Homemade fungicide for plants

Contents

Home Garden Fungicides

Fungicides like chlorothalonil, mancozeb, and copper can be applied to prevent late blight infection in tomatoes

Amanda Gevens, Ken Cleveland and Lauren Thomas, UW Madison – Plant Pathology
Revised: 5/30/2012
Item number: XHT1211

Diseases of vegetable plants can pose a challenge for the home gardener. Typically, cultural methods are the preferred options for disease management in home vegetable gardens. Cultural methods include proper site selection, plant spacing, staking, watering, fertilization, and perhaps most importantly, use of disease-resistant vegetable cultivars. However, if diseases become especially problematic, fungicide treatments are also an option for home gardeners.

This guide is intended to help identify some of the common, and most suitable, fungicides available for disease control in home vegetable gardens. All of the fungicides listed on this fact sheet have been found on shelves at southern Wisconsin home garden centers. This listing is not intended to be exhaustive, but references fungicides that, when used properly, can be effective in controlling the most common diseases of vegetables grown in home gardens. When selecting a product from this list, be sure to note the product name carefully, as several products can have very similar names and contain similar active ingredients. Check that the active ingredient on the label of the product that you select is the ingredient that you are looking for. Also, be sure to read and follow all label instructions of the fungicide that you select to ensure that you use the product in the safest and most effective manner possible.

VEGETABLE

DISEASE(S)

ACTIVE INGREDIENT

BRAND NAMES

asparagus

rust

chlorothalonil

Daconil, Fung-onil,
Ortho Max Disease Control

mancozeb

Mancozeb Flowable

myclobutanil

Spectracide Immunox

propiconazole

Monterey Fungi Fighter, Infuse

tebuconazole

Bayer Advanced 3 in 1,
Bayer Advanced Disease Control

bean

rust

chlorothalonil

Daconil, Fung-onil,
Ortho Max Disease Control

myclobutanil

Spectracide Immunox

propiconazole

Monterey Fungi Fighter, Infuse

tebuconazole

Bayer Advanced 3 in 1, Bayer Advanced Disease Control

carrot

Alternaria leaf blight

Cercospora leaf blight

chlorothalonil

Daconil, Fung-onil,
Ortho Max Disease Control

copper*

Copper Fungicide, Copper Soap,
Dragon Dust, Earth Tone,
Garden Dust

propiconazole

Monterey Fungi Fighter, Infuse

cucurbits

(cucumber, melon, squash)

downy mildew

chlorothalonil

Daconil, Fung-onil,
Ortho Max Disease Control

copper*

Copper Fungicide, Copper Soap,
Dragon Dust, Earth Tone,
Garden Dust

mancozeb

Mancozeb Flowable

phosphorous acids

Excel LG-Systemic Fungicide

cucurbits

(cucumber, melon, squash)

powdery mildew

myclobutanil

Spectracide Immunox

neem oil*

70% Neem Oil, Garden Safe,
Natural Guard Neem

other plant-based oils*

Vegetable Pharm,
SNS 244 All Natural, Organocide, Oleotrol M

potassium bicarbonate*

Green Cure Organic Fungicide

propiconazole

Monterey Fungi Fighter, Infuse

sulfur*

Dusting sulfur, Earth Tone 3 in 1,
Safer Garden Fungicide

tebuconazole

Bayer Advanced 3 in 1,
Bayer Advanced Disease Control

VEGETABLE

DISEASE(S)

ACTIVE INGREDIENT

BRAND NAMES

onion

downy mildew

chlorothalonil

Daconil, Fung-onil,
Ortho Max Disease Control

copper*

Copper Fungicide, Copper Soap,
Dragon Dust, Earth Tone,
Garden Dust

mancozeb

Mancozeb Flowable

phosphorous acids

Excel LG-Systemic Fungicide

onion

leaf blight

purple blotch

chlorothalonil

Daconil, Fung-onil,
Ortho Max Disease Control

mancozeb

Mancozeb Flowable

pepper

anthracnose

chlorothalonil

Daconil, Fung-onil,
Ortho Max Disease Control

potato

early blight

late blight

chlorothalonil

Daconil, Fung-onil,
Ortho Max Disease Control

copper*

Copper Fungicide, Copper Soap,
Dragon Dust, Earth Tone,
Garden Dust

mancozeb

Mancozeb Flowable

sweet corn

fungal foliar diseases

rust

chlorothalonil

Daconil, Fung-onil,
Ortho Max Disease Control

mancozeb

Mancozeb Flowable

propiconazole

Monterey Fungi Fighter, Infuse

tebuconazole

Bayer Advanced 3 in 1,
Bayer Advanced Disease Control

tomato

early blight

late blight

Septoria leaf spot

chlorothalonil

Daconil, Fung-onil,
Ortho Max Disease Control

copper*

Copper Fungicide, Copper Soap,
Dragon Dust, Earth Tone,
Garden Dust

mancozeb

Mancozeb Flowable

vegetables

(general)

damping-off

Root rot

Streptomyces lydicus*

Actino-Iron, Actinovate

vegetables

(general)

bacterial diseases

(bean bacterial blight, cabbage black rot, cucumber angular leaf spot, onion bacterial blight, pepper bacterial spot, potato blackleg, tomato bacterial spot)

copper*

Copper Fungicide, Copper Soap,
Dragon Dust, Earth Tone,
Garden Dust

vegetables

(general)

viral diseases

(cucumber mosaic virus, tobacco mosaic virus, tomato spotted wilt virus)

none

None

* Active ingredients generally considered ‘organic’. Certified organic growers must use pesticides approved by their organic certifying agency.

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Tags: disease, fungus, pesticide Categories: Vegetable Care, Vegetable Problems, Vegetables

There are many times that vegetable gardeners may run into issues with blights, mildews, leaf spots and other fungi that attack plants. These fungi can quickly damage a vegetable plant causing it to become unproductive or even dead.

Organic fungicides can help defend and prevent some plant diseases, like the ones listed above.

A major problem for many vegetable gardeners is finding an organic solution to many fungi issues. There are lots of fungicides on the market to help fight fungi, but how do you know if it’s an organic fungicide or chemical based?

To help find organic fungicides for your vegetable garden fungi problems here are five natural fungicides made by Garden’s Alive! you can use to help keep your vegetables stay productive, healthy and organic.

Plant Guardian Biofungicide

Plant Guardian Biofungicide helps to control bacterial spot, powdery mildew, rust, gray mold and leaf blight.

An organic fungicide that can be used on a wide range of plants such as roses, vegetables, fruits, nuts and flowers. It can also help promote a healthier lawn by controlling many lawn diseases like brown patch dollar spot.

Plant Guardian can be applied using a hose-end sprayer, or pressurized handheld sprayers.

Sulfur Guard Fungicide

Sulfur Guard Fungicideis an organic fungicide that’s used for disease and mite control on fruit trees, vegetables and flowers. It can also help prevent scab, powdery mildew, thrips and leaf spot.

Soil Guardian for Soilbourne Diseases

Soil Guardian is a preventive biological fungicide that can be used on fruiting vegetables, herbs and leafy vegetables.

The active ingredient is a microbe that provides protection to plant roots against soilbourne diseases.

Soil Guardian is an organic fungicide that works best when applied to seeds, seedlings, or transplants where soilbourne diseases might be an issue.

Soap-Shield Liquid Copper Fungicide

Soap-Shield Liquid Copper Fungicide controls diseases of a wide range of vegetables, fruits and flowers. Soap Shield acts to protect plants from infection.

Fixed copper has long been a natural fungicide used to control a wide range of plant diseases including powdery mildew, downy mildew, leaf spot and late blight.

Enz-Rot Blossom End Rot Spray

Enz-Rot Blossom End Rot Spray helps to prevent and control blossom end rot in tomatoes, squash, peppers and other vegetables that may suffer.

Blossom end rot is a disorder caused by a deficiency of calcium in the soil. Use Enz-Rot during periods of rapid growth, or after excessive rainfall on the foliage and fruit of the plant. It helps to restore calcium and prevent blossom end rot.

Always Identify The Problem

Always be sure to properly identify the disease before applying any natural fungicide. If the disease is not diagnosed correctly you may use the wrong treatment causing the issue to increase. This will surely result in a plant that lacks production or dies.

Garden’s Alive! offers a wide range of organic fungicides, pesticides and fertilizers for the home gardeners.

or the image below to save $20 off any order of $40 or more. That is half off your order!

More Great Organic Products From Garden’s Alive!

Are there any home remedies for ringworm?

Read on to discover 11 natural treatments for fungal infections, such as ringworm:

1. Garlic

Share on PinterestGarlic paste may be used as a topical treatment, although no studies have been conducted on its use.

Garlic is often used to treat infection. Although there are no studies that examine the effects of garlic on ringworm, it has proven effective for other types of fungi, including Candida, Torulopsis, Trichophyton, and Cryptococcus.

To use garlic as a treatment, make a paste of crushed garlic cloves by blending the garlic with some olive or coconut oil. Apply a thin layer of paste to the affected skin and cover with gauze. Leave in place for up to 2 hours before rinsing. Repeat twice daily until symptoms resolve.

If the garlic paste causes stinging, swelling, or redness, rinse off immediately and do not reapply.

2. Soapy water

To prevent ringworm from spreading or infecting other areas of the body, keep the skin as clean as possible. To do this, rinse the infection with soap and warm water once or twice daily. Be sure to dry the skin fully, as fungus thrives in moist areas.

Always clean the skin in this way before using any of the other home remedies listed below. Before using any of the following substances on the ringworm patches, a person should apply a small amount to a healthy area of skin to ensure they do not have a sensitivity or allergy to the treatment.

3. Apple cider vinegar

Apple cider vinegar has demonstrated antifungal properties against Candida, another fungal infection.

To treat ringworm with apple cider vinegar, soak a cotton wool pad in the undiluted vinegar and wipe it on the affected area. Repeat up to 3 times daily.

4. Aloe vera

Aloe vera contains six antiseptic agents that, according to research, exhibit antifungal, antibacterial, and antiviral activities.

Apply the gel from an aloe vera plant onto the ringworm patch three or four times daily. The gel also has cooling properties, so it may soothe itchy and swollen skin.

5. Coconut oil

Certain fatty acids found in coconut oil may kill fungal cells by damaging their cell membranes.

Some research suggests that coconut oil may be an effective remedy for people with mild to moderate skin infections. Use it to treat ringworm by applying liquid coconut oil to the skin three times per day.

Also, people can use coconut oil as a moisturizing lotion, which may be an effective way to prevent future ringworm infections.

6. Grapefruit seed extract

Anecdotal evidence suggests that grapefruit seed extract may treat fungal infections. To treat ringworm, proponents recommend mixing 1 drop of grapefruit seed extract with a tablespoon of water and applying to the skin twice daily.

7. Turmeric

Turmeric is a popular spice with anti-inflammatory properties. A part of turmeric known as curcumin is believed to be responsible for the spice’s health benefits. Numerous studies detail its extensive antimicrobial abilities.

Consume turmeric as a tea or add it to meals to reap its benefits. For topical applications, mix it with a small amount of water or coconut oil until it forms a paste and apply this to the skin. Leave it to dry before wiping off.

Be aware that turmeric may stain lighter skin a yellow color, but this will fade within a few days.

8. Powdered licorice

Share on PinterestLicorice powder can be used to make a paste with antiviral and antimicrobial properties.

A frequently used herb in traditional Chinese medicine, licorice demonstrates antiviral, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory properties.

It is also used as a home remedy for ringworm and other fungal infections. For best results, mix 3 tablespoons of powdered licorice root into a cup of water.

Bring this mixture to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Once the liquid has cooled, it should form a paste.

Apply this to the ringworm patch twice a day, allowing it to sit for at least 10 minutes each time before wiping or rinsing off.

9. Tea tree oil

Native Australians have used tea tree oil as a remedy for many bacterial and fungal skin conditions for almost a century. Today, tea tree oil is both popular and effective in treating ringworm.

Make a 2 percent dilution of tea tree oil by mixing 12 drops of the essential oil with 1 ounce of a cold-pressed carrier oil, such as coconut oil. Apply this to the skin three times daily.

Those who do not have sensitive skin may be able to apply the tea tree oil directly to the affected skin without diluting it first.

10. Oil of oregano

Oil of oregano that is made from wild oregano (Origanum vulgare) contains two strong antifungals called thymol and carvacrol.

Some research has shown that oil of oregano can stop the growth of the fungus Candida albicans. Always dilute oil of oregano with a carrier oil before use. Apply the oil to the affected area up to three times daily.

Note that the majority of oil of oregano on the market contains common oregano (Origanum marjoram) rather than wild oregano.

11. Lemongrass oil

Lemongrass essential oil has been shown to reduce the activity of several types of fungus. To use lemongrass oil for ringworm, mix it with a carrier oil, and apply it to the skin twice daily with a cotton ball.

Roman Rozenblyum/Demand Media

A topical anti-fungal is a medication applied to the skin to treat certain fungal infections, such as ringworm and athlete’s foot. Anti-fungal drugs are typically prescribed by a doctor, but may also be purchased over-the-counter or made at home using natural ingredients commonly found in drug stores, grocery stores, or perhaps already in your home. Natural topical anti-fungal medications are only recommended for superficial fungus infections that can affect the skin, fingernails and toenails, or hair.

Essential Oils

Roman Rozenblyum/Demand Media

Essential oils are the most commonly used topical anti-bacterial and anti-fungal treatments. According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information, essential oils have anti-microbial properties that fight bacteria and fungi. There are more than a dozen essential oils. Essential oils most effective in treating fungal infections include lavender oil, glove oil, coconut oil, orange oil, jojoba oil, rosemary oil, oil of oregano, and the most widely used–tea tree oil. Tea tree oil, according to Drug Information Online, can be used for fungal infections, scalp infections, cuts, acne, burns, stings, yeast infections, and even respiratory disorders.

Mix essential oils together or use them on their own. You can apply essential oils straight to the skin, hair and nails, or dilute them with warm water. Mix 1 tbsp. of essential oil with about 2 cups of water. Use a clean cloth or cotton balls to apply the mixture to the skin. Several drops of essential oils may also be added to bath water to fight fungus and body odors. To treat fungus on the scalp, mix a few drops of essential oils into your favorite shampoo and conditioner.

Other Natural Anti-fungals

Roman Rozenblyum/Demand Media

Vinegar is another helpful topical antibacterial and anti-fungal remedy. White distilled vinegar and apple cider vinegar both inhibit fungus growth. Both can also be used on the skin, hair and nails. Mix 2 oz. of vinegar with about 8 oz. of warm water. Apply the mixture to the skin with a clean cloth or cotton balls several times per day.

Epsom salt also makes a great natural topical anti-fungal treatment, especially for fungus of the feet. Fill a basin with hot water and pour about 4 oz. of Epsom salt into the water. Once the water is cool enough, soak your feet in the water for about 20 to 30 minutes. Repeat this treatment two or three times per day.

Baking soda, fresh garlic, grapefruit seed extract, olive leaf extract, and lemon grass are other natural products you can use to treat fungus infections. Finally, eat more homemade foods that are great sources of zinc and selenium. Zinc and selenium are dietary supplements that act as antibacterial and anti-fungal agents.

Fungal infections can be the peskiest kind of infection to get rid of because once they find a host, they like to stick around for the long haul. Though you can heal fungal infections using salves, creams, and sprays, diet is also a major factor in helping to clear a fungus from your body. A diet high in sugar and yeast will lead to an overgrowth of yeast within the body, causing a fungal infection. Along with a diet change, there are a few other things you can do to get rid of that pesky fungus. My favorite natural treatment is an anti-fungal salve. With a salve, I combine the natural healing properties of herbs, essential oils, carrier oils, and shea butter!

Essential oils with antifungal properties

There are tons of essential oils that, in combination can battle even the toughest of fungal infections. Some are more irritating than others to the skin so please be sure to research which essential oils you are adding to your salve.

  • oregano
  • thyme
  • clove
  • lavender
  • tea tree
  • geranium
  • chamomile
  • cedarwood
  • cinnamon bark
  • Frankincense
  • lemongrass
  • pine
  • ravensara
  • rosemary

Healing fungal infections with herbs is easy

There are many herbs that are very helpful to healing a fungal infection, but the two that are most notable and usually can be found in the best of herbal anti-fungal salves are chaparral and black walnut. These two are standout herbs in the anti-fungal department but there are plenty more herbs that can be used in your salve to help heal fungal infections:

  • Chaparral leaf – Not only is chaparral anti-fungal but it is also antibacterial, antiseptic, and anti-parasitic. This herb is jam packed with skin healing properties and packs a powerful punch against fungal infections.
  • Black Walnut Hulls – The most commonly used herb in anti-fungal creams and sprays, black walnut hulls are also antibacterial, antiseptic, and anti-parasitic. Any really good herbal salve for fungal infections will have black walnut hulls in it.
  • Echinacea root – Not only is this herb a super immune booster, which helps aid the body in ridding infections faster, but this super herb is also anti-fungal!
  • Whole cloves – Cloves contain some of the same phenols as Oil of Oregano, which are highly anti-fungal in nature, as well as antimicrobial, antioxidant, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory. This oil has been prized for centuries for its anti-fungal properties.
  • Lavender buds – I really believe that lavender is one of those herbs that is the heal-all end-all “god herbs”. This herb is good for so many things, it’s not surprising that it is also anti-fungal. What can’t lavender do?
  • Calendula – One of the best skin healing herbs, calendula is not just great for healing wounds and lacerations but also fungal infections. Calendula is great at reducing inflammation, treating burns, scrapes, eczema, and more!
  • Garlic – Not only is garlic one of the most potent natural antibiotics healing anything from ear infections to colds, garlic is also highly anti-fungal. You can throw some garlic into a blender with a little bit of water or oil and rub it onto your feet or infected area. Some people even like to sprinkle garlic powder into their shoes when fighting a foot fungus.

Make an herbal infused oil for maximum healing benefits

Making an herbal infused oil is extremely simple. All that you need is an organic healing carrier oil (olive, coconut, almond, grapeseed, hemp, etc.), the herbs of your choice, a mason jar, and some heat via the oven, sunshine, double boiler, etc. as long as it’s very low heat (100-140 degrees F) so that you don’t destroy the healing properties within the oil. When you steep the chosen herbs into your oil, you will be transferring those medicinal benefits from the plant into the oil. You can then use that oil in your healing recipes such as salves, massage oils, and even body butter. There are several methods that you can utilize to extract the herbal healing benefits into your oil.

  • Solar Infusion – This is one of the best methods to extract the healing benefits that your chosen herbs have. Not only are you charging your oil with naturally healing sun rays but this is the gentlest method of infusion. Some people also like to steep their herbs in the moonlight, this can give it an extra boost as well. To infuse your oil solar style, just fill your jar 1/4-1/2 full of your herbs. You can do a single herb or even a combination depending on what you are planning to use your oil for. Fill the rest of the jar, to the top, with your carrier oil (you can even do a combination of oils if you like. In all of my salves, I steep my herbs in a combination of extra virgin olive oil and extra virgin coconut oil) and cover with a lid. Set out in the sun or a sunny window and give a good shake to the jar ever day for 2 weeks. Using a cheese cloth lined strainer, strain the oil from your herbs and squeeze out any remaining oil to get the most of the oil as possible.
  • Stove Top Infusion – This is a good quick method if you don’t have the time to wait 2 weeks for a solar infusion to complete. In a double boiler drop in 1/4 part herbs to 1 part oil and allow to steep over the heat for several hours. I see people saying to leave it overnight, but there is no way to do that with a double boiler. Only do this if you are using a crockpot (which you can also use instead of the stove). Using a cheese cloth lined strainer, strain the oil from your herbs and squeeze out any remaining oil to get the most of the oil as possible.
  • Oven Infusion – When I don’t have sunshine out here in Texas, this is the method I like to use the most. I find it the easiest to leave it be without having to refill water in the bottom of a double boiler like the stove-top method. Turn your oven on the lowest setting that you can. I like to use a 1/2 gallon mason jar but this can be done in smaller. Fill your jar 1/4-1/2 full of your herbs and cover with oil to the top and cover with a lid. Set the mason jar on its side on a cookie sheet (I use one with a rim so that any oil that might leak out from the lid won’t fall onto my oven’s heating element) and put in the oven on the middle rack. Every couple of hours pull the jar out of the oven and give 2 or 3 shakes. Leave in the oven for 24-48 hours. Using a cheese cloth lined strainer, strain the oil from your herbs and squeeze out any remaining oil to get the most of the oil as possible.

DIY Anti-Fungal Salve

This salve can easily be made without the essential oils and is still highly effective! If you need to use this on young children for ringworm or nail fungus, substitute 100 drops of Plant Therapy’s Wart No More!

8 oz. salve

INGREDIENTS

  • 1/4 cup beeswax pastilles
  • 1/4 cup unrefined shea butter
  • 1/2 cup chaparral leaf/black walnut hull infused olive oil
  • 1/2 tsp. tea tree essential oil
  • 1/2 tsp. lavender essential oil
  • 20 drops Thyme essential oil

DIRECTIONS

  1. In a double boiler (or makeshift one) combine beeswax, shea butter, and herbal infused oil. Melt ingredients.
  2. Once ingredients are completely melted, remove from the heat.
  3. Mix in your essential oils and pour into containers to cool. Once cool, store in a dark cool area for maximum shelf life.

TO USE

Apply to the clean, dry affected area two times a day until the infection is completely gone. Fungal infections can be very difficult to get rid of, persistence and a healthy diet are the keys.

Other natural treatments to help heal foot fungus

  • Combine one part raw apple cider vinegar and four parts water, then soak your feet for soothing relief.
  • A combination of dead sea salts and Epsom salts in a foot soak can be very beneficial to helping heal athlete’s foot.
  • A foot powder can be made by combining 4 parts arrowroot powder, 1 part finely ground chaparral leaf, and 1 part finely ground black walnut hulls. Apply to clean dry feet or shoes for all day healing.
  • Always keep affected areas clean and dry, moisture is the leading cause of bacterial and fungal growth.

An Easy DIY Homemade Garden Fungicide

Controlling The Fungus Among Us

If you’re growing any gourds this year, this easy homemade fungicide recipe might just come in handy for you. Curcurbits like cucumbers, squash, pumpkins, and watermelon are notoriously prone to a fungal disease known as powdery mildew.

And as you’ll see below, this simple recipe can also be used to treat other fungus issues around the garden. In addition, it is widely used by rose aficionados to help control the black spot fungus that is a common problem for rose bushes.

Learn More: “How to Use Squash Pits for Bigger Garden Yields” (Video)

Is Powdery Mildew Consuming Your Cucumbers?

Powdery mildew is easily recognizable in an otherwise healthy garden. When this fungus goes unchecked, it often looks like someone has used a flour sifter to apply a thin coat of flour across the leaves of affected plants.

Powdery mildew can pop up on other garden plants, too. Some other plants that are especially prone to this fungal issue include phlox, bee balm, roses, apples, and grapes.

Make Your Own Homemade Garden Fungicide

Ingredients

4 level teaspoons or 1-1/3 tablespoons of baking boda
1 teaspoon of mild soap (e.g., Dawn or Ivory—should be biodegradable with no phosphates)
1 gallon of water

Directions

Mix all ingredients thoroughly and keep agitated. Then spray plants. Spray all leaves thoroughly, until the solution begins to run off. Spray the top and bottom of affected leaves, and spray all of the small new leaves, even if they don’t appear to have the fungus yet.

Read More: “Colloidal Silver Kills Plant Fungus, Produces Larger and Healthier Crops”

Peer Reviewed and Scientist Approved

Gardeners might be infamous for passing along myths and legends, but this simple fungicide has some pretty good academic credentials. Dr. R. Kenneth Horst from Cornell University led a series of studies to document the effectiveness of baking soda as a fungicide.

His studies found that a 0.5% solution of baking soda is best to control powdery mildew in curcurbits, and he found that using a surfactant (like soap or horticultural oil) is necessary to make the solution effective.2)http://www.attra.org/attra-pub/bakingsoda.html You can find lots of information about Dr. Horst’s work, and other relevant research, in this document from the National Center for Appropriate Technology:

View or Download the Original File Here: “Use of Baking Soda as a Fungicide”

Natural Alternatives for Controlling Fungal Issues

Before you start breaking out the fungicides, consider whether or not you might be able to control the issue just by adjusting your watering schedule. Powdery mildew can spring up during exceptionally dry conditions, especially when you have hot, dry days and cool nights. If you are growing plants that are susceptible to drought stress, make sure that they are getting regular water during summer hot streaks.

Air circulation is one of the biggest factors in many fungal infections, and you might be able to control powdery mildew and other fungal issues by spacing plants farther apart and pruning selectively to increase air flow through the affected area.3)The Organic Gardener’s Handbook of Natural Pest and Disease Control. Ellis, Barbara W. and Martin, Deborah L. 2009. Rodale.

And if you’ve had problems with powdery mildew in the past, one of the best things you can do is be sure to select plants that are resistant to powdery mildew in the future. Some varieties are less susceptible to the fungus, and they are advertised as being resistant in seed catalogs and garden centers.

How do you control fungus in your garden? Let us know in the comments below!

(This article was originally published on May 17, 2016.)

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References

I am finally sharing this post with you on how to make an easy homemade fungicide spray for plants with just two ingredients.

SPRING is finally here! I have been waiting for months to finally share a gardening post with you, it has been so long!

This is something I have mentioned before, but haven’t done a full post on.

The best part? This is great for MORE than just preventing fungus and bacteria, be sure to read the chemist notes below to learn more.

Pin this post to save for later: Easy Homemade Fungicide Spray for Plants – Two Ingredients!!

Homemade Weed Killer Recipe Can Be Found here!

Ingredients:

  • 1 aspirin tablet 325 mg
  • 1 gallon water
  • Spray bottle (read this post for spray bottle info)
  • A few drops of dish soap (OPTIONAL)

Directions:

  1. Crush aspirin up until it is a fine powder.
  2. Mix with one gallon of water.
  3. Add contents to a spray bottle. At this point, you can add a few drops of soap if you choose too. PLEASE read notes below about the dish soap!!
  4. Using the mist setting, spray leaves of plant until lightly, but evenly coated.
  5. Use every few weeks during the growing season.

For More Aggressive Treatments:

I wanted to include a quick alternative solution for this. I have done quite a bit of research on using aspirin for plants. In a few horticulture books, the solution mentioned was 1 aspirin to 1 LITER of water. This makes it a little more concentrated, so if you want to really make sure your plant is protected from disease, you can use this ratio. I have used the 1 liter of water for my roses, and they responded well.

Information on Optional Dish Soap:

Dish soap plays one roll in this. It makes the solution stick to the leaves. I usually don’t use it, and it works fine. If you really want to make sure the solution sticks to the leaves for longer, it doesn’t hurt to add a few drops of dish soap.

I wouldn’t use dish soap on any thin leaves or sensitive leaves. Read more below under the chemistry of this solution.

The Chemistry Behind This Easy Homemade Fungicide Spray for Plants

There is a good reason this solution works, and it’s all based on Chemistry!

Aspirin is known in the chemistry world as acetylsalicylic acid. It was invented by a chemist, then many decades later, a scientist by the name of Bayer studied the use of acetylsalicylic acid for medicinal uses. He called it aspirin and started selling it.

To get a deep history and unique article, read this post from last year.

For this article, let’s discuss why aspirin works for this solution:

Aspirin is white, crystalline powder with weak acidic properties. When mixed with water, it turns back into salicylic acid and acetic acid (vinegar). The compound salicylic acid is the key to its uniqueness.

Salicylic Acid

The salicylic acid works as an antifungal for plants when the leaves are sprayed. In this study, it was highly effective at preventing wilt disease in green peppers!

It works to prevent many types of fungus in plants like wilt, rust, and powdery mildew.

Optional Dish Soap

The reason this is optional is because it isn’t necessary, BUT it does help solution stick better. This is good for treating something more aggressively, or if you live in a place with a lot rain. I don’t typically add any dish soap, and the solution works fine.

You can use insecticidal soap or dishwashing liquid like Dawn.

How it Can Help Grow Healthier Blooms

Believe it or not, this does wonders for blooms! Like I mention in this post, salicin was originally extracted from willow bark. Salicin was the precursor to aspirin. Willow is an incredible rooting hormone!

Spraying the leaves of your plants with this spray enhances blooms, makes them darker, and more vivid.

It can also make your plant grow larger with regular use!

What Type of Plants Can I Use This On?

Really any! I use this on all my flowers in pots and in the ground. The research article I shared above talked about using it on peppers, so it can also be helpful in a vegetable garden. Remember to start with one gallon of water to one aspirin, then if you decide to increase the concentration to one liter of water, feel free to do so!

Aspirin is a popular tool among gardeners. I came across many people who used it for their plants when I took horticulture.

Precautions:

DON’T spray this on your plants when temperatures are above 90 degrees! As with any fungicide, really hot temperatures can cause scorching!!

DON’T spray more than every two weeks!

DON’T combine this with other fungicide sprays especially heavy duty ones!

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