Growing caladiums in pots

Growing Caladium indoors in pots

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Caladiums as house plants, when growing indoors in pots are a stunning addition to any room’s design and feeling. So this is an enigma to me how is it still almost unknown not only to an average home grower, but even to professional home plants’ distributors. Large, fancy painted Caladium leaves are made to be a conversation topic or even a subject of admiration. Easy indoor care and cheap tubers transportation as well as low buying price should make Caladium‘s way into many homes. So probably, its glory days as a house plant are still ahead. As for now YOU can discover its unique tropical beauty and be among yet few Caladium indoor growers.

Caladium description and natural habitat

Unusual patterns and colors on large leaves, it is Caladium‘s own trademark. It can be red and white splashes on green surface or brightly red colored or white areas around midribs and margins of the leaf’s disk. The whole leafs can be in different shades of red – from pink to almost black. Most of these color bonanza is due to a prolific hybridization of two wild species found in tropical rainforests of Latin America: Caladium bicolor and Caladium picturatum.

The distinct traits of those two species are manifested in two different shapes of leaves. More round or heart shaped leaves are heritage of Caladium bicolor. In wild it has plain green surface with random red and white spots. Those hybrids are called fancy leaved Caladiums. The other group of hybrids, called lance leaved Caladiums, has its dominant genes from Caladium picturatum.

Size-wise the larger tubers will produce larger leaves. The leaves can be from 10cm or less (about 3″) and up to 60-70cm (24-27″) long. Each leaf will arise on a slender petiole, which can also get up to 70cm (27″) high.

Photo © vickievilla, Flickr

Flowers are not Caladium‘s main attraction and they will rarely flower indoors. Belonging to Araceae family, its flowers have typical look similar to other family members as Peace lily (Spathiphyllum) or Dumb canes (Dieffenbachia). Actually, in case it does develop a flower, the advise is to remove it. Flowering and developing seeds is any flowering plant’s priority number one. Meaning it will divert all available resources into it, while sacrificing development of the tuber.

Caladium care indoors

Planting Caladium tubers

In habitat, Caladium will grow on limestone outcrops of tropical rain forests, where they receive plenty of humidity with frequent rain falls. The poriferous soil there, however, will never hold any standing water. These are the kind of conditions you need to have in mind when planting your tubers.

You won’t need a big pot for this. About 5 times the diameter of the tuber is a good pot size. Most bagged soil available will do just fine with amendment of 1/3 volume of perlite. Perlite is added to make the soil lighter and more poriferous, while it still will supply enough water to the roots. Don’t forget to add a drainage layer at the bottom of the pot as well as drainage holes.

Look at your tuber. You will see a large “eye” on one side looking a bit like tree rings. This is the up side. The main shoot will grow from the eye. Pot it the eye up, if you want your plant have tall petioles with large leaves. However if you plant it on the side, it will have more dense appearance with shorter and smaller, but more numerous leaves.

Plant the tuber shallow with soil just covering it. Water and put it in a warm place. It will take from a couple of weeks to sometimes a couple of months to start growing.

Watering Caladium and winter storage

Increase watering when the first shoot has made its appearance and has grown a couple of centimeters (about 1in). The soil now should never be allowed to get completely dry. Just make sure it doesn’t stand in water.

High humidity is important for Caladiums. So it will do great with daily showers from a spray bottle, but don’t leave any big water drops on the foliage.

Caladium are seasonally dormant plants. At the end of the growing season the leaves will start to fade. At this point you will have to reduce watering to stop it completely when all the foliage is gone and your plant has entered the winter rest.

Store it in its pot in a warm place not colder than 16°C (60°F). It will need about two months of rest period. After that, take the tuber up, change the soil, take a bigger pot if the tuber has grown substantially and start it all over again.

Fertilizing Caladium

Feeding your Caladium during the active growing is a must if you want good size tubers to develop for the next season. A balanced fertilizer with NPK about 8-8-8 will do the job.

Apply the soluble fertilizer (as instructed on the label) once a month directly to the soil without spraying or poring it on the leaves. Caladium leaves are very sensitive and are easy to burn with fertilizer.

You can also strew long release granules with about the same NPK. Use about 1/2 tbsp 3 times during the growing season.

Right light conditions for Caladium

Light might be a complicated issue with Caladiums planted outdoors. Too much direct sun and it will burn the leaves or attractive pink color will turn brown. To little light and the colors may be not as prominent as you could expect.

Growing indoors the perfect place for your Caladiums would be in an east or west facing window. A few hours sun light in morning or evening is all they need to reveal all its glory.

Caladium propagation

The easiest way for a home grower is to obtain tubers. They are normally available during Caladium‘s resting period from late fall to early spring. Advantages are many: law price, easy to ship and a plant true to the type.

The last one is something you will not get when propagation by seeds. The hybrids gens in seeds will be snaffled, resulting in colors different from parents. Often it will reverse to its basic, original form, but in few cases you might get a new exiting variety.

Caladium cultivars / varieties

Due to a bountiful breeding during many years, we can now pick and choose between more than two thousand Caladium cultivars. Those I grow now in our home you can see on photos above in this article. For more cultivars I asked my Facebook friend GDe Leo‘s permission to publish some of his photos of some of his plants.

Enjoy, inspire, try it!

One of 14 distinctive Caladium species

You can now order a set of 5 mixed Caladium tubers in my shop:

  • Caladium mix (5 mixed tubers pack)

    Sold By : Asean Plant Export

    Scientific name: Caladium bicolor Common names: Elephant Ear, Heart of Jesus, Angel Wings …

    $29.95 Add to cart

Moonlight Caladium: Exotic Leafy Plants to Grow Indoors Or Out

Do you ever think about how different plants evoke the places from which they originate? Caladium is one of those plants.

Originating in the heart of South America, right along the banks of the Amazon River, these guys are showstoppers with their brightly-colored, paper-thin foliage.

The translucence of the leaves is what makes them so luminous, because the light shines through, making all the colors and markings stand out. Caladium comes in pink, white, red, and green in all kinds of patterns and hues.

Caladium is related to the elephant ear plant. They are both of the family Araceae and known by the common name elephant ear for their shape, along with Alocasia, Colocasia, and Xanthosoma.

There are seven species of caladium, all indigenous to Brazil and the surrounding areas of South and Central America.

In their native habitat, they grow in the open spaces of tropical forests and on the banks of streams.

No matter where you plant them, caladium, like their other elephant ear cousins, die off and go dormant for several months of every year. However, if you take special care of the tubers, you can keep your caladiums for many years.

Keeping caladium in cold northern climates may require some fiddling every year. However, it’s usually worth it for the bright colors of the foliage that rival any flower, and which last from spring until late summer.

Unless you live in the few tropical regions of the U.S., you may still have to take special care of your caladiums, as they can tolerate no frost whatsoever. It will kill your bulbs.

The other very important consideration is that all parts of the caladium plant are poisonous. It may not be the right plant for you if you have pets or children.

Moonlight Caladium Variety

Do you follow plants on social media? I was recently captivated by a picture I saw on Pinterest of potted moonlight caladium sitting in a window and backlit by sunlight.

The translucent white leaves with a light green border and spine are a real showstopper.

Plant them as a backdrop for colorful flowers, in clumps around a pond or water feature, or in a pot inside to brighten up the indoors.

You are sure to get compliments. Moonlight or Florida moonlight is one of the many cultivars of caladium. Many cultivars aren’t sold under any name as there are so many hybrids.

However, this cultivar was named for its creator: the University of Florida in 2002. Additionally, it’s gaining popularity.

Growing Moonlight Caladium

Given the right conditions, caladium will thrive and grow up to two feet tall in pleasing round clumps.

The rules are the same whether you grow them outside or inside. Be aware that you will have to provide what the plant needs indoors; mainly, humidity.

Caladium thrives on humidity, and the typical home with an air-conditioned interior is arid. It will not do well if you don’t take precautions against this.

How To Help Your Moonlight Caladium Thrive

How can you provide proper humidity for your plant without sacrificing your own comfort, you ask?

Make sure to keep it away from HVAC vents, for one. They are very drying. You can mist regularly, and you can put it on a saucer with a thin layer of pebbles and water.

Do you know how this provides humidity? As the water from the saucer evaporates, it creates a small pocket of moisture right around the plant.

Other caladium must-haves:

  • Shade
  • Good drainage
  • The right temperature
  • Fertilizer

Shade

Midday sun will scorch your caladiums, so whether indoors or out, look for a Northern or Eastern exposure and partial to full shade.

You can plant them under a tree, and they will do well. Some caladium varieties can tolerate sun, but moonlight loves the shade.

Drainage

For outdoor planting, don’t put caladium in a spot that puddles after rain. Make a mounded area for better drainage and keep the bulbs moist but not wet.

When they begin to grow, it’s best to keep them moist at all times. For indoor use, make sure you have a well-draining pot and potting mix.

Temperature

Caladium bulbs begin to bloom when temperatures are consistently above 70 degrees Fahrenheit.

They cannot tolerate any frost whatsoever. It will kill the leaves and the bulbs.

When planting outdoors, make sure not to plant until the soil has warmed up and all danger of frost has passed.

Fertilizer

Caladiums need fertilizer in their growing season, which is spring to late summer.

If you have caladiums that are still surviving inside during late fall and winter, only water them when the soil dries out completely and never fertilize.

You can use bone meal, liquid fertilizer, or slow-release pellets.

How to Plant Moonlight Caladium

If you are planning to use these beauties in your landscape, you want to plant after the soil temperature reaches at least 65 degrees Fahrenheit.

In some locations, the last frost is very late in the year, so you can always start your caladium indoors and move them once they’re well established.

Make sure they’re in a warm, moist place with high humidity inside.

As with other bulbs, plant them smooth side down and eye side up. If you mistakenly plant them upside down, they will still sprout, but they may not be as happy.

Cover them with at least half an inch of soil, but up to two inches. Add a bit of bone meal to the hole before planting. Water the bulbs after planting and mulch to preserve the soil’s moisture.

Bigger bulbs give more foliage, and they are sold in different size grades. The bigger bulbs do better, as this is the source of energy for the plant. The bigger they are, the further apart they need to be spaced: small bulbs need 6-8 inches of space, while jumbo bulbs need up to 18 inches of space.

When to Take the Plants Inside

When temperatures outside are consistently in the 60s, it’s time to take your plants inside.

They may live for a while inside, but their pattern is to stop growing for about five months before starting again.

To save bulbs indoors, wait until the last leaf has died before pulling up the tuber and removing the dead leaves.

Let them dry for a few days and then pack them in peat moss for the winter and store in a cool, dry place.

If you have an indoor caladium, over-winter the bulbs in their pot. Stop watering them and set in a cool, dark place while you wait for spring.

Takeaway

Moonlight caladium is one of the most exotic and eerily beautiful plants you can cultivate in your home or garden. The showy leaves will make your neighbors ooh and ah for years to come.

Caladium

The plant genus (caladium) is not short of varieties, which consists of over 1000. Most are hybrids from the C. bicolor and sold with by the name of C. x hortulanum (hybrids). Many other common names are used for these hybrids including the rosebud, frieda hemple, lord derby and a fair few others.

These are low growing foliage plants that only grow up to 25in (60cm) tall, with large leaves growing up to 18 inches (45 cm) long.

How it looks: The arrow or heart shaped decorative leaves are very thin and have a papery texture. These leaves grow up from the tuber buried in the soil on quite thin stems. Some of the eye catching color mixtures are impressive, such as the lord derby that displays green and pink leaves with green veins and the candidum with white leaves displaying prominent green veins.

Growing caladium indoors: The caladium is a tuber plant so the foliage only lasts from late spring until the beginning of fall, but they are well worth having around for the summer displaying their attractive colors.

Tubers can be placed in moist potting soil (about 2 -3 inches deep) at the beginning of spring with temperatures of no lower than 75ºF (23ºC). Once shoots appear begin taking care of the plant as advised below.

Growing Tip! If you would like to encourage tubers to begin growing quicker then place the pots on a heating mat.

After the growing period: After the yellowing leaves have started to wilt; remove the tubers from the pots and allow the tuber to dry out “anywhere in the house that’s warm enough”. Remove any excess stem; they’re now ready for planting in potting soil and stored away until next spring returns.

Displaying: The heart of Jesus plant is best placed in a window box or container and they make a great plant for growing around garden borders. They look much better in a row than one single plant, although it’s up to what the individual grower prefers and wants to do. These also make great balcony and patio plants, if the temperature is warm enough.

Caladium bicolor (Aiton) Vent.
Family: Araceae
English: fancy-leaf caladium, elephant’s-ear
Chinese: 五彩芋
French: Calalou sauvage, palette de peintre
Portuguese: papageio
General poisoning notes: Caladium (Caladium bicolor) is a houseplant that can cause burning and irritation of the lips. The plant can be a problem to children who ingest the leaves as well as to family pets that might nibble on the foliage.
Indications (Heart of Jesus): Angina, Ascaris, Catarrh, Constipation, Sore, Sore Throat, Splinter, Toothache, Wound
Activities: Abortifacient, Anthelmintic, Antiseptic, Ascaricide, Emetic, Febrifuge, Insecticide, Larvicide, Purgative, Vulnerary
USES: Tuber: Powdered tuber employed to treat facial skin blemishes by the French Guiana Palikur. Root: Used for botfly larvae in NW Guyana. Leaf: All parts of the leaf are macerated in fresh water for an external bath to remedy numerous maladies of French Guiana Wayapi children. Crushed leaves are used in veterinary medicine to destroy vermin on sores of cattle.
57 Published articles of Caladium bicolor
1. Cold-resistance in two Caladium bicolor cultivars.
Wang Ying; Lu GuoQuan; Wang ChenJing; et al.
Journal of Zhejiang A&F University Volume: 31 Issue: 2 Pages: 285-290 Published: 2014
2. NEW RECORDS OF CYCLOCEPHALA DEJEAN (COLEOPTERA: SCARABAEIDAE: DYNASTINAE) ASSOCIATED WITH CALADIUM BICOLOR (AITON) VENT. (ARACEAE).
Jaime Gasca-Alvarez, Hector
Coleopterists Bulletin Volume: 67 Issue: 4 Pages: 416-418 Published: Dec 2013
3. NEW RECORDS OF CYCLOCEPHALA DEJEAN (COLEOPTERA: SCARABAEIDAE: DYNASTINAE) ASSOCIATED WITH CALADIUM BICOLOR (AITON) VENT. (ARACEAE)
Jaime Gasca-Alvarez, Hector
COLEOPTERISTS BULLETIN Volume: 67 Issue: 4 Pages: 416-418 Published: DEC 2013
4. EFFECT OF DROUGHT STRESS ON BENDING STIFFNESS IN PETIOLES OF CALADIUM BICOLOR (ARACEAE)
Caliaro, Marco; Schmich, Florian; Speck, Thomas; et al.
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF BOTANY Volume: 100 Issue: 11 Pages: 2141-2148 Published: NOV 2013
5. Effect of processed wild cocoyam corm meal ( Caladium bicolor) on the growth and carcass characteristics of broiler birds.
Ahaotu, E. O.; Okonkwo, J. C.; Uwalaka, R. E.; et al.
Scientific Journal of Animal Science Volume: 2 Issue: 11 Pages: 304-309 Published: 2013
from Publisher
6. Caladium bicolor as bioadsorbent for treatment of industrial effluents.
Adefemi, O. S.; Awokunmi, E. E.; Ibigbami, O. A.
International Journal of Research in Chemistry and Environment (IJRCE) Volume: 3 Issue: 2 Pages: 136-139 Published: 2013
7. The impact of raw and cooked wild cocoyam ( Caladium bicolor) on the performance of broiler chicks.
Onu, P. N.; Madubuike, F. N.
Biotechnology in Animal Husbandry Volume: 28 Issue: 1 Pages: 119-128 Published: 2012
from Publisher
8. Micropropagation of Caladium bicolor (Ait.) Vent. ‘Thep Songsil’ and Incidence of Somaclonal Variants
Thepsithar, C.; Thongpukdee, A.; Chiensil, P.
Edited VanTuyl, JM; DeVries, DP
Conference: 23rd International Eucarpia Symposium, Section Ornamentals – Colourful Breeding and Genetics Location: Leiden, NETHERLANDS Date: AUG 31-SEP 04, 2009
XXIII INTERNATIONAL EUCARPIA SYMPOSIUM, SECTION ORNAMENTALS, COLOURFUL BREEDING AND GENETICS – PT II Book Series: Acta Horticulturae Volume: 855 Pages: 273-279 Published: 2010
9. Somaclonal Variation of Caladium bicolor (Ait.) Vent. ‘Jao Ying’ after In Vitro Culture Propagation
Thongpukdee, A.; Thepsithar, C.; Chiensil, P.
Edited VanTuyl, JM; DeVries, DP
Conference: 23rd International Eucarpia Symposium, Section Ornamentals – Colourful Breeding and Genetics Location: Leiden, NETHERLANDS Date: AUG 31-SEP 04, 2009
XXIII INTERNATIONAL EUCARPIA SYMPOSIUM, SECTION ORNAMENTALS, COLOURFUL BREEDING AND GENETICS – PT II Book Series: Acta Horticulturae Volume: 855 Pages: 281-287 Published: 2010
10. Micropropagation of Caladium bicolor (Ait.) Vent. ‘Thep Songsil’ and incidence of somaclonal variants.
Thepsithar, C.; Thongpukdee, A.; Chiensil, P.
Edited Tuyl, J. M. van; Vries, D. P. de
Conference: XXIII International EUCARPIA Symposium, Section Ornamentals, Colourful Breeding and Genetics, Leiden, Netherlands, 31 August-4 September 2009.
Acta Horticulturae Issue: 855 Pages: 273-280 Published: 2010
11. Somaclonal variation of Caladium bicolor (Ait.) Vent. ‘Jao Ying’ after in vitro culture propagation.
Thongpukdee, A.; Thepsithar, C.; Chiensil, P.
Edited Tuyl, J. M. van; Vries, D. P. de
Conference: XXIII International EUCARPIA Symposium, Section Ornamentals, Colourful Breeding and Genetics, Leiden, Netherlands, 31 August-4 September 2009.
Acta Horticulturae Issue: 855 Pages: 281-288 Published: 2010
12. Regenerated plant populations from rhizome-calli showed morphological and chromosomal changes in Caladium bicolor (ait.) Vent. cv. Bleeding Heart
Mujib, Abdul; Banerjee, Saumitra; Fatima, Samar; et al.
Conference: 5th International Conference on Propagation of Ornamental Plants Location: Sofia, BULGARIA Date: SEP 05-08, 2007
PROPAGATION OF ORNAMENTAL PLANTS Volume: 8 Issue: 3 Pages: 138-143 Published: SEP 2008
13. Shading and reducing tuber provide young green leaf explants for the propagation of true-to-type Caladium bicolor Ait. plants.
Ahmed, E. U.; Hayashi, T.; Yazawa, S.
Edited Kanlayanarat, S.; Nell, T. A.; Eason, J.
Conference: Proceedings of the International Conference on Quality Management in Supply Chains of Ornamentals, Bangkok, Thailand, 3-6 December 2007.
Acta Horticulturae Issue: 755 Pages: 87-91 Published: 2007
14. Shading and reducing tuber provide young green leaf explants for the propagation of true-to-type Caladium bicolor Ait. plants
Ahmed, E. U.; Hayashi, T.; Yazawa, S.
Edited Kanlayanarat, S; Nell, TA; Eason, J
Conference: International Conference on Quality Management in Supply Chains of Ornamentals Location: King Mongkuts Univ Technol Thonburi, Bangkok, THAILAND Date: DEC 03-06, 2007
Sponsor(s): Int Soc Horticutural Sci
PROCEEDINGS OF THE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN SUPPLY CHAINS OF ORNAMENTALS Book Series: ACTA HORTICULTURAE Volume: 755 Pages: 87-91 Published: 2007
15. Somaclonal variation of caladium from in vitro propagation

Somkanea, U.; Thapsithar, C.; Thongpukdee, A.
Edited Kanlayanarat, S; Nell, TA; Eason, J
Conference: International Conference on Quality Management in Supply Chains of Ornamentals Location: King Mongkuts Univ Technol Thonburi, Bangkok, THAILAND Date: DEC 03-06, 2007
Sponsor(s): Int Soc Horticutural Sci
PROCEEDINGS OF THE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN SUPPLY CHAINS OF ORNAMENTALS Book Series: ACTA HORTICULTURAE Volume: 755 Pages: 357-364 Published: 2007
16. Somaclonal variation of caladium from in vitro propagation.
Somkanea, U.; Thapsithar, C.; Thongpukdee, A.
Edited Kanlayanarat, S.; Nell, T. A.; Eason, J.
Conference: Proceedings of the International Conference on Quality Management in Supply Chains of Ornamentals, Bangkok, Thailand, 3-6 December 2007.
Acta Horticulturae Issue: 755 Pages: 357-364 Published: 2007
17. Intraspecific diversification in Caladium bicolor (Ait.) Vent. (Araceae) as revealed by chromosome analysis.
Roy, S. C.
Environment and Ecology Volume: 25 Issue: 4 Pages: 903-911 Published: 2007
18. An in vitro study on micropropagation of Caladium bicolor.
Aamir Ali; Asifa Munawar; Shagufta Naz
International Journal of Agriculture and Biology Volume: 9 Issue: 5 Pages: 731-735 Published: 2007
19. Caladium bicolor (Araceae) and Cyclocephata celata (Coleoptera, Dynastinae): A well-established pollination system in the northern Atlantic Rainforest of Pernambuco, Brazil
Maia, A. C. D.; Schlindwein, C.
PLANT BIOLOGY Volume: 8 Issue: 4 Pages: 529-534 Published: JUL 2006
20. Recovery of lead and cadmium ions from metal-loaded biomass of wild cocoyam (Caladium bicolor) using acidic, basic and neutral eluent solutions
Horsfall Jnr, Michael; Ogban, Fred E.; Akporhonor, Eyetemi E.
Electronic Journal of Biotechnology Volume: 9 Issue: 2 Pages: 0-0 Published: 2006-04-15
21. Recovery of lead and cadmium ions from metal-loaded biomass of wild cocoyam (Caladium bicolor) using acidic, basic and neutral eluent solutions
Horsfall, Michael, Jr.; Ogban, Fred E.; Akporhonor, Eyetemi E.
ELECTRONIC JOURNAL OF BIOTECHNOLOGY Volume: 9 Issue: 2 Pages: 152-156 Published: APR 15 2006
22. Effect of raw and cooked wild cocoyam ( Caladium bicolor) on the performance of broiler chicks.
Onu, P. N.; Madubuike, F. N.
Agricultura Tropica et Subtropica Volume: 39 Issue: 4 Pages: 273-278 Published: 2006
23. Effects of temperature on the sorption of Pb2+ and Cd2+ from aqueous solution by Caladium bicolor (Wild Cocoyam) biomass
Horsfall Jnr, Michael; Spiff, Ayebaemi I.
Electronic Journal of Biotechnology Volume: 8 Issue: 2 Pages: 43-50 Published: 2005-08-15
24. Effects of temperature on the sorption of Pb2+ and Cd2+ from aqueous solution by Caladium bicolor (Wild Cocoyam) biomass
Horsfall, M; Spiff, AI
ELECTRONIC JOURNAL OF BIOTECHNOLOGY Volume: 8 Issue: 2 Pages: 162-169 Published: AUG 15 2005
25. Caladium virus x, a new potexvirus from Caladium bicolor (Araceae)
Rivas, EB; Duarte, LML; Alexandre, MAV; et al.
JOURNAL OF PLANT PATHOLOGY Volume: 87 Issue: 2 Pages: 109-114 Published: JUL 2005
from Publisher
26. Kinetic studies on the sorption of lead and cadmium ions from aqueous solutions by Caladium bicolor (wild cocoyam) biomass
Horsfall, M; Spiff, AI
BULLETIN OF THE CHEMICAL SOCIETY OF ETHIOPIA Volume: 19 Issue: 1 Pages: 89-102 Published: JUN 2005
27. Enhanced anthocyanin synthesis in foliage plant Caladium bicolor
Li, SJ; Deng, XM; Mao, HZ; et al.
PLANT CELL REPORTS Volume: 23 Issue: 10-11 Pages: 716-720 Published: MAR 2005
28. Effect of metal ion concentration on the biosorption of Pb2+ and Cd2+ by Caladium bicolor (wild cocoyam)
Horsfall, M; Spiff, AI
AFRICAN JOURNAL OF BIOTECHNOLOGY Volume: 4 Issue: 2 Pages: 191-196 Published: FEB 2005
29. Caladium bicolor and wild Dioscorea dumetorum starches as dual purpose polymer additive.
Umoren, S. A.
Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management Volume: 9 Issue: 1 Pages: 75-78 Published: 2005
30. Studies on the effect of pH on the sorption of Pb2+ and Cd2+ ions from aqueous solutions by Caladium bicolor (Wild Cocoyam) biomass
Horsfall, M; Spiff, AI
ELECTRONIC JOURNAL OF BIOTECHNOLOGY Volume: 7 Issue: 3 Published: DEC 15 2004
31. Studies on the effect of pH on the sorption of Pb2+ and Cd2+ ions from aqueous solutions by Caladium bicolor (Wild Cocoyam) biomass
Horsfall Jnr, Michael; Spiff, Ayebaemi I.
Electronic Journal of Biotechnology Volume: 7 Issue: 3 Pages: 14-15 Published: 2004-12-15
32. Studies on the effect of pH on the sorption of Pb2+ and Cd2+ ions from aqueous solutions by Caladium bicolor (Wild Cocoyam) biomass
Horsfall, Michael Jr; Spiff, Ayebaemi I.
Electronic Journal of Biotechnology Volume: 7 Issue: 3 Published: DEC 15 04
33. Caladium bicolor (Aiton) Ventenat (Araceae) – A new angiospermic record for Bangladesh
Ara, H; Partha, P; Hassan, MDA
BANGLADESH JOURNAL OF BOTANY Volume: 33 Issue: 1 Pages: 75-77 Published: JUN 2004
34. 迷你型花叶芋试管苗移栽技术
Techniques for transplanting mini color-leaved plantlets of Caladium bicolor grown in test-tube
朱玉球; 曾燕如; 许远; et al.
Shu Yuqiu; Ceng Yanru; Xu Yuan; et al.
浙江林学院学报 Volume: 21 Issue: 2 Pages: 231-234 Article Number: 1000-5692(2004)21:22.0.TX;2-G Published: 2004
Journal of Zhejiang Forestry College Volume: 21 Issue: 2 Pages: 231-234 Article Number: 1000-5692(2004)21:22.0.TX;2-G Published: 2004
35. Cytopathic features induced by Caladium virus X ( Potexvirus) in Caladium bicolor and Gomphrena globosa.
Rivas, E. B.; Galleti, S. R.; Duarte, L. M. L.; et al.
Arquivos do Instituto Biologico (Sao Paulo) Volume: 71 Issue: 4 Pages: 457-464 Published: 2004
36. Techniques for transplanting mini color-leaved plantlets of Caladium bicolor grown in test-tube.
Zhu YuQiu; Zeng YanRu; Xu Yuan; et al.
Journal of Zhejiang Forestry College Volume: 21 Issue: 2 Pages: 231-234 Published: 2004
37. Lower incidence of variants in Caladium bicolor Ait. plants propagated by culture of explants from younger tissue
Ahmed, EU; Hayashi, T; Zhu, Y; et al.
SCIENTIA HORTICULTURAE Volume: 96 Issue: 1-4 Pages: 187-194 Article Number: PII S0304-4238(02)00092-4 Published: DEC 6 2002

38. Aspects of floral development in Caladium bicolor (Araceae)
Barabe, D; Lacroix, C
CANADIAN JOURNAL OF BOTANY-REVUE CANADIENNE DE BOTANIQUE Volume: 80 Issue: 8 Pages: 899-905 Published: AUG 2002
39. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) provides molecular markers for the identification of Caladium bicolor cultivars
Loh, JP; Kiew, R; Kee, A; et al.
ANNALS OF BOTANY Volume: 84 Issue: 2 Pages: 155-161 Published: AUG 1999
40. INTEGRATION AND EXPRESSION OF HUMAN GROWTH-HORMONE GENE IN CALADIUM-BICOLOR
LI, BJ; WANG, JF; XU, ZF; et al.
SCIENCE IN CHINA SERIES B-CHEMISTRY Volume: 37 Issue: 3 Pages: 280-285 Published: MAR 1994
41. In vitro propagation of Caladium bicolor cv. ‘Bleeding Heart’.
Mujib, A.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Jana, B. K.
Experimental Genetics Volume: 7 Issue: 1/2 Pages: 68-71 Published: 1991
42. Plant regeneration from leaf callus protoplasts of Caladium bicolor Vent.
Jing, Z. P.; Wang, Z. Z.
Physiologia Plantarum Volume: 82 Issue: 1 Pages: A17 Published: 1991
43. TRANSFORMATION OF FOREIGN GENES INTO THE MONOCOTYLEDONOUS PLANT CALADIUM-BICOLOR MEDIATED BY CONSTRUCTED TI-PLASMID OF AGROBACTERIUM-TUMEFACIENS
LI, BJ; WU, M
CHINESE SCIENCE BULLETIN Volume: 35 Issue: 1 Pages: 52-55 Published: JAN 1990
44. Transformation of foreign genes into the monocotyledonous plant Caladium bicolor mediated by constructed Ti-plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens.
Li, B. J.; Wu, M.
Kexue Tongbao = Chinese Science Bulletin Volume: 35 Issue: 1 Pages: 52-55 Published: 1990
45. The effect of light quality on morphogenesis of Caladium bicolor in vitro.
Ni, D. X.; Cai, T. G.; Zhang, P. F.; et al.
Acta Horticulturae Sinica Volume: 14 Issue: 4 Pages: 271-275 Published: 1987
46. Rapid multiplication of Caladium bicolor in vitro.
Li, Z. W.
Fujian Agricultural Science and Technology Issue: 6 Pages: 15-16 Published: 1987
47. MODE OF EVOLUTION IN CALADIUM-BICOLOR (AIT) VENT (ARACEAE)
SARKAR, AK
BIOLOGISCHES ZENTRALBLATT Volume: 105 Issue: 6 Pages: 621-639 Published: NOV-DEC 1986
48. CYCLOCEPHALA VISITOR AND PROBABLE POLLINATOR OF CALADIUM-BICOLOR ARACEAE
PELLMYR O
Acta Amazonica Volume: 15 Issue: 1-2 Pages: 269-272 Published: 1985
49. DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS OF TWO PESTICIDES ON A VEGETATIVELY REPRODUCING PLANT CALADIUM-BICOLOR
RAHMAN M S; GUHA M; BHATTACHARYA G N
Geobios (Jodhpur) Volume: 13 Issue: 4 Pages: 181-184 Published: 1986
50. INFLUENCE OF FERTILIZER LEVEL APICAL BUD REMOVAL AND TUBER ORIENTATION ON FORCING OF CALADIUM-BICOLOR
CONOVER C A; POOLE R T
Hortscience Volume: 10 Issue: (3 SECT 1) Pages: 226-227 Published: 1975
51. STUDIES ON THE MODE OF EVOLUTION IN CALADIUM-BICOLOR ARACEAE
SARKAR A K
Indian Science Congress Association Proceedings Volume: 62 Pages: 125 Published: 1975
52. Influence of shade level and soil temperature on forcing of Caladium bicolor.
Conover, C. A.; Poole, R. T.
Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural Society 1973 Volume: 86 Pages: 369-372 Published: 1974
53. INFLUENCE OF SHADE LEVEL AND SOIL TEMPERATURE ON FORCING OF CALADIUM-BICOLOR
CONOVER C A; POOLE R T
Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural Society Volume: 86 Pages: (1974) 369-372 Published: 1973
54. A COMPARISON OF CHEMICAL TREATMENTS WITH HOT WATER FOR CONTROL OF ROOT-KNOT NEMATODES IN CALADIUM-BICOLOR-M TUBERS
RHOADES H L
Plant Disease Reporter Volume: 54 Issue: 5 Pages: 411-413 Published: 1970
55. A COMPARISON OF CHEMICAL TREATMENTS WITH HOT WATER FOR CONTROL OF ROOT-KNOT NEMATODES IN CALADIUM-BICOLOR-M TUBERS
RHOADES H L
Plant Disease Reporter Volume: 54 Issue: 5 Pages: 411-413 Published: 1970
56. STUDIES ON CYTOLOGY OF CALADIUM BICOLOR WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO MODE OF SPECIATION
SHARMA, AK; SARKAR, AK
GENETICA IBERICA Volume: 16 Issue: 1-2 Pages: 21-& Published: 1964
57. Petiole rot of Caladium bicolor Vent, caused by a new strain of Pellicularia filamentosa.
SAKSENA, H. K.
Indian Phytopathology Volume: 12 Issue: 2 Pages: 144-150 pp. Published: 1960231:mnxhyy>231:mnxhyy>

Looking for bold color and pattern in your summer garden? Try caladiums.

The large heart-shaped leaves light up shady spots throughout the summer in shades of pink, red, green and white.

The solid deep red and green bring weight to an arrangement of annuals, and the brighter leaves with veins shot through in pink or green add texture.

And just when you think you’ve seen it all, caladiums show up with sprinkles of confetti, small kisses of color dotting the foliage.

How to Grow Caladiums

Caladiums are easy to grow from tubers, found in the Garden Center with summer-blooming tropical bulbs in spring.

Tuck the tubers into a container of potting mix, water regularly and fertilize every couple of weeks.

Later in spring, you will find nursery-grown caladium plants in the Garden Center. Plant these in containers or in a garden bed.

How to Plant Caladiums in a Container

  1. Start with a large planter, at least 18 inches wide and deep, with drainage holes in the bottom.
  2. Pour in an inch thick layer of small rocks.
  3. Add an inch or two of pine bark mulch or other well-draining filler material.
  4. Pour in potting mix up to within 2 inches of the rim of the container.
  5. Gently remove the caladium plant from its nursery pot. Shake the roots loose and trim them if they’re long. Make a well a few inches deep in the center of the planter and tuck in the caladiums.
  6. Add additional flowers such as begonias and petunias. Fill in with potting mix, and water the plants in.

Caladiums like filtered sun — no more than four hours a day. Some will take more sun, just be sure to check the plant tag when selecting varieties.

This is an advantage of container planting: You can move the pot in and out of the sun until you get the right amount of light.

Overwintering Caladiums

Caladiums are not winter hardy in most of the country. If you have a knack for indoor gardening and enough light in your home, try overwintering caladiums as houseplants.

If that’s not an option, take care of the plants up until a few weeks before the first frost and then cut back the caladium foliage.

Shake the soil off the tubers and let dry. Store in a labeled paper bag in a dry place.

When it’s time to plant in late spring, bring out the bags. Toss out any tubers that appear withered or moldy. Tuck the good ones into containers of potting mix, fertilize and water, and enjoy another summer of caladiums.

Caladiums play well with other shade-tolerant annuals like begonias, impatiens, salvia and petunias. Use the bold colors of the annuals to contrast with the patterns of the caladiums. It’s like matching patterned shirts and ties.

Annual Companion Plants for Caladiums:

  • Daisy
  • Celosia
  • Zinnias
  • Marigolds
  • Begonias
  • Impatiens
  • Petunias

Perennial Companion Plants for Caladiums:

  • Ferns
  • Hostas

Caladium Care Indoors – Growing Caladiums As Indoor Plants

Caladiums are amazing foliage plants with colorful leaves that have absolutely no frost tolerance. Can you grow Caladium plants indoors? The plant’s special needs make using Caladiums as indoor plants rather challenging. However, a few tips on how to care for Caladium indoors might see you enjoying the attractive leaves for a bit longer than outdoor grown tubers. Moving your Caladium inside will save the tubers for spring growth and can possibly extend the foliar season.

Can I Move My Caladium Indoors?

Tender tubers and bulbs need to be lifted in fall before any chance of frost can terminate them. Caladium tubers are frost tender and will die if exposed to cold. As such, they need to be brought indoors in northern climates and will usually die back in winter even in warmer regions. This is all well and good, as the tubers from which the foliage is born, require some rejuvenating rest. Many gardeners try Caladiums as indoor plants. There are some special instructions on Caladium care indoors to keep the plants healthy and preserve the tubers.

Plants growing in regions that experience cold winters could be planted in containers to facilitate moving them inside when cold temperatures threaten. Growing Caladium as indoor plants has its challenges, though, as the plant requires high humidity and heated home interiors are generally quite arid.

Additionally, Caladium plants produce leaves only from spring to fall and then require a rest period of around five months to recharge and sprout anew in spring. You can extend the foliar display a little bit by bringing containers indoors, but eventually the leaves will die back and the tuber will go dormant until warm temperatures arrive.

Still, bringing plants inside in containers will preserve the tubers and prevent them from sustaining damage in winter outdoor conditions.

How to Care for Caladium Indoors

Indoor Caladium plants require a medium light area with protection from midday sun, which will scorch the leaves. A northern or eastern window is usually the best exposure. Humidity is crucial to Caladium houseplant care as the tubers are native to South American tropical forests and produce seasonal foliage during the rainy, warm season.

Mimicking the plant’s native conditions is key to successfully introducing the plant to the home interior. Keeping the humidity high in a heated home may be done with misting and by placing a saucer filled with pebbles and water under the container. The evaporation will moisten the ambient air and provide the humidity necessary for your Caladium. Keep your plant away from heating vents which will blow dry air and drafty windows or doors.

While your plant is still in its foliar glory, you will need to keep it watered and happy. You should only fertilize the plant when it is actively growing during spring to late summer. In the fall and winter, no special food is necessary. Water the soil when it is dry to the touch.

Keep the plant in an area with temperatures of at least 65 degrees Fahrenheit (18 C.). When the leaves begin to die back, allow them to persist until fully spent and then cut them off. You can then either lift the tubers, allow them to dry and store them in peat in a breathable bag or leave them in the soil and suspend watering.

In spring, either plant out stored tubers or begin watering the potted tubers. Move the container to slightly brighter light being careful to protect new shoots from sizzling rays. Once the container has fully sprouted, gradually reintroduce it to the outdoors until fall and repeat the process all over again.

Caladiums

Any garden with a shady location has a perfect spot for caladiums. These tropical tubers, most of them varieties derived from Caladium bicolor, are grown for their dramatic summer foliage. They are naturals in beds with ferns or coleus, in pots to accent shady spots, or indoors as knock-your-socks-off houseplants.

But caladiums have their limitations, particularly when it comes to temperature. A primary requirement is soil warmed to above 65° F, no surprise for a plant native to tropical South America. In cool climates, you certainly need sun to attain that level of warmth. Fortunately, several of the best varieties tolerate full sun beautifully as long as they get plenty of water.

Tall, Short, and In-Between Varieties

Until fairly recently, caladium varieties could be neatly divided into tall fancy-leaved and shorter lance-leaved types. Each has special talents and uses. Tall kinds such as white ‘Candidum’ and pink ‘Carolyn Whorton’ put on a beautiful show, but since each tuber has but one to three active buds, the leaf count is low. De-eyeing tubers (removing the terminal buds on the tuber when it first spikes to encourage side buds to develop) before planting will increase leaf numbers. Lance-leaved types, including ‘Rosalie’ and ‘White Wing’, produce many more leaves from multiple buds, but the leaves are thinner and not as long.

At the University of Florida’s Gulf Coast Research Station in Brandenton, Gary Wilfret has spent 25 years breeding caladiums that combine the best of both types and are custom-made for growing in containers. Of the eight varieties released so far, pink-and-green ‘Florida Sweetheart’ is his runaway hit, with red-and-green ‘Florida Red Ruffles’ poised to enter the big time as soon as growers accumulate sufficient stock. Besides its vigorous leaf production, ‘Florida Red Ruffles’ may have a slight edge in terms of cold tolerance. Wilfret’s long-term goal? To extend caladiums’ growing range into climates where nighttime temperatures drop below 55° F.

Because 80 percent of caladiums are now grown in containers, which can be moved about as needed to expose the plants to the warmth they need, give them a try no matter where you live.

Caladiums in Containers

In USDA Hardiness Zone 7 southward, it’s always warm enough to grow caladiums in outdoor beds; gardeners everywhere can growing caladiums in containers. Use a peaty potting soil, and plant three to five tubers upright in a 6-inch pot. Cover them with 2 inches of potting soil, soak once, and keep the pots in a very warm spot (70° to 80° F) for three weeks. Because the tubers like semidry conditions while they are breaking dormancy, water lightly, but don’t let the soil dry completely.

When slender spikes push through the soil, move the pots to bright light, indoors or out, and start giving them more water. As long as temperatures stay above 70° F, the leaves should quickly unfurl.

Caladiums in full leaf need a steady supply of water. Plants that dry to the point of wilting will revive after a short dry spell, but forgotten plants may become dormant. Once dormant, caladiums will refuse to leaf out for at least eight weeks.

Because caladiums are basically all leaves, they thrive on regular fertilizer. To keep plenty of new leaves coming on, mix a balanced soluble fertilizer such as 10-10-10 into the watering can twice a month while plants are growing well.

The great advantage of pot-grown caladiums is that you can move them about as needed to keep them warm. When nights become chilly in fall, bring them indoors, near a sunny window, until they look as if they need a rest. At that point, let them dry out completely. To save space, you can collect the tubers, shake off the soil, and stash them in old hosiery or a mesh bag for up to five months. As long as the tubers are stored above 60° F, they will be ready to replant the following spring.

Bedding Basics

In the warm, humid climates of southern zones 8 and 9 (National Gardening zones Middle, Lower, and Tropical South), plant caladium tubers directly into the ground in spring. In most other areas, you’ll save several weeks of growing time by transplanting potted plants that are already up and growing.

Plant in soil that is moist, well drained, humus rich, and slightly acidic. Caladiums are popular grown around the bases of trees, but for this planting scheme to work, you will need to create a 5-inch-deep bed of rich soil so the tuberous roots will have adequate space and a fair chance at moisture.

To make watering and fertilizing easier, plant three tubers (or plants) in 6-inch black plastic pots (nursery liners) and sink the pots up to their rims in the beds. The pots collect and hold water, stave off invasions from thirsty tree roots, and make it simple to lift and collect the tubers in fall.

Fun in the Sun

If you live in a cool climate, it’s important to grow sun-tolerant caladiums in a sunny spot from the beginning, or at least let the plants gradually become accustomed to the feel of warm sun on their leaves. Even with the most sun-tolerant varieties, if you grow plants in the shade and suddenly shift them into bright sun, existing leaves are likely to develop brown sunburned patches. However, the new leaves that replace them should look fine, and will turn your bed or patio into a technicolor tropical paradise.

Six Caladiums Selected for Sun

Name; Type; Use; Colors

‘Aaron’; Tall fancy-leaved; Beds; White; medium green edge.

‘Carolyn Whorton’; Tall fancy-leaved; Beds; Pink, green, red.

‘Red Flash’; Tall fancy-leaved; Beds; Red, green; white speckles.

‘Florida Sweetheart’; Interspecies hybrid; Beds, pots; Pink; green edge.

‘Miss Muffet’; Interspecies hybrid; Beds, pots; Cream; red speckles .

‘White Wing’; Short lance-leaved; Beds, pots; White; green edge.

Caladiums for Cutting?

It’s true. You can use caladium leaves in flower arrangements, where they will last two weeks or more. The trick is to soak the freshly cut stems in deep water in a dark place for 24 hours before putting them to work in a vase. Being pollen-free, caladium leaves are naturally nonallergenic.

Elephant’s Ears

As common in the Deep South as buttermilk biscuits are the huge green leaves of a caladium relative, elephant’s ear (Alocasia), which grows to 8 feet tall in rich, moist soils. It is hardy to zone 8. Few plants are more dramatic when grown at the edge of a water garden, but any moist, shady spot will do.

Barbara Pleasant, a freelance garden writer who lives in northern Alabama, wrote the National Gardening Regional Report from the Middle South.

Photography by Mike MacCaskey

Gardening 101: Caladiums

A newer caladium with beautiful pink-white-and-green leaves, is great for shady spots. Photo by: Ralph Anderson

Caladium leaves can be shaped like hearts, arrows, or lances in color combinations of red, pink, rose, white, chartreuse, and green. The brilliant foliage of this classic plant is often translucent, which makes them light up your garden. They’ve brightened shady spots for generations, but now you have the option of newer selections that can take some direct sun.

  • Try a few of our favorite caladium varieties.

Nurseryman Stewart Myers of Myers Plants & Pottery in Pelham, Alabama, (myersplantsandpottery.com) has been planting thousands of caladium tubers every year for the last 30 years. His secret? Always plant after Mother’s Day, when the soil has warmed. “If you plant too early, when the soil is still cool, your bulbs will rot,” he says. Caladiums are ideal for both new and experienced gardeners because they are so easy to grow.

Related: Elephant’s Ear Plant Care

“For a big show of color, pick your favorite selection and plant a bunch,” Stewart says. “Larger, fancy-leaf types (heart-shaped leaves) work best for this. Try strap-leaf types (shorter plants with bunches of leaves) or dwarf types (smaller, heart-shaped leaves) for pots and window boxes.” Caladiums are great companions for impatiens, begonias, and ferns.

RELATED:

How to Grow Caladiums
Caladiums originated in South America, so they thrive in warm weather. Like their larger cousins, elephant’s ears, they’re carefree once you cover their basic needs.

Light for Caladiums: All caladiums love filtered sunlight and shade. Some newer selections can take more sun.

Best Soil for Caladiums: Caladiums need well-drained soil that’s rich in organic matter, such as mushroom compost or chopped leaves.

How to Plant Caladiums: Buy potted caladiums ready to plant, or grow them from tubers. (Though they’re sometimes called bulbs, they are really tubers.) Plant tubers point side up about 1 to 1 1⁄2 inches deep. Space them 8 to 14 inches apart, depending on the ultimate size of your plants as listed on the tag.

How to Water Caladiums: Always water caladiums regularly. Keep the soil slightly moist. Add mulch, such as pine straw, to help retain soil moisture and conserve water. If you have caladiums in full sun, don’t let them dry out.

How to Feed Caladiums: Use a slow-release fertilizer such as Osmocote Outdoor & Indoor Smart-Release Plant Food 19-6-12 or a liquid feed such as Miracle-Gro Liquid All Purpose Plant Food 12-4-8.

Wintering Caladiums: In the Tropical South, you can leave tubers in the ground year-round. In the rest of the South, you’ll need to dig them up in early fall if you want to replant next year. Remove any remaining leaves and roots. Let tubers dry in a shaded area for a few days. Place them in dry peat moss to store. Keep them in a warm spot (50 to 60 degrees) until it’s time to replant.

Where to Buy Caladiums: You’ll find a good selection of caladiums at your local nursery. For an even wider assortment of tubers you can buy online, visit Classic Caladiums, classiccaladiums.com.

Heart to Heart™ ‘Heart’s Delight’ Sun or Shade Caladium Caladium hortulanum

Maintenance Notes:

Indoors:

Caladiums can be a very nice windowsill or sunroom plant and for much of the United States and certainly in Canada this might be the best use for Caladiums. Since they are tropical they need to have warmth and humidity, try to always keep the temperatures above 65 F for best growth and leaf size, and a pebble tray or frequent misting can help to keep humidity up around your plants. If you live in a northern climate, be careful not to plant too early in spring as temperatures below 50F will chill and stunt plants, normal indoor temperatures should be fine and winter heaters usually dry things out a bit too much. So this can be a good guide for when to grow these Caladiums, when you turn the heater off for the summer.

Plant tubers pointed end facing upwards, so the tuber is about 2” below the soil level, the roots form on the top of the tuber , so you need to plant them deep enough that roots have room to grow, but not too deep because it delays new leaves and weakens the plant. If your plants are already growing in pots when you purchase them, plant them about ½” deeper when you transplant them to make sure the tubers have room to keep growing.

Caladiums do not need a lot of fertilizer, about ¼ of what most folks feed their flowering annuals, and too much fertilizer can burn the leaves especially the white portions of the leaf. So just fertilize with ¼ the strength what you normally do for your flowers and apply weekly or every other week.

Keep plants in a sunny to partly sunny location and avoid burning hot southern exposures especially at higher altitudes.

Keep soil in your pots moist at all times, wilting will cause leaves to yellow and drop, so just check to make they do not dry out!

Outdoors:

Since Caladiums prefer heat and humidity and do not tolerate cold, soggy soils, for most gardeners who live in the north will have best results in containers, as the soil in pots or planters warms up faster and has better drainage so plants will not become soggy. Remember for best growth always keep the temperatures above 65 F.

A ¼ – ½ strength fertilizing every week or every other week is fine throughout the season, too strong a fertilizer can burn leaves, and since the leaves last all season you want to keep them looking fresh. Caladiums like to be moist at all times so avoid allowing them to dry out as it also causes leaves to yellow and drop.

Where the Caladiums will do best depends a lot on your location within the US, since sunlight intensity varies depending on where you live here’s a quick reference to help guide to help you succeed.

Region

When to Plant

Sun or Shade

Containers or in the garden

NW & NE United States & Canada

Early summer

Full sun – light shade.

Caladiums do best in containers in this part of the country and usually need to be in a protected warm location for best results. Like a sunroom or warm patio setting. If growing outdoors select the warmest protected locations in the garden.

SW United States

Spring

shade to light shade only

Containers may be easiest but a shady, cool garden spot can also be lovely. Watch your watering to keep the plants from drying out.

Midwest

Late Spring

Light shade

Containers are likely best, but a late spring planting into a protected shade flower bed will also be fine.

SE United States

Spring

Shade to sun

Both containers and garden plantings work fine, in the deep south Caladiums may even come back the following year if kept dry over the winter.

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