Growing eucalyptus from seeds

Contents

Eucalyptus Seed – Eucalyptus Globulus Silverdrop Seed

Flower Specifications

Season: Perennial

USDA Zones: 8 – 10

Height: 24 – 72 inches

Bloom Season: Spring

Bloom Color: White

Environment: Full sun

Soil Type: Moist, well-drained, pH 6.5 – 7.5

Planting Directions

Temperature: 60 – 70F

Average Germ Time: 84 – 98 days

Light Required: Yes

Depth: Press into soil and cover lightly with sand

Sowing Rate: 1 – 2 seeds per plant

Moisture: Keep seeds moist until germination

Care & Maintenance: Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus Globulus Silverdrop) – Start Eucalyptus seed to grow this Silver Drop shrub. Eucalyptus Silver Drop is a hardy perennial plant with teardrop-shaped leaves. The leaves are green-gray with a slight dusty appearance that makes the leaves look silvery. The leaves of Eucalyptus Silver Drop–like those of other Eucalyptus varieties–contain highly fragranced oil that is used for aroma therapy and other medicinal uses. The shrub-like plant is considerably smaller than the large trees of the other Eucalyptus varieties. This perennial is a beautiful plant for the background of your garden as it has an interesting color and shape, and contrasts nicely with colorful blooms, and as a bonus, the foliage is a wonderful filler in fresh and dried flower arrangements as well.

Sow Eucalyptus seed indoors into a starter tray. Press the flower seed into the soil and lightly cover with sand. Keep the seeds moist by watering from underneath. Once the seedling is 4 – 5 inches tall, transplant it into container. Use a 1 – 2 gallon container with potting mix with the appropriate amount of granular 5-10-10 fertilizer with micronutrients. If you want to plant Eucalyptus Silver Drop directly in the garden, prepare a spot for it. If your soil is clay-like or sandy, mix humus (compost) into the existing soil to improve its quality. Use a hoe or spade to break up existing soil, and pour the compost into the loosened soil; mix with a strong rake or hoe.

Choose a pot in which to germinate the Eucalyptus deglupta seed. It should have several holes in the bottom for drainage. Seeding flats are ideal if you plan on germinating more than one seed. Combine equal parts of sand and peat moss and moisten it well. Peat moss resists moisture when it is dry, so you may have to stir the mixture well to get it uniformly moist. Pour the mixture into the container, to within 1/2 inch of the rim.
Eucalyptus deglupta seeds require light to germinate, so place the seed on the surface of the planting mix and don’t cover it. Fill a spray bottle with tap water and adjust the nozzle to a fine mist. Mist the seeds and the surface of the planting mix. The seeds also require a bit of heat, so set a heat mat to 71 degrees Fahrenheit and place the pot on top of it.
For the first three days, the pot should remain in a lightly shaded area. On day four, move the pot into the sun for one hour then place it back in the shade. Over the course of the next week, gradually increase the amount of time the pot spends in the sun until it receives 50 percent sun. During this time, keep the soil moist by spraying it with the misting bottle. The Eucalyptus deglupta seed’s germination period is erratic and may occur anytime between 14 and 90 days after sowing.
Move the seedling into full sun all day when it has its third set of leaves. Continue to keep the soil moist. When the Eucalyptus deglupta reaches 10 to 12 inches in height, it is ready to be transplanted into the landscape. Harden off the seedling by reducing the amount of water given by half and gradually exposing it to increasing amounts of direct sun, over the course of two weeks.

Effect of temperature and light on germination of 10 species of Eucalyptus from north-western NSW

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Propagating Eucalyptus: How To Grow Eucalyptus From Seed Or Cuttings

The word eucalyptus is derived from the Greek meaning “well covered” referring to the flower buds, which are covered with a lidded cup-like tough outer membrane. This membrane is flung off as the flower blooms, revealing the woody fruit containing many eucalyptus tree seeds. Let’s learn more about how to grow eucalyptus from seed and other methods of eucalyptus propagation.

Eucalyptus Propagation

Native to Australia and encompassing over two-thirds of its land mass, eucalyptus is not only the koala’s mainstay, but is known to control aphids and other insect infestations. Popular for its use in floral arrangements, eucalyptus propagation can be accomplished in several ways, with eucalyptus tree seeds being the most common and reliable method.

Grafting and micro propagation are also used. Eucalyptus cuttings for propagation are a less than fool proof method, but some species take to this method better than others.

How to Grow Eucalyptus from Seed

Eucalyptus grows rapidly in poor soil conditions and readily reseeds itself in warmer climates. However, some types of eucalyptus require cold stratification, wherein the seed must be chilled to begin the process of germination.

Varieties of eucalyptus which need to be cold stratified include:

  • E. amygdalina
  • E. coccifera
  • E. dalrympleana
  • E. debeuzevillei
  • E. delegatensis
  • E. dives
  • E. elata
  • E. fastigata
  • E. glaucescens
  • E. goniocalyx
  • E. kybeanensis
  • E. mitchellana
  • E. niphophila
  • E. nitens
  • E. pauciflora
  • E. perriniana
  • E. regnans
  • E. stellulata

To cold stratify eucalyptus tree seeds, mix together 1 teaspoon of seeds to 2 to 3 tablespoons of filler such as perlite, vermiculite or sand. Dampen the mixture, put in a zip-lock bag labeled and dated, and place in the refrigerator for four to six weeks. After that time, you may sow the seeds including the inert filler.

So now, how to grow eucalyptus from seed? Sow eucalyptus tree seeds in the spring (late spring in some climates) in flats of pasteurized soil medium placed in a shady area and covered with white plastic. Once some maturity has been achieved, transplant to small pots and then again upon maturation into a prepared garden row. Of course, the eucalyptus tree seeds may also be directly sowed into the container in which the plant will continue to grow.

Starting Eucalyptus Trees from Cuttings

Growing eucalyptus from seed is the easiest route to propagation; however, some brave souls have been known to attempt eucalyptus propagation from rooting eucalyptus cuttings. Rooting cuttings is a bit more difficult to achieve unless one uses mist propagation units or micro propagation facilities.

For the intrepid gardener, however, the following are instructions for rooting eucalyptus cuttings:

  • Choose 4-inch long mature shoots during June/July and dip the bottom tips of the cuttings in rooting hormone for about 30 seconds. Eucalyptus cuttings should have at least one budding leaf but if it has sprouting leaves, break these off.
  • Fill a pot with perlite and position the cuttings down into the medium with the rooting hormone end covered. Allow the pot to absorb water until moistened through its bottom hole set into a saucer filled with water and then cover the pot with a plastic bag and place in a warm location.
  • Rooting eucalyptus cuttings for propagation should remain in temperatures about 80-90 F. (27-32 C.). Keep moist and hopefully after four weeks or so your cuttings will have rooted and will be ready for transplanting.

Good luck!

Angela Carlson

Abstract

Eucalyptus can be propagated in a variety of ways.Propagation by seeds is most common; grafting and micropropagation are also used.Cuttings are difficult to start, but can be used in some species.

Introduction

Eucalyptus is native of Australia.The name “eucalyptus” is derived from the Greek “eu” meaning well and “kalyptos” meaning covered. The Greek “Eu kalyptos” refers to the flower buds of the species which

are covered with a cup-like membrane structure with a hard lid that is thrown off as the flower expands. The fruit is covered by a woody conical cup shaped skin and contains many minute seeds (http://users.netaccess.co.nz/ambleside/eucalypt.html).

Over two-thirds of Australia’s vegetation is eucalyptus.The genus Eucalyptus is of the family Myrtaceae, and it has over 700 species.Eucalyptus has been known to help control aphids and other insects.It will grow rapidly even in poor soil conditions.It is most commonly known for its use in cut flower arrangements (“How to Grow a Eucalyptus: Get it in the Ground as Soon as Possible!”).

Eucalyptus can be propagated using a variety of methods.Among them are seeds, grafting, micropropagation, and cuttings.

Methods of Propagation

Seeds

    • This is the most preferable method that is used. It is mostly done in the spring when the capsules are mature and just about ready to open. Seeds are able to germinate immediately because no dormancy conditions occur. Any seeds that are not sown immediately should be stored at 35-40°F (“Growing Eucalyptus From Seed”).
    • Some of the seeds may require stratification for two months at 4°C (Plant Propagation: Principles and Practices).
    • The seeds are usually planted in flats of pasteurized soil and placed in a shady location or covered with white plastic. From there they are transplanted into small pots and later moved into a lined-out nursery row. The seeds may be sown directly into containers in which the seedlings are grown (Plant Propagation: Principles and Practices).

Grafting oA side-wedge method is used most successfully.The seedling rootstocks are grown in containers and placed under very high humidity conditions.Using scions that have been girdled for at least a month will increase the success of the graft (Plant Propagation: Principles and Practices).
Micropropagation

oEven with mature plant tissue this is done routinely (Plant Propagation: Principles and Practices).

Cuttings

oMost species are difficult to start from cuttings; however, there are some that can obtain good rooting. Treatments such as 4000ppm IBA + 4000ppm NAA are used with mist and bottom heat for some species.Others respond best to four-node cuttings treated with IBA.In this case leaf retention is important, so older shoots should not be used.Rooting is best when cuttings are taken from rapidly growing stock plants (Plant Propagation: Principles and Procedures).

Future Work Needed

Future work should probably be pursued in cutting propagation to find more species that are found that can obtain good rooting.

“Growing Eucalyptus From Seed.”13.Online.4 May 2001.

Hartmann, Hudson T.; Kester, Dale E.; Davies, Fred T. Jr.; and Geneve, Robert L.Plant Propagation:

Principles and Procedures.6th ed.New Jersey: Simon and Schuster, 1997.

“How to Grow a Eucalyptus: Get it in the Ground as Soon as Possible!”Eucalyptus Introduction and

Cultural Information.26.Online.4 May 2001.

“Propagation and Establishment of Eucalyptus.”Eucalyptus Propagation and Growing.5.Online.

4 May 2001

http://users.netaccess.co.nz/ambleside/eucprop.htmlhttp://users.netaccess.co.nz/ambleside/eucprop.html

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Eucalypts by Cuttings

Christian Narkowicz

When discussing the propagation of Australian plants by cutting, there appeared to be a law which stated “thou shall not propagate eucalypts by cutting”, and I presumed this to be true However, a few years ago I saw an article on the propagation of eucalypts in India, and they showed a photograph of a nursery with the caption slating that the juvenile plants were from cuttings. Surely this must have been a mistake! More recently I came across a letter in Australian Plants online from a resident of the Netherlands requesting information on the possible propagation of eucalypts from cuttings. Why would a Dutchman be interested in such a thing? Hadn’t he heard the law of eucalypt propagation?

Intrigued, I did a search on the Internet and found a reference to Dr Ruad of the CSIRO, who is working on vegetative (tissue culture) eucalypt propagation. Dr Roud provided some references and I subsequently found a book entitled Eucalypt Domestication and Breeding, Eldridge K et al (eds), Clarendon Press, Oxford (1993), from which most of the following information has been extracted.

It is believed that the first successful, deliberate, rooted cuttings of eucalypts were achieved in Canberra in 1948 using shoots from seedlings of various species, in greenhouses with bottom heat and mist sprays Vegetative propagation was also discovered by accident in Morocco, with discarded prunings of Eucalyptus camaldulensis seedlings fallen on the ground striking roots, under favourable warm, moist conditions, after a few days. Following these observations more formal trials were conducted. It was discovered that many eucalypt species could be propagated by cuttings of seedling material, up to about node 15.

The observation of aerial roots in mature E.deglupta and E.robusta suggested that these species may readily strike from cuttings. Work by J Davidson in Canberra revealed that E.deglupta cuttings would strike from crowns taken from trees five years old and older, from new growth of scions taken from mature trees grafted onto seedlings, and from coppiced mature trees.

The success of plantation-grown eucalypts, often commercially superior hybrids, propagated by cutting, ensured continuing research into vegetative propagation in Africa, South America, Europe, Asia, New Guinea and Australia. Propagation by cuttings is increasingly the method of choice for plantation eucalypts.

So, why the belief that eucalypts cannot be propagated by cutting? Well, there are many difficulties with the procedure. The main problem seems to be getting the right cutting material. New growth from young plants is essential for most species that will strike. Growth from older parts of a tree may be difficult or impossible to strike. It was found that in most species adult trees, over five years old, produce a rooting inhibitor which prevents cuttings from striking. The position in the crown where the shoot is taken is also important and influences vigour and habit.

Most eucalypts will strike from material taken from seedlings, however it is often desirable to select characteristics from a mature tree. It is possible to bring about juvenile growth by several different methods. Cutting down the tree leaving a stump of about 20cm is one way. New coppiced growth is of a juvenile nature and suitable for cutting. Another technique is to rejuvenate the growth by repeated cuttings, with the striking rate increasing with each generation. A further technique is repeated grafting. Material from a mature tree is grafted onto a seedling (preferably from the same parent), with new growth repeatedly regrafted until juvenile growth occurs, from which cuttings can be taken.

In tropical climates cuttings root and grow quickly, with plants ready for planting out two to three months. In temperate climates (eg. France) it takes longer. In France cuttings are taken throughout the year, other than in mid-winter. A typical cutting may be about 30 cm long, with 2-4 nodes (4-8 leaves). Cuttings are treated by immersion in a fungicide solution (such as Benlate, 6 gm/10 litres water) and drained. Hormone treatment is typically a light dusting of the extreme basal end with 1% IBA. Potting medium may be any sterile, free-draining, moisture retaining medium. Sand, vermiculite, aged sawdust, milled pinebark and pumice have all been used successfully. Cuttings, individually potted, are kept under polythene covers in a plastic greenhouse. The temperature of the substrate is kept at 20oC. Lower temperatures will retard root growth and higher temperatures may encourage rot. Medium is treated with fungicide on a weekly basis. Slow release Osmocote would be a suitable fertiliser. Ambient temperature does not require strict regulation but should be kept below 30oC. A minimum of 200 hours of light per monthis desirable, and 400 hours per month is better. This may be achieved with artificial lighting, if necessary.

So why would a gardener want to grow eucalypts from cuttings? Perhaps there is a magnificent flowering gum or an unusual colour form of some other eucalypt you would like to (try to) propagate, with an assurance of identical flower colour. Perhaps you would like to do it just to see if you can.

And why did the Dutchman want to grow eucalypts from cuttings? Perhaps he was crazy but he wanted to breed cultivars, subject them to freezing Dutch winters (as low as -30oC) and then propagate the survivors vegetatively. I sent him some seeds of E.coccifera, which may be a good start.

Further information is available from this article in the June 1997 issue of Australian Plums online (originally published in the Eucalyptus Study Group newsletter).

From Eucryphia, the newsletter of the Australian Plants Society (Tasmania), September 1997.

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Australian Plants online – 2007
Association of Societies for Growing Australian Plants

Growing Eucalyptus Trees from Seed

In the wild all Eucalyptus seeds are grown inside their own hard protective capsule. All of our seeds have been removed from these capsules to make your job easier. The following method is very reliable and easy to follow.

STEP 1

Hardy Eucalyptus seeds always benefit from a cold period at 3 – 5 deg C, usually 2 months in the refridgerator. We tend to store our seeds in the refridgerator so this is not always necessary when you receive them (we will indicate if you need to cold treat them).

STEP 2

Eucalyptus seedlings hate their roots being disturbed at any time during their growth. Therefore, we tend to choose a pot or tray that is deep enough to allow the tap root to grow unhindered until it is ready for potting on. A standard 2 – 3 inch deep seed tray is fine, otherwise try some deeper pots.

STEP 3

Fill your chosen tray or pot with a good general purpose compost , water it well and leave it to drain. Place the tray or pot in a propagator for 24hrs bringing it up to the required germination temperature (15 – 20 deg C). If you don’t have a propagator simply cover the top of your pot with a clear plastic bag held in place with an elastic band. (If you cant achieve this temperature, dont worry your seeds will still germinate but may take a while longer).

STEP 4

Sprinkle the fine seeds thinly onto the surface of your prewarmed compost and place them back into your chosen propagator. Keep a weekly eye on your seeds. Never allow them to dry out as they will die. If you need to, simply mist the surface of the compost with a light spray.

STEP 5

Germination can be very quick taking anything from 1 – 2 weeks. Once your seeds germinate prize them out of the compost gently. Tip – always handle the seedlings by their leaves. Prepare some fresh compost in 2 – 3 inch pots and transfer each seedling into their own pot by planting them level with their own natural collar.

STEP 6

Water and label each pot and position them into bright shade. You should aim to plant the seedlings into their final garden position within 12 – 15 months by which time the seedlings should be at least 1 foot tall. If you need to in the interim period, continue to pot the seedlings up (always taking care not to disturb their roots).

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When to Plant Eucalyptus Seed

Lindsay J. Daniels

As with most aspects of growing native plants, there are many ideas, sometimes conflicting, on when eucalyptus seed should be sown. I have tried sowings at different times throughout the year and have also obtained the opinions of other growers of native plants. The following article is based on my experiences and findings and that of others.

In most areas of Queensland seed of most species of eucalypts can be sown and reasonable germination can be obtained at any time of the year without using artificial heat. To do this, a sheltered position that is warmed by the sun is necessary. This is usually on the northern side of a building. Natural light and ventilation should be good, but it should be protected from heavy rain. In winter the areas may receive some direct sunlight particularly in the morning, but in summer it should not be in direct sunlight.

Although germination will occur right throughout the year, germination is usually slower, more uneven and percentage not as high during the period from May to mid-August. During this period germination may take from 2 to 3 weeks, compared to 3 to 10 days during spring and summer. I have also found that, while fresh seed that has a high viability will germinate satisfactorily during the winter period, older seed often gives a much poorer result, even though this older seed may give reasonable germination in the warmer months.

Seeds (and chaff) of the river red gum
(Eucalyptus camaldulensis)

As a general rule the best time for sowing eucalyptus seed appears to be early spring. I have had consistently good results by sowing during the first warm spell. The time of this will vary from year to year and from district to district, but in most areas of central and southern Queensland it can be from late August to mid-September. This is the time when most plants will commence to make new growth. Although, temperatures during this period will not be as high as later in the summer, plants appear to want to grow and reproduce as soon as temperatures start to warm up.

Sowings can continue right throughout the summer with the prospect of good germination, but seedlings from sowing during the hottest period often have to contend with more pest and disease problems. The late summer to autumn period, during March and April, usually gives good germination and, although later growth is slower, pest and disease incidence is generally low, and for some species and in our hotter areas, autumn sowings may have some advantages.

An exception to the early spring plantings are some tropical species of eucalypts. These give best germination if sowing is delayed until October or November when temperatures are higher, as they apparently need a higher optimum temperature for germination. Winter sowings of these species are not recommended.

Although reasonable germination can be expected from seed of most species of eucalypts in most areas of Queensland throughout the year, the optimum time for sowing appears to be spring and early summer, with the autumn period being the next most suitable time. My experience of the germination of species other than eucalypts indicates that generally they follow the same pattern as that for eucalypts; so that the best times for planting eucalyptus seed also appears to be the best times for planting seed of most species of native plants.

The spring and early summer sowings have the added advantage in that the resultant plants will be of suitable size for planting out in the ground in the following March – April period. This time appears to be the best time for planting out of most species in most areas of Queensland.

From the newsletter of the Pine Rivers Branch of the Society for Growing Australian Plants (Queensland), September 2007.

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Australian Plants online – 2007
Association of Societies for Growing Australian Plants

Buy Flower, Vegetable and Plant Seeds from Chiltern Seeds

One of the hardiest; juvenile foliage silver-blue and particularly attractive. A good hedging and timber tree with fast growth and good for cut foliage. Hardy throughout the British Isles. 100ft (30m)
A remarkable genus of over 500 species nearly all natives of Australia, ranging from small shrubs to the tallest of all broad leaved trees. One of the most interesting aspects of the Eucalypts is that the adult leaves are usually completely different in form from the juvenile leaves, which themselves are frequently of a most unusual and attractive appearance. They have many horticultural uses. Many species make very fine trees that are both ornamental and very fast growing, some reaching 3 or 4ft. the first year, and over 20ft in five years. They are amongst the finest sources of cut ornamental foliage for the floral artist, and for this purpose they should be grown as stooled (coppiced) or pollarded specimens. For these all the previous year’s growth is pruned; down to ground level for stooled specimens and a short stem 1 or 2ft. long retained for pollarded specimens. The resulting annual growths, always of juvenile foliage, can reach 7ft. in the case of some species and it is these that are so excellent for cutting, lasting, as they do, a considerable time in water. Many Eucalypts treated as above make most beautiful shrubs when the young leaves, continuing to unfold from spring to summer, can be more colourful than many flowering shrubs. Eucalypts make excellent foliage pot plants for indoor decoration, in which case they should be treated as coppice plants. Lastly, the foliage of many species is agreeably aromatic when crushed and the smoke from a bonfire of prunings is said to be delightfully scented.

Eucalyptus Seeds – Eucalyptus Cinerea Silver Dollar Seed

Season: Perennial

USDA Zones: 8 – 10

Height: 420 inches

Bloom Season: Spring

Bloom Color: White

Environment: Full sun

Soil Type: Moist, well-drained, pH 6.5 – 7.5

Temperature: 60 – 70F

Average Germ Time: 84 – 98 days

Light Required: Yes

Depth: Press into soil and cover lightly with sand

Sowing Rate: 1 – 2 seeds per plant

Moisture: Keep seeds moist until germination

Care & Maintenance: Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus Cinerea Silver Dollar) – Bring this wonderfully aromatic tree to your yard! Amazingly fast growing, Eucalyptus Silver Dollar Tree, establishes from Eucalyptus seeds, and it creates a versatile tree for the yard or for a container indoors. Silver Dollar Gum tree has attractive blue-green, coin-shaped juvenile leaves, opposite on the pendulous stems, excellent for cut foliage. A good choice evergreen tree, withstanding dry areas and wind. Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Watering can be reduced after establishment. Feed with a general purpose fertilizer before new growth begins in spring. Prune Eucalyptus Silver Dollar tree in winter time.

Plant this blue-gray Silver Dollar Gum tree as a windbreak, in slots between buildings or as a shade tree in hot climates. Take advantage of its unique coloring by combining with plants that offer interesting contrast. Looks best when used in windrows or groves on large-scale home sites.

Sow Eucalyptus seed indoors into a starter tray. Press the flower seed into the soil and lightly cover with sand. Keep the Eucalyptus Cinerea seeds moist by watering from underneath. Once the seedling is 4 – 5 inches tall, transplant it into container. Use a 1 – 2 gallon container with potting mix with the appropriate amount of granular 5-10-10 fertilizer with micronutrients. If you want to plant Eucalyptus Silver Drop directly in the garden, prepare a spot for it. If your soil is clay-like or sandy, mix humus (compost) into the existing soil to improve its quality. Use a hoe or spade to break up existing soil, and pour the compost into the loosened soil; mix with a strong rake or hoe.

EUCALYPTUS cinerea Silver Dollar

Eucalypt’s germinate readily from seed and are generally considered one of the easiest natives to grow from seed.

Depending on the species Eucalyptus seed comes in various sizes from very fine to several millimetres long. As a rule of thumb seed that is fine should be sown on the surface of a porous mix and not buried. Seed 1 to 2 mm in diameter can be covered very lightly and seed from 2 mm up can be sown to a depth of the seed width.

Although seed can be sown most of the year in Australia seed is generally best sown in spring or autumn in temperate climates, avoid the coldest and hottest months of the year. The optimum germination temperature for germination is around 18-22°C

  1. Sow seed on surface of a porous seed raising mix. The seed will lodge in the the pores of the mix once watered.
  2. Sprinkle a very light covering of the seed raising mix over the seed if required to hold the seed in place. Do not bury seed.
  3. Water with fine mist spray to avoid disturbance of the seed.
  4. Place in a warm shaded or semi shaded position to avoid dying out.
  5. Keep warm & moist, avoid drying out or waterlogging the growing mix.
  6. Germination generally occurs in around 10-28 days in the right condition.

General note: Seeds of many natives are dormant and require specific conditions or pre-treatment for germination.
Do not be too hasty to discard seed that does not germinate, seeds will often lay dormant until the conditions are similar to their natural requirements for germination to occur. Containers put to one side will often surprise long after they were discarded.

Silver Dollar Eucalyptus Seeds (Eucalyptus cineraria) + FREE Bonus 6 Variety Seed Pack – a $30 Value!

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  • Frozen Seed Capsules™ are designed as a time capsule for seeds. They are intended to be stored in the freezer and will protect and preserve your seeds, providing many years of excellent germination rates. Seeds saved in a frozen environment can last for decades. Even storing Frozen Seed Capsules™ in the refrigerator or at room temperature is acceptable and also extends seed life by many years!
  • The screw-top lid provides an air/water-tight environment to keep seeds dry. The glass vial ensures protection for long-term storage and seeds are easily viewable, yet completely secure; no more flimsy envelopes! Organic cotton keeps seeds dry and comfortable and color-changing silica beads absorb moisture to prevent seed damage.
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*THIS ITEM HAS AN EXTENDED HANDLING TIME AND WILL SHIP WITHIN 30 DAYS FROM THE DATE YOU PLACE YOUR ORDER*

  • Frozen Seed Capsules™ are designed as a time capsule for seeds. They are intended to be stored in the freezer and will protect and preserve your seeds, providing many years of excellent germination rates. Seeds saved in a frozen environment can last for decades. Even storing Frozen Seed Capsules™ in the refrigerator or at room temperature is acceptable and also extends seed life by many years!
  • The screw-top lid provides an air/water-tight environment to keep seeds dry. The glass vial ensures protection for long-term storage and seeds are easily viewable, yet completely secure; no more flimsy envelopes! Organic cotton keeps seeds dry and comfortable and color-changing silica beads absorb moisture to prevent seed damage.
  • Plant your seeds now or save seeds to grow year after year. Collect seeds from your own harvest and place the seeds into your Frozen Seed Capsules™ to save the seeds for planting next season.
  • Perfect for both the rare seeds collector and avid gardener, Frozen Seed Capsules™ make saving seeds easy and effective!

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