How to keep apricots fresh?

The Best Ways to Find, Store, and Use Apricots

Every week we get Down & Dirty, in which we break down our favorite unique seasonal fruits, vegetables, and more. This post was brought to you by our friends at Evolution Fresh, who like fresh, flavorful ingredients as much as we do.

Today: Don’t get druped into thinking that apricots aren’t anything special.

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It’s probably tough to be an apricot, the unfavored stone fruit. Apricots show up early at the market, before the summer fruit party really begins; most of their family members aren’t yet ready to make an appearance. (That early arrival also means that they’re susceptible to late spring frosts and that they have very specific growing preferences to boot.) They’re smaller and less popular than peaches and nectarines, but not small enough to be as cute as cherries. They’re the black sheep of the drupes.

Ask around and you’ll find plenty of apricot deriders who’ll proclaim them bland or mealy. Some of that disdain stems from the fact that if you don’t live near the source, apricots have a reputation for inconsistent quality — and that’s putting it nicely. In The Fruit Hunters, Adam Gollner says of most commercially produced options: “It’s almost impossible to find an apricot that doesn’t taste like coins.”

But they don’t deserve their outcast status. When you stumble upon a good one, they are superb — sweet and meaty, with just enough tartness to balance them out. Plus, apricots are sometimes considered aphrodisiacs (Shakespeare thought so; go reread A Midsummer Night’s Dream), and only the good foods seem to earn that reputation.

More: Shakespeare was decidedly less enamored with sea beans and gooseberries.

Given that most apricots we see come in a uniform shade of orange — somewhere between the oranges of creamy orange-vanilla ice pops and small fish-shaped crackers — it would be easy to assume that there’s only one variety of the fruit. But there are, in fact, a large number of different apricot cultivars. Start paying attention to them to find the truly special apricots. Some varieties are ever-so-modestly named (like Flavor Giant, Superb, and Perfection), some are covered in soft fuzz, and others have smooth skin. Apricots come in a variety of colors, too: some in deeper shades and some far lighter like Angelcots, with their yellow skin and sweet, almost white flesh (1).

Where to Find Apricots and How to Store Them
Look for apricots at your favorite grocery store or, if you live near where they are grown, at your farmers market. Angelcots have an especially short season, so act quickly. They’re available at Trader Joe’s nationwide, and a few other locations.

Apricots have a small window of perfect ripeness — they’re at their best when they have a little bit of give to them. Store them on your kitchen counter, but if they’re in danger of heading past their prime, you can pop them in the fridge for a few days.

What to Do with Them
Start your day with a strawberry apricot crisp or spoon apricot compote over a bowl of yogurt. Make a batch of apricot fruit leather to snack on, but remember that apricots don’t have to be confined to sweet treats — they’re often paired with meats like lamb or pork in savory dishes. Try them in an avocado and rye berry salad or paired with green beans and ham. Then head back to the sweet side for dessert: Toss halved apricots on the grill, and serve them with a dollop of whipped basil ricotta.

Tell us: What are your favorite ways to use apricots?

Photos by James Ransom

This post was brought to you by Evolution Fresh. Check out their new pairing guide to find out which foods go best with their juices.

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  • Make sure you know what foods are in season with our seasonal food calendar. It’ll work out cheaper, your fruit and veg will taste better and it’s more nutritious.

    When foods are in season, there’s more of it which means lots of supermarket deals and 2-for-1 offers. Bulk-buy and you can freeze joints of meat which might be more expensive in another month, or for example, when tomatoes are in season, make a batch of herby sauce and freeze in containers for pastas and soups.

    Take a look below to see what fruit and vegetables are in season each month and browse some of the recipes you could make…

    January seasonal food

    Chicken livers on toast with pomergranate seeds

    The parties are over, we’re all carrying a little extra Christmas weight, so time to get healthy. Oranges and lemons are coming into season, root veg like parsnips and swedes are in abundance, and salmon makes its seasonal debut.

    Fruit
    Apples (Bramley)
    Clementines
    Kiwi fruit (in season from mid-Jan)
    Lemons (coming into season)
    Oranges (coming into season)
    Passion fruit
    Pears
    Pomegranate

    Vegetables
    Beetroot (end of season)
    Brussel sprouts
    Cauliflower
    Celery (end of season)
    Celeriac
    Kale
    Leeks
    Mushrooms (wild)
    Parsnips
    Potatoes (maincrop)
    Rhubarb (coming into season)
    Shallots
    Swedes
    Turnips

    Meat
    Duck (end of season)
    Goose (end of season)
    Rabbit (available, but at its best Jul-Dec)
    Turkey
    Venison

    Fish and seafood
    Haddock
    Mussels
    Oysters
    Salmon (coming into season)

    Our favourite seasonal January recipes
    Salmon pasta with leeks and creme fraiche
    Roast root veg
    Easy leek and potato soup
    Cauliflower in three-cheese sauce
    Rhubarb and orange tart
    Citrus squares

    February seasonal food

    Only the hardiest of veggies are around in February – the only newcomer is purple sprouting broccoli – but there’s lots of lovely seafood in season. Keep the winter blues away with hearty recipes made with February’s seasonal foods.

    Fruit
    Apples (Bramley) (end of season)
    Clementines (end of season)
    Kiwi fruit
    Lemons
    Oranges
    Passion fruit
    Pears (end of season)
    Pomegranates

    Vegetables
    Brussel sprouts (end of season)
    Cauliflower
    Celeriac
    Kale (end of season)
    Leeks
    Mushrooms (wild) (end of season)
    Parsnips (end of season)
    Potatoes (maincrop) (end of season)
    Purple sprouting broccoli (coming into season)
    Rhubarb
    Shallots
    Swedes (end of season)
    Turnips (end of season)

    Meat
    Rabbit (available but at its best Jul-Dec)
    Turkey (end of season)
    Venison (end of season)

    Fish and seafood
    Haddock (end of season)
    Mussels (end of season)
    Oysters
    Salmon

    Our favourite seasonal February recipes
    Steamed purple sprouting broccoli with goat’s cheese
    Grilled cauliflower soup
    Mussel and shallot broth
    Carrot and parsnip hotpot
    Chicken with baked rhubarb

    March seasonal food

    In March, the weather (hopefully!) warms up, getting you in the mood for lighter dishes with spinach, spring onions and watercress coming into season. Enjoy the last of the mussels and oysters.

    Fruit
    Kiwi fruit
    Lemons (end of main season)
    Oranges (end of main season)
    Passion fruit (end of season)
    Pomegranates (end of season)

    Vegetables
    Cauliflower
    Celeriac (end of season)
    Leeks (end of season)
    Peppers (coming into season)
    Purple sprouting broccoli
    Rhubarb
    Shallots (end of season)
    Spinach (comes into season mid-March)
    Spring onions (coming into season)

    Meat
    Rabbit (still available)
    Turkey (still available)

    Fish and seafood
    Mussels (end of season)
    Oysters (end of season)
    Salmon

    Our favourite seasonal March recipes
    Spinach pie with peperonata
    Goat’s cheese with watercress salad
    Garlic and wine mussels
    Sausage and spring onion meatball pasta
    Creamy spinach and roasted vegetable lasagne

    April seasonal food

    asparagus burrata and prosciutto toast

    Enjoy early spring in April and the seasonal foods that come with it, the most well-known, of course, being lamb. Asparagus and apricots make their debut, and it’s also the season for tuna and crab.

    Fruit
    Apricot (coming into season)
    Kiwi fruit

    Vegetables
    Asparagus (coming into season)
    Cauliflower (end of season)
    Peppers
    Purple sprouting broccoli (end of season)
    Rhubarb
    Spinach
    Spring onions

    Meat
    Lamb (coming into season)
    Rabbit (still available)
    Turkey (still available)

    Fish and seafood
    Crab (coming into season)
    Salmon
    Tuna (coming into season)

    Our favourite seasonal April recipes
    Slow roast shoulder of lamb
    Greek lamb casserole
    Smoked salmon and asparagus omelette
    Tuna steaks with tomato butter

    May seasonal food

    May is the month when seasonal food gets really colourful, with peas, carrots and cherries coming into season, along with aubergines and rocket. The first of the new potatoes arrive, sardines and pollock are available too.

    Fruit
    Apricots
    Cherries (coming into season)
    Kiwi fruit

    Vegetables
    Asparagus
    Aubergines (in season from late May)
    Carrots (in season from late May)
    New potatoes (coming into season)
    Peas (coming into season)
    Peppers
    Rhubarb (end of season)
    Rocket (coming into season)
    Spinach
    Spring onions
    Watercress (coming into season)

    Meat
    Lamb
    Rabbit (available, but at its best Jul-Dec)

    Fish and seafood
    Crab
    Pollock (pollack) (in season from mid-May)
    Salmon
    Sardines (in season from end of May)
    Tuna

    June seasonal food

    baked mackerel

    Summer really kicks off in June. It’s the best month for broad beans, pak choi and courgettes, while strawerries, raspberries, blueberries and tomatoes have started to ripen. Haddock and mackerel also come into season.

    Fruit
    Apricots
    Blueberries (coming into season)
    Cherries
    Kiwi fruit
    Raspberries (coming into season)
    Strawberries (coming into season)
    Tomatoes (coming into season)

    Vegetables
    Artichokes (globe) (coming into season)
    Asparagus
    Aubergines
    Broad beans (in season mid-June)
    Carrots
    Courgettes (coming into season)
    Fennel (coming into season)
    New potatoes
    Pak choi (in season end of June)
    Peas
    Peppers
    Rocket
    Spinach (end of main season)
    Spring onions
    Turnips (summer season crop in season)
    Watercress

    Meat
    Lamb
    Rabbit (available but best Jul-Dec)

    Fish and seafood
    Crab
    Haddock (coming into season)
    Mackerel (coming into season)
    Pollock (pollack)
    Salmon
    Sardines
    Tuna

    Our favourite seasonal June recipes
    Red berry shortcake
    Smoked mackerel and spring onion jacket
    Creamy spinach and haddock fillets
    Broad bean and pepper salad
    Pak choi with cannellini beans and garlic
    Green and red salad stack
    Fennel and salmon parcels

    July seasonal food

    Berries are in season and blackberries make their first appearance, along with melon and peaches. Sweetcorn, broccoli, beetroot and courgettes come into season and seafood lovers can enjoy fresh, seasonal scallops.

    Fruit
    Apricots
    Blackberries (coming into season)
    Blueberries
    Cherries
    Kiwi fruit
    Melon (coming into season)
    Peaches (coming into season)
    Raspberries
    Strawberries
    Tomatoes

    Vegetables
    Artichokes (globe)
    Asparagus (end of season)
    Aubergines
    Beetroot (coming into season)
    Broad beans
    Broccoli (in season from end of July)
    Carrots
    Courgettes
    Cucumber (coming into season)
    Fennel
    New potatoes (end of season)
    Pak choi
    Peas
    Peppers
    Potatoes (maincrop) (coming into season)
    Rocket
    Spring onions (end of season)
    Sweetcorn (coming into season)
    Turnips (summer season crop)
    Watercress

    Meat
    Lamb
    Rabbit (main season begins)

    Fish and seafood
    Crab
    Haddock
    Mackerel
    Pollock (pollack)
    Prawns
    Salmon
    Sardines
    Scallops (from mid-July)
    Tuna

    Our favourite July seasonal recipes
    Courgette fritters
    BBQ sweetcorn with lime and chilli butter
    Rabbit in red wine sauce
    Scallop, bacon and lamb’s lettuce salad

    August seasonal food

    Mediterranean vegetables are everywhere in August, berries are still going strong, broccoli is abundant and nectarines come into season. Think salads and smoothies. There’s lots of fish and seafood around too.

    Fruit
    Apricots
    Blackberries
    Blueberries
    Cherries (end of season)
    Kiwi fruit (end of season)
    Melon
    Nectarines (coming into season)
    Peaches
    Raspberries
    Strawberries (end of season)
    Tomatoes

    Vegetables
    Artichokes (globe)
    Aubergines
    Beetroot
    Broad beans
    Broccoli
    Carrots
    Celery (coming into season)
    Courgettes
    Cucumber
    Fennel
    Pak choi
    Peas
    Peppers
    Potatoes (maincrop)
    Rocket
    Sweetcorn
    Watercress

    Meat
    Lamb
    Rabbit
    Venison (may still be available)

    Fish and seafood
    Crab
    Haddock
    Mackerel
    Pollock (pollack)
    Salmon
    Sardines
    Scallops
    Tuna

    Our favourite August seasonal recipes
    Stuffed peppers
    Iced berry smoothies
    Broad bean crostini
    Fruity chicken salad
    Crab, pea and redcurrant salad
    Warm broccoli and chicken salad

    September seasonal food

    September marks the end of summer berries, but there’s lots of other fruit like apples, plums, grapes, figs and pears. Pumpkin, squash, kale and leeks make their debut, lamb makes a comeback and it’s the start of the mussels season.

    Fruit
    Apples (Bramley) (coming into season)
    Apricots (end of season)
    Blackberries
    Blueberries (end of season)
    Grapes (short season to October)
    Figs (coming into season)
    Melon
    Nectarines
    Peaches (end of season)
    Pears (coming into season)
    Plums (coming into season)
    Raspberries (end of season)
    Tomatoes

    Vegetables
    Artichokes (globe)
    Aubergines
    Beetroot
    Broad beans (in season until early Sep)
    Broccoli
    Butternut squash (coming into season)
    Carrots
    Celery
    Celeriac (coming into season)
    Courgettes
    Cucumber (end of season)
    Fennel
    Kale (coming into season)
    Leeks (coming into season)
    Pak choi (end of season)
    Peas
    Peppers
    Potatoes (maincrop)
    Pumpkin (coming into season)
    Rocket
    Sweetcorn
    Watercress

    Meat
    Duck (coming into season)
    Goose (coming into season)
    Lamb
    Rabbit
    Venison (coming into season)

    Fish and seafood
    Crab
    Haddock
    Mackerel
    Mussels (coming into season)
    Pollock (pollack)
    Salmon
    Sardines
    Scallops
    Tuna (until end Sep)

    Our favourite seasonal September recipes Lamb cutlets with pumpkin
    Leek and pear tart

    October seasonal food

    Autumn’s still great for fruit and veg. It’s the start of the season for wild mushrooms, cranberries and shallots, while squash and pumpkin are widely available. Oysters start their season and it’s turkey time too.

    Fruit
    Apples (Bramley)
    Blackberries (end of season)
    Cranberries (coming into season)
    Grapes (end of season)
    Figs
    Melon (end of season)
    Nectarines (end of season)
    Pears
    Plums (end of season)
    Tomatoes (end of season)

    Vegetables
    Artichokes (globe)
    Aubergines (until mid-October)
    Beetroot
    Broccoli (end of season)
    Butternut squash
    Carrots (end of season)
    Celery
    Celeriac
    Courgettes (end of season)
    Fennel (end of season)
    Kale
    Leeks
    Mushrooms (wild) (coming into season)
    Parsnips
    Peas (end of season)
    Peppers (end of season)
    Potatoes (maincrop)
    Pumpkin
    Rocket (end of season)
    Shallots (coming into season)
    Sweetcorn (end of season)
    Swedes (until mid-Oct)
    Turnips (winter crop coming into season)
    Watercress

    Meat
    Duck
    Goose
    Lamb (end of season)
    Rabbit
    Turkey (coming into season)
    Venison

    Fish and seafood
    Crab
    Haddock
    Mackerel
    Mussels
    Oysters (coming into season)
    Pollock (pollack)
    Prawns (end of season)
    Salmon (end of season)
    Scallops

    November seasonal food

    Root vegetables like swedes and parsnips sweeten in the November frost and as the festive season approaches, chestnuts, clementines and passion fruit are easy to come by. It’s also the season forthe love-hate Brussels sprout.

    Fruit
    Apples (Bramley)
    Clementines (coming into season)
    Cranberries
    Figs (end of season)
    Passion fruit (coming into season)
    Pears

    Vegetables
    Artichokes (globe) (end of season)
    Beetroot
    Brussels sprouts (in season from end of Nov)
    Butternut squash (end of season)
    Celery
    Celeriac
    Kale
    Leeks
    Mushrooms (wild)
    Parsnips
    Potatoes
    Pumpkin
    Shallots
    Swedes
    Turnips
    Watercress (until early Nov)

    Meat
    Duck
    Goose
    Rabbit
    Turkey
    Venison

    Fish and seafood
    Crab (end of season)
    Haddock
    Mussels
    Oysters
    Pollock (pollack)
    Scallops

    Our favourite seasonal November recipes
    Clementine custard tart
    Buttered swede with crispy bacon
    Brie and cranberry torte
    Brussels sprouts with chestnuts
    Steak with parsnip mash

    December seasonal food

    It’s the season to be jolly in December as goose, duck and of course, turkey are in the shops. Cauliflower comes into season, as does sweet pomegranate, while hardy veggies like parsnip, swedes, turnips and sprouts are easy to find.

    Fruit
    Apples (Bramley)
    Clementines
    Cranberries (end of season)
    Passion fruit
    Pears
    Pomegranate (coming into season)

    Vegetables
    Beetroot
    Brussels sprouts
    Cauliflower (in season from mid-Dec)
    Celery
    Celeriac
    Kale
    Leeks
    Mushrooms (wild)
    Parsnips
    Potatoes (maincrop)
    Pumpkin
    Shallots
    Swede
    Turnips

    Meat
    Duck
    Goose
    Rabbit
    Turkey
    Venison

    Fish and seafood
    Haddock
    Mussels
    Oysters
    Pollock (pollack) (until start of Dec)
    Scallops

    Our favourite seasonal December recipes
    Roast turkey with chestnut, sage and apple stuffing
    Roast goose with apple and bay leaves
    Beetroot and pomegranate soup
    Celeriac, carrot and pearl barley bake
    Tana Ramsay’s Clementine tart

    What’s your favourite month or season for fresh produce? Do you love summer berries or is it spring vegetables that win you over? We’d love to hear your thoughts so join the conversation over on our Facebook page!

    First Fruits of the Season

    In Colorado, spring is synonymous with wildflowers, but in Grand Junction that’s not the only vegetation that’s in blossom right now. Orchards are blooming with color as an array of fruit is in abundance. Apples, pears, grapes, apricots, berries, cherries, and of course peaches overflow at area fruit stands and farmers markets. Restaurants integrate locally grown produce into their seasonal menus.

    Apricots, peaches, and cherries are the first fruits to arrive in the spring. Each budding flower is distinctly different, so it’s easy to tell them apart and know which soon-to-be fruit you’re looking at. While peaches are easy to distinguish from apricots and cherries, even from a distance, it will take a closer inspection to tell the apricot and cherry blossoms apart.

    Palisade peaches are known for being sweet and perfectly juicy. During the warm summer months, it’s nearly impossible to visit a farmer’s market anywhere in Colorado without seeing a booth selling Palisade peaches. They start out as bright pink flowers and are easy to identify even from far away. From a distance, peach orchards blend into a vast sea of soft pink waves that look spectacular and become even more magical when you walk among them.

    Photo by @cora_lena_

    While Palisade might be more known for wine and peaches, all the other produce that comes from the fertile soil is exceptional too, including apricots. While they might just look like miniature peaches, right down to the fuzzy skin, apricots have more of a tart taste to them. Apricot blossoms develop soft, pure white flowers that glitter in the sun.

    Photo by @linda.robi2

    Palisade’s plump and flavorful cherry blossoms also begin their life cycle with flowers somewhere in between peaches and apricots. Light pink or white, or some combination of the two blended together, with red around the center.

    Here are a few places where you can view the orchards and taste its bounty. Stop in at any of these local orchards to walk among the orchards and see the flowers up close. Remember to look, but don’t touch! What you see will soon develop into a delicious treat, a reward to look forward to.

    Valley Fruit:

    Located right off Elberta Avenue, the main road coming into Palisade from I-70, this little fruit stand replicates an old west town that’s full of charm. You can head west on G 7/10 road for rolling orchard and vineyard views on both sides.

    Herman Produce:

    Another shop located right off Elberta Avenue, Herman Produce is a bright pink building with a large FRUIT sign, making it easy to see as you’re coming down the road. While the actual shop doesn’t open until June, the expansive orchards are in bloom well before then and is a great place to pull off and feast your eyes upon the upcoming harvest.

    McLean Farms:

    Keep on heading down Elberta Avenue until you reach McLean Farms, known not only for their peaches but also for their peach ice cream. In addition to ice cream, their shop has sundaes covered with an assortment of fruit sauces, all made locally.

    Check out the Grand Junction Adventure Guide.

    Photo Roasted apricotsCredit Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times

    Peaches and plums are delicious throughout the summer, but the apricot season is short and sweet. So now is the time to feature them in both your desserts and main dishes, as Martha Rose Shulman writes in this week’s Recipes for Health:

    Apricots are an early summer fruit, and their short season is now. They’re worth buying, for the purposes of both taste and nutrition, only when you can find them ripe. You don’t want them so ripe that they bruise as soon as you put them into a bag – they should be slightly firm to the touch, as apricots ripen from the inside out – but if they were picked green they will have little flavor, and they’ll have that mealy texture that describes a bad apricot.

    Here are new ways to cook with apricots.

    Photo

    Buckwheat Crepes With Roasted Apricots: A delicious combination of earthy/nutty crepes and sweet and tangy apricots.

    Photo

    Apricot Crumble With Oatmeal Topping: A topping prepared ahead of time means this satisfying dessert takes only 20 minutes to bake.

    Photo

    Pan-Cooked Chicken Scaloppine With Spiced Roasted Apricots: Roasted apricots go well with savory dishes like these chicken breasts, or your vegetarian favorite.

    Photo

    Soufflé Omelet With Apricot Sauce: Beaten egg whites keep this Cointreau-spiked dessert omelet light and airy.

    Photo

    Small Apricot Galettes: Simple, rustic tarts show off peak-season fruit.

    Apricot

    A relative of the peach, nectarine, plum and cherry, apricots are fragrant, with a soft, velvety skin that ranges from pale yellow to deep orange. Inside there’s a large kernel that will fall out easily if the flesh is ripe.

    Apricots need a warm climate to thrive – in the summer most come from hot European countries, and there’s also a short winter season for apricots grown in Chile and South Africa.

    Availability

    The British apricot season is from May to September.

    Choose the best

    An apricot’s colour is not always a reliable guide to flavour, but steer clear of very pale varieties, and always avoid wrinkled or blemished skins. The flesh should feel moderately firm with some give.

    Prepare it

    Halve by running a blade around the kernel following the line of the fruit’s natural dimple, then gently twist apart and flip out the stone. Brush the cut sides with lemon juice to prevent the flesh from discolouring.

    Store it

    At room temperature if not completely ripe (they’ll ripen in a day or two in the fruit bowl), otherwise in the fridge.

    Cook it

    In tarts and crumbles; poached and served with double cream; or use to make jam, compote or chutneys.

    Alternatives

    Try peach or nectarine.

    Apricots are in season. We have recipes

    What’s in season: Apricots and other stone fruit are a common sight at market stands this time of year, but the flavorful fruit are really starting to come into season. Apricots, including sweet, plump Helena apricots, large Robadas, cult-favorite Blenheims and fragrant Poppy apricots, as well as crimson Flavor Royal pluots and other pluots and apriums (hybrid fruit created by crossing apricots with plums) are making a colorful show with a season that typically lasts well through the hot summer months. Green apricots — unripe apricots similar in appearance to almonds — pop up occasionally at the odd stand; these are bitter- or sour-flavored fruit often used for pickling.

    Galettes, jam and more: 12 great recipes using apricots >>

    What to cook: Sometimes apricots are best savored as a simple snack, with a stack of napkins handy to help with each juicy bite. Slice the fruit to add sweet notes to a quick salad, or halve and grill apricots to caramelize the sugars before serving alongside a simple scoop of ice cream. Turn the fruit into a shrub — a sweetened, vinegar-based drink also called “drinking vinegars” — or add diced fruit to a summer sangria. If adding to a tart, galette or crumble, the skins are easily removed before using: Score the base of each fruit with an X, then place in boiling water just until the skin begins to curl. Remove the fruit to a bowl of ice water to stop the cooking and peel the skin away as soon as the fruit is cool enough to handle.

    What’s on the horizon: Tomatillos, wrapped in their delicate paper skins, are making a good show at a number of stands, and corn is just starting to show up.

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    Fresh Fruit Storage and Ripening Tips

    Here are some basic storage and ripening guidelines for fresh fruit. Humidity can speed up the ripening process. Most fruits are best kept in a cool, dry place, such as on a countertop away from sunlight and heat. For tips on preparing a specific produce item, search by name in The FruitGuys Magazine.

    Want farm-fresh fruit?

    We’ve got you covered.

    Remember to always wash your hands, and rinse fruit in cold water before eating, even if it’s organic.

    Apples

    Apples should be kept in a cool space away from sunlight and heat. Depending on the variety, they will keep in a cool space for up to two weeks. When refrigerated, most apples will keep for 3–4 weeks.

    Apricots

    Apricots continue to ripen after picking. They should be stored at room temperature, away from sunlight and heat until they give softly to the touch and have a sweet aroma. Once ripe, refrigerate apricots as necessary to prevent spoiling, but cold temperatures may change their texture and taste.

    Apriums

    Apriums are an apricot-plum fruit hybrid. They continue to ripen after picking and should be stored at room temperature, away from sunlight and heat until they give softly to the touch and have a sweet aroma. After ripe, refrigerate apriums as necessary to prevent spoiling, but cold temperatures may change their texture and taste.

    We’ve got you covered.

    Avocados

    Store avocados at room temperature until they are ripe. They’ll give slightly to pressure when they’re ready to eat. To ripen avocados faster, put them in a paper bag for a couple of days. After ripening, they may be refrigerated for several days, and half-avocados should be stored in an airtight container in the fridge with the pit still in place (to limit browning).

    Bananas

    Store bananas at room temperature away from direct sunlight and heat. Bananas become yellow, soft, and sweet as they ripen. If you want to speed the ripening process, put bananas in a paper bag with an apple overnight. The natural ethylene gas released by the apple will help ripen your bananas. Bananas are very delicate and can be easily damaged by extreme temperatures, hot or cold. Refrigerating bananas will turn their skins black. Black-skinned bananas were most likely exposed to extremely cold temperatures. The flesh inside will continue to ripen, even refrigerated, and can still be eaten, or if too ripe, used for baking.

    Berries

    Berries are picked ripe and should be enjoyed as soon as possible. Berries should be kept refrigerated until eaten. Do not wash berries until you are ready to eat (or freeze) them.

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    Cherries

    Refrigerate cherries unwashed in a plastic bag for up to a week or 10 days. Before eating, rinse the cherries and let them warm to room temperature for best flavor. If you think you might not eat them before they spoil, try pitting and freezing the cherries for a refreshing treat in the hot summer months!

    Figs

    Figs are picked ripe. If they are hard, let them sit a room temperature until soft. Once ripe, refrigerate figs until ready to eat. You can enjoy them cold or at room temperature.

    Grapefruit

    Grapefruit can be stored at room temperature for a week or so. Keep out of direct sunlight. You can also refrigerate grapefruit for up to several weeks.

    Grapes

    Grapes should be stored in the refrigerator, unwashed and dry, and kept on their stems (rather than loose). You can rinse them off just before eating. If you rinse grapes before putting them in the fridge, they’ll only last a few days—since even a tiny amount of moisture will encourage bacteria growth, as will the exposed area left behind by the stem. Dry, refrigerated grapes on the stem can last up to two weeks.

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    Kiwi

    Keep kiwifruit at room temperature until ripe, when it gives slightly to the touch. Once ripe, refrigerated kiwi will keep for a few days. Very firm unripe kiwi can keep refrigerated for up to two months.

    Lemons

    Lemons can be stored at room temperature for a couple of weeks. Keep out of direct sunlight. Refrigerated lemons can keep up to several weeks.

    Limes

    Limes can be stored at room temperature for a couple of weeks, out of direct sunlight. Refrigerated lines can keep for up to several weeks.

    Mangoes

    Mangoes can be stored at room temperature and will continue to ripen. When they give slightly to touch, they are ready to eat. Refrigerate mangoes to slow down the ripening process.

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    Melons

    Store melons at room temperature until ripe. The best indicator of melon ripeness is the aroma. If a melon’s sweet fragrance is noticeable, it’s probably ready to cut and eat. The outside of the melon should feel firm but give slightly to pressure, particularly on the end where the stem was. If it feels rock-hard, give it a little more time. Once cut, cover and refrigerate.

    Nectarines

    Nectarines are climacteric, which means they ripen after picking. Nectarines should be stored at room temperature, away from sunlight and heat until they give softly to touch and have a sweet aroma. The FruitGuys strives to deliver them to you on the firm side so they won’t be damaged in shipping. To speed nectarine ripening, place them in a paper bag on the counter. When they’ve reached the desired ripeness, eat or refrigerate nectarines for up to several days.

    Oranges

    Oranges can be stored at room temperature for a couple of weeks or refrigerated for up to several weeks. Keep out of direct sunlight.

    Passion Fruit

    Passion fruit is a fragrant fruit and is best eaten ripe, cut in half and scooped out. You can tell when a passion fruit is ripe when it begins to look shriveled. For the best tasting passion fruit, we recommend you store passion fruit on the counter out of direct sunlight and give it a few days to “wrinkle-up.”

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    Peaches

    Peaches are climacteric, which means they ripen after picking. Peaches should be stored at room temperature, away from sunlight and heat until they give softly to the touch and have a sweet aroma. The FruitGuys delivers them to you on the firm side so they won’t be damaged during shipping. Peach ripening can be hastened by placing them in a paper bag on the counter. When they’ve reached the desired ripeness, you can refrigerate peaches, but cold temperatures may change their texture and taste.

    Pears

    Pears are picked hard and continue to ripen. Pears should be stored at room temperature, away from heat and sunlight. Pears ripen from the inside out, so if it gives to the touch, particularly near the stem, it is ready to eat. You can slow ripening by refrigerating pears. Once ripe, the pear can be refrigerated for up to five days.

    Plums

    Plums continue to ripen after picking. Plums should be stored at room temperature, away from sunlight and heat until they give softly to the touch and have a sweet aroma. Once ripe, refrigerate plums as necessary to prevent spoiling, but cold temperatures may change their texture and taste.

    Pluots

    Pluots are a plum-apricot cross. They continue to ripen after picking and should be stored at room temperature, away from sunlight and heat until they give softly to the touch and have a sweet aroma. Once ripe, refrigerate pluots as necessary to prevent spoiling, but cold temperatures may change their texture and taste.

    Pomelos

    Pomelos are the largest citrus fruit. Pomelos can be stored at room temperature for a couple of weeks or refrigerated for up to several weeks. Keep away from direct sunlight and heat.

    Satsuma Mandarins

    Satsumas can be stored at room temperature for a couple of weeks or refrigerate Satsumas for up to several weeks. Satsuma mandarin skin is soft, pliable, and has an “airy” and puffy look and feel. Don’t let the looks of the peel fool you—this is a deliciously sweet-tart mandarin, one of our favorites.

    Tangerines

    Tangerines can be stored at room temperature for a couple of weeks or refrigerate tangerines for up to several weeks. Keep away from direct sunlight and heat.

    We’ve got you covered.
    Contact us with any questions: [email protected], 1-877-FRUIT-ME (877-378-4863).

    When stone fruit emerge at farmers’ markets, our heads fill with images of pies, tarts, jams, and the sensation of biting into a juicy, cool piece of fruit poolside, beachside, or porchside. But apricots are almost more of a treat than the others: After munching on their dried counterparts for the better part of the winter, we like swapping the chewy texture and super sweet flavor for the clean flavor of the fresh fruit. Plus, apricots are pretty versatile, playing well in both sweet and savory dishes. Read on for how to buy and store these stone fruit, and take a look at the slideshow below for recipe inspiration.

    HOW TO BUY
    The tastiest apricots are tree-ripened (it doesn’t ripen after it’s picked), so the best apricots will be found at farmers’ markets. They should be purchased ripe or slightly under-ripe. Avoid choosing any with green coloration or brown soft spots. Instead, select fruit that yields slightly to the touch and has a uniform color.

    HOW TO STORE
    Keep in an untied plastic bag in the fridge for no more than three to five days. Soften in a paper bag at room temperature.

    Tomorrow: Blueberries!

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