Flowering shrubs full sun

Rely on hydrangeas for blowsy flowers in white, blues and pinks. Photo:

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Here are 11 brilliant summer shrubs to make your garden more colourful. They produce masses of flowers from the start of summer right through to autumn.

Lots of shrubs enliven the garden in spring – philadelphus, lilacs, forsythia and the like – but once their flowers have faded, the early summer garden can be left lacking. These brilliant summer shrubs will make sure your garden is colour and full of flowers in summer.

New Hydrangea ‘L.A. Dreamin’ shows pink, blue and purple flowers on the same plant

Hydrangea

Hydrangeas are one of the best summer shrubs, if only for the range of flowers amongst them. There are the classic mophead Hydrangea macrophylla cultivars with big, blowsy balls of blooms. The elegant H. paniculata varieties with their long flowering spikes, the big lime-green footballs of flowers on H. arborescens. Mauve-flowered H. aspera, each bloom ringed with delicate white butterfly-like petals, or the interesting oak-leaved foliage of H. quercifolia.

Just make sure that you grow them in soil that doesn’t dry out. The clue is in the name. From the Greek words ‘hydor’ (water) and ‘angos’ (jar or vessel) hydrangea can be translated as ‘water barrel’, referring to its need for water. Hydrangeas are one of the first plants to wilt in hot weather if water is lacking. And remember that if you have acid soil your mophead hydrangea will tend towards blue flowers, in alkaline soil they’ll be pink. You could try Plantinova’s new hydrangea ‘L.A. Dreamin’ which shows pink, blue and everything in between on the same plant.

Summer shrubs: Great for a hot, sunny spot, Cistus x purpureus. Photo:

Cistus

Cistus are a great summer-flowering shrub for a hot, sunny spot. Try growing them on a free-draining bank or in a gravel garden. They grow best on chalky, alkaline soil. With their silvery-green drought-tolerant foliage and covering of tissue-paper flowers in shades of pink or pure white, often with attractive splodges at the base of each petal for extra interest, they’ll add lots of colour during the summer months.

Lightly prune them after flowering to keep the plants in good shape and covered with fresh growth. We recommend Cistus ladanifer, which has big white flowers with maroon spots around the golden boss of anthers in the centre, or Cistus x purpureus, a reliable plant with deep pink flowers.

Summer shrubs: Deutzias are covered in flowers that bees love. Photo:

Deutzia

If there was a shrub that deserved to be more widely grown, it’s Deutzia. You don’t see them very often, but once you do, you won’t forget the well-behaved, emerald green-leaved shrub that was absolutely smothered in pretty pink flowers (scented on some varieties). These plants are often alive with bees making the most of the bounty. Try ‘Tourbillon Rouge’ for deep pink flowers or Deutzia gracilis, for pure white blooms with a sweet scent. Prune after flowering to keep the shrubs tidy.

Summer shrubs: Lavender ‘Gros Blue’ has slender spikes of deep violet

Lavender

Of all the summer-flowering shrubs, everyone knows lavender, thanks to its distinctive look and instantly recognisable scent. Grow it in very well-drained soil and full sun to get the best from it. Prune it back after flowering to ensure plants don’t become woody and lopsided. Make sure you prune into fresh green growth, not older, woodier stems because they won’t regrow.

English lavender, Lavandula angustifolia, is the hardiest, so choose it or one of its well-known cultivars such as ‘Hidcote’. Lavandula x intermedia is also pretty tough, with longer, more slender flower spikes. Try ‘Gros Bleu’, which is dark purple, or ‘Grosso’.

Summer shrubs: Hebes flower almost year-round with mini bottlebrush blooms

Hebe

Not just shrubs for summer, hebes can flower almost any month of the year in flower, yet they’re strangely underrated. Hebei are evergreen, so they’ll lend the garden foliage interest all year, their flowers are a boon for butterflies and bees, their foliage and flowers can be used in flower arrangements, and the flowers themselves are often richly coloured and a great addition to borders. Try ‘Silver Queen’ for its variegated leaves and purple flowers, or ‘Autumn Glory’ for flowers that continue into the autumn months.

Summer shrubs: Ring the changes with a species fuchsia such as F. paniculata. Photo:

Fuchsia

Fuchsias can divide opinion. There are gardeners who love the fat flowers with their tutu-like skirts, and others who can’t stand them. If you’re fall into the latter camp, consider a more graceful fuchsia such as the hardy F. magellanica cultivar ‘Hawskhead’, with its slim white blooms, or F. magellanica var. gracilis ‘Versicolor’, which has smoky grey-pink leaves and slender magenta flowers. Or try one that doesn’t look like a fuchsia at all: F. paniculata has glossy green leaves on a large shrub, and panicles of bright pink flowers.

Summer shrubs: The pheasant berry, Leycesteria formosa. Photo:

Leycesteria

Leycesteria formosa, or pheasant berry, makes a sturdy, upright shrub that perhaps works best at the back of a border. It has bright green stems, which make sure it adds interest in winter, mid-green leaves and, in summer and into autumn, pendant strings of maroon flowers – although they are actually bracts that enclose wine coloured berries.

Summer shrubs: Buddleja alternifolia boasts long, arching sprays of clustered flowers. Photo:

Buddleja

Another summer shrub that needs no introduction is Buddleja, the butterfly bush. If you want to ring the changes from the widely-grown B. davidii cultivars (as lovely as those are), try a different species. Buddleja globosa has golden-orange perfectly spherical flowers. Buddleja alternifolia has flowers of lavender-mauve held on long stems that cascade downwards giving it the common name of fountain boodle. Both are just as popular with butterflies.

Summer shrubs: Sprays of purple flowers on Vitex agnus-castus. Photo:

Vitex agnus-castus

You might need an introduction to Vitex agnus-castus, an unusual shrub with spikes of violet summer flowers, held among elegant and aromatic palmate leaves. It can get quite large, reaching about 2m in height and spread, but can be kept to size through judicious pruning in spring. It’s hardy down to -10°C so might not be the best choice if you live in cold areas. If your garden regularly sees hard frosts, choose a sheltered position for it.

Summer shrubs: Cotoneaster horizontalis is a magnet for bees. Photo:

Cotoneaster

Cotoneaster horizontalis is another underrated summer shrub. It is absolutely covered in small, pretty white flowers in summer and once they’re open, you’ll find all the bees in your garden are irresistibly drawn to them. Its herringbone-like branching habit makes great ground cover or an interesting covering for a wall, and in autumn the red berries that follow the flowers draw the birds too. It will grow almost anywhere, it is tough as old boots – a foolproof, hardworking choice.

Summer shrubs: Pretty Abelia grandiflora is under-rated. Photo:

Abelia

Lastly, Abelia x grandiflora produces masses of fragrant, palest pink trumpet-shaped flowers from June onwards. It’s hardy down to -10°C so is best kept for milder gardens, or warm sheltered positions. Semi-evergreen, it will retain its glossy leaves throughout winter if weather conditions stay mild. If it’s happy it can reach a good size – up to 4m tall – so consider hard pruning it every three to four years to keep it manageable and full of fresh growth (do this in April or May).

Discover our top 10 plants for clay soil, and our ten best for acid soil.

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Summer is sometimes the forgotten season in the garden. All of the beautiful spring blooms usually get all of the attention and when summer rolls around, we realize we didn’t plan for color to carry us through until fall. I have you covered with these summer-blooming shrubs.

What’s great about these is that they’re low-maintenance. Who wants to work in the garden during those dog days of summer? You can sit back and enjoy the season while these hardworking shrubs color your outdoor spaces.

  1. The Beyond Midnight® Bluebeard Shrub – I love finding ways to add more blue to the garden. It’s such a captivating color. The Beyond Midnight® Bluebeard adds deep blue color to your late summer landscape. It’s also a low-maintenance shrub that can take the heat and attracts pollinators to the garden!
    Zones 5-9
  2. Pinky Winky® Panicle Hydrangea – I love that this hydrangea help make the transition from summer to fall a little more colorful. The base of the large white blooms begin to turn pink as autumn nears, leaving you with giant two-toned flower panicles. This shrub can take sun or part shade and grows well in a container or in the garden.
    Zones 3-8

3. Happy Face Yellow® Potentilla – Native to North America, the Potentilla booms non-stop from spring to frost. I love the cheerful yellow flowers and the plant’s durability. Potentilla is deer-resistant to boot!
Zones 2-7

4. All That Glows® Viburnum – Another deer-resistant favorite! All That Glows® viburnum is loaded with clusters of white flowers in early summer. Plant an All That Glitters® viburnum nearby to pollinate All That Glows®, and you’ll have shiny blue fruit after the white blooms fade.
Zones 4-8


5. Vanilla Spice® Summersweet – This is a great native plant with gorgeous fragrant flowers that bloom in the summer. Summersweet attracts butterflies and hummingbirds and helps keep deer away.
Zones 4-9

Shrubs for Sun

Shrubs help add structure to the garden. They vary from small spreading groundcover types to large specimens that can grow 12 feet or more. As you consider which to plant, know that many offer more than one season of interest. These woody plants can flower, produce ornamental or edible berries, offer colorful foliage or even spectacular fall color.

The shrubs listed below may be planted in full afternoon sun. Many may also be planted in part sun (a morning sun location or in dappled light—as under the canopy of an open-branched tree). All will lose their leaves in winter which gives you the benefit of frost covered branches. If you want year-round ‘green’ consider planting an evergreen shrub.

Please Note: In stock availability of specific varieties listed below will vary depending upon time of season and sales. Please visit us to view current varieties.

Almond, Dwarf Flowering (Prunus glandulosa)

Variety: Rosea Plena

Height: 4′-5′

Spread: 3′-4′

Flowers: Double pink flowers in early Spring.

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: Dwarf, ornamental flowering almond. Upright vase shape. Shiny green leaves.

Apache Plume (Fallugia)

Photo Courtesy Plant Select

Height: 3′-5′

Spread: 3′-5′

Flowers: White flowers with pink fuzzy seed heads

Fall Color: Interesting seed heads

Other Notes: White stems offer winter interest. Excellent for dry, sunny locations. A Colorado Plant Select shrub.

Barberry (Berberis)

Crimson Pygmy Barberry

Winter Berries

Height: 2′

Spread: 2′-3′

Flowers: Inconspicuous

Fall Color: Orange-Scarlet

Other Notes: Deep red foliage. Bright red berries in fall and winter. Thorns.

Rocket Series

Rocket Orange: new growth is orange and deepens to red

Height: 4′

Spread: 18″-24″

Flowers: Inconspicuous

Fall Color: Orange-Scarlet tones

Other Notes: Rocket Series are varieties with a narrow, upright habit and offer MUCH color in tight spaces.Tiny Bright red berries in fall and winter. Thorns. Plant in full sun for the best color show.

Rose Glow Barberry

Height: 3′

Spread: 2′-3′

Flowers: Inconspicuous

Fall Color: Red

Other Notes: Burgundy speckled foliage offers a great color contrast. Bright red berries in fall and winter. Thorns.

Beautybush (Kolkwitzia)

Height: 6′-10′

Spread: 6′-10′

Flowers: Pink, bell-shaped flowers in summer

Fall Color: Yellow

Other Notes: Broad, rounded shrub with dark green leaves. Will also grow in part sun.

Blue Stem Joint Fir (Ephedra)

Height: 4′-6′

Spread: 3′-8′

Flower: Yellow (Small insignificant)

Fall Color: Blue-green

Other Notes: A drought tolerant, dryland plant. Plant in well drained soil.

Bluebeard (Caryopteris)

Dark Knight

Height: 2′-3′

Spread: 3′

Flowers: Deep blue summer to fall

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: Must be planted in well drained soil.

Sunshine Blue Bluebeard

Height: 3′

Spread: 3′

Flowers: Bright blue summer to fall

Fall Color: Yellow leaves

Other Notes: Deciduous shrub with yellow foliage and blue flowers in summer. Adds excellent yellow color in your landscape. Full to partial sun, moderate water.

Buckthorn (Rhamnus)

‘Fine Line’ Buckthorn

Height: 5′-7′

Spread: 2′-3′

Flowers: Yes but they are tiny–not showy.

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: Need a shrub for a skinny spot?…this is the one. Columnar, sturdy, drought tolerant. Mediterranean looking. Can also grow in part sun.

Burning Bush (Euonymus)

Dwarf Burning Bush

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries Fall Color

Height: 4′-5′

Spread: 5′-6′

Flowers: Insignificant.

Fall Color: Yes! Brilliant red in fall.

Other Notes: Vase-shaped when young, rounded at maturity. Plant in full sun for best fall color.

Butterfly Bush (Buddleia)

Blue Chip Junior

Height: 2′

Spread: 2′

Flowers: Purple flowers in Summer

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: The next generation of Lo & Behold® ‘Blue Chip’, young Junior is smaller, less brittle, and has attractive silver-green leaves. Great for mass plantings or mixed into perennial gardens. Sterile flowers from mid-summer to frost do not produce unwanted seedlings.

Empire Blue

Height: 4′-6′

Spread: 2′-3′

Flowers: Fragrant blue flowers with an orange eye

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: Blooms in summer. Can use as a cutflower.

Honeycomb

Photo Courtesy Chelsea Nursery

Height: 6′-10′

Spread: 6′-8

Flowers: Fragrant yellow flowers in summer

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: A unique color for this type of plant. Works great as a cutflower. Dead head for best show. Vase-shaped habit.

Miss Molly

Height: 4′-5′

Spread: 3′-4′

Flowers: Magenta blooms mid-summer to frost

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: Upright spreading shrub. Deadhead for best flower display. Butterfly magnet! (A Proven Winners Shrub)

Pink Charm

Height: 5′-6′

Spread: 4′-6′

Flowers: Lavender pink blooms mid-summer to frost

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: Upright spreading shrub. Deadhead for best flower display. Butterfly magnet!

Royal Red

Photo Courtesy Chelsea Nursery

Height: 4′-6′

Spread: 4-6′

Flowers: Pink-red blooms mid-summer to frost

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: Upright spreading shrub. Deadhead for best flower display. Butterfly magnet!

Cherry, Nanking (Prunus)

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 8′-10′

Spread: 10′-12′

Flowers: Pinkish-white in spring followed by red1/3″ berries.

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: Tough—moist or dry site. Birds love this shrub!

Chokeberry (Aronia)

Autumn Magic Chokeberry (Aronia melancarpa)

Height: 4′-6′

Spread: 4′-5′

Flowers: Profuse white flowers in spring followed by edible black berries

Fall Color: Purple-red fall color

Other Notes: Upright shrub that adapts well to poor soil (moist or dry)

Coralberry (Symphoricarpos)

Hancock Coralberry

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 2′-3′

Spread: 6’+

Flowers: Insignificant.

Fall Color: No color to leaves but rose pink berries persist into winter.

Other Notes: A good low spreading shrub for groundcover or hillsides.

Cotoneaster

Cranberry Cotoneaster (C. Apiculatus)

Winter Berries

Height: 2′-3′

Spread: 3′-6′

Flowers: Small pink blooms in summer

Fall Color: Bright red berries that persist through winter. Bronze-red leaves.

Hedge Cotoneaster (C. lucidus)

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 8′-10′

Spread: 4′-6′

Flowers: Small pink flowers in summer.

Fall Color: Yes! Black fruit stands out against bright fall leaves of orange and red.

Other Notes: A tall upright shrub that makes a great screen. Tough, drought tolerant. Attracts birds.

Tom Thumb Cotoneaster (C. adpressus)

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 8″-12″

Spread: 4′-6′

Flowers: Small pink blooms in summer

Fall Color: Red leaves (rarely has berries)

Other Notes: Low spreading shrub with small, glossy green leaves. Makes a great groundcover.

Dogwood (Cornus)

Red Twig Dogwood

Height: 6′-8′

Spread: 6′-8′

Flowers: White flowers in Spring

Fall Color: Red purple

Other Notes: Bright red stems in winter! Can also be planted in morning/part sun locations.

Ivory Halo Dogwood

Height: 5′-6′

Spread: 5′-6′

Flowers: White in spring

Fall Color: Insignificant

Other Notes: Bright red stems in winter. Leaves are white and green during season. Compact, rounded shape. Can also be planted in morning/part sun locations.

Yellow Twig Dogwood

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 6′-8′

Spread: 6′-8′

Flowers: White in Spring

Fall Color: Red purple

Other Notes: Bright yellow stems in winter! Can also be planted in morning/part sun locations.

Elderberry (Sambucus)

American Elderberry ‘Adams’ (Sambucus canadensis)

Height: 8′-10′

Spread: 8′-10′

Flowers: Large white blossoms in early summer followed by dark purple berries

Fall Color: Yellow Has deep purple fruit in late Summer/EarlyFall.

Other Notes: Attractive, large, green leaf variety. Fruit may be used when ripe and COOKED and into jellies/jams/syrup. Other parts of this plant are not edible.

Red Elderberry ‘Lemony Lace’ Red Elderberry (Sambucus racemosa)

Photo Courtesy Proven Winners

Height: 4′-6′

Spread: 4′-6′

Flowers: Large clusters of white flowers in spring followed by bright red berries.

Fall Color: Yellow

Other Notes: A Proven Winners elder. Does best in a moist spot. Brightly colored yellow leaves all season. Though Native American did use these berries– they are not considered palatable. Red elderberries are extremely sour with many seeds but are sometimes used to make jams/jellies. They should always be ripe and COOKED before consuming. Other parts of this plant are not edible.

European Elderberries
‘Black Lace’ European Elderberry (Sambucus nigra)

Height: 8′-10′

Spread: 8′-10′

Flowers: Pink, lacy blossoms in early summer

Fall Color: Deep purple all season. Has deep blackish-red fruit in Fall.

Other Notes: Large rounded shrub with lovely deep purple lacy foliage. Can also be planted in part sun. Does best in a moist spot. A great alternative to a Japanese Maple. The light flowers are particularly striking against the dark foliage. This variety is mostly used as an ornamental. However, if you use the berries, they should always be ripe and COOKED before consuming. Other parts of this plant are not edible.

‘Emerald Lace’ European Elderberry (Sambucus nigra)

Height: 8′-10′

Spread: 8′-10′

Flowers: Creamy, lacy blossoms in early summer

Fall Color: Has deep black fruit in Fall.

Other Notes: Large rounded shrub with finely cut green foliage. Can also be planted in part sun. Does best in a moist spot. A great alternative to a Japanese Maple. Huge flower heads are followed by black berries. If you use the berries, they should always be ripe and COOKED before consuming. Other parts of this plant are not edible. Popular in Europe, the berries are used to make juice, wine, or preserves.

‘Haschberg’ European Elderberry (Sambucus nigra)

Height: 8′-10′

Spread: 8′-10′

Flowers: Creamy, lacy blossoms in early summer

Fall Color: Has deep blackish-red fruit in Fall.

Other Notes: One of the leading fruiting varieties in Germany and Austria, Haschberg bears abundant crops of large, juicy and flavorful, bluish black berries. With its attractive dark green foliage and large clusters of white flowers, Haschberg also makes a fine ornamental shrub. If you use the berries, they should always be ripe and COOKED before consuming. Other parts of this plant are not edible.

‘Korsor’ European Elderberry (Sambucus nigra)

Height: 8′-10′

Spread: 8′-10′

Flowers: Cream colored, lacy blossoms in early summer

Fall Color: Has blue-black fruit in Fall.

Other Notes: A popular European fruiting variety, Korsor produces abundant crops of large, dark blue, flavorful and juicy berries. With its large clusters of creamy-white flowers, Korsor also makes a fine ornamental shrub. If you use the berries, they should always be ripe and COOKED before consuming. Other parts of this plant are not edible.

Fernbush (Chamaebatiaria)

Height: 6′-8′

Spread: 4′-6′

Flowers: Creamy white in Summer

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: This is a tall semi-evergreen, dryland shrub with fragrant fern like leaves. They produce creamy white flowers in late summer. Plant them near a window to enjoy the fragrance. Native plant.

Forsythia

Lynwood Gold Forsythia

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 5′-7′

Spread: 7′

Flower: Deep yellow flowers in early Spring

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: Deep golden yellow flowers of this forsythia cover the branches in early Spring. A dense plant with an upright habit, it tolerates city conditions well. Performs well in both sun or light shade.

Genista

Royal Gold Genista

Photos Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 18″-24″

Spread: 2′

Flower: Yellow flowers cover this shrub in mid-Summer.

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: Very drought tolerant once established. Grows well in poor dry soil. Compact, low growing shrub with bright green foliage.

Hibiscus, Hardy / Rose-Of-Sharon (Hibiscus)

Aphrodite

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 8′-12′

Spread: 6′-10′

Flowers: Dark pink flowers with dark red eye bloom in late summer

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: Upright shrub with large saucer shaped flowers that bloom from July until frost. Has dark pink flowers with a dark red eye. Valuable as a specimen plant. Prefers well-drained soil.

Lavender Chiffon

Photos Courtesy Proven Winners

Height: 8′-12′

Spread: 6′-10′

Flowers: Lavender flowers bloom in late summer

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: Large, upright shrub.

White Chiffon

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries Inc

Height: 8′-12′

Spread: 6′-10′

Flowers: Large, single white flowers in late summer

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: Large upright shrub. (A Proven Winners shrub)

Woodbridge

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 8′-12′

Spread: 6′-10′

Flowers: Single rose pink flowers with a red center bloom in late summer

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: An adaptable plant that prefers well drained soil. Easy to grow. Attracts butterflies.

Lilac (Syringa)

Beauty of Moscow (Krasavitsa Moskvy)

Photo Courtesy Fisher Farms

Height: up to 15′

Spread: 8′-12′

Flowers: White with a tinge of light pink in spring.

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: Extremely fragrant flowers are large and showy. Will sucker and have a more open habit than many lilacs.

Bloomerang Lilac

Photo Courtesy Proven Winners

Height: 4′-5′

Spread: 4′-5′

Flowers: Fragrant plum purple buds open to light purple flowers in Spring. Repeat blooming throughout season.

Fall Color: No.

Other Notes: Good choice for smaller spaces.. Can also be planted in part sun. Plant in well-drained soil.

Charles Joly Lilac

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 10′-12′

Spread: 8′-10′

Flowers: Purple flowers in Spring.

Fall Color: No.

Other Notes: One of the earlier French hybrids, this lilac is still popular. It bears smaller panicles of purple buds that turn to magenta double flowers as they open for a fabulous show!

Common Purple Lilac

Photos Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 12′-15′

Spread: 8′-12′

Flower: Lilac of course! And VERY fragrant. Cut some in spring for a vase inside and they will quickly fill your house with old-fashioned lilac fragrance.

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: Very hardy. Upright vase-shaped habit.

Dwarf Korean Lilac

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 4′-5′

Spread: 5′-6′

Flowers: Red-purple buds open to fragrant lilac flowers in Spring.

Fall Color: No.

Other Notes: Good choice for smaller spaces. Nice deep green leaves. Plant in well-drained soil.

Ludwig Spaeth Lilac

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 10′-12′

Spread: 6′-8′

Flowers: Red, purple blossoms in spring (fragrant).

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: Large, upright shape. An old cultivar developed in 1883. Plant in well-drained soil.

Miss Kim Lilac

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 6′-7′

Spread: 5′-6′

Flowers: Lavender flowers in spring (fragrant)

Fall Color: Burgundy red fall foliage.

Other Notes: Dark green glossy leaves.

President Grevy Lilac

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries Inc

Height: 10-12′

Spread: 8′

Flowers: Double lilac blue flowers in spring.

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: Large upright form.

Primrose

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries Inc

Height: 10′-12′

Spread: 10′-12′

Flowers: Creamy yellow buds open to cream colored flowers. A unique color for lilacs.

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: Rounded shape.

Sensation Lilac

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 8′-10′

Spread: 8′-12

Flowers: Bi-color blue flowers edged in white appear in spring.

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: A truly unique variety with an upright habit.

Tinkerbelle

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 5′-6′

Spread: 4′-5′

Flowers: Wine red flower buds open to pink

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: Very similar to Dwarf Korean in appearance but with a spicy fragrance

Mockorange (Philadelphus)

Blizzard

Height: 4′-5′

Spread: 3′

Flowers: Single, white, fragrant flowers bloom in clusters in Summer

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: A selection from a seedling population of Philadelphus lewisii collected in Alberta, Canada, that has proven hardy to zone 3. It blooms up to 4 weeks. It forms a medium sized upright shrub that is tolerant of full sun. The name ‘Blizzard’ was chosen for both the profuse amount of spring bloom and the extreme winter hardiness of this fine plant.

Minnesota Snowflake

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 6′-8′

Spread: 5′-6′

Flowers: 2″ double white fragrant flowers in Summer

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: Arching, vase shaped shrub. Full sun, moderate water. Zone 4.

Ninebark (Physocarpus)

Amber Jubilee

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 5′-6′

Spread: 4′

Flowers: White flowers in spring

Fall Color: Red-purple fall colored leaves

Other Notes: Foliage tones in orange, yellow, and golds. Rounded, dense habit.

Center Glow Ninebark

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries Inc

Height: 8′-10′

Spread: 8′-10′

Flowers: White flowers in spring

Fall Color: Red-purple fall colored leaves

Other Notes: Maroon foliage, new growth is yellow. Upright, rounded shape.

Dart’s Gold Ninebark

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries Inc

Height: 4′-5′

Spread: 4′-5

Flowers: Creamy white flowers in Spring.

Fall Color: Red fruit in fall.

Other Notes: Bright yellow leaves during the growing season. Compact rounded shape. Great shrub to use for color contrast.

Diablo Ninebark

Height: 8′-10′

Spread: 8′-10′

Flowers: Pink buds open to creamy white flowers in spring

Fall Color: Bronze/Maroon

Other Notes: Beautiful red-purple foliage on long arching canes. Forms a beautiful rounded mound of foliage and, even though it gets quite tall, can be controlled by cutting branches back each spring. Spring flowers contrast nicely against the dark foliage. Plant in full sun for best foliage color.

Little Devil Ninebark

Photos Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 3′-4′

Spread: 3′-4′

Flower: White/pink flowers in early Summer

Fall Color: Red-purple leaves all year

Other Notes: This cute and compact ninebark offers low maintenance for the homeowner with a small garden. Burgundy foliage makes for a nice contrast. No pruning needed. Upright mounded habit.

Oak, Gambel/Scrub Oak (Quercus gambelii)

Height: Generally 12′-15′ (variable—can grow up to 20′)

Spread: 8′-15′

Flowers: No

Fall Color: Yellow, Orange, Red.

Plum, Double Flowering (Prunus triloba)

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 10′-12′

Spread: 10′-12′

Flowers: 1″ double light pink flowers in early Spring

Fall Color: Yellow-bronze

Other Notes: A handsome large shrub or small airy tree. Prefers rich well-drained soils. Zone 3. If you like the look of this shrub but need something smaller, try Flowering Almond (Prunus glandulosa). It is very similar in appearance but is about a 1/3 of the size of the Double Flowering Plum.

Potentilla AKA Cinquefoil

McKay’s White Potentilla

Height: 2′

Spread: 2′-3′

Flowers: Creamy white flowers in summer

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: Small rounded shrub.

Pink Beauty Potentilla

Height: 2′

Spread: 2′

Flowers: Pink blooms in summer

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: Small rounded shrub

Privet (Ligustrum)

Golden Vicary Privet

Height: 4′-6′

Spread: 4′-6′

Flowers: Fragrant SMALL white flowers

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: Compact vase-shape. Yellow leaves make it a nice shrub for color contrast.

Lodense

Height: 3′-4′

Spread: 3′-4′

Flowers: Small white flowers in summer

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: Compact shrub with dense green leaves. Often used as a hedge. Zone 4.

Privet, New Mexico A.K.A Desert Olive (Forestiera)

Height: 6′-8′

Spread: 6′-8′

Flowers: Small light yellow flowers in spring

Fall Color: Bright yellow leaves and blue black berries.

Other Notes: Erect, arching shrub with olive-green leaves. Very drought tolerant.
Great for a sunny, hot spot.

Quince, Flowering (Chaenomeles)

Texas Scarlet Flowering Quince

Height: 3′-4′

Spread: 3′-4′

Flower: Scarlet flowers appear before foliage in early Spring. (makes a great cutflower)

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: Compact, thornless variety. Does not produce fruit. Very drought tolerant once established. May also be grown in part sun.

Toyo Nishiki Flowering Quince

Height: 6′-8′

Spread: 6′-8′

Flower: Flowers of white/pink appear before foliage in early Spring. (makes a great cutflower)

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: This variety will produce fruit but is grown as an ornamental. Very drought tolerant once established. May also be grown in part sun.

Rabbitbrush (Chrysothamnus / Ericameria nauseosus)

Winter

Height: 2′-6′ (very variable)

Spread: 2′-4′

Flowers: Yellow flowers late summer to early fall.

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: Rounded shrub, very drought tolerant. Fluffy seed clusters add winter interest. Plant this is the hottest, driest spot you have. Can be cut back to within a foot in Spring.

Dwarf Rabbitbrush

Photo Courtesy Plant Select

Height: 16″-28″

Spread: 20″-30″

Flowers: Yellow flowers late summer to early fall

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: A Colorado Plant Select that much like it’s larger cousin, loves the sun and tolerate wind, cold, and drought once established.

Rhododendron (Azalea)

Golden Lights

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries Inc

Height: 4’-5’

Spread: 3’-4’

Exposure: Full to part sun.

Other Notes: Introduced for its golden flowers. The foliage turns bronze in Fall Flowers late May to early June. Likes moist, well-drained, acidic soil. Zone 4.

Mandarin Lights

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries Inc

Height: 4’-5’

Spread: 4’-5’

Exposure: Full to part sun.

Other Notes: Flowers in spring are a BRIGHT mandarin orange. Bronze fall foliage. Rounded habit. Zone 4. From the University of Minnesota.

Northern Lights

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries Inc

Height: 4’-5’

Spread: 5’-6’

Exposure: Full to part sun

Other Notes: Flowers range from light to deep pink. Fall color is insignificant. Rounded habit. Zone 4. From the University of Minnesota.

Rosy Lights Azalea

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries Inc

Height: 4’-5′

Spread: 5’-6’

Exposure: Full to part sun.

Other Notes: ‘Rosy Lights’ is a dark rose-pink. A spectacular display of fragrant flowers are produced in late May or early June. Flower buds are winter hardy to -45°F. From the University of Minnesota. Zone 4. Likes moist, well-drained, acidic soil.

Sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata)

Western Sagebrush

Height: 5′-10′

Spread: 5′-10′

Flowers: Small inconspicuous yellow flowers

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: This is a tall fragrant shrub with rugged silver foliage. It is a great accent plant and excellent for wildlife habitat. It is extremely drought tolerant and soil tolerant.

Sand Cherry (Prunus)

Purple-leaf Sand Cherry / Cistena Plum (Prunus)

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 6′- 8′

Spread: 5′- 6′

Flowers: Small pink, fragrant flowers in Spring

Fall Color: Maroon

Other Notes: Maroon foliage throughout the season make this a nice contrast plant. May also be trained into a small tree as pictured.

Western Sand Cherry ‘Pawnee Buttes’

Photos Courtesy Plant Select

Height: 15″- 18″

Spread: 4′- 6′

Flowers: Creamy white flowers in spring followed by black berries in summer.

Fall Color: Yes! Red-purple leaves.

Other Notes: Low and spreading groundcover type. A Colorado Plant Select shrub.

Siberian Peashrub (Caragana)

Height: 12′-15’+

Spread: 12’-15’

Flowers: Bright yellow pea-like flowers in spring

Fall Color: Yellowish

Other Notes: Upright rounded habit. Very drought tolerant once established. Useful as a windbreak, hedge or screen. Deer and Drought tolerant. Zone 2.

Smokebush (Cotinus)

Royal Purple Smokebush

Height: 8′-10′

Spread: 8′-10′

Flowers: Dusty rose ‘flowers’ look like smoke.

Fall Color: Deep purple w/ pink ‘smoke.’

Other Notes: Deep purple foliage. Zone 5. Does best in full sun.

Spirea (Spiraea)

Anthony Waterer

Height: 2′-3

Spread: 4′-5

Flowers: Rose pink in summer

Fall Color: Red-purple

Other Notes: Upright rounded shrub. Can be grown in part sun.

Goldflame

Height: 2′-3′

Spread: 3′-4′

Flowers: Crimson blooms in summer.

Fall Color: Red-bronze

Other Notes: Leaves are ever-changing color. Bright red new growth changing to yellow and then to green. Low, mounded shrub. Can be grown in part sun.

Gold Mound

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 1′-2′

Spread: 2′-3′

Flowers: Pink blooms in summer

Fall Color: Yellow foliage tinges red.

Other Notes: Great pop of color for small spaces. Yellow foliage throughout season. Can be grown in part sun.

Little Princess

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 2′-3′

Spread: 3′

Flowers: Pink flowers in summer.

Fall Color: Dark red.

Other Notes: Low mounded shrub. Can be grown in part sun.

Mellow Yellow

Height: 3′-5′

Spread: 3′-5′

Flowers: Small white blooms in spring.

Fall Color: Yellow

Other Notes: Arching stems with bright lime-yellow leaves make this a GREAT contrast plant.

Renaissance Spirea (Spirea vanhouttei)

Early Fall Color

Height: 5′-7′

Spread: 6′-8′

Flowers: Profuse white flowers in spring.

Fall Color: Orange-red leaves.

Other Notes: Vase-shaped shrub with arching branches. Renaissance is an improved bridal wreath spirea.

Snowmound

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 3′-4′

Spread: 3′-4′

Flowers: Masses of pure white flowers in spring.

Fall Color: No

Other Notes: A dwarf, rounded shrub with dark green foliage.

Sumac (Rhus)

Gro-Low Sumac

Height: 2-4′

Spread: 6′-8′

Flowers: Small yellow flowers followed by small fuzzy red fruit.

Fall Color: Yes! Orange-scarlet tones.

Other Notes: As the name suggest, low growing and WIDE spreading shrub. Excellent for mass beds and hillsides.

Three Leaf Sumac ‘Autumn Amber’ (Rhus trilobata)

Height: 18″

Spread: 6′-8′

Flowers: Small yellow flowers followed by small orange-red fruit.

Fall Color: Amber-red tones.

Other Notes: Ideal groundcover shrub for terraced walls, large open areas and dry shrub areas. Graceful and delicate-looking, yet tough enough to be used in harsh planting sites. Low-growing selection of native three-leaf sumac developed in New Mexico. Summer leaves glossy, bright green; Must have good drainage.

Tiger Eyes Sumac (Rhus typhina)

Height: 6′

Spread: 6′

Flowers: No

Fall Color: Yes! Yellow, orange, red tones.

Other Notes: A dwarf form of cutleaf staghorn sumac with bright yellow leaves during growing season.

Viburnum

Compact European Cranberrybush (V. opulus compactum)

Height: 5′-6′

Spread: 5′-6′

Flowers: White flowers in late spring followed by red berries.

Fall Color: Deep red.

Other Notes: Rounded shrub. Very pretty in all seasons. Will also grow in part sun.

Mohican Viburnum (V. lantana)

Photos Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 6′

Spread: 6′-8′

Flowers: Showy white flowers in late spring followed by striking pink/blue berries.

Fall Color: Deep burgundy with black berries

Other Notes: U.S. National Arboretum introduction, selected for its compact growth. Creamy white, flat-topped flowers cover the plant in Spring, followed by orange-red fruit in early Summer lasting a month before turning black in fall. Makes a nice hedge. Zone 3.

Compact Koreanspice Viburnum (V. carlesii)

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 3′-4′

Spread: 3′- 4′

Flowers: White flowers in summer

Fall Color: Yes, wine red foliage.

Other Notes: One of the best dwarf viburnums available, it produces exceptionally dark green leaves with a nice spring show of large white flowers. Rounded, dense shrub with stiff, upright spreading branches.

Snowball Viburnum (opulus)

Height: 10′-12′

Spread: 10′- 12′

Flowers: Profuse round, double white flowers in late spring.

Fall Color: No.

Other Notes: A large, very popular spring flowering shrub.

Weigela

Wine and Roses

Height: 4′-5′

Spread: 4′-5′

Flowers: Deep rosy pink in spring with potential to re-bloom

Fall Color: Deep wine leaves

Other Notes: Deep dark burgundy wine leaves throughout season. Prefers moist soil.

Willow (Salix)

Hakuro Nishiki Willow (Salix integra)

Photo Courtesy Bailey Nurseries

Height: 4′-6’+

Spread: 4′-6’+

Flowers: No

Fall Color: White/Green/Pink leaves

Other Notes: A lovely small shrub with pink stems and buds that open to dappled green, pink and white foliage. Some leaves will be all white. The stems are graceful and spreading. Will also grow in partial shade. Rounded shape at maturity.

Bush Allamanda

Allamanda schottii

Of all the allamanda varieties among South Florida shrubs, bush allamanda is probably the most easy-to-grow, with bright green foliage and abundant yellow flowers.

The clusters of golden trumpet-shaped blossoms appear on and off most of the year – more during warmer weather.

The plant will grow too large eventually to work as a foundation shrub, but other than that, it’s one of the most versatile yellow flowering shrubs for any sunny spot.

Its size and color make it an ideal accent, hedge or single specimen for the yard…even a not-too-tall privacy screen around lanai or pool cage.

Equally at home in formal landscaping or a more casual setting, all this pretty shrub requires to keep it neat and tidy is an occasional trimming to bring out its naturally elegant form.
These plants tend to become bare at the base when they’re more mature. If you dislike that look, grow small plants around the allamanda to cover up the trunk.

If you like allamanda but the bush variety is too large for your needs, consider the dwarf variety.

There’s also a vine, Brown Bud Allamanda, with huge yellow flowers.

Plant specs

Bush allamandas are evergreen and moderately salt-tolerant. They’re moderate growers that like full to partial sun and do best in Zone 10.

You can keep them trimmed at 3 feet while young and then 4 or 5 feet tall once they’re mature.

Plant care

Add top soil (or organic peat moss) and cow manure to the hole when you plant.

Trim as needed to shape and cut back in spring (late March or early April) for size.

Water on a regular basis, but don’t keep this plant overly wet.Let it dry out a bit between waterings.

Fertilize 3 times a year – in spring summer and autumn – with a quality granular fertilizer.

Plant spacing

Allamanda bushes grow wider at the top, so place them no closer than 3 feet apart.

Come out from the house at least 2-1/2 feet.

If planting along a walk or drive, come in 3 to 4 feet.

These shrubs can be grown in large containers.

Landscape uses for bush allamanda

  • single specimen
  • accent for a mixed bed
  • lining the edge of a deck or patio
  • along a fence
  • as a backdrop for smaller plants
  • anchor for a garden bed
  • around the base of tall palms
  • on each side of a garden gate or entryway
  • medium-height hedge
  • corner accent for the house
  • privacy plant
  • screening plant for A/C or other things you’d like to camouflaged
  • along a blank wall for height and interest

GOOD SNOWBIRD PLANT? YES
COMPANION PLANT SUGGESTIONS: Plumbago, ruella, hibiscus, Maui or dwarf ixora, dwarf oleander, and copper plant.

Other shrubs you might like: Dwarf Allamanda, Thryallis

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Yellow blooms are prized by gardeners due to the color’s innate feeling of happiness, cheerfulness, and joyfulness. Yellow brings a sense of energy to a garden and also compliments almost any other shade of flower quite nicely.

From low-growing, shade-loving ground cover to tall bushes that will burst with yellow blooms when grown in bright sunlight, there are many shrubs that are prized for their yellow blooms.

From green foliage tinged with streaks of yellow to large flowers as bright as the sun, there are many options out there that will bring a burst of this energetic color to your garden or landscape.

We’ve collected a list of 10 shrubs that will produce yellow blooms. Let’s check them out!

1. Golden Oriole Azalea

This azalea bush produces lemon-yellow flowers, although many are mixed with white or orange tinges of color. It blooms in the spring and will grow anywhere from 6-10 feet in height. It will grow best in zones 5-9 when planted in an area where it only received partial sunlight. It has a very mild fragrance and is known to attract bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds.

2. Potentilla

This shrub has dark green foliage that is comprised of many small flower-like leaves that have bright yellow flowers bursting out of the foliage. The flowers have five round leaves and a dark yellow center eye. The most common yellow potentilla shrubs are the Abbortswood and Goldstar. Potentilla is very tolerant of cold weather and grows best in zones 2-7 in an area where it receives full sun or just an hour or two of shade each day.

3. Bush Cinquefoil

Technically a member of the rose family, this is a yellow bush that is often found growing naturally and how now become popular in landscaping. It grows best in zones 2-6 and has pale yellow flowers that begin to bloom in early summer. Gardeners enjoy this blooming yellow shrub because of its very natural look. It grows from 1-4 feet in height and will bloom best when grown in full sunlight.

4. St. John’s Wort

There are many variations of the St. John’s Wort bush, with the Sunburst being among the most popular due to its flashy yellow blooms. It is often used strategically in landscaping because of its semi-invasive nature. It has small, but eye-catching, yellow flowers that have small tendrils protruding from the central eye. Growers also appreciate its lush green foliage that lasts throughout the year. St. John’s Wort will thrive in zones 5-9.

5. Forsythia

One of the most common blooming yellow shrubs, the Forsythia is a sign of cheerfulness due to the fact that it is usually one of the first perennial shrubs to begin blooming in early spring. It is a symbol of the fact that spring is on its way or that winter has ended, depending on the growing zone. It grows best in zones 4-8 and is adored by gardeners simply for the fact that it is an early bloomer and takes little to no maintenance other than pruning back the branches to keep the plant’s shape looking tidy. Forsythia is often grown outside of the garden and its bright yellow color looks incredible when grown against the green grass of summer.

6. Witch Hazel

Speaking of early bloomers, witch hazel tends to bloom even before forsythia bushes, although its blooms are far less flashy. The blooms of witch hazel are small, spiky petals that jut out from a central brown ball. Witch hazel is quite tolerant of heat and grows best in well-drained soil in an area it will receive full sun to partial shade. It will flourish best in zones 5-8.

7. Moonshadow Euonymus

Commonly used as a groundcover, this shade perennial has shiny, dark green foliage that is tinged with bursts of yellow throughout its leaves. It grows to be just over a foot in height and will spread between 4-5 feet wide. It will grow occasional branches that sound be trimmed out but is a very low-maintenance plant. It will grow best in zones 4-10.

8. Yellow Roses

Every rose color has a symbolic meaning, and yellow roses are meant to be a symbol of joy and friendship. Yellow rose bushes tend to grow between 4-6 feet in height and prefer zones 6-10. Like all roses, yellow rose bushes produce a warm, rich fragrance and will begin blooming in late spring. Rose bushes look lovely when grown against the side of a house or up against a fence because many gardeners often feel they look best as a standalone plant.

9. Japanese Rose Bush

This lovely shrub produces roses that are far more delicate in appearance than a traditional rose. It is also prized for its small, bright green leaves that adorn the stems of the bush and remain throughout the year. There are two variations to the Japanese rose bush: single-flowered and double-flowered. Both types will begin blooming in early spring. It will grow best in zones 4-9.

10. Yellow Camellia Shrub

Camellias come in many shades and the yellow camellia shrub will produce charming, pale yellow flowers with overlapping petals that have a lovely ripple. They are not very tolerant of the cold or the heat and will grow best in zones 8-10. Camellias are a more high-maintenance plant, although their flowers are lovely enough to be worth the effort.

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