 petals. The Strong fragrance is another great feature of this rose. Thus, the Victor Hugo rose is a good choice for making bouquets and vases.

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The Victor Hugo rose plants will grow up to a height of 1 meter. It needs full Sun exposure. Pruning is a must for this rose plant in winter and spring. The blooming of Victor Hugo rose will start in the spring and it repeats until the fall.

  • Class : Hybrid tea.
  • Flower color : Deep red.
  • Blooming : From spring to fall.
  • Caring : Need full Sun exposure, pruning is a must in winter and spring.

4 Rhapsody In Blue

credit of image : alf van beem wikimedia

Rhapsody in blue is a stunningly colorful rose with a color of mauve and purple fade to slate blue. It’s a semi-double rose that form in large clusters. The beautiful Rhapsody in blue roses initially opens as a complete blue colored flowers. But gradually they fade into the slate blue. It is also a great cut flower and can be a better selection for display shows.

To plant the Rhapsody in blue, choose a location where there is moderate temperature and partial Sun. The plant will grow up to 1.2 meters in height. The colorful bloom will appear throughout the summer season.

  • Category : Shrub.
  • Flower color : Mauve and purple fade to slate blue.
  • Blooming : Throughout the summer.
  • Caring : Partial shade, moderate watering and pruning in summer.

3 Gold Medal

credit of image : ryan somma flickr

As the name suggests, the gold medal plant bears large, brilliantly dark gold colored blossoms. Its flowers form in clusters and each flower consists 30-40 petals. The color of gold medal roses becomes more intense during mild temperature. The intense fruity fragrance of gold medal makes it as one of the best roses to grow in your garden.

The gold medal is an upright and nearly thornless bushy plant. It will reach up to 36 inches in height. For a healthy growth, this plant needs full Sun exposure. You should also cut back its canes in spring and winter. The stunning dark gold colored flowers will appear from spring through summer.

  • Class : Hybrid tea.
  • Flower type : Double.
  • Flower color : Dark gold.
  • Blooming : Spring through summer.
  • Caring : Full Sun exposure, mid watering and pruning in spring and winter.

2 Black Baccara

credit of image : t.kiya flickr

At first look, the Black Baccara look like a large, beautiful black rose. But it is not at all a black rose. Actually, the unique velvet texture of its petals has a strong resemblance with the black color. Black Baccara is also renowned among the rose lovers for its near black color. Each flower opens 4 inches across and contains up to 45 petals.

The Black Baccara rose can be a great addition to your garden and display shows. You will need to choose a location with full Sun exposure to plant this rose. For the healthy growth of Black Baccara, make sure you plant it in a well-drained soil. The shining, velvet colored flowers will appear from spring through fall.

  • Class : Hybrid tea.
  • Flower color : Velvet.
  • Blooming : Spring through fall.
  • Caring : Full Sun exposure, mild watering and pruning.

credit of image : audrey flickr

The double delight is truly one of most wonderful roses in the world. It is renowned both in beauty and fragrance. This amazing plant bears large, creamy blossoms edged with striking red color. Each bloom has 30-35 petals. The double delight roses also produce intense spicy fragrance throughout the blooming season.

The double delight roses are definitely a good choice for cutting edge garden and display shows. To develop a striking, rich color, the double delight rose should get full Sun exposure. It grows to a height of approximately 1.5 meters.

Pruning in the spring is another important thing you should consider. It will definitely bring more flowers to your double delight plant. The large, colorful and high centered blooms will appear from spring through fall.

  • Class : Hybrid tea.
  • Flower type : Double.
  • Blooming : Spring through fall.
  • Caring : Full Sun, moderate watering and pruning in spring.

Afterthoughts

Throughout the history, there is no other flower as celebrated as roses. They symbolize everything to everyone – love, gratitude, appreciation, spirituality, passion, enthusiasm, friendship, joy and good health. Roses can definitely bring positive changes in our life by inspiring the mood and emotions.

When do they bloom?

Icebergs bloom from October, throughout summer and well into autumn.

Most suitable climate

Icebergs will generally grow anywhere, except in very warm and dry regions where water is scarce and the sun is too harsh. Gardeners with cold winter gardens and those in temperate climates can plant them with confidence. They grow well in the Western Cape (even in those windy coastal towns), and equally well in KwaZulu-Natal – from the cooler and frost-affected interior to the warm, humid subtropical areas.

What they need

Location: full sun for at least five hours a day.
Soil: good loamy to sandy soil. Clay soil is acceptable if the drainage is improved – adding some agricultural lime every year makes the soil more workable. Make an effort to prepare the planting holes very well; add generous amounts of compost and a large handful of bone meal to each. Mulching to keep the soil moist and cool is practically non-negotiable when it comes to roses with their shallow root systems. Organic mulch will also provide extra nutrients as it breaks down.
Water: roses like regular, liberal applications of water. In cooler weather you can cut down somewhat, but during summer it is essential to water deeply two to three times per week.
Fertilizing: generally, roses need to be fed every month, and even more regularly if they are in pots. There are some wonderful fertilizers specially formulated for roses – both chemical and organic.
Pruning: You don’t have to be a dab hand with the pruning shears to prune an Iceberg; in fact, the traditional winter pruning (while they are dormant) can be done with a simple hedge cutter or even a power saw. Later on, once they are actively growing and flowering again, all you need to do is regularly remove spent blooms and withered or diseased stems.

In a nutshell

* A rose for beginner gardeners.
* Flowers heartily, seldom disappoints.
* Suitable for mass planting.

How-To Video: Pruning a Rose Bush

Pruning roses is easy—they’re such tough plants that you can’t really hurt them. It’s pretty hard to “over prune” a rose. So be brave—and wear some rose gloves!

Product Update: We are proud to carry Dr. Earth products. The product featured in this video has been replaced with Dr. Earth Total Advantage Rose & Flower organic fertilizer.

Tools needed

  • Gauntlet gloves – leather gloves with leather arm protectors
  • Sharp, clean pruner
  • For large rose stems (and large bushes), long-handled pruners

Simple principles

  • Roses bloom on new (current season’s) growth, so you want to encourage lots of new growth by pruning
  • Remove dead, damaged, or diseased branches
  • Remove branches that cross each other or rub against each other
  • Open up the center of the bush (roses like heat and sun in the center of the plant)
  • Shape the plant
  • Reduce the size of the plant
  • Promote new, flowering branches
  • Make cuts 1/8 to ¼ inch away from a branch or ABOVE leaf nodes, not more not less
  • Cut at a 45-degree angle

Getting Started

  • Remove dead/damaged branches
  • Open up center, removing crossing branches
  • Reduce size by at least 1/3 or more
  • Reducing entire bush to 12- to 18-inches tall will plants compact and tidy—but not necessary
  • Remember to cut about 1/8 inch above a leave node
  • Step back and assess: is the plant well-balanced? If not, prune to balance

Climbing Roses

  • Same principles as above, except:
  • Leave main, sturdy, arching canes
  • Prune branches growing off main canes leaving only five to seven leaf nodes.
  • Prune 1/8 inch above leaf nodes
  • Support main canes coming from ground level by tying with sturdy plastic plant tie.

When do I feed?

  • Once new growth is about two inches long, feed with Dr. Earth Total Advantage Rose & Flower Fertilizer.
  • Then, after each blooms cycle. (Approximately every eight weeks.)
  • Remember, blooms take a lot of energy to produce, so roses need a lot of food!

Perfect rose pruning

Give your roses a pruning in July to promote better flowers and lush growth from October onwards.

Life is a garden filled with beautiful roses in spring, summer and autumn. In order to get the best from your roses, they will need to be pruned now (July). For those in the very cold parts of the country, pruning should be left until late August.

Why do roses need to be cut back? Roses are pruned to develop or maintain a plant to its optimum appearance, desired shape and size, and to encourage strong, healthy growth and maximum number of flowers. If your roses did not flower well last summer, it is best to prune lightly.

It makes it much easier to prune when using good quality, sharp pruning equipment. Use secateurs for small cuts and long-handled loppers for out-of-reach or awkward spots. Wear leather or heavy-duty gardening gloves and closed shoes as a sensible precaution against scratches from thorns. The most important thing to remember is that one cannot prune wrongly and that it is actually very easy. There really is nothing to it!

Tips for pruning different roses

Cut back Hybrid Tea roses (roses with large, well-shaped blooms on strong stems) to 50cm. Remove old wood and inward growing branches to allow light and air to reach all parts of the bush. Branches that cross or rub against each other should also be removed. Anything thinner than a pencil in thickness is never going to produce strong growth, so chose two to three main stems that will remain and remove the rest.

Floribunda roses (roses with clusters of shapely, pointed blooms) planted in a border can be given a light pruning. They can be pruned more severely where they are planted close together in a bed. ‘Iceberg’ roses sprout from old wood, so if they have grown to large and untidy cut them right back to 50cm short stems and on standards the crown needs to be cut to 30cm length, however if you want them to become large shrubs you can prune them very lightly. Miniature roses can be cut back to 30cm using garden shears, and any dead stems removed.

Most climbing roses bloom on wood that is two years or older so only unproductive older wood, or spindly growth need be removed. Tie long canes horizontally to their support to encourage more flowers.

Rose care

If roses are sprayed during their growing season, spraying after pruning is not necessary. Roses will not grow well in compacted soil. Break up any lumps of soil and fork in a generous amount of organic material, such as compost, milled bark or peanut shells, together with a small, closed handful of rose fertiliser and a handful of dolomitic lime for each rose.

Water thoroughly after pruning, and then once a week until the roses start sprouting. Increase watering to twice a week and more frequently as the weather warms up, and you will have a splendid show of roses this summer.

Life is a garden filled with beautiful roses in spring, summer and autumn. In order to get the best from your roses, they will need to be pruned now (July). For those in the very cold parts of the country, pruning should be left until late August. Why do roses need to be cut back? Roses are pruned to develop or maintain a plant to its optimum appearance, desired shape and size, and to encourage strong, healthy growth and maximum number of flowers. If your roses did not flower well last summer, it is best to prune lightly.

It makes it much easier to prune when using good quality, sharp pruning equipment. Use secateurs for small cuts and long-handled loppers for out-of-reach or awkward spots. Wear leather or heavy-duty gardening gloves and closed shoes as a sensible precaution against scratches from thorns. The most important thing to remember is that one cannot prune wrongly and that it is actually very easy. There really is nothing to it!

Tips for pruning different roses

Cut back Hybrid Tea roses (roses with large, well-shaped blooms on strong stems) to 50cm. Remove old wood and inward growing branches to allow light and air to reach all parts of the bush. Branches that cross or rub against each other should also be removed. Anything thinner than a pencil in thickness is never going to produce strong growth, so chose two to three main stems that will remain and remove the rest.

Floribunda roses (roses with clusters of shapely, pointed blooms) planted in a border can be given a light pruning. They can be pruned more severely where they are planted close together in a bed. ‘Iceberg’ roses sprout from old wood, so if they have grown to large and untidy cut them right back to 50cm short stems and on standards the crown needs to be cut to 30cm length, however if you want them to become large shrubs you can prune them very lightly.

Miniature roses can be cut back to 30cm using garden shears, and any dead stems removed. Most climbing roses bloom on wood that is two years or older so only unproductive older wood, or spindly growth need be removed. Tie long canes horizontally to their support to encourage more flowers.

Rose care

If roses are sprayed during their growing season, spraying after pruning is not necessary. Roses will not grow well in compacted soil. Break up any lumps of soil and fork in a generous amount of organic material, such as compost, milled bark or peanut shells, together with a small, closed handful of rose fertiliser and a handful of dolomitic lime for each rose.

Water thoroughly after pruning, and then once a week until the roses start sprouting. Increase watering to twice a week and more frequently as the weather warms up, and you will have a splendid show of roses this summer.

Information On Iceberg Roses: What Is An Iceberg Rose?

By Stan V. Griep
American Rose Society Consulting Master Rosarian – Rocky Mountain District

Iceberg roses have become a very popular rose among rose lovers due to their winter hardiness as well as their overall ease of care. Iceberg roses, with their beautiful flushes of fragrant blooms set against attractive foliage help them to be an eye catching beauty in the rose bed or garden. When we talk about Iceberg roses though, things can get very confusing in a hurry, so let me explain why.

Types of Iceberg Roses

The Original Iceberg Rose

The original Iceberg rose was bred by Reimer Kordes of Kordes Roses in Germany and introduced in 1958. This white blooming floribunda rose bush has a strong fragrance along with being very disease resistant. Iceberg rose’s white blooms are so bright it is hard to capture them well in a photo. The Iceberg rose’s winter hardiness is well known, too, which has led to her popularity.

The New Iceberg Rose

Around 2002 the “New” Iceberg rose was introduced, again from Kordes Roses of Germany by Tim Hermann Kordes. This version of the Iceberg rose was considered a florist’s rose and hybrid tea rose, but still a beautiful white rose. The fragrance on new Iceberg roses is considered to be mild when compared to the original. There is even a polyantha rose that was introduced around 1910 in the United Kingdom that carried the name Iceberg. The polyantha rose, however, does not appear to be related to the Kordes Iceberg rose bush.

Climbing Iceberg Roses

There is also a Climbing Iceberg rose that was introduced around 1968 in the United Kingdom. It is considered to be a sport of the original Iceberg rose from Kordes Roses of Germany. Climbing Iceberg roses are also extremely hardy and carry the same fragrant white blooms. This climber blooms on the old wood only, so be VERY careful about pruning this climber. Pruning it too much will mean the loss of the current season’s blooms! It is highly recommended not to prune this rose bush at all for at least two years of its growth in your garden or rose bed and, if it must be pruned, do so sparingly.

Colored Iceberg Roses

From there we move on to some Iceberg roses with pink and deep purple to deep red colorations.

  • Blushing Pink Iceberg rose is a sport of the original Iceberg. This Iceberg rose’s petals have a wonderful light pink blush to them almost as if painted by a famous artist. She carries the same amazing hardiness and growth habits as the original Iceberg floribunda rose bush and will, at times, produce flushes of white blooms, especially during the hot summer temps.
  • Brilliant Pink Iceberg rose is similar to Blushing Pink Iceberg rose except that she has a more pronounced pink coloration, kind of a creamy pink in some temperature conditions. Brilliant Pink rose Iceberg carries the same hardiness and disease resistance as all of the Iceberg roses do. This Iceberg rose’s fragrance is a mild honey like fragrance.
  • Burgundy Iceberg rose has deep purple blooms with a slightly lighter reverse in some rose beds, and I have seen this Iceberg rose have deep dark red blooms in other rose beds. Burgundy Iceberg rose is a sport of Brilliant Pink Iceberg rose.
  • There is even a blended yellow blooming Iceberg rose known as Golden Iceberg rose. Introduced in 2006 and a floribunda rose as well, this Iceberg rose’s fragrance is moderate and pleasing and the foliage is glossy green just as a rose bush should have. Golden Iceberg roses do not appear to be related in any way to the other Iceberg roses listed in this article; however, it is said to be a very hardy rose bush in its own right.

If you are looking for consistently hardy and very disease resistant rose bushes, the original and related Iceberg rose bushes really need to be on your list. Truly excellent rose bushes for any rose lover.

ROSE BLUSHING PINK ICEBERG (PBR)Bare Rooted

ROSES GENERAL CARE

Summary

  • Select a sunny aspect well clear of existing trees and shrubs
  • Prepare the garden bed in well drained soil
  • Do not use fertiliser when planting
  • Do not let the roots dry out at anytime after opening your rose package
  • Plant with all roots going downwards & outwards
  • Water in well after planting.
  • Re-prune the branches to a good growth eye if necessary.

The enclosed bare-root roses have been packed with care and should arrive to you in good condition. All the roses sold by Garden Express are bud grafted. They are supplied as bare root plants when dormant during the winter months. After roses are dug the roots are washed free of soil prior to packing and transport. Bare root roses travel extremely well and should remain fresh in transit for up to two weeks.

When your plants arrive:

Step 1. Undo the parcel carefully and soak the roots in water overnight.
Step 2. Plant the following day (as per planting instructions & diagram), do not let roots dry out.
Step 3. If the plants arrive in advance of your desired planting time they should be heeled-in*.
*To keep bare rooted roses longer than 3 days they should be “heeled-in”. Select an open space in the garden, dig one large hole and plant all your bundled roses in it and firm down soil. Water in well. They will keep for several weeks if kept watered.
*Note: It is important not to let the roots dry out at any stage of planting.

Choosing the right position – All roses require an open, sunny and well drained position. At least 5 hours sun per day is required, preferably more. Although shaded areas will allow roses to do well, the quantity of flowers will reduce with the percentage of shade. Shaded parts of the garden are more liable to attacks from fungus diseases as the plants remain wet for too long after rains or dewy nights. Protection from wind is essential for good blooms but remember to allow for movement of air. Avoid planting too close to established shrubs and trees.

Soil preparation Ideal soils are not available to everyone, but roses are very adaptable with some help from the gardener. Best soils are medium to heavy loam to about 35cm minimum depth, over a good clay subsoil. However roses can be grown successfully in many soil types. The important thing to remember is that light sandy soils retain less moisture and nutrients. Light sandy soils require copious quantities of compost and animal manures, as well as more frequent watering. Mulching is advisable with all soil types as it eliminates many problems, such as less watering and weeding and also retains better average soil temperature. Some mulches to use: Pea straw, lucerne, tan or pine bark, leaf mould, peat moss, and horse or cow manure.

DO NOT – use fowl manure or other quick soluble fertilisers at planting time.
DO NOT – replant into old soil where roses have been removed. Renew with fresh soil.
DO NOT – use weedicides or pre-emergence weedicides. (Roundup™ type weed killers can be used to clean an area prior to planting).

Sucker Growth – Most rose plants are budded onto “root-stocks”. Occasionally a shoot from the root stock grows and is known as a “sucker”. It will come from below the graft and the foliage will look distinctly different. This growth must be removed immediately, as it grows quite vigorously and will completely take over the plant. To remove sucker growth, first find where it originates. This may be on the main stem or from a root below ground. Take a sharp knife and remove the growth completely. Do not use secatures and do not cut off growth at ground level. DO NOT confuse water shoots with suckers. Water shoots ALWAYS come above the graft.

Dead heading – Regularly removing old flowers (dead heading) will encourage the production of more flowers throughout all of the warmer months.

How to plant – The ideal time for planting bare root roses in Australia is June and July. Later planting is possible, depending upon climate, but generous watering will be necessary until the plants have full foliage. The proposed rose bed should have been dug over many times prior to planting and brought to a good tilth, ready for the plants. A thorough cultivation at the time of planting is a bare minimum. Dig a hole large enough to take the roots, which should be placed down and outwards over a small mound at the bottom of the hole. A hole approximately 30cm wide by 25cm deep should be sufficient. Cover with soil and firm down moderately. Water in well. The bud graft or bud union should remain approximately 5cm above soil level. Do not use fertilisers at planting time, as this may burn the roots. However, the addition of well rotted animal manure and a small amount of blood and bone well dug in is beneficial.

The following can be used as a guide for spacing your plants:

Hybrid Tea Bush – Average 1 – 1.3 metre apart
Floribunda Bush – Average 0.6 – 1 metre apart
Ground Covers – Average 1 metre apart

In most circumstances the graft or bud union of all bush roses should remain approximately 5cm above soil level.
Water in well and firm moderately.

Twin Coloured Roses – Twin color roses need specific care. In order for these roses to reach their full potential, it is important that the more vigorous color is managed to allow the other color to grow and flourish. As these plants are growing, please ensure equal growth from both colours by cutting back the white flowering stems a little harder than the other colour rose. This will ensure that the more vigorous color will not overtake and crowd out the second colour of these lovely plants.

Pests and diseases – With most diseases of roses, prevention is the best cure. Most diseases can be prevented but not always cured. While it would be desirable to grow roses without spraying, they do need treating to retain good health and vitality and consequently better quality flowers. Fungus diseases such as black spot and mildew are more prevalent in the humid areas of Australia.

The following suggestions are what we have found to be most satisfactory.

Black Spot – Probably the most troublesome disease because if left unattended the plant will become defoliated and consequently lose vigour and become debilitated. It is important to remember that Black Spot cannot be cured, so a preventive spraying program is necessary. Immediately after Winter pruning spray the roses and surrounding ground with Bordeaux or Lime Sulphur, this helps eradicate any fungus spores left on the pruned plant. In early spring, when good growth commences, start spraying thoroughly every 10 days. The following fungacide sprays are considered effective: Triforine (Saprol), Mancozeb, Dithane M45, Baycor, Systhane. A good organic control for fungal infections is 1 part full cream milk to 10 parts water and sprayed onto foliage every 7 to 14 days.

Mildew – Mainly effects the young growth and is usually at its worst in sub-tropical areas where night air is cool and dews are prevalent. Spray every 10 days or when necessary with Nimrod, Triforine (Saprol), or Rubigan. For both Black Spot and Powdery Mildew avoid watering roses overhead in the late afternoon or evening, as night dampness is conducive to the spread of fungus diseases.

Rust – Appears as rust coloured spots or swellings on the underside of leaves and occasionally on the stems. Not very common, but if noticed spray the undersides of leaves with Rubigan, Triforine, or Zineb.

Insects – Aphids, two spotted mite (Red spider mite) and other sucking insects can be controlled with the following: Rogor, Metasystox, Mavrik, Torgue. These are all systemic sprays, rotate usage to avoid insects becoming partly immune.
Caterpillars & Chewing Pests- Can be eradicated using Cabaryl Septene) or Bugmaster (Sevin).

IMPORTANT NOTE: All the above sprays should be used strictly in accordance with directions on labels and compatibility investigated if using more than one at a time. Use protective clothing for safety and do not spray when temperature is above 25C. Always store chemicals well out of reach of children.

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