Echeveria black prince variegated

Heir to the succulent throne: Echeveria ‘Black Prince’

Echeveria ‘Black Prince’ a noble choice for the garden, patio, or a bright nook indoors

The small, dark, and handsome echeveria known as ‘Black Prince’ has to make any list of Halloween-appropriate succulents. It’s unusual for an echeveria in that its rosettes often appear to be nearly black. Combine that with its glowing green center and striking red flowers, and this dark hens-and-chicks succulent just might startle an unsuspecting trick-or-treater. (Of course, it helps to have some well-placed, oversized spiders and bloodshot monster eyes nearby.)

With a royalty-inspired name like ‘Black Prince’, it’s no shock that, upon closer inspection, the fleshy leaves betray a deep shade of purple. Hues vary, though. Your specimen may seem more like ‘Thoroughly Brown Prince’. Seasonal and environmental factors play a role. More sun exposure should promote darker foliage, although the plant appreciates bright shade in the toastiest climates.

‘Black Prince’ traces its parentage to Echeveria shaviana and Echeveria affinis. In this Altman Plants video, our succulent guru Tom Jesch says that a sunny windowsill serves as an excellent perch for the clumping hybrid. It also excels in rock gardens and dish gardens, the rosettes typically staying to four, five inches tall and wide, though some report double that size. Keep it nice and cozy(ish) during winter chills.

As there are always a certain number of undesirables dwelling in any given kingdom, so too can ‘Black Prince’ attract living things that we gardeners would rather it carry on without, namely mealybugs. After mathing for a bit, we determined that there are about a million different recipes for eradicating such pests. We favor a gentle approach, spraying infected areas with a 50/50 solution of isopropyl alcohol and water. Should your ‘Prince’ become a haven for those tiny rascals, check for signs of overwatering (such as leaf rot) and make sure it’s receiving good air circulation and enough light.

Like dirt on a black car, water spots on the leaves can be hard to miss or disregard. Just spray or gently wipe with mineral-free water. It’s royal treatment, sure, but this one deserves to be spoiled a little. Enduring some drama will be worth it when you see the dramatic effect Echeveria ‘Black Prince’ adds to just about any planter arrangement. Because, you know, black goes with everything. It’s going to earn that crown on contrast powers alone.

Echeveria ‘Black Prince’ is available at our retail shop and wholesale shop.


Scientific Name

Echeveria ‘Black Prince’

Common Names

Black Hens and Chicks

Scientific Classification

Family: Crassulaceae
Subfamily: Sedoideae
Tribe: Sedeae
Subtribe: Sedinae
Genus: Echeveria

Description

Echeveria ‘Black Prince’ is a slow and low growing, succulent plant that produces clumps of short rosettes, up to 3 inches (7.5 cm) wide, with thin, triangular and dark leaves. These leaves first emerge greenish, but darken to a deep lavender brown. With age, the lower leaves widen out up to 1 inch (2.5 cm) at the base with an acuminate tip that has fine, yellow edges. The dark red flowers appear on short stalks in late fall to early winter.

Photo via washington-dc.cactus-society.org

Hardiness

USDA hardiness zones 9a to 11b: from 20 °F (−6.7 °C) to 50 °F (+10 °C).

How to Grow and Care

Most of the common Echeveria species are not complicated succulents to grow, provided you follow a few basic rules. First, be careful never to let water sit in the rosette as it can cause rot or fungal diseases that will kill the plant. Additionally, remove dead leaves from the bottom of the plant as it grows. These dead leaves provide a haven for pests, and Echeveria are susceptible to mealy bugs. As with all succulents, careful watering habits and plenty of light will help ensure success.

Most Echeveria can be easily propagated from leaf cuttings, although a few are better from seeds or stem cuttings. To propagate a leaf cutting, place the individual leaf in a succulent or cacti mix and cover the dish until the new plant sprouts.

Repot as needed, preferably during the warm season. To repot a succulent, make sure the soil is dry before repotting, then gently remove the pot. Knock away the old soil from the roots, making sure to remove any rotted or dead roots in the process. Treat any cuts with a fungicide.

Learn more at How to Grow and Care for Echeveria.

Origin

Echeveria ‘Black Prince’ is a hybrid between Echeveria shaviana with Echeveria affinis.

Forms, Cultivars and Hybrids

  • Echeveria ‘Bess Bates’

Links

  • Back to genus Echeveria
  • Succulentopedia: Browse succulents by Scientific Name, Common Name, Genus, Family, USDA Hardiness Zone, Origin, or cacti by Genus

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Photo via willowaynurseries.comPhoto via etsy.comPhoto via cgf.net

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Echeveria ‘Black Prince’ – Tips For Growing Black Prince Echeveria Plants

Echeveria ‘Black Prince’ is a favorite succulent plant, especially of those who like the dark purple look of the leaves, which are so deep they appear black. Those looking to add something a little different to the landscape or container gardens will certainly enjoy this easy-care plant.

About Echeveria ‘Black Prince’

Leaves will first be green and darken as they mature. The center of the plant is usually green. A low grower, the Black Prince plant has a rosette that can reach 3 inches (7.5 cm.) across. It is attractive in mixed containers or planted together with a few of the same type.

Black Prince’ succulent produces offsets, what we often call babies, that can fill your container and sometimes even spill over the sides. Offsets of the growing Black Prince echeveria grow from the bottom, growing upward against the mother plant. You may remove these babies to grow in other containers if you’d like.

Plant the Black Prince plant

on a mound of soil or in a container filled to the top for the best view of emerging offsets. The mature, happily growing plant blooms dark red flowers in late autumn to winter.

Growing Black Prince Echeveria

Black Prince echeveria care includes potting in proper soil, finding the right location, and limiting water. Never let water remain in the rosette of this plant. It can cause rot or fungal disease. Actually, with this echeveria and other succulents, it is best to water at the soil level, keeping the leaves fairly dry.

Water sparingly, but provide more water in spring and summer. Let soil dry out between waterings. Cut back to less water in winter, sometimes once a month is appropriate. Black Prince echeveria care includes growing the specimen in a fast-draining succulent mixture, amended with coarse sand, pumice or other additions normally used in a succulent soil mix.

Locate your plant in a sunny spot. Full morning sun is best, but some afternoon sun fills the plant’s needs. Limit afternoon sun in summer, as it may harm leaves and roots in the hottest locations. This is easier when the plant is in a container. If growing in the ground, plant in an area that gets afternoon shade.

As the plant grows, bottom leaves will occasionally shrivel. This is normal and they should be removed. Keep all containers free of leaves and debris that encourage pests. Keep an eye on Black Prince for signs of mealybugs, the waxy white patches that may appear on leaf axils or other parts of the plant. If you see ants around your plants, take precautions. These are sometimes a sign of other pests, like aphids, and have the potential for creating honeydew.

Echeveria ‘Black Prince’

Echeveria ‘Black Prince’ (Reinelt): Dark and mysterious, ‘Black Prince’ has deep thick leaves of burgundy to near black. It is a hybrid of E. affinis x E. shaviana, but its appearance is strongly determined only by its E. affinis parent. It has a fairly open rosette form, reaching about 6.0″ in diameter at maturity, then produces new offsets around its base. Exposure to full, summer sun and drought can induce the plant to bleach to coppery orange. It can send up tall bloom stalks in spring and fall with bright fuchsia to red flowers.

Echeveria need bright sunlight to maintain their colors and compact rosette form. They will not survive a hard frost, but if there is a risk of freezing temperatures they can be brought indoors to grow on a sunny window sill or under a grow light.

Like most succulents, they need great drainage and infrequent water to prevent rot. Pick containers with drainage holes and use well-draining cactus and succulent soil with 50% to 70% mineral grit such as coarse sand, pumice, or perlite. Water deeply enough for water to run out the drainage hole, then wait for the soil to fully dry before watering again.

Also known as “Mexican Hens & Chicks”, Echeveria can produce new offsets or “chicks” on stolons around the base of the mother plant. These chicks can be left to form a tidy cluster or removed and transplanted. Additionally, Echeveria can be propagated from stem cuttings or mature leaves. Look to our Succulent Cuttings Guide for more information.

Full Echeveria Guide

5 Brilliant Black Succulents

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If you’re interested in adding a new hue to your garden, but the vibrant colors of most succulents don’t appeal to you, consider black succulents. These somber succulents are a great way to add contrast and pizazz to any garden.

Whether you’re expanding your collection or decorating according to a certain color theme, try adding a few black succulents to your next project for a splash of color and class.

Table of Contents

Echeveria ‘Black Prince’

(The above image is from Instagram, but you can look at some of these Echeveria for purchase at Mountain Crest Gardens here.)

This petite black succulent boasts the symmetrical rosette pattern that Echeveria are known for. This succulent stays quite small, only reaching about three inches in diameter at maturity. The leaves are wide and triangular in shape. New growth starts out as a bright, lime green and darkens to a deep brown-black with age.

Black Prince is a clumping succulent that grows in dense clusters. The offsets, or chicks, can either be removed to be planted elsewhere or left to grow as ground cover. The petite size of Black Prince makes it a perfect addition to living walls or fairy gardens.

In late fall to early winter, Black Prince produces a short green stalk from the center of its rosette. Dark red flowers appear on the stalk, creating an interesting contrast to the green and black colors of the leaves.

Black Prince was originally created by pollinating an Echeveria shaviana with the pollen of an Echeveria affnis. A variegated cultivar of Black Prince, known as Bess Bates, also exists.

As with most Echeveria, Black Prince is low-maintenance and perfect for any gardener and any project. It requires partial sun, infrequent watering, and well-draining soil. It is a slow growing succulent and will not need to be repotted often.

Aeonium arboreum ‘Zwartkop’

The vibrant colors of this Aeonium will create a striking contrast in any setting. Get yours at Mountain Crest Gardens by clicking this picture.

Aeonium arboreum is a striking succulent with large rosettes of deep purplish-black leaves. The rosettes can reach up to eight inches in diameter and the entire plant can grow up to three feet in height. The size and gorgeous color of Zwartkop make it an ideal plant for outdoor succulent gardens, provided that the climate is appropriate.

Aeonium arboreum are native to North Africa and typically grow during the winter and are dormant during the summer. They require porous soil and proper watering techniques in order to thrive. They do well in full or partial sun, but the color of the leaves will deepen as the plant receives more light.

Zwartkop are not frost hardy and must be brought inside or covered during frigid weather. They do well in container gardens, especially when they can be left outside during warm weather and brought inside when temperatures drop.

Zwartkop are best propagated from stem cuttings. As the plant grows, the bottom leaves of the rosette will fall off, leaving a bare stem. To keep the plant looking tidy, you can remove the rosette to replant elsewhere and the bare stem will produce another rosette.

Sinocrassula yunnanensis ‘Chinese Jade’

Sinocrassula yunnanensis is ideal for both containers and outdoor gardens. They’re tough to find, so check Etsy by clicking on this picture.

Sinocrassula yunnanensis is a small succulent, with stems reaching up to four inches in length. The leaves are arranged on the short stems in a rosette pattern, which can grow up to about 1.5 inches in diameter. The leaves are flat on one side and rounded on the other and are covered in short, fine hairs.

This strange-looking succulent is a monocarpic plant, meaning it flowers once and then dies. An individual rosette will produce a long stem with tiny white flowers. Once it blooms, that rosette will die. Since the plant typically grows in dense clumps, the dead rosette is quickly replaced by new rosettes.

Sinocrassula yunnanensis is easy to care for and great for beginner gardeners. They grow best with partial sun and well-draining soil. Water only when the soil is dry to avoid root rot.

This adorable little succulent is easily propagated through leaf cuttings or offsets. If allowed to grow naturally, they will grow in dense clumps that are perfect for ground cover or container gardens.

Echinopsis ancistrophora ‘Arachnacantha’

Planet Desert is just the place to find your new Arachnacantha!

This darkly colored cactus is native to Bolivia and is sometimes referred to as Lobivia arachnacantha. The name, arachnacantha, comes from a Greek word meaning “spider web shaped thorns”. You can probably guess why this spooky-looking cactus was given this name.

In the spring, the cactus will produce large yellow or orange flowers that open only during the daytime. Arachnacantha is a rather petite cactus that typically stays under six inches in height. It tends to grow in tight clumps. Like many vibrantly colored succulents and cacti, the more sun this plant receives, the deeper the color will be.

This is a low-maintenance plant that’s great for gardeners of all skill levels. Arachnacantha does best with full sun and infrequent watering. In the winter, the cactus goes dormant and will survive with little to no water until spring.

It is not a particularly frost tolerant plant and will need to be protected or brought inside during freezing temperatures. However, it will bloom better in the spring if it is kept in cooler temperatures through the winter.

Echeveria ‘Black Knight’

If you’d like to add a Black Knight to your collection, check out Leaf and Clay by clicking on the photo.

This gloomy-hued Echeveria is an interesting and easy-to-care-for addition to any succulent collection or garden project. The thick, fleshy leaves are arranged in a rosette pattern. In the very center of the plant, you’ll be able to see the vibrant green color of the stem and young leaves. As the leaves grow, they become a deep purplish-black color.

In late summer to fall, Black Knight produces thin lime green stems from the center of the rosette. Atop the stem grows bright red flowers that create a stark contrast against the deep colors of the leaves.

As with most Echeveria, Black Knight requires very little care in order to thrive. Partial sun or bright indoor light is best and water the plant only when the soil is dry. This plant cannot be left in overly moist soil or it is at risk of developing root rot. It’s not a frost tolerant plant and must be protected from frigid weather.

Black Knight can be easily propagated from leaf or stem cuttings, but it can also be grown from seed. Following classic propagation techniques will help ensure success in sharing your beloved Black Knight with friends and family.

Whether you’re interested in a coal-colored cactus or a dark and dreamy Echeveria, these five black succulents are sure to stand out in any setting. Try adding a few to your collection for a touch of drama and mystique.

Echeveria ‘Bess Bates’

Synonyms

Echeveria ‘Black Prince’ f. variegata

Family: Crassulaceae
Subfamily: Sedoideae
Tribe: Sedeae
Subtribe: Sedinae
Genus: Echeveria

Echeveria ‘Bess Bates’ is a variegated form of Echeveria ‘Black Prince’. It is a slow and low growing succulent plant that produces clumps of short rosettes, up to 3 inches (7.5 cm) in diameter, of variegated, thin and triangular leaves. The dark red flowers appear on short stalks in late fall to early winter.

USDA hardiness zones 9a to 11b: from 20 °F (−6.7 °C) to 50 °F (+10 °C).

Photo via reddit.com

Most of the common Echeveria species are not complicated succulents to grow, provided you follow a few basic rules. First, be careful never to let water sit in the rosette as it can cause rot or fungal diseases that will kill the plant. Additionally, remove dead leaves from the bottom of the plant as it grows. These dead leaves provide a haven for pests and Echeverias are susceptible to mealy bugs. As with all succulents, careful watering habits and plenty of light will help ensure success.

Repot as needed, preferably during the warm season. To repot a succulent, make sure the soil is dry before repotting, then gently remove the pot. Knock away the old soil from the roots, making sure to remove any rotted or dead roots in the process. Treat any cuts with a fungicide

Most Echeverias can be easily propagated from leaf cuttings, although a few are better from seeds or stem cuttings. To propagate a leaf cutting, place the individual leaf in a potting soil for succulents and cover the dish until the new plant sprouts.

Learn more at How to Grow and Care for Echeveria.

Echeveria ‘Bess Bates’ is a variegated form of Echeveria ‘Black Prince’.

  • Back to genus Echeveria
  • Succulentopedia: Browse succulents by Scientific Name, Common Name, Genus, Family, USDA Hardiness Zone, Origin, or cacti by Genus

Photo via silversummer21.blogspot.comPhoto by Emmanuelle AubéPhoto via pinterest.com

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Echeveria ‘Black Prince is a dark succulent that will definitely add some mood to your garden. It may be small, but the imitation black leaves stand out in a sea of green.

Black Prince’s rosettes have spirals of wide and pointed leaves. The leaves turn very dark purple as they mature – so dark that they appear black! The coloring depends on how much sunlight this succulent receives.

The Echeveria genus comes from Mexico and has many hybrids. ‘Black Prince’ is a hybrid of Echeverias affinis and shaviana. It’s reasonably easy to grow indoors and out.

So, without further ado, here’s everything you need to know about adding this royal succulent to your garden.

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  • Safer Brand Insect Killing Soap
  • Orange Guard Indoor/Outdoor Pest Control
  • Botanigard ES Biological Insecticide

Quick Care Guide

Echeveria ‘Black Prince’ is a beautiful succulent hybrid. Source: salchuiwt

Common Name(s) Black Hens and Chicks, Black Prince
Scientific Name Echeveria affinis
Family Crassulaceae
Height & Spread 6-10″ tall and wide
Light Full sun to partial shade
Water Water when the soil is dry
Soil Well-draining soil
Fertilizer 1/2 strength liquid fertilizer, optional
Pests & Diseases Aphids, mealybugs, rot

All About Black Hens and Chicks

Zones 9-11 are perfect for growing Black Hens and Chicks outdoors. In all other zones though, it will be happiest on a windowsill during the cold months. This black succulent grows from spring to fall, although slowly.

Once it’s mature, Echeveria Black Prince grows vivid red flowers in the late fall. These flowers are supported by tall, leafed stems that rise from the center of the rosette. They may invite hummingbirds to visit your garden.

If you’re growing Black Prince in a rock garden, consider using light-colored rocks so the dark leaves will stand out. If you’re growing in a container, fill the soil to the very top so the low-growing succulent will be visible.

Types of Black Prince

While most black prince echeveria is similar in coloration, there’s one variety which we should mention. Compared to others, it’s a multicolored variant and quite striking.

Echeveria ‘Bess Bates’, Variegated ‘Black Prince’

A rare find, Bess Bates is the colorful spinoff of Black Prince. Its leaves are striped with yellow, green, and dark purple. This beautiful succulent has the same needs as Black Prince.

Echeveria ‘Black Prince’ Care

Lovely in beds, this plant is easy to grow indoors or outside. Source: douneika

Like most Echeveria, Black Prince is low-maintenance. Once you understand its needs, you should have no problem taking care of it.

Light & Temperature

Echeveria ‘Black Prince’ needs 6 hours of sunlight a day. However, it can get burned in high heat. Choose a spot that gets plenty of sun in the morning and shade or indirect light in the afternoon.

If your Black Prince lives inside, it will need as much sunlight as possible. South-facing windows are preferred if you live in the Northern hemisphere.

Black Prince can tolerate light frost but should be kept at a minimum temperature of 20° F.

Water & Humidity

Because this is a desert plant, only water when the soil is completely dry.

Black Prince needs the most water in spring to summer and less during the winter. When in doubt, pay attention to the leaves. If they’re mushy, you’re watering too often and need to cut back. If the leaves are withered or wrinkly, your plant needs a drink.

When watering, water at the base of the plant. If the leaves are constantly wet, they may start to rot.

Soil

When it comes to succulents, you can’t go wrong with a decent, well-draining soil. Specialty succulent soils usually have the perfect sandy ratio for Black Prince.

If you’d rather mix your own, add one part soil to one part perlite or sand.

Fertilizer

Black Hens and Chicks doesn’t require fertilizer. However, if you feel your succulent needs a boost, try out some liquid fertilizer. It should be diluted to ½ or ¼ strength and low in nitrogen.

Fertilize during the spring and summer, but less often than the bottle recommends. Overfertilizing can burn the leaves.

Repotting

The Black Prince succulent is small, so it probably won’t outgrow its container. If you have your heart set on a new pot though, transplanting is easy. Repot when the soil is dry so you can easily dust off the roots.

After replanting, keep the soil dry for a few days. This will allow the roots to settle in and heal from any damage. It will also lessen the likeliness of rot.

Propagation

Black Hens and Chicks easily propagates from offsets without any help. These ‘chicks’ shoot out from the bottom of the plant and root themselves. You can move them to a different container by cutting them off the ‘hen’. After letting the cut dry out, plant them in their new home. Mist the soil until new roots are established.

You can also take stem cuttings, which are ideal for etiolated succulents. After clipping them off an inch below the rosette, follow the same process for offsets.

Finally, leaf cuttings are a common and easy way to propagate Echeveria. Gently twist a healthy leaf off the stem without leaving any pieces behind. Let your new cutting dry out for a few days and then place it on well-draining soil. Instead of watering, consistently mist the soil. In time, your cutting will grow roots and a baby rosette. As the rosette grows, the cutting will die and eventually fall off the new plant.

Pruning

Black Prince Echeveria naturally drops its old, lower leaves. If these leaves look clearly dead but are still hanging on, gently pull them off to maintain a clean look. Throw away the dead leaves as they can attract pests if left in the pot.

Dying leaves caused by overwatering or rot should also be removed.

Troubleshooting

A nicely-potted example of an Echeveria ‘Black Prince’. Source: Erick Lux

Pests and diseases are a rarity in Black Hens and Chicks. However, this succulent isn’t invincible. Be on the lookout for any warning signs that the following problems are occurring.

Growing Problems

One of the last things you want is for the leaves to fall off your Black Prince. While this is normal for old leaves, new ones should not be dropping. This is usually a sign of overwatering. Prevent this by watering sparingly and always repotting with dry soil.

Etiolation is another problem you may come across. The stem of your Black Prince will stretch out if it isn’t getting enough sunlight. Once stretched, the stem won’t shrink back down. What you can do though is behead the rosette and propagate from it.

Pests

A succulent that’s harboring pests may wilt, yellow, and eventually die. This can be prevented by keeping your Black Prince dry and free of dead leaves. In the case of infestation, here are the most common pests and how to remove them.

Mealybugs are small, white insects that love to dine on succulent sap. They lay their eggs in pouches that look like bunches of cotton. The honeydew they secrete attracts ants, which will need to be removed as well.

Remove mealybugs with:

  • A q-tip soaked in rubbing alcohol
  • Insecticidal soap
  • Mycoinsecticide
  • Neem Oil
  • Ladybugs and lacewings

Aphids, a common menace, feed on sap like mealybugs. Their honeydew looks like a sooty mold and invites ants as well. Large groups of aphids usually live on the underside of leaves.

Remove aphids with:

  • Insecticidal soap
  • Orange Guard Spray
  • Ladybugs and lacewings
  • Diatomaceous Earth
  • Neem Oil

Diseases

Rot and fungal diseases are a possibility in Echeveria ‘Black Prince’. Rot occurs when the succulent is constantly wet. Sections of the roots, stem, and leaves turn black or brown and mushy. If nothing is done about it, the rot may grow bacteria and kill the whole plant.

Once you notice your plant is rotting, you’ll need to take immediate action. Remove your Black Prince from the soil and cut off all the rotted parts. Then, let the plant dry out for a few days. Replant it in new, dry soil and don’t water for a few more days. From then on, be more careful with your watering so this won’t happen again.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q. What’s the difference between ‘Black Prince’ and ‘Black Knight’?

A. Black Knight has long and slender leaves, while Black Prince has wide, almost circular leaves. The Black Prince rosette is usually more opened than Black Knight. When it comes to color, Black Knight is the darkest.

Q. Why are there black spots on my Echeveria ‘Black Prince’?

A. This is probably just a sunburn. It won’t do any damage to the plant as long as you move it out of direct sun and heat. If the black spots are mushy, they may be patches of rot.

Q. Is Echeveria ‘Black Prince’ toxic?

A. No, this succulent is safe for pets and humans.

The Green Thumbs Behind This Article:
Rachel Garcia
Succulent Fanatic
Lorin Nielsen
Lifetime Gardener Did this article help you? × How can we improve it? × Thanks for your feedback!

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