Dividing bleeding heart plant

With such a fascinating name and appearance, who’d think that the bleeding heart flowers can have many different types. They come in various foliage, flower color and sizes.

With such a fascinating name and appearance, who’d think that the bleeding heart flowers can have many different types. They come in various foliage, flower color and sizes.

Get to know its various types and their unique characteristics.

Types

Bleeding heart flowers are usually pink, white, red, or yellow and their height ranges from six inches to two feet. Their foliage is very attractive and they produce dozens of delicate, heart-shaped flowers in the spring. Below are some of their varieties.

Amore Pink

These come in a beautiful shade of pink and can get up to 14 inches in height. They can disappear if it gets warm, reappearing in the fall or the following spring. They look great as a cut flower and are attractive to hummingbirds. They also need to be frozen for a while, and you can divide them after they start blooming. The Amore Rose variety is a little darker in pink than this variety.

Aurora

An all-white flower, it can also be called the Fern Leaf Bleeding Heart and works best in partial shade. They need to be frozen for six to eight weeks in a plastic bag in your freezer and when they bloom they are elegant-looking and eye-catching even though you need to use caution because they can cause skin irritations for some people.

Bacchanal

A type of Dicentra Formosa, these can be 12-18 inches in height and have showy pink blooms that are usually one inch in size. They can disappear when the weather gets warm and reappear in the fall or the following spring and they can be divided after they flower. The Bacchanal has won several international flower awards so they are truly special.

Burning Hearts

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These are a type of Fern Leaf Bleeding Heart and contain dark pink or red flowers with a touch of light pink and/or white. You can divide them after they bloom and their flowers are approximately one inch in size. They are stunning and eye-catching.

Candy Hearts

A plethora of color is included in this bloom, from dark pink to light pink and even white, and they can easily handle transplanting if you freeze them first in a plastic bag for six to eight weeks. They, too, can cause skin irritations in some people and can disappear and reappear at different times.

Dicentra canadensis

These bleeding heart flowers are all white so they have a pure, elegant look. They grow up to six inches in height and have unusual foliage colors. With these flowers, it is best to start them indoors because they need specific temperatures to start the growing process. If you start this flower with seeds, they need to be exposed to freezing temperatures; therefore, it is recommended that you place them in the freezer for six to eight weeks after first placing them in a plastic bag. Their blooms are under one inch in size and they have finely divided, fernlike leaves.

Dutchman’s Breeches

Also called Dicentra cucullaria, they grow six to ten inches tall and have flowers that are white in color with yellow at the base. They contain fruit that consists of a long, thin pod and round black seeds and the seeds produce white growth, which does not need to be taken care of because it is eaten by ants. In addition to white, they can also be yellow or pink and they are known by White Hearts, Colic Weed, and Butterfly Banners, among other names.

Fire Island

Striking and attention-getting, these Fern Leaf Bleeding Heart flowers are magenta and dark red with white tips and they do a great job of attracting butterflies and hummingbirds. The Fire Island variety has blue-green leaves and is deer- and rabbit-resistant. Although they need excellent drainage, these flowers do very well in large pots, even those holding three or more gallons. You can divide them after they flower and they are a hybrid of the Dicentra peregrina and the Dicentra eximia.

Fringed Bleeding Heart

These are also known as Dicentra eximia and can be dark pink, light pink, and white in the same flower. They have pods that contain many seeds and when ripe, they turn dark brown in color. They also have white growths, which are eaten by ants, and their blooms have fringed edges. They attract bees and are both deer- and rabbit-resistant, making them low-maintenance flowers to own. If you prefer to have this flower in white, it is called Dicentra Eximia Alba.

Gold Heart

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These showy pink flowers with white tips grow up to 24 inches tall and have unusual foliage colors. They are rabbit- and deer-resistant and work great if placed in pots that are three gallons or more in size. In addition, hummingbirds love them.

Hien

Also called Komakusa, they are showy and multi-colored, including dark pink, light pink, and sometimes white. They are a one-child plant and may cause skin irritations in some people. They do best in partial shade and should be started indoors by freezing them for six to eight weeks before planting them anywhere else.

Ivory Hearts

As the name suggests, these flowers are all white and are striking. You can divide them after they start blooming and they too can disappear when it’s warm, although they reappear in the fall or the following spring. Just as with other Bleeding Heart flowers, these can cause skin irritations for some people so caution is advised.

King of Hearts

A type of Fern Leaf Bleeding Heart, these beautiful plants with pink flowers can grow up to 18 inches in height and have unique greyish blue-green leaves. Since the flowers are infertile, you can count on them to bloom from spring to fall without any deadheading. The bloom size is under one inch and if you remove the stalks from the flowers after they finish blooming, they can remain looking amazing for a very long time.

Komakusa

Also called Dicentra peregrina, these are simply elegant-looking in light pink and white. When the weather warms up enough, they can disappear. However, if this happens, they always regrow in the fall or the following spring. If you choose the variety with fringed leaves, their blooms repeat themselves all throughout the summer.

Lamprocapnos Spectabilis

Dark pink in color with white highlights at the base, these can also be called Lady’s Locket or Lady in a Bath. They can grow up to 39 inches tall and look great as a cut flower. Once again, starting the seeds inside is a great idea and if you arrange them with about a dozen other Lady’s Lockets or any other flower, they look spectacular. Their seeds’ white fleshy growth gets eaten by ants so there is no need to worry about them once they start appearing. The ones that bloom in white are called Lamprocapnos Spectabilis Alba.

Lamprocapnos

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A very showy flower, it is the main variety of bleeding heart flowers and is reddish-pink in color. Some bleeding heart flowers can cause skin irritations in some people but the flowers are showy and eye-catching. They can also be called Dicentra.

Langtrees

Also called a Pacific Bleeding Heart, they are mostly white in color and some include fringed edges. They will naturalize and although showy and eye-catching, the flowers can sometimes irritate the skin on certain people so handling them with caution is recommended.

Luxuriant

These dark pink, showy flowers have won international flower awards and they can easily be divided after flowering. Also called the Pink Fringed Bleeding Heart, they grow best in partial shade and can sometimes cause skin irritations in some people so caution is always advised when handling them.

Pacific Bleeding Heart

Also known as Dicentra Formosa, Wild Bleeding Heart, or Western Bleeding Heart, these flowers are usually pink and purple in color so they are quite eye-catching. They prefer partial shade and the seeds need to experience freezing temperatures for a while in order for the plant to look its best later on. It’s best to start this plant indoors and you can divide them after they start to flower if you wish to plant them in additional spots.

Pearl Drops

A Pacific Bleeding Heart variety, these flowers are white and elegant-looking, always naturalize, and can be divided after their flowering period is complete. They can disappear and reappear at different times and they sometimes cause skin irritations in some people.

Red Fountain

With powdery blue-grey leaves and brightly colored dark-pink or red blooms, they are deer-resistant and grow well in large pots, including those that are three or more gallons in size. They do need excellent drainage; otherwise, they are low-maintenance and easy to grow, not to mention eye-catching.

Silversmith

A form of Dicentra Formosa, these silvery-white blooms grow best in partial shade and can disappear when it gets too warm, reappearing in the fall or the following spring. They naturalize, can cause skin irritations in some people, which can be avoided with a little extra care, and can be divided after they are finished blooming.

Snowdrift

A variety of Dicentra eximia, these beautiful white flowers are under one inch in size and have unusual, showy foliage. They are very fragrant flowers and are perfect when used as cut flowers or groundcovers. The Snowdrift has seeds that need warm moisture to germinate, usually 65 to 70 degrees Fahrenheit, followed by a cold moist period in 25- to 40-degree temperatures, and next by a cool moist period in 40- to 50-degree temperatures. They can easily handle being transplanted but they should only be divided while the leaves are dormant. Bumblebees pollinate them and they bloom in every season except the winter.

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These showy flowers that are mostly dark pink in color have seeds that need a freezing period and they can disappear and reappear at various times throughout the year. They can easily handle transplanting and they should be divided after they flower.

Valentine

A Lamprocapnos spectabilis variety that is also known by the name Hordival, these striking flowers are bright red in color and highlighted in white. They grow up to 30 inches in height and bloom in late spring or early summer. In addition, the flowers tolerate dry shade well, have blooms under one inch in size, and are deer-resistant. They attract hummingbirds and they can be divided after they flower.

White Gold

Also known as the Golden Bleeding Heart, they are mostly white in color and can grow as tall as 30 inches in height. They can have golden leaves; in fact, their foliage is one of the things that makes them so unique. In addition, the White Gold variety attracts hummingbirds and blooms in the Spring. A truly unique flower, they are easy to transplant and divide as well.

Yubae

A form of Dicentra peregrina, the flowers are dark pink or red and highlighted in white. They should be frozen for six to eight weeks before planting but they are easy to divide and grow well in partial shade. Just as other Bleeding Hearts, they can cause skin irritations in some people so you should always use caution when handling them.

Did You Know That Bleeding Heart Flowers…

  • Bloom great in zones 2-9, which means that most of the country can grow them?
  • Have amazing foliage that comes in various colors and can grow up to three feet tall?
  • Have a heart-shaped quality that looks as if it has a drop of blood at the bottom?
  • Thrive in full or partial shade so no direct sunlight is needed for them to grow and thrive?
  • Have the potential to irritate the skin but this can be avoided simply by handling it more carefully?
  • Have leaves that you can cook and eat in the spring?
  • Are part of the poppy family?
  • Are deciduous and therefore discard their leaves at the end of the summer?
  • Are a rich source of nectar and can attract hummingbirds, which are popular with a lot of growers?
  • Are a major food source for animals such as snails, aphids, and the larvae of certain butterfly species?
  • Are fire-resistant and can even tolerate a drought?
  • Are perennial and therefore can survive over two years in the wild?
  • Have roots that have been used for conditions such as bruises and painful sprains as well as insect bites and stomach pain?

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Disguised as delicate ephemeral beauties, Bleeding Hearts are resilient and trouble-free woodland plants that offer sprays of heart-shaped flowers. Perfect for the romantic.

Oft associated with old-fashioned cottage gardens, the Bleeding Heart (Dicentra spectabilis) plant was introduced to England by Robert Fortune when he returned in 1846 from a plant expedition under the aegis of the Royal Horticulture Society to northern China where the plant was widely cultivated. Thank you, Mr. Fortune.

(N.B.: Wondering what plants to pair with Bleeding Hearts in the garden? For our favorite combinations, see Shady Secrets of an Expert Gardener.)

Above: Photograph by K Yamada via Flickr.

Shade-loving, clump-forming woodland perennials that generally grow 2 or 3 feet high, Bleeding Hearts have delicate fern-like leaves and heart-shaped blooms in shades of red, pink, and white in late spring and summer. Hardy in growing zones 4 to 8, their arching stems make excellent cut flowers. Place in one of Alexa’s affordable vase picks: Simple Glass Vases for Under $30.

Above: Bleeding Heart ‘Alba’ (Dicentra spectabilis ‘Alba’) with pure white flowers and light green foliage; $28.17 for a one-gallon pot at Nature Hills Nursery (available seasonally). Photograph by Patrick Standish via Flickr.

Above: Native to the Appalachian Mountains, Fringed Leaf Bleeding Heart (Dicentra eximia) is hardy in zones 3 to 9. It is a compact variety that grows to about 15 inches; $6.49 for a 3-inch pot at Prairie Nursery. Image via New York Metropolitan Flora Project.

For more ideas, see Design Sleuth: The Ultimate Shade Garden and Walk on the Wild Side: A New England Woodland Garden.

Bleeding heart is a lovely woodland plant that has graced prairie gardens since the turn of the last century. The botanical name, Dicentra, is from two Greek words describing the flower: dis (meaning “two”) and kenton, meaning “spurs”. The common name, originating from Chinese folklore, is due to the resemblance of “a drop of blood” formed below the inflated and pouched heart-shaped flower spurs. The flowers are held on graceful arching stems similar to those of Solomon’s seal. It’s also called Dutchman’s breaches, lady’s locket and lady in a bath.

Bleeding heart is best planted in a well drained but humus-rich soil in shade or partial shade. It requires even moisture but does not do well in heavy soils or wet sites. Do not move or disturb them unnecessarily as their roots are brittle. Bleeding heart can be propagated by careful division in early spring or by taking 3-inch long root cuttings.

The genus consists of about 20 species, native to North America and Asia. Only three of these are considered reliably hardy (Zone 3) and are readily available on the Canadian prairies: Dicentra spectabilis, D. exima, and D. formosa.

The common or showy bleeding heart (D. spectabilis) is the showiest of the three with the largest flowers. Native to Siberia, China, Korea, Japan and Manchuria, it was introduced to England by Robert Fortune in 1846. He was the first plant explorer to make extensive use of the terrarium-like Wardian cases when shipping plants home. Only 35 of his 250 plants died on the long voyage from Shanghai.

About 30 inches tall and wide, the individual flowers are deep pink and white and about one inch in diameter. The light green foliage is larger than that of the other species but not as deeply cut. After blooming, the foliage often yellows and dies back, especially if summers are hot and dry. Fill in with annuals or let adjacent plants encroach the space.

Among the cultivars are: ‘Alba’ with white heart-shaped flowers but otherwise similar; ‘Gold Heart’ with yellow foliage and a bit smaller in size; and ‘Valentine’ with red and white flowers and grey-green foliage.

The fern-leafed or fringed bleeding heart (Dicentra exima) is native to eastern North America. The Latin name of the species, exima, means “distinguished.” Only 18 inches in height, the deep rose pink to pink flowers hang from arching, leafless flower stalks. Longer blooming, it has finely dissected grey-green foliage and does not go summer-dormant. It was introduced to Britain in 1812 by John Lyon. A Scot who had been previously employed as a gardener by William Hamilton of Philadelphia, an eminent American botanist and plant collector, Lyon collected in eastern North America.

Among the cultivars of the fringed bleeding heart are: ‘Alba’ with creamy white flowers and light green leaves; ‘Luxuriant’ with cherry red flowers larger than those of the species; ‘Adrian Bloom’ with crimson flowers with grey foliage; and ‘Bountiful’ with rich red flowers.

The western bleeding heart (Dicentra formosa) is native to western North America from California to British Columbia but otherwise similar to D. exima, about 45cm tall with ferny foliage. The species name, formosa, has nothing to do with the island of the same name, but both mean “beautiful”. The cultivar ‘Alba’ is similar with white flowers.

It was introduced to Europe by a Scottish surgeon, Archibald Menzies who collected seeds in Nootka Sound in 1792 that he gave to the Royal Botanic Garden at Kew. In 1835, it made its way back to North America where it was sold in Boston. D. exima and D. formosa hybridize readily and are similar in that neither go dormant in late summer and both have a longer flowering period than D. spectabilis.

Sara is the author of numerous gardening books, among them the revised Creating the Prairie Xeriscape. And with Hugh Skinner: Gardening Naturally – A Chemical-free Handbook for the Prairies; Trees and Shrubs for the Prairies, and Groundcovers & Vines for the Prairies. Expect Fruit for Northern Gardens with Bob Bors in November, 2017.

This column is provided courtesy of the Saskatchewan Perennial Society (SPS; http://www.saskperennial.ca; [email protected]; http://www.facebook.com/saskperennial). Check out our Bulletin Board or Calendar for upcoming garden information sessions, workshops, tours and other events. Got growing questions? Gardenline is here to help! Email [email protected] with your questions or call Helen at 306-966

Propagating Bleeding Hearts : How To Grow More Bleeding Hearts

Few plants match the old-fashioned charm and romantic blossoms of bleeding hearts. These whimsical plants appear in spring in shady to partially sunny locations. As perennials they come back year after year but how to propagate bleeding heart plants? Bleeding heart propagation is easy through seed, cuttings or division. Cuttings and division will give plants truer to the parent plant and a quicker bloom time. These are simple ways to grow more bleeding hearts to share with friends and family.

When to Propagate a Bleeding Heart

With their lacy, fern-like foliage and pillowy, heart-shaped flowers, bleeding heart is one of the champions of the low light landscape. The plants will bloom for years but often flowers slow down as the plant gets older. This is when to propagate a bleeding heart by division. Such activity will rejuvenate the plant while also allowing you to grow more. Division can occur either in fall or in early spring. If dividing in fall, wait until foliage has died back.

You may also choose to propagate the plants with seed but results will be variable and the process much slower. The best time to plant seeds is in late summer. The seeds need a period of cold exposure to break dormancy and release the embryo. You may also choose to plant the seeds in pots and take them indoors, but they will still need several weeks in the freezer before they will germinate.

Some species of bleeding heart will self-sow, so be on the lookout under the parent plant for babies. These can be transplanted once they have two sets of true leaves into a prepared garden bed in partial to full shade. Cuttings should be taken while the plant is actively growing but after it has flowered.

Propagating Bleeding Hearts from Seed

Bleeding heart propagation from seed is fairly straightforward. Lightly pre-moisten the soil in which the seeds will grow. A good potting mixture with plenty of peat and vermiculite will be perfect. You may also sow directly into a prepared garden bed. Plant seeds half as deep as the seed’s width. Cover with soil.

For indoor seeds in pots, wrap the pots in plastic wrap and put the containers in the freezer for up to 6 weeks, then place containers in a warm location to germinate.

Germination usually takes place in a month. Outdoor seeds will not germinate until soil and ambient temperatures warm in spring. Transplant seedlings gently and keep moderately moist until they establish.

How to Propagate Bleeding Heart Plants with Cuttings or Division

Another method of propagating bleeding hearts is through vegetative means. Bleeding hearts react well to division and, in fact, grow much better if divided every 5 years or so. Dig up the plant carefully and use a sharp, clean soil saw to cut the plant in half or thirds. Each portion should be planted in loose soil or in containers and kept moderately moist.

For cuttings, you may take a portion of a root. Before taking root cuttings, water the plant thoroughly the night before. Excavate carefully to find a good, healthy thick root. Rinse the root clean and look for growth nodes. Take a section of the root that includes at least two nodes. Lay the cutting on pre-moistened horticultural sand and cover it with an inch (2.54 cm.) more of the material. Keep the cutting moist in low light. Usually, in 4 to 6 weeks you can expect some sprouting.

How to Grow a Bleeding Heart Plant in a Container

Bleeding hearts are beautiful plants that blossom in the early spring. They produce delicate heart shaped flowers that dangle on a pendant stalk.

The bleeding heart, scientifically known as Lamprocapnos spectabilis, is a shrub that is native to the understory of forests. While they are often planted in perennial garden beds, bleeding hearts are also an ideal plant for an early spring container display.

Here are a few considerations when working with bleeding heart plants.

HAVE A Plan

Bleeding hearts prefer cool moist environments and will pair well with ferns. When including these plants in a container arrangement it is important to plan ahead because bleeding hearts go dormant in late summer.

To maintain interest in the container arrangement, plant them with late bloomers that have attractive foliage such as hostas. The container can also be moved and stored in a shady space once the plant becomes dormant.

Container

Be sure to choose a large container for your bleeding hearts as they can become a substantial plant and they will need plenty of space to grow. Consider using the species Dicentra formosa in containers because of its more compact size. This species only grows from 9 inches to 1.5 feet tall. A bleeding heart can grow four to five years in a large container before needing to be divided and repotted.

Water and Potting Mix

Bleeding hearts prefer a very rich potting mix that has plenty of organic material. It is important to remember you are trying to mimic its natural environment, a forest floor. Include some perlite or coarse sand in the potting mix to ensure it allows enough drainage. The soil should be kept moist but not soggy. Bleeding hearts like moisture and humidity, but can easily succumb to root rot. Be sure to be diligent about watering on hot days as this will help bleeding hearts manage the heat.

Light

Place the container in a space that is lightly shaded or that has bright filtered sunlight, some morning sun exposure will be okay. The pink flowered varieties of bleeding heart can tolerate more direct sun than the white flowered varieties.

Fertilizer

The plants can be fertilized once a month during the growing season with a diluted liquid fertilizer. Alternatively, you can use a slow release granular fertilizer or compost.

Dormancy

Once the plant has finished flowering, sometime during late spring or early summer, it will begin to go dormant. The leaves will turn a yellowish color and some may fall off. At this point, you can trim back the shrub to give it shape and help it grow fuller the next season. You may also want to consider moving it if it is prominently displayed.

Outdoor Container Arrangement

Bleeding hearts are an attractive container plant. Use them to take advantage of the cool wet spring. Bleeding hearts will perform well when you need an extra dash of color before summer blossoms appear. Consider planting them in a rustic outdoor planter like those from the Urban Garden Accent collection to accentuate the plant’s cottage style charm. Their unique flowers and lacy foliage are the perfect spring time addition to outdoor patios, entryways, and sidewalks.

Featured image by LongitudeLatitude

Bleeding Heart Plant Stock Photos and Images

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  • Bleeding Heart Plant
  • A macro shot of some bleeding heart plant blooms.
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  • High Angle View Of Bleeding Heart Plant In Back Yard
  • Pink Bleeding Heart Plant
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  • Flowers of the bleeding heart plant, Dicentra spectabilis
  • Bleeding heart flowers growing on plant in spring garden.
  • Lamprocapnos spectabilis. Bleeding heart flowers
  • White bleeding heart plant, heart shaped flowers
  • The heart shaped flowers of the bleeding heart plant Dicentra spectabilis in a garden
  • delicate shade loving plant that produces tiny little blossoms that look like hearts. A Bleeding heart plant, one of my favorites
  • Bleeding Heart plant or Lamprocapnos spectabilis (formerly Dicentra Spectabilis) is a species of flowering plant in the poppy family Papaveraceae.
  • bleeding heart plant
  • Bleeding heart Plant Lamprocapnos spectabilis
  • Heart shaped flowers of the Bleeding Heart plant dangling on its branch. Done is sepia tone
  • Dicentra spectabilis ( Bleeding Heart Dicentra or Dutchman’s Breeches ), UK
  • Bleeding heart plant / Dicentra spectabilis
  • Closeup of a stem with delicate pink heart shaped flowers on Bleeding Heart plant. Scientific name of this perennial is Lamprocapnos spectabilis.
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  • A macro shot of some bleeding heart plant blooms.
  • White flowers dicentra with dew drops. Selective focus.
  • Dicentra spectabilis, or bleeding heart plant, flowering in the Spring in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (also known as Lamprocapnos spectabilis)
  • An arch of pink bleeding heart (dicentra spectabilis) in flower, England, UK – summer
  • Lamprocapnos spectabilis or bleeding heart plant close up
  • White bleeding heart flowers, Dicentra spectabilis, on an aching stem
  • Old-fashioned bleeding heart plant – closeup. Lamprocapnos spectabilis
  • Blooming Bleeding Heart Plant is a herbaceous plant of the Dicentra Spectabilis family of Papaveraceae. Pink flowers with a white tip, beautiful carve
  • White bleeding heart plant, heart shaped flowers
  • The heart shaped flowers of the bleeding heart plant Dicentra spectabilis in a garden
  • A stem of a bleeding heart plant with multiple flowers photographed against weathered wood boards in natural light.
  • Bleeding Heart Plant, Dicentra spectabilis
  • Bleeding Heart at Van Dusen
  • Bleeding heart Plant Lamprocapnos spectabilis
  • Bright pink heart shaped flowers of the Bleeding Heart plant
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  • A macro shot of the blooms of a bleeding heart plant.
  • Pink flowers dicentra with dew drops.
  • Stem of white bleeding heart plant in springtime
  • An arch of pink bleeding heart ( Lamprocapnos spectabilis,) in flower, England, UK – summer
  • Lamprocapnos spectabilis or bleeding heart plant close up
  • Green leaves of a bleeding-heart plant with raindrops
  • Old-fashioned bleeding heart plant – closeup. Lamprocapnos spectabilis
  • Blooming Bleeding Heart Plant beautiful pink white flowers Dicentra Spectabilis. Pharmaceutical garden in Moscow, exhibition of decorative flowers Red
  • Bleeding heart (Dicentra spectabilis) in flower. 1855 illustration of a bleeding heart plant in flower, entitled ‘Dicentre eclatant (Fumariacees)’.
  • The heart shaped flowers of the bleeding heart plant Dicentra spectabilis in a garden
  • Teddy bear at garden wear traditional german bavarian clothes and hat, shows inflorescence of bleeding heart plant with many lovely blossoms (copy spa
  • Dicentra spectabilis – Bleeding Heart
  • An aged sundial sits on bark mulch with bleeding heart plant nearby
  • Bleeding heart Plant Lamprocapnos spectabilis
  • Rain collected into one large drop between the leaves of a Bleeding Heart plant
  • Watery heart (Lamprocapnos spectabilis)
  • Bleeding Hearts
  • Flowering pink bleeding heart plant in bloom.
  • A female hand holding a delicate pink and white bloom from a bleeding heart plant.
  • A macro shot of the blooms of a bleeding heart plant.
  • Heart shaped fuschia flowers. Dicentra spectabilis or broken heart in the garden
  • Lamprocapnos spectabilis – bleeding heart flower.
  • An arch of pink bleeding heart (Lamprocapnos spectabilis) in flower in an English garden border on a warm summer day, UK Dicentra
  • Capture my heart
  • Green leaf of a bleeding-heart plant with raindrops
  • These are beautiful pink Bleeding Heart flowers.
  • Lamprocapnos spectabilis. Bleeding heart flowers in an English garden.
  • Close up of the spring flowers of the bleeding heart, Lamprocapnos spectablis
  • The heart shaped flowers of the bleeding heart plant Dicentra spectabilis in a garden
  • Bleeding Heart flower
  • Dicentra spectabilis – Bleeding Heart
  • closeup of Bleeding Heart flowers on black background
  • Bleeding heart Plant Lamprocapnos spectabilis
  • Bleeding heart (Lamprocapnos spectabilis) flowers. Raceme of pink and white flowers of plant in the poppy family (Papaveraceae)
  • bleeding heart flower
  • seed – bleeding heart
  • Bleeding Heart flower (Dicentra spectabilis) in the spring garden.
  • Pacific bleeding heart, western bleending heart (Dicentra formosa), blooming
  • A macro shot of the blooms of a bleeding heart plant.
  • Bleeding heart flowers on dark background. Bleeding heart is a flowering plant in the poppy family.
  • Beautiful red bleeding-heart flowering tropical plant on a sunny day in Darwin, Australia
  • Dicentra Spectabilis Alba,also called Lamprocapnos spectabilis ‘Alba’. flowers in full bloom in May, UK
  • Bleeding Heart with arching stems of pink and white heart-shaped flowers.
  • Green leaves of a bleeding-heart plant with raindrops
  • Beautiful bleeding heart (Lamprocapnos spectabilis) flowers in spring.
  • Lamprocapnos spectabilis. Bleeding heart flowers in an English garden.
  • Pink and white Trailing Fuchsia plant in a basket.
  • The heart shaped flowers of the bleeding heart plant Dicentra spectabilis in a garden
  • A row of bleeding heart flowers, photographed at the New York botanical gardens.
  • Dicentra spectabilis – Bleeding Heart
  • Beautiful bleeding heart blossoms in a perrenial garden.
  • Bleeding heart Plant Lamprocapnos spectabilis
  • Lamprocapnos Spectabilis, Bleeding Heart
  • bleeding heart flower
  • Bleeding Heart flowers
  • bleeding heart ,
  • Close up of bleeding heart or Asian bleeding heart flowers blooming in spring, Vancouver, BC, Canada
  • A macro shot of the blooms of a bleeding heart plant.
  • Bleeding heart flowers on dark background. Bleeding heart is a flowering plant in the poppy family.
  • Beautiful red bleeding-heart flowering tropical plant on a sunny day in Darwin, Australia
  • Dicentra Spectabilis Alba,also called Lamprocapnos spectabilis ‘Alba’. flowers in full bloom in May, UK

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