How to grow a pluot tree from seed?

When it comes to planting stone fruit at home, pluots are the way to go, says Chuck Ingels, UC Cooperative Extension advisor in Sacramento County. Cherries are delicious, but with a new maggot pest, are hard to grow. Peaches and nectarines are susceptible to leaf curl disease, which is challenging to manage because the most effective products have been removed from store shelves. Apples and pears can suffer from fire blight and coddling moths worms.

Dapple Dandy pluot. (Photo: Wikimedia Commons) “I think plums and pluots are the best choices for backyard trees,” Ingels said. “Especially pluots.”

“Pluot” is a trade name for varieties of interspecific plum-apricot bred by private Modesto breeder Floyd Zaiger. Pluots’ skin is typically dappled but smooth and without the bitterness in the skin of plums. The flesh is unusually sweet and juicy with complex plum-apricot flavors.

“I really like Flavor Grenade,” Ingels said. “The taste just explodes in your mouth. Another good one is Dapple Dandy, which is a little later.”

Flavor Grenade is a large fruit with oblong shape. The skin has a red blush on green background, and the flesh is a juicy yellow. Dapple Dandy has mottled pale green to yellow, red-spotted skin and red or pink juicy firm flesh.

About a dozen varieties of pluot are offered by Dave Wilson Nursery of Modesto, Zaiger’s exclusive licensee. Dave Wilson Nursery supplies bare root trees in the winter to retail nurseries across California. The best time to plant is early- to mid-winter.

At the UC Cooperative Extension Fair Oaks Horticulture Center in Sacramento, Master Gardeners are creatively planting and pruning pluots and other fruit trees to make them easier to harvest and take less space.

Phil Damewood, a former Sacramento County Master Gardener, prunes a fruit bush. “We have fruit bushes at the horticulture center,” Ingels said. “It works out really well.”

Fruit bushes are standard or semi-dwarf trees kept small by periodic summer pruning. Fruit bushes can be managed without a ladder and multiple species and varieties can be grown in relatively small areas. When bare-root planted in the winter, the trees are headed to knee height. In late spring and again in the summer, new growth is cut in half. This pruning regimen continues until trees reach the desired height – usually two years. For the life of the tree, it is pruned to a size manageable from the ground.

“The main concern is keeping them tame,” Ingels said. “For pluots, there is just one dwarfing rootstock – Citation.”

Pluots, like plums, will also need a pollinizer of a different variety to ensure good fruit set. Most pluot varieties will pollinize another pluot variety. Another option is planting certain varieties of plum to pollinize the pluot.

At the Fair Oaks Horticulture Center, Master Gardeners are experimenting with a number of planting arrangements, such as planting two to four different trees in one hole. Trees grown in this close proximity combine to form a bush the approximate size of one tree grown alone. For more ambitious gardeners, fruit trees can also be carefully trained into an espalier or other design. For examples, see the Fair Oaks Horticulture Center website.

How to Grow a Plum Tree from a Pit

  1. Place the pit in a bucket of water and see if it stays afloat or sinks. If it floats, the pit is no good and shouldn’t be planted. If it sinks, it should grow.
  2. Dry the pit thoroughly and put it in a zip-lock bag with some compost or peat moss.
  3. Place the bag in the refrigerator and maintain the pit’s temperature at around 40 degrees Fahrenheit (4.4 degrees Celsius) for six to eight weeks.
  4. Check the pit frequently after about five weeks. When it cracks and sprouts, remove it from the refrigerator.
  5. Prepare the soil for planting by combining two parts soil with one part compost. Try to do this about a week before the pit is ready. If it hasn’t started sprouting by the fifth week, start preparing the soil then.
  6. Plant the pit 4-inches (101.6-millimeters) deep in the soil.
  7. Place a hardware cloth over the area until the sprout breaks through the surface. This will keep animals from digging up the pit
  8. Transplant the sapling after a year, if necessary, to the place where you want it to grow permanently. Spring is the best time for transplanting .

Take a plum and an apricot, put them together, and what do you get? It depends! Pluots, apriums, apriplums and plumcots are all different kinds of plum-apricot hybrids… but what are the differences?

First-Generation Hybrids

A first-generation hybrid is one where a plum parent and an apricot parent are mixed. “Children” of these unions are known as plumcots or apriplums. These hybrids have existed for hundreds of years. These hybrids tend to show more plum than apricot traits.

Plumcots are available in many varieties, ranging from the very sweet, like Flavorosa and Flavor Royal, to average-flavored varieties like Flavor Fall. Some kinds of plumcots even exhibit different flavors, like Flavor Grenade, which has been compared to everything from apple to pineapple. Like their cousins, the plums, plumcots are often available in beautiful colors, and the flesh can be anywhere from yellow to bright red or purple, depending on the variety.

Later-Generation Hybrids

Pluots are a later-generation hybrid that also show more plum characteristics. The outside of the fruit closely resembles a plum, and the flavor is the only place where some apricot traits shine through. Like plumcots, pluots are available in many varieties. One of the most surprising to cut into is the Dapple Dandy, which looks mottled and brownish on the outside and has beautiful bright red or pink flesh. The Flavor Finale is a purple-red variety that resembles a traditional dark plum, but its flavor is complex and very delicious.

Apriums are a hybrid that are one fourth plum and three quarters apricot, making them the only hybrid that more closely resembles apricots. Available in the early fruit season, apriums are only available for a very short time. Apriums like Cot-N-Candy and Flavor Delight tend to exhibit plummy aftertastes, though the fruit itself resembles an apricot.

How to Use Them?

Aside from eating these hybrids raw, try them in any recipe calling for either plums or apricots. Here are some of our favorites:

  • Mixed Berry Plum Crisp
  • Roasted Plum Salad with Goat Cheese, Roast Chicken with Plums and Plum Crumble
  • Apricot Tart

Image: ClayIrving

What’s the Difference Between a “Hybrid” Fruit and a “GMO?”

Q: What is a GMO?

A: A GMO, or Genetically Modified Organism, has had its DNA altered via genetic engineering to make it more disease, pest, or chemical resistant, or to include desirable characteristics such as size, color, enhanced nutrition, or stability (shelf life). GMO produce might include things such as tomatoes that have been genetically altered to stay firm, or corn, soybean, or sugar beets modified to resist pests and/or weed killers or to be more drought tolerant. The FruitGuys never use GMO fruit, vegetables, or products. We supported Prop 37, the 2012 California ballot initiative that would have required GMO products to be labeled so consumers can choose for themselves (visit Right to Know GMO to find out how to get involved).

Close to 90% of the corn, soybean, cotton, and sugar beet crops grown in the U.S. has been genetically modified. Corn, soybean, and sugar beet byproducts are used in many processed foods. GMO foods are required to be labeled in the European Union. Here, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Food and Drug Administration, and the Environmental Protection Agency are responsible for regulating the production and safety of GMO foods. While the World Health Organization states “no effects on human health have been shown as a result of the consumption of such foods by the general population in the countries where they have been approved,” there have not been any studies addressing concerns about allergies and unknown long-term effects on human health. Some studies have shown potential harm to non-modified plants and animals, including unintended crossbreeding, pesticide resistance, and population changes.

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Q: What is a hybrid?

A: Hybrids, or hybrid fruits, such as an aprium (apricot crossed with a plum) or pluot (plum crossed with an apricot), is a variety made by naturally crossbreeding two separate varieties to create a new one. Hybridization can occur spontaneously in nature (through cross-pollination) or be practiced by farmers and gardeners. Pioneering botanist Luther Burbank developed more than 800 plant varieties using hybridization, grafting, and crossbreeding all-natural trait selection processes. Hybridization is a form of crossbreeding where two different varieties are combined resulting in an offspring that combines characteristics of the parent varieties. Over successive generations, the desirable traits can be tailored. Burbank brought us the first plumcot—a cross between a plum and an apricot—and the Russet potato, among many other fruits, vegetables, and plants. In mammals, a hybrid example is the Labradoodle, produced by crossing a standard poodle and a Labrador retriever.

Contact us with any questions: [email protected], 1-877-FRUIT-ME (877-378-4863).

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Badger Flame beetroot

Row 7, a collaboration between a chef, a plant breeder and a seedsman, aims to sell seeds for vegetables that might not otherwise reach a broad market, reported the New York Times last month. One of its offerings is the Badger Flame, a beetroot of brilliant orange that a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison bred to produce a sweet and mild variety his children would enjoy.

No more tears? The EverMild onion. Photograph: evermild.com

The EverMild onion

The troubled reputation of agriculture giant Monsanto was built on Roundup, Agent Orange and genetically modified commodity crops. But it discovered that GM wasn’t as effective in producing new vegetables as a tried-and-tested method: crossbreeding (enhanced for the 21st century by a technique called genetic marking). Among its inventions is the EverMild onion, bred for lower levels of the pyruvate that lend onions their pungency and tear-inducing qualities.

The oroblanco: big in Japan. Photograph: Alamy

The oroblanco

The oroblanco was introduced to the world in the 1980s after its development at the University of California Citrus Experiment Station. A cross between the grapefruit and a pomelo, it borrows from the latter to make a less bitter hybrid. Initially unsuccessful because it is green even when ripe, it has bounced back, partly due to success in popularising the similar Sweetie variety in Japan.

Major toms: black tomatoes, a product of US-Israeli experimentation. Photograph: Alamy

Black tomatoes

Scientists from the US and Israel have experimented with breeding “black tomatoes” that are red on the inside and dark on the outside. Their exterior hue derives from high levels of anthocyanin, the pigment that lends blueberries, blackberries and chokeberries their colour. Black tomatoes are commercially available in the UK under the name Indigo Rose.

Basket weave: Apriums are mostly apricot, with a hint of plum. Photograph: Alamy

Apriums and pluots

Developed in California in the 1980s by Floyd Zaiger, apriums and pluots are hybrids themselves descended from hybrids. Plums and apricots have been naturally cross-pollinating for centuries. The aprium and pluot were created by tinkering with proportions. The aprium is mostly apricot and part plum; the pluot the other way around.

Plumcots

A plumcot is a cross between a plum and an apricot. Through an all-natural process of breeding apricots and plums, this amazingly flavorful category of fruit has taken the marketplace by storm. There are many special varieties that have been “born”. We grow several unique varieties of plumcots.

They range in flavor from over-the-top sweet to tart and tangy, and just about everything in between. You may be reluctant to pick up and try a plumcot in store, as they often are cosmetically shocking! From mottled (like the image to the right) to looking like a grenade, to cherry-like.

They have a great deal of nutritious value and are low in fat, making them ideal for snacking or sweetening up other dishes.

Many people are suspicious of plumcot thinking that this strange fruit must be genetically engineered, but this is not the case. Plumcots were first sold in 1989 and were developed by a Californian fruit breeder named Floyd Zaiger. It took Zaiger several generations of cross breeding before the modern plumcot finally emerged. Zaiger’s work used the “Pluot,” a 50-50 plum and apricot hybrid created by Luther Burbank in the late 19th Century, as a foundation for additional hybridization.

Plumcot Information

  • APPROXIMATE START DATES
  • PACK STYLES
  • NUTRITIONAL INFO
  • PLUs
May June July August
Yummy Rosa 11 Black Cherry 15 Dapple Dandy 13 Black Kat 8
Flavorosa 11 Cherry Red 15 Sunset Gold 13 Flavor Fall 22
Flavor Fusion 19 Festival Red 15 Flavor Grenade 13
Black Raspberry 25 Dapple Fire 15 Flavorich 13 September
Red Raspberry 13 Fall Fiesta 10

Cross a plum tree with an apricot, and you get a funny-sounding fruit called a plumcot. Geneticist Floyd Zaiger created the first plumcot hybrid and went on to grow 20 other varieties. Like all fresh produce, plumcots are a good source of nutrients.

Light and Sweet

One medium plumcot has roughly 80 calories, making it ideal for a light and healthy snack. The fruit has no fat or cholesterol, but plumcots are unusually high in sugar, with 15 grams per serving.

Promoting Regularity

Plumcots are a good source of dietary fiber — essential for regular bowel movements and overall gastrointestinal health — with 3 grams per medium fruit.
Vitamins and Other Nutrients

A medium plumcot contains 6 percent of your daily recommended vitamin A and 10 percent of the recommendation for vitamin C. The fruit also has 1 gram of protein. Plumcots and other fresh produce contribute to your daily fluid intake since most fruits and vegetables contain a high percentage of water.

Available PLUs for Plumcots

SKU: 3386519
GTIN: 00895359002078
3278 Large Plumcot
SKU: 3386519
GTIN: 00895359002078
3278 Large Plumcot
SKU: 3386501
GTIN: 00895359002344
3611 Black Plumcot
SKU: 3386498
GTIN: 00895359002337
3610 Green Plumcot
SKU: 3386480
GTIN: 00895359002320
3609 Red Plumcot

Plant Hybrids: All Natural, Unique Fruit Creations.

Pam ZbochFollow Jan 13, 2016 · 6 min read

Doesn’t it seem like every time you walk into a grocery store there are new types of fruit on the shelves? Often times there are new apple, citrus, banana varieties and more popping up that you don’t recall growing up with. That’s because new hybrid fruit varieties are constantly being created and emerging in the scene. Best of all, you can easily grow these fruit hybrids at home!

What Is A Hybrid Fruit?

Hybrid fruit varieties are produced naturally by hand and sometimes even nature by being cross-pollinated or grafted. For example, when two parent plants like a nectarine and a plum are cross-pollinated they produce an offspring known as a nectaplum. The nectaplum has traits from both the nectarine tree and the plum tree, which combine to give it a unique color and flavor.

Not all hybrid fruits are as wild as nectaplums, some are common apple varieties, like the Pink Lady or McIntosh. You may have been enjoying fruit hybrids for years without even knowing it.

One way hybrid fruit varieties are created is by the cross-pollination of flowers from two different fruit trees. This can happen in nature when the wind, birds and bees spread pollen naturally. You can also do this by hand by taking a small paintbrush and painting over each bloom on two different trees.

This works when two different types of fruit trees have different blooming periods, because the pollen can be stored. If a tree is successfully pollinated it will produce fruit that contains hybrid seeds that you can plant.

You can also produce a hybrid by taking a cutting from one tree and grafting it to the rootstock of another mature tree. Cut into the branch to expose green flesh on both the branch and the trunk. Place the green flesh of the branch against the green flesh on the trunk and tie the branch to the trunk with twine or hold it together with wax to keep it in place. The trunk and the branch will grow together.

There are many different ways to cut and place cuttings on to rootstocks, and this is how fruit hybrids like the 3 in 1 blueberry are made. Three different blueberry varieties are grafted to a single root system.

Are Hybrid Varieties GMO?

While some hybrid fruit varieties are GMO, ours at Fast Growing Trees are not. GMO stands for Genetically Modified Organisms, which are generated when the DNA of a plant has been changed. As a result GMOs are not organic.

Massive produce operations will modify the DNA of their crops in order to produce fruit and vegetables that are larger, more colorful, to have a longer shelf life, and a stronger resistance to pests, molds, and diseases.

Plants are also genetically modified to survive against the harmful chemicals and pesticides that are sprayed on craps to keep bugs and molds away.

Once the DNA has been modified in a lab it becomes unnatural leading some to believe that GMOs are harmful to humans if consumed. However, no conclusive studies have been made.

Hybrid fruits are created naturally and contain natural DNA, making them different from GMOs. Also, they can be grown organically.

Notable Hybrid Fruit:

1. The Meyer Lemon, which is a hybrid cross between an ordinary lemon and an orange, outshines ordinary lemons with its large size and sweet citrus flavors, so much so that it has revolutionized the culinary world. Chefs love using its unforgettable sweet yet tart zest for entrees as well as desserts. Plus, Meyer lemon wedges are perfect for flavoring hot beverages and teas.

2. Do you ever find yourself stuck trying to decide what citrus fruit you want for a healthy breaks or snacking? The Cara Cara Orange will end that decisiveness for you because it’s simply irresistible. They are a cross between a Washington Navel Orange and a Brazilian Bahia Navel Orange. While they look like ordinary oranges on the outside, with bright orange skin, they have unique rosy-pink flesh and an incredibly sweet flavor.

Cara Cara oranges are low in acid, which takes the bitter zing out of its taste. Grapefruit lovers often mistake this sweet citrus fruit for a grapefruit hybrid, and enjoy them just the same.

3. The Clementine can be slightly confusing because isn’t it the same thing as a mandarin or tangerine? The answer to that question is no! A clementine is the result of crossing a sweet orange with a mandarin. As a result you get a scrumptious little citrus fruit that’s easy to peel, and that’s almost seedless. Clementines are perfect for snacking because you don’t have to worry about spitting out seeds in front of anyone!

They’re different from tangerines because tangerines have a much more bitter taste and have seeds in each segment. Mandarins are smaller orange relatives with loose skin and a taste that is sweeter than a tangerine, but not as sweet as a clementine.

4. The 4 in 1 Apple Tree serves as a guide for those who enjoy multiple types of apples. It can be difficult trying to choose flavors among the huge varieties of apples offered at stores today. I often find myself wondering if it’s the Gala or McIntosh that’s really sweet. Instead of staring at apples in the store with turmoil grow four different varieties on a single tree at home.

You can create a miniature apple factory in a small space and harvest fresh apples over the course of five months. The apple varieties pollinate each other, so you only need one tree. This is great for gardens with limited space and for those looking for apple varieties.

5. The Pineberry is a classic fruit that has been grown in South America in Europe, but has recently started to become extremely popular in North America for the twist that it puts on the classic strawberry that we are used to.

Pineberries are the result of crossing the North American strawberry with the Coastal Strawberry. These berries combined create a strawberry with white skin, and red seeds. It seems like a strawberry with inverted colors and we can’t keep our eyes away.

Best of all pineberries provide a tropical splash of refreshing flavor because they taste like sweet pineapples. They are perfect for snacking on and for adding to tropical fruit smoothies. If you want the pineapple taste with out the bitter zing then don’t hesitate to start growing your own pineberries at home, either in the ground or in a container.

Enjoy Hybrid Fruit

Hybrid fruit varieties are created both by hand and nature, and often provide irresistible new flavors that are exciting to try. Some hybrid fruits have been around for centuries, while new fruit hybrids are frequently becoming very popular.

As a gardener and plant enthusiast I’ve loved growing trees and shrubs my entire life. Unknown to most, there are always new faster fruiting and double blooming plant hybrids emerging on the scene. I often feel the need to share my plant knowledge and new trends with the growing gardening community through my blog!

11 Odd Hybrid Fruits and Vegetables

A UK-based horticulturist company has developed the TomTato—a plant that can produce both tomatoes and potatoes on the same stem. But the plant is not a true hybrid. There are plenty of other combination fruit-vegetables that do exist, though, and are available in stores now.

1. Pluot

Thinkstock

Plums and apricots both come from the same genus—Prunus—which made crossing the two fruits relatively easy for Floyd Zaiger, a Nebraskan biologist noted for his work in fruit genetics. The pluot now has a number of different varieties, and in the 13 years since it was created it has become relatively popular amongst fruit eaters.

2. Plumcot

Wikimedia Commons

Zaiger wasn’t the first person to create a plum-apricot hybrid, though. Luther Burbank, a fruit producer and plant nursery owner, managed to cross the two fruits more than a century ago. The problem was that, back then, plant genetics were less advanced than they are today, and Burbank’s plumcots weren’t as hardy as they needed to be to endure the cross-country shipping that fresh produce endures before it reaches our tables and plates. Zaiger owes a debt of gratitude to Luther Burbank, however, for showing him the way.

3. Rangpur

Wikimedia Commons

The fruit with the closest taste and consistency to a rangpur is a lime—and in fact its binomial name (the name assigned to species) is Citrus limonia. In China the rangpur, which is named after the Bangladeshi city in which it was first found, is called a Canton lemon. Though to many western palates and eyes it may be a fringe fruit, in Costa Rica rangpurs are often more popular than lemons and limes.

4. Tangelo

Wikimedia Commons

Tangelos are a cross between tangerines and grapefruits, or pomelos. Created by a USDA biologist named Walter Swingle in 1911, the tangelo is super juicy and incredibly large when put next to an ordinary tangerine.

5. Blood lime

Home Citrus Growers

Blood oranges already exist, but other “bloody” citrus fruits do not. Eating a plain lime may be too sour for the ordinary person without also having a Synsepalum dulcificum miracle fruit to dull the bitterness. But blood limes are sweeter than ordinary ones, having incorporated the Ellendale Mandarin with a red finger lime.

6. Ugli fruit

The Ugli fruit is a trademarked name for what is—at least in part—a Jamaican tangelo. But Cabel Hall Citrus Company added another citrus fruit into the tangelo mix to make its variant. A Seville orange joins the grapefruit and tangerine hybrid, giving extra tang and flavor.

7. Tayberry

Wikimedia Commons

The British summer season of blackberry and raspberry picking is a popular time, and in 1979 growers found a way to combine both fruits into the tayberry. The berry is difficult to pick industrially, however, so has never been incorporated into commercial farming crops.

8. Rabbage

The rabbage (or Brassicoraphanus) is a crossed cabbage and radish, and was developed successfully to self-propagate by a Soviet agronomist named Georgi Dmitrievich Karpechenko in the 1910s and ’20s. It has fallen out of fashion, though, because the hybrid wasn’t quite as well-integrated as consumers would like.

9. Limequat

Thinkstock

A cross between a lime and a kumquat, the limequat takes out some of the harsh acidity of the citrus fruit and replaces it with a soft, sweet skin—though some still find the tang too much to take. Just like the tangelo, the limequat was hybridized by Walter Swingle.

10. Yuzu

Wikimedia Commons

Mandarins and papedas met in this grapefruit-looking matrimony localized to East Asia. Yuzu fruits are used in Japanese and Korean cooking, particularly for ponzu sauce, but are less popular in the west.

11. Jostaberry

Wikimedia Commons

Anyone tasting a jostaberry would think it a cross between a gooseberry and a blackcurrant—for good reason. Both species are part of the jostaberry cultivar, Ribes x nidigrolaria. Though many people enjoy the jostaberry’s taste, in the 36 years since its development no one has been able to successfully harvest the fruits on a commercial scale.

Plant Care 101: Plant Hybrids

So, every time you walk into a grocery store, it seems there are new types of fruit on the shelves. Where do these new varieties come from? Enter plant hybrids. New hybrid fruit varieties are constantly being created and hitting the scene. And the good news is that you can easily grow these fruit hybrids at home!

So, every time you walk into a grocery store, it seems there are new types of fruit on the shelves. Where do these new varieties come from? Enter plant hybrids. New hybrid fruit varieties are constantly being created and hitting the scene. And the good news is that you can easily grow these fruit hybrids at home!

What Are Plant Hybrids?

Plant hybrids and their new fruit varieties are produced naturally, by hand and sometimes even nature, via cross-pollination or grafting. For example, when two parent plants, like a nectarine and a plum, are cross-pollinated, they produce an offspring known as a nectaplum. The nectaplum has traits from both the nectarine tree and the plum tree, which combine to give it a unique color and flavor.

Not all hybrid fruits are as wild as nectaplums. Some are common apple varieties, like the Pink Lady or McIntosh. You may have been enjoying plant hybrids for years without even knowing it.

While some hybrid fruit varieties are GMO, ours at Fast-Growing-Trees.com are not. GMO, also known as Genetically Modified Organisms, are generated when the DNA of a plant has been changed. As a result, GMOs are not technically organic.

Massive produce operations will modify the DNA of their crops. This produces fruits and vegetables that are larger, more colorful, last longer, and boast a stronger resistance to pests, molds, and diseases.

Hybrid fruits are created naturally and contain natural DNA, making them different from GMOs. Also, they can be grown organically.

However, it’s important to note that no conclusive studies have been made on the effects of GMO hybrids.

1. Meyer Lemon

A hybrid cross between an ordinary lemon and an orange, the Meyer outshines ordinary lemons with its large size and sweet citrus flavors. Chefs love using its unforgettable sweet yet tart zest for entrees as well as desserts. Plus, Meyer Lemon wedges are perfect for flavoring hot beverages and teas.

2. Cara Cara Orange

They are a cross between a Washington Navel Orange and a Brazilian Bahia Navel Orange. While they look like ordinary oranges on the outside, with bright orange skin, they have unique rosy-pink flesh and an incredibly sweet flavor.

3. Clementine

The delectable result of crossing a sweet orange with a mandarin. You get a scrumptious little citrus fruit that’s easy to peel and almost seedless. Clementines are perfect for snacking because you don’t have to worry about spitting out seeds!

They’re different from tangerines because tangerines have a much more bitter taste and have seeds in each segment. Mandarins are smaller orange relatives with loose skin and a taste that is sweeter than a tangerine, but not as sweet as a clementine.

4. 4-in-1 Apple Tree

You can create a miniature apple factory in a small space and harvest fresh apples over the course of five months. The apple varieties pollinate each other, so you only need one tree. This is great for gardens with limited space.

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