How long does it take for passion fruit to grow?

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Passion Fruit Harvest Time – When And How To Harvest Passion Fruit

When do you pick passion fruit? Interestingly, the fruit isn’t harvested from the vine but is actually ready to eat when it falls off the plant. Fruits ripen at different times of the year in regard to planting zone. These facts make it difficult to know when to harvest passion fruit, especially in cooler regions. Other things to consider are species and site. The two varieties of fruit each have different maturity times, with purple fruits ripening earlier than yellow fruits. The best test for ripeness and passion fruit harvest time is the taste test. Nibble your way to a successful harvest of sweet-tart fruit.

When Do You Pick Passion Fruit?

The passion fruit vine is a sub-tropical to tropical plant that cannot tolerate freezing temperatures. It is classed in two forms, the yellow and purple species. Each form has slight differences outside of the obvious color difference, with the purple fruiting vine a more hardy strain that can withstand temperate climates with some protection. In cooler regions, fruits will ripen much later than those grown in long season, warm areas. The trick to knowing how to harvest passion fruit resides in experience and flavor preference.

The purple passion fruit is native to Brazil and widely grown

in tropical to sub-tropical areas. This vine seems to have a greater tolerance for cooler conditions and ripens later than its golden hued cousin. The origin of the yellow form is unknown, but it is also called tropical passion fruit. Fruits usually start to appear on vines that are 1 to 3 years old with earlier fruit occurring in warmer regions.

The yellow fruiting vine blooms April to November while the purple flowers in March through April. Fruits can be expected to ripen 70 to 80 days after pollination. This means passion fruit harvest time is around the end of summer into fall for purple vines and may be through winter for the yellow form.

How to Harvest Passion Fruit

You will know it is time to harvest when fruits are plump, have a slight give and are fully colored. In the yellow forms, the color is deeply golden and the purple fruits will be nearly black. Slightly wrinkled fruits are super ripe and will have a sweeter taste than the smooth skinned passion fruit.

The ripest fruits will simply drop off the vine, so keep the area under your plant clear to facilitate finding the fruit. Fruits that are still on the vine and have changed from green to purple or yellow are also ripe and may be picked straight from the tree.

Simply give attached fruit a gentle twist when picking passion fruit from the vine. Green passion fruit won’t ripen fully off the vine but ripe fruits will develop deeper, sweeter flavor if left uneaten for several days.

Storing Passion Fruit

After picking passion fruit, you can store them for a week or more in the refrigerator. When picking passion fruit, place them in boxes or crates where air can circulate. Don’t use a bag, as the fruit can mold.

Wash and dry the fruit and store in the crisper of the refrigerator or in mesh bags. Commercial growers coat the fruit in paraffin to allow for easier shipping and keep fruit fresh for up to 30 days.

If you want the fruit to ripen a bit more, leave it on the kitchen counter for a few days. The taste will be sweeter and more balanced. Use passion fruit fresh, as a condiment or cooked down to add to desserts. The rich flavor is also used in cocktails, as juice and in delicious ice cream.

Growing Aussie Passionfruit At Home FAQs*

Aussie passionfruit is an exotic fruit that is available in store all year round. If you would like to grow your own passionfruit vine at home, or you’re having trouble with an existing vine, please scroll through our FAQs. If your question isn’t answered, you can reach out to the team on our Facebook page, or ask your local nursery for more information.

*Answers from Aussie Passionfruit grower Nick Hornery

Location and Aspect

What variety is best for cool climates?

The most common backyard variety, bred to withstand cooler temperatures, is the Nellie Kelly. This variety grafts popular passionfruit vines onto a hardier rootstock vine making them less susceptible to disease, pests and frosts. You can find tips on how to grow it here http://www.nelliekelly.com.au/passionfruit.html.

What variety is best for temperate and tropical climates?

Our commercial growers recommend purple varieties for temperate regions such as Northern NSW and Panamas for more tropical regions such as Central and Far North QLD.

Is it true you should try to grow vines north to south?

It is a good idea to plant vines from north to south. Most commercial vines run north to south allowing them to get sun on both sides throughout the day.

What area of my yard should I plant a passionfruit vine?

To assist growth, plant your vine in a warm, sunny, sheltered spot with fertile soil. Ensure you water your vine regularly and feed it seasol fertilizer approximately every 6-8 weeks.

Aussie Passionfruit Season

When is passionfruit in peak season?

Purple passionfruit usually experiences peaks during summer, autumn and winter, depending on conditions.
Panamas come into peak season earlier than the black varieties, so the spring can be fruitful for this variety.

Pollination and Fruit Development

My vine has plenty of flowers however it is not producing fruit. What can I do to help passionfruit develop?

Many factors contribute to the development of plump and luscious passionfruit. Here are some top tips for transforming passionfruit flowers into tasty fruit from Aussie Passionfruit grower Nick Hornery:

  • Fertilise your plant with seasol or granular fertilizer approximately every 6-8 weeks
  • Hand-pollinate your passionfruit to encourage the fruiting process. This can be done using a paintbrush by collecting pollen from the stamen of one flower and spreading it to the pistil of another flower on the vine
  • Plant fragrant flowers such as lavender near your vine to attract more bees to help pollination
  • Plant your vine in a sunny spot, and run the vine from north to south to ensure optimal sunlight
  • If you’re planting a purple variety, do so in spring so it has time to grow stronger before the winter chill sets in
Why are my vines full of fruit with no pulp inside? What can I do to develop more pulp?

This could be due to ineffective pollination where not enough pollen has been transferred from the stamen to the pistil to set a pulp-filled fruit. This can occur when there is a lack of bees or insects around to assist pollination and can sometimes happen in heavy rainfall or high/low temperatures. You could try using a small paintbrush to spread pollen in the flower to pollinate them yourself.

Do you need a male and female plant to produce passionfruit?

No. All passionfruit flowers have a male part (stamen) and female part (pistil) which both play a part in pollination.

Some yellow fruit varieties, such as the Panama, are largely self-incompatible so pollinising varieties are recommended for fruit setting to occur. When planting clonal selections of these varieties, it is recommend that growers interplant with alternate rows of polliniser varieties to ensure good fruit set.

How long does a passionfruit vine take to produce fruit?

Passionfruit vines can take anywhere between 5 – 18 months to fruit, depending on variety and conditions however they usually develop fruit within a year. It helps to plant the vine in spring, so the vine has time to develop in warm conditions and defend itself in the cooler months. If you plant after the new year, the vine might be too young to fight the winter chill.

How long does passionfruit take to ripen?

The Sweetheart variety can take 2-3 months to ripen in summer while the Nellie Kelly variety, suitable for cooler climates, can take a little longer. You can tell when most purple varieties are ripe as they drop off the vine and onto the ground. Ripe fruit that are left on the ground may get sun burnt so make sure you regularly collect the fruit.

With Panama passionfruits, pick them off the vine when they are deep in colour, heavy for their size and come off the vine easily. You can always taste test one to see if they’re ready!

Pest and Weed Control

A pest is eating my vine. Would you recommend any products to stop this?

There are many products available to combat pests such as snails and insects. White oil can be a good option for keeping pests under control. If your vine is mature and treated with white oil, it should bounce back and increase growth in the warmer months.

For bigger pests such as possums and rats we recommend visiting your local hardware store or nursery to find out which product is best for you.

How do I get rid of weeds and suckers from my vine?

Many passionfruit vines are grafted, meaning they use the rootstock of a stronger variety to withstand disease. Occasionally the understock starts to overtake the fruiting variety causing weed-like “suckers”. Prune off the suckers below the graft area and avoid ruining the root system.

Replacing and Controlling Your Vine

My vine is getting old. When should I replace it?

It’s best to replant new vines every few years or when your vine is starting to look tired and old. As a guide, our commercial growers replant every three years to ensure they get optimal fruit from a crop.

My passionfruit vine is taking over another plant in my garden, how can I stop this?

Prune your vine back so that it is not in the way of other plants. The best time to prune is in spring as new growth resumes.

How do I get rid of my vine?

Try cutting the base of the vine a few inches from the ground and spraying the vine with roundup or a similar herbicide. If you don’t wish to use herbicides, cut off the stalks and cover them with paint tins or plastic containers so they don’t have access to light and die.

Passion Fruit Plant Stock Photos and Images

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  • Moth on a passion fruit plant
  • Passion fruit plant
  • High Angle View Of Passion Fruit And Plant On Table
  • closeup of a passion fruit plant with a lot of fruits
  • Passion fruit plant on a wall
  • Passion fruit / Passionfruit (Passiflora edulis) growing and have fresh fruits on the vine.
  • the entrance to the boulangerie Patisserie Loewert in Kayserberg Alsace France with a passion fruit plant growing around the door
  • Fruit and flower of an ornamental blue passion flower, Passiflora caerulea, with buds and leaves on climbing vine, September
  • Passion fruit
  • Bee on a passion fruit flower in the sun.
  • Passiflora edulis flavicarpa passion fruit flower on blurred and bokeh background
  • Fruit of Passion flower Passiflora caerulea, Passifloraceae
  • Close up of colorful flower and green leaves of granadilla passion fruit plant in garden setting
  • Macro shot red passion plant climbing parts tendril, red passion tendril
  • Blue Passion Flower or Common Passion Flower (Passiflora caerulea), fruit, native to Argentina and Brazil, ornamental plant
  • Close up of passion fruit on the vine, selective focus
  • Passion flower and fruit
  • Orange fruit of the passiflora plant – Passiflora caerulea hanging in the sun in front of an old brick wall in France, Europe.
  • Passion Fruit (Passiflora edulis f. edulis), whole and halved fruit studio picture
  • Passion fruit or Passiflora edulis or Maracuja or Parcha or Grenadille or Fruit de la passion plant with two fresh green fruits
  • Passion fruit plant
  • High Angle View Of Passion Fruit And Plant On Table
  • Passion fruit vine growing in a home garden
  • Green passion fruit in the farm in agriculture farm in rural of Thailand
  • mother of millions, devil’s backbone or Chandelier plant between leaves of passion fruit
  • Lady Margaret Passion seed Plant – Passiflora
  • Stunning passion flower climbing plant with ripe orange fruit, growing up brick wall at Eastcote historic walled garden, Hillingdon, UK.
  • Passiflora edulis blooming purple flower. Vine tropical and subtropical sweet seedy passion fruit. Fresh exotic blossom botanical plant aroma
  • Solanum Betaceum Is A Small Tree Or Shrub In The Flowering Plant Family Solanaceae It Is Best Known As The Species That Bear The Tamarillo An Egg Shap
  • Passiflora edulis or Passionfruit: Eye Care And stimulate excretion. Prevent colds and nourish the heart. A Passionfruit on green blurred background a
  • The passion fruit tree
  • green plant of wild growing passion fruit.
  • General Gastronomy, Passion fruit, styling, Valerie Lhomme
  • Blue Passion Flower or Common Passion Flower (Passiflora caerulea), fruit, native to Argentina and Brazil, ornamental plant
  • Close up of passion fruit on the vine, selective focus
  • Passion flower and fruit covering a wall face in an English garden
  • Orange fruit of the passiflora plant – Passiflora caerulea hanging in the sun in front of an old brick wall in France, Europe.
  • Passion Fruit (Passiflora edulis f. flavicarpa), whole and halved fruit, studio picture
  • Passion fruit or Passiflora edulis or Maracuja or Parcha or Grenadille or Fruit de la passion plant with multiple closed flowers waiting to open
  • Vine of passion fruit (Passiflora) plant with ripening fruits in a organic vegetable field in Kerala, India
  • Close-up Of Fruit Growing On Plant
  • Passion fruit vine growing in a home garden
  • Close up studio shot of vine green leaves and curling tendrils of the granadilla plant on white background
  • Passion Flower Fruit
  • Lady Margaret Passion seed Plant – Passiflora
  • Stunning passion flower climbing plant with ripe orange fruit, growing up brick wall at Eastcote historic walled garden, Hillingdon, UK.
  • fresh passion fruit in the garden
  • Granadilla Fruit Cultivation In Ecuador Andes Mountain Also A Passion Fruit
  • Close up a flower on black background. Passiflora foetida L. have beta carotene helps prevent cancer. And heart disease is a high fiber diet.
  • The passion fruit tree
  • Granadilla fruit isolated on white background with clipping path
  • General Gastronomy, Passion fruit, styling, Valerie Lhomme
  • Fruit of the Winged-stem Passion Flower (Passiflora alata), Maracuja
  • Close up of passion fruit on the vine, selective focus
  • Passion fruit and flower on a climbing plant
  • Orange fruit of the passiflora plant – Passiflora caerulea hanging in the sun in front of an old brick wall in France, Europe.
  • Passion Flower from bud to fruit.
  • Passion fruit, Maracuja, Passiflora edulis, on the vine in plantations, near El Jardin, Antioquia, Colombia
  • leaf of gulupa plant on wooden background
  • Stuffed Toy By Passion Fruit On Potted Plant
  • Passion fruit vine growing in a home garden
  • Exotic fruit in a vintage basket, Berastagi, Sumatra, Indonesia.
  • Patio outdoor summer garden in backyard porch of home with pergola canopy wooden gazebo and orange citrus hanging plants with fruit and nobody in Assi
  • yellow passion fruit on vine, passion fruit is the fruit of a number of plants in the Passiflora family,
  • Stunning passion flower climbing plant with ripe orange fruit, growing up brick wall at Eastcote historic walled garden, Hillingdon, UK.
  • Passion fruit flower
  • fresh passion fruit in the garden
  • Passion fruit flower
  • The passion fruit tree
  • Granadilla fruit isolated on white background with clipping path
  • General Gastronomy, Passion fruit, styling, Valerie Lhomme
  • Mango and passion fruit on wooden background
  • Close up of passion fruit on the vine, selective focus
  • Maypop fruit
  • Detail of a branch of leaves of a passiflora plant – Passiflora caerulea hanging in the sun in front of an old brick wall in France, Europe.
  • Passion fruit growing at at Madeira
  • Passion fruit, Maracuja, Passiflora edulis, on the vine in plantations, near El Jardin, Antioquia, Colombia
  • Luscious red flower of passion.
  • Passion fruit / Passionfruit (Passiflora edulis) growing and have fresh fruits on the vine.
  • Fruit and flower of passiflora caerulea or Passion Flower in autumn
  • Sweet passion fruit on a market stall, exotic fruit, Barestagi, sumatra, Indonesia.
  • Macro shot red passion plant climbing parts tendril, red passion tendril
  • yellow passion fruit on vine, passion fruit is the fruit of a number of plants in the Passiflora family,
  • Close-up Of Fruit Hanging Outdoors
  • Passion fruit flower
  • fresh passion fruit in the garden
  • Colorful flower of Passion fruit. Colombia, South America.
  • The passion fruit tree
  • Blue passion flower and red wall as background
  • General Gastronomy, Passion fruit, styling, Valerie Lhomme
  • Mango and passion fruit on wooden background
  • Close up of passion fruit on the vine, selective focus
  • A very ripe Pink Banana at the Sunken Gardens, St. Petersburg, Florida
  • Hand Holding a Passion Fruit. Showing the fruit with hands. Fruit also known as Maracuja or maracuya.
  • Studio shot section of vine single green leaf and curling tendrils of the granadilla plant on white background
  • Passion fruit, Maracuja, Passiflora edulis, on the vine in plantations, near El Jardin, Antioquia, Colombia
  • passion flower isolated on white
  • Yellow passion fruit ,Passiflora edulis, on white background
  • Bottom view of Passion Fruit Flower between Leaves (Curitiba, Parana, Brazil) (South Brazil)
  • Sweet passion fruit hanging in a market stall, exotic fruit, Barestagi, sumatra, Indonesia.

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Search Results for Passion Fruit Plant Stock Photos and Images

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Passion Fruit

Common Name: Passion Fruit, Granadilla, Purple Granadilla, Yellow Passion Fruit.

Latin Name: Passiflora edulis.

Origin: South America.

Description (what it looks like): A shallow-rooted, woody, perennial vine, climbing by means of tendrils; little curly spring-like things. Passion fruit are vigorous growing to a height between 2-5 metres, provided there is a suitable trellis to support its growth. Leaves have 3 deep lobes, alternatively spaced, being glossy green on top and slightly dull and pale green underneath. The vine produces a single striking flower 5–7.5 cm wide at each node. The passion fruit is a type of berry, round to oval, either yellow or dark purple at maturity (depending on the variety), with a soft to firm, juicy interior filled with numerous seeds. In Australia, the purple passion fruit was flourishing and partially naturalised in coastal areas of Queensland before 1900.

Uses (function): Plant many seedlings in a long row to form an edible fence/screen/shade barrier to the house for hot afternoon sun or cover over chicken coop. The vines make good container plants, however require maintenance to keep them happy and fruiting. Prune back old growth in early spring; use trimmings and spent leaves as mulch. Empty passionfruit shells also make great mulch and disintegrate quickly.

Nutritional value: Raw passion fruit is 73% water, 22% carbohydrates, 2% protein and 0.7% fat. Nutritionally, it contains good amounts of vitamins B and C, dietary fiber, niacin, iron and phosphorus.

Growing details (propagation, seed etc): Vines can be easily grown from the seeds within the fruit. Plant seeds straight away and seedlings are likely within 10-20 days. More than one vine is needed for pollination. Usually returns a crop within 18 months of planting. Harvest throughout May to December. The fruit will quickly turn from green to deep purple (or yellow) when ripe and then fall to the ground within a few days. They can either be picked when they change color or gathered from the ground each day. The fruit is sweetest when slightly shriveled. Requires protection from winds. A vine has a typical lifespan of 5-7 years. It is regarded as an environmental weed in New South Wales and Queensland, so please keep contained within your property to avoid it spreading into neighbouring properties or National Parks.

Best time to grow: Plant out in spring, once the soil starts to warm up.

Soil: Fertile, well drained, light to heavy loam. Spread pelletised chook manure twice yearly around the base of the vine. Mulch well to protect shallow roots.

Sun: Plant in full sun to part shade.

Water: Keep moist and give regular moisture during the growing season.

How to eat it: Eaten by spooning directly from the shell, the pulp can be used on pavlovas, cheesecakes, fruit flans and icings.

Often made into jams and jellies. Freeze excess into ice cube trays and add at your convenience to smoothies, juices or cocktails. Squeeze juice from seeds to enjoy the passion fruit juice without crunchy seeds. Bake into cakes or thicken juice with sugar syrup for a delicious drizzle over desserts.

Images references:

Getty

They are so popular because of their high vitamin content. They are highly rich in vitamin C, beta-cryptoxanthin and alpha-carotene that boosts your immunity. The fruit also has iron which increases haemoglobin in our red blood cells. The rich content of riboflavin (vitamin B6) and niacin (vitamin B3) helps in regulate the thyroid activity in our body.

Passion fruit in Australia

There are over 50 varieties of passion fruit vine including Banana, Hawaiian, Norfolk Island, Yellow Giant, Panama Gold, Panama Red and Nellie Kelly. Cultivars can differ in cold tolerance, so always check the label before buying. The kind you’ll most commonly find in Aussie backyards is the Nellie Kelly – a cultivar that has been bred to withstand cooler temperatures and resist pests and diseases. In more tropical regions, Panamas grow best.

Climate

Passionfruit vines are versatile but are best suited to subtropical and temperate climates, provided there is protection from frost when young. Plant a passionfruit vine between spring to early autumn season and provide it with a wall or framework to climb on.

According to TUI Garden, there are 5 steps to the success of growing passion fruit:

  • Choose a spot in full sun except in very hot areas, where partial shade is preferable.
  • Prepare your soil with organic matter like compost and sheep pellets.
  • Add a layer of citrus and fruit mix to plant into. Passionfruit is best planted between mid-spring and mid-summer in New Zealand.
  • Feed passionfruit with a fertiliser rich in potassium in spring and summer.
  • Mulch and water well, particularly over the warmer months.​

How to eat a passionfruit?

To eat a passion fruit raw, cut it in half and use a spoon to remove the pulp from the rind. The rind is not edible. People can eat both the seeds and the pulp, or just the pulp.

Did you know you can open passionfruit with your bare hands? Place the passionfruit between your palms, clasp your fingers together and push your palms towards each other to break the passionfruit skin, then pry it open with your fingers. Watch out for the juice!

You’ll know a passionfruit is ripe when you hold them and they feel heavy, meaning they are full of the jelly-like fruit and juice. They should also have a wrinkled skin that you will be able to squeeze. The softer the skin, the riper the fruit is.

How to ripen quickly

To ripen passion fruit at home, place it at room temperature and give it a few days to ripen further. Keep it away from direct sunlight.

Green passion fruit won’t ripen fully off the vine, but ripe fruits will develop deeper, sweeter flavor if left uneaten for several days.

You could eat unripe passion fruit but the taste would be very tart.

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Passion fruit vine: How to grow passion fruit

Five fun tips for enjoying passionfruit

Harvesting tools

There are many ways to pick up the fruit from the ground; bending over & picking up by hand (back-breaking!), using a grabber-type tool (RSI injury waiting to happen) or using another type of tool to pick up the fruit & deposit it into a bucket/basket without bending over.

Some farms are successfully using a tool originally designed to rapidly collect golf balls at driving ranges. The Roll-in is a cage of flexible tensile wires, secured at either end into a frame which creates a rolling ball of wires. As the wires are pressed over a round object they part and then spring back into place behind the object thus collecting it into the wire cage.

PRO’s

  • all about speed & efficiency
  • enables you to collect large quantities of fruit very quickly
  • when attached to a long handle, the Roll-in gives you access to a wide picking area whilst walking down the centre of a row making collection more efficient
  • weighs less than 1 kg when empty
  • with an experienced picker, you can pick as fast as you can walk
  • the release bracket can be attached to a bucket or basket for easy emptying
  • with the right picking style, using a Roll-in does not mark the fruit in any way
  • kit comes with spare wires for maintenance & repairs
  • easy to clean

CON’s

  • incorrect technique can result in minor fruit marking
  • cost approx. $100 per item

South Coast Organics

All About Passion Fruit

1)When are they in season?

2) From where does the Passion Fruit originate?

3)How do they grow?

4)How do you eat them?

5) What is the nutritional value?

6) Will they grow anywhere?

7) How do you know when they are ripe?

The Answers

1)When are they in season?

Passion Fruit (Passaiflora edulis) come in “waves” throughout the year with the heaviest harvest in late summer. There is usually one in January and one in spring as well.

2) From where does the Passion Fruit originate?

Passiflora edulis is a vine species of a scion flower that is native to Brazil,Paraguay and northeastern Argentina.

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3)How do they grow?

The passion fruit is a vigorous, climbing vine that clings by tendrils to almost any support. It can grow 15 to 20 ft. per year once established and must have strong support. It is generally short-lived (5 to 7 years).

4)How do you eat them?

Wait for them to drop off the vine to insure ripeness. Look for fruit that is slightly wrinkled.To eat fresh simply cut in half and scoop out or squeeze out into your mouth. The small black seeds are edible just crunch them down.The fruit is also an excellent topping for ice cream or cheesecake, makes great jelly or jam and the puree is often used in mixed drinks.

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5) What is the nutritional value?

Passion fruit is an excellent source of vitamins A and C. One passion fruit has only 16 calories. When eaten with the seeds, a serving is an excellent source of fiber.

Passion Fruit
Serving size 118g

Amounts Per Serving % Daily Value
Calories 110
Calories from Fat 5
Total Fat 1g 2%
Saturated Fat 0g 0%
Sodium 35mg 1%
Total Carbohydrate 28g 9%
Dietary Fiber 12g 48%
Sugars 13g
Protein 3g
Vitamin A 30%
Vitamin C 60%
Calcium 2%
Iron 10%

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6) Will they grow anywhere?

The purple passion fruit is subtropical and prefers a frost-free climate. However, there are cultivars that can take temperatures into the upper 20’s (°F) without serious damage. The plant is widely grown in California as far north as San Jose, the Monterey Bay Area and the San Francisco Bay Area. The vines may lose some of their leaves in cool winters. The roots often re sprout even if the top is killed. The plant does not grow well in intense summer heat. The yellow passion fruit is tropical or near-tropical and is much more intolerant of frost. Both forms need protection from the wind. Generally, annual rainfall should be at least 35 inches. Passion fruit vines make good container specimens but require maintenance. They perform well indoors.

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7) How do you know when they are ripe?

When ripe, it has wrinkled, dimpled, deep purple skin. Skin is old-looking, but does not mean the fruit is rotten. Mold does not affect quality and can be wiped off. Fruit color is green when they are immature, changing to shades of purple, red or yellow as they ripen. Leave at room temperature to ripen. The skin will wrinkle, but the fruit will not soften much. Once ripe, store in the refrigerator up to 1 week.

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