Bald cypress tree michigan

Cypress Tree Leaves Stock Photos and Images

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  • Close up of Cypress tree leaves
  • details of small delicate leaves of conifer cypress tree with mini seed cones amongst dark depths of foliage
  • Close-up of Cypress Tree leaves.
  • Close-up of Bald Cypress leaves (Taxodium distichum)
  • Cypress tree branches and leaves Germany
  • Early foliage of what is believed to by a Cypress tree – not fully identified but perhaps Chamaecyparis obtusa.
  • Taxodium distichum, Swamp Cypress, in autumn
  • USA, Texas, Cypress tree with golden leaves in Frio River
  • Cypress tree in a village cemetery near Chinon Indre et Loire
  • Taxodium distichum. Bald cypress tree in Autumn.
  • Evergreen cypress tree leaves and branch, cupressaceae lycopodiodies
  • Red Fir Tree flowers on cypress tree
  • Beavers Bend State Park is a 1,300 acres state park located near Broken Bow, Oklahoma
  • Bald Cypress tree looking upward, Taxodium distichum.
  • Autumn colour in the needle like leaves of the Chinese swamp cypress, Glyptostrobus pensilis
  • Close-up of foliage of bald cypress trees (Taxodium distichum) in the swamp bogs at Sam Houston Jones State, Louisiana.
  • Strangely spirally cut small Cypress or Cupressus evergreen tree with light green scale like leaves surrounded with uncut grass and hedge
  • Dorsal view of Juniper Shieldbug final instar nymph (Cyphostethus tristriatus) perched on cypress tree leaves. Tipperary, Ireland
  • Cypress tree with flowers or fruits, cones.
  • Cypress tree foliage in spring, Northlake Nature Center, Mandeville, Louisiana, USA
  • details of small delicate leaves of conifer cypress tree with mini seed cones amongst dark depths of foliage
  • A red-bellied woodpecker perching in a tree.
  • Lawson’s Cypress, Chamaecyparis lawsoniana Leaves
  • Cypress tree branches and leaves Germany
  • Bald Cypress Tree Taxodium distichum Florida USA
  • Chamaecyparis lawsoniana ‘Lutea Nana’. Lawson’s cypress ‘Lutea Nana’ tree in autumn
  • USA, Texas, Cypress tree with golden leaves in Frio River
  • Cypress cedar plant with seed cones surrounded with dark green scale like leaves
  • Taxodium distichum. Bald cypress tree in Autumn.
  • Cupressus leylandii or Leylan cypress fruits close up
  • Christmas floral frame, web banner. Border of green cypress, juniperus and berry eucalyptus tree branches isolated on white table background. Winter
  • Beavers Bend State Park is a 1,300 acres state park located near Broken Bow, Oklahoma
  • Swamp Cypress in Autumn, Botanic Gardens, Hagley Park, Christchurch, Canterbury, South Island, New Zealand
  • Autumn colour in the needle like leaves of the Chinese swamp cypress, Glyptostrobus pensilis
  • Tule tree, or Tree of Life, the widest tree in the world, about 1500 years old, located in Oaxaca, Mexico
  • Very small Cypress or Cupressus evergreen tree with light green scale like leaves planted next to wire fence in local public park
  • Echte Sumpfzypresse, Sumpfeibe, Taxodium distichum, bald cypress, baldcypress, bald-cypress, cypress, southern-cypress, white-cy
  • A cypress tree, Taxodium distichum, with Common Dogwood ,Cornus sanguinea ‘Magic Flame’, planted around the base of the trunk.
  • Leaves of the Cypress Tree
  • details of small delicate leaves of conifer cypress tree with mini seed cones amongst dark depths of foliage
  • Bald cypress trees growing in Lake Marion.
  • set of 6 painted green cypress
  • The cone and leaves of a Bald Cypress tree growing in woodland in the UK.
  • Swamp Cypress tree with light green feathery foliage in an English garden in June
  • Cupressus arizonica var. glabra ‘Blue Ice’. Smooth Arizona cypress ‘Blue Ice’ tree at RHS Wisley Gardens, Surrey, England
  • USA, Texas, Cypress tree with golden leaves in Frio River
  • Tree roots, mosses and fall leaves, Jizo-in Rinzai Buddhist temple, Kyoto, Japan
  • Taxodium distichum. Bald cypress tree in Autumn.
  • Cupressus leylandii or Leylan cypress fruits close up
  • Pond-cypress cones and leaves (Taxodium ascendens)
  • Beavers Bend State Park is a 1,300 acres state park located near Broken Bow, Oklahoma
  • Swamp Cypress in Autumn, Botanic Gardens, Hagley Park, Christchurch, Canterbury, South Island, New Zealand
  • Swamp cypress, Taxodium distichum, and reflection in red autumn foliage by the side of a small lake
  • Expansive branches of Tule Tree, tree of life, widest tree in the world, about 1500 years old, located in Oaxaca, Mexico
  • Dense cobweb holding multiple dark brown fallen leaves mixed with green Cypress or Cupressus evergreen tree branches in local public park
  • Echte Sumpfzypresse, Sumpfeibe, Taxodium distichum, bald cypress, baldcypress, bald-cypress, cypress, southern-cypress, white-cy
  • A pair of cypresses (Cupressus sempervirens) in a Tuscan property (Montepulciano – Tuscany). The cypress is a characteristic tree of Tuscany.
  • Leaves of the Cypress Tree
  • details of small delicate leaves of conifer cypress tree with mini seed cones amongst dark depths of foliage
  • Cypress
  • Close up of cypress berries on a branch
  • Hinoki False Cypress Bonsai Tree -This Cypress tree is a favorite of Japanese horticulturists who make miniature versions of this plant in containers.
  • Swamp Cypress tree with light green feathery foliage in an English garden in June
  • Cupressus arizonica var. glabra ‘Blue Ice’. Smooth Arizona cypress ‘Blue Ice’ tree at RHS Wisley Gardens, Surrey, England
  • USA, Texas, Cypress tree with golden leaves in Frio River
  • Swamp Cypress, Taxodium distichum tree growing in parkland showing autumn brown foliage, Shepperton Surrey England UK
  • Taxodium distichum var. imbricarium ‘Nutans’. Bald cypress tree in Autumn.
  • Cupressus leylandii or Leylan cypress fruits close up
  • Pond-cypress cones and leaves (Taxodium ascendens)
  • Beavers Bend State Park is a 1,300 acres state park located near Broken Bow, Oklahoma
  • Swamp Cypress in Autumn, Botanic Gardens, Hagley Park, Christchurch, Canterbury, South Island, New Zealand
  • Swamp cypress, Taxodium distichum, and reflection in red autumn foliage by the side of a small lake
  • Expansive branches of Tule Tree, tree of life, widest tree in the world, about 1500 years old, located in Oaxaca, Mexico
  • Cypress or Cupressus evergreen tree with light green scale like leaves surrounded with uncut grass and other trees in background on warm sunny summer
  • Bald Cypress (Taxodium distichum) on the Wakulla River, Wakulla Springs State Park, FL, USA
  • Image of light green cypress tree wonderful color
  • Leaves of the Cypress Tree as Black and White
  • details of small delicate leaves of conifer cypress tree with mini seed cones amongst dark depths of foliage
  • Cypress
  • Close up of cypress berries on a branch
  • A branch of evergreen gradient cypress tree with small cones.
  • Swamp Cypress tree with light green feathery foliage in an English garden in June
  • Cupressus arizonica var. glabra ‘Blue Ice’. Smooth Arizona cypress ‘Blue Ice’ tree at RHS Wisley Gardens, Surrey, England
  • Juniper Shieldbug (Cyphostethus tristriatus) perched on leaves of Lawson’s cypress tree. Tipperary, Ireland
  • Swamp Cypress, Taxodium distichum tree growing in parkland showing autumn brown foliage, Shepperton Surrey England UK
  • Taxodium distichum var. imbricarium ‘Nutans’. Bald cypress tree in Autumn.
  • A close up of the leaves of a bald cypress(Taxodium distichum) in autumn
  • White Ibis perched on cypress tree limb in winter, Gainesville, Florida, USA.
  • Beavers Bend State Park is a 1,300 acres state park located near Broken Bow, Oklahoma
  • Palm tree on a background of cypress trees in the subtropical park
  • Cypress tree trunks and their water reflections in the swamps near New Orleans, Louisiana during the autumn season.
  • Mingo National Wildlife Refuge
  • Cypress or Cupressus small evergreen tree with light green scale like leaves planted in decorative stone flower pot in local public park
  • Lemon Cypress plant isolated on white background
  • Image of light green cypress tree wonderful color
  • A threesome of cypresses (Cupressus sempervirens) in a property of San Gimignano (Tuscany – Italy). A characteristic signature of Tuscan landscape.
  • details of small delicate leaves of conifer cypress tree
  • Cypress
  • Close up of cypress berries on a branch
  • Tree Chamaecyparis Pisifera

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SelecTree: Tree Detail

General Notes

Good wind screen in coastal areas. Develops a wind-sculptured form. Becomes susceptible to coryneum canker in inland areas.

Cal-IPC (California Invasive Plant Council) states this tree, native to the Monterey area, will invade coastal prarie, desert scrub and riparian areas.

Has fragrant Leaf.

Native to California’s Monterey Peninsula.

A Hesperocyparis macrocarpa in Pescadero is registered as a California Big Tree. It measures 102 feet high, with a trunk circumference of 588 inches and a crown spread of 111 feet.

Family: Cupressaceae

Synonyms

Cupressus macrocarpa
Cupressus lambertiana

Tree Characteristics

Erect or Spreading with a High Canopy.

Rounded, Umbrella or Vase Shape.

Has Evergreen foliage.

Height: 40 – 65 feet.

Growth Rate: 36 Inches per Year.

Longevity 40 to 150 years.

Leaves Scalelike, Medium Green, No Change, Evergreen.

Flowers Inconspicuous. . Has separate male and female flowers on the same tree (monoecious).

Brown, Gray or Mostly Green Cone, Medium (0.50 – 1.50 inches), fruiting in Fall Wildlife use it.

Bark Dark Gray or Red Brown, Furrowed or Scaly.

Shading Capacity Rated as Dense in Leaf.

Litter Issue is Dry Fruit.

Cupressus sempervirens

Linnaeus 1753, p. 1002

Common names

Mediterranean cypress, common cypress, Italian cypress.

Taxonomic notes

Synonymy (Farjon 2005):

Many authors have recognized that the species broadly assumes two growth habits, fastigiate or horizontal, and have assigned subspecific taxonomic ranks on that basis. It is widely thought that only the horizontal form predates human activity, with the fastigiate form having a horticultural origin dating to early historic or prehistoric times. Thus it is a cultivar, not a variety or subspecies. There is also some question as to whether the fastigiate form is strictly heritable; it appears that “horizontal” specimens may arise from “fastigiate” stock (Stankov 1999, Farjon 2005).

Description

“A tree 20-30 m in height. Trunk straight. Bark thin, smooth and gray for quite a long time, later becoming gray-brown and longitudinally furrowed. Shoots radiating in all directions, about 1 mm in diameter, round or quadrangular. Leaves scale-like, decussate, small, ovate, obtuse, dark green, with a dorsal gland in the shape of longitudinal furrow. Flowers appear early in spring. Cones on short stalk, glossy, brown to gray, pendulous, globose to elliptic, 2-3 cm long, composed of 8 to 14 opposite scales, with concave to flat apophysis, with a small central umbo and a point. Seeds 8-20 to each fertile scale, brown, flattened, minute, without resin blisters, narrowly winged. Cotyledons usually 2” (Vidakovic 1991).

Cones begin to open in September. After shedding the seeds, the cone persists on the tree for several years because, as with many species of Cupressus, C. sempervirens displays varying levels of serotiny: cones may remain unopened on the tree for many years until a fire induces them to open and subsequently to shed viable seed (Vidakovic 1991).

Distribution and Ecology

Due to the long horticultural history of this species in the Mediterranean region, its original native distribution is unclear; perhaps the question is pointless, as widespread human alteration of natural environments in the region has occurred across a time span featuring substantial climate changes. Various authorities attribute its native distribution to Greece (some Aegaean islands), Turkey, Crete, N Iran, Lebanon, and Syria; and perhaps Cyprus (which would only be appropriate). In N Africa, it may be native to Tunisia and N Libya. Currently, it can be found growing in cultivation or locally naturalized throughout the entire Mediterranean region (Vidakovic 1991, Dinets 1998, Stankov 1999).

It is tolerant to temperatures as low as -20°C (Tucovic 1956, Raddi and Panconesi 1989), but Bannister and Neuner (2001) rate it hardy to Zone 7 (cold hardiness limit between -17.7°C and -12.2°C). “This species is also tolerant to drought, air currents, wind dust, sleet and atmospheric gases. Its root system is well developed. It succeeds on acid and alkaline soils” (Vidakovic 1991).

Big tree

The largest reported specimens within the species’ native range can be found in the Lefka Ori (Greek for White Mountains) of Western Crete. In the National Park “Samaria Gorge” trees grow to approximately 30-33 m high and 1 m dbh. These trees may have been planted in ancient times. In native stands a big tree would be some 20-25 m tall and 50 cm dbh (Stankov 1999). The largest trees are probably old horticultural specimens that have received ample water and nutrients. For example, a dbh of 182 cm and height of 15 m are reported for a tree in Campestri, Tuscany (Corpo Forestale Della Stato 1999), and another Tuscan tree (Firenze, FI: Villa della Petraia) has been measured at 30 m tall and 172 cm dbh (Stankov 1999). Similarly, the tallest specimens appear to be in cultivation; a tree 38.1 m tall has been measured at the Casa de Labrador in Aranjuez, Spain (Árboles Singulares de Madrid 2013).

Oldest

“The species attains up to 1000 years of age” (Vidakovic 1991).

Dendrochronology

In Italy, its use has been explored for both archeological dating and dendroclimatic reconstruction (Corona 1970). It has frequently been used in archeological dating in Israel (e.g., Liphschitz et al. 1981).

Ethnobotany

A common ornamental, planted around the world. The “ood is durable and easily worked” (Vidakovic 1991), and the species has been planted for timber production, particularly in South America, Africa, and New Zealand (Stankov 1999).

Observations

See Big tree, above. Can also be seen in nearly any subtropical or temperate arboretum.

Remarks

The epithet sempervirens means “always green.” This epithet has only been applied to three conifers, indicating that conifer taxonomists are more imaginative than they are usually given credit for.

“A full crop of seed occurs every year. Germination energy is high and germination lasts for several years. Due to aromatic oils, the seeds are fragrant, especially when crushed. In 1 kg there are up to 150,000 seeds… Fast-growing when young, it begins producing seed in its tenth year. In addition to seeds, it may be propagated by grafting, cuttings and coppice shoots” (Vidakovic 1991).

Citations

Corona, E. 1970. Valore dendrocronologico del cipresso sempreverde. Monti e Boschi 21(5): 21-25 .

Dinets, Vladimir. E-mail, 1998.01.12.

Stankov, Hristo Dimitrov. E-mail, 30-Jun-1999.

Tucovic, A. 1956. Cempres – Cupressus sempervirens L. u Beogradu. Sumarstvo 1-2: 45-52.

See also

Elwes and Henry 1906-1913 at the Biodiversity Heritage Library. This series of volumes, privately printed, provides some of the most engaging descriptions of conifers ever published. Although they only treat species cultivated in the U.K. and Ireland, and the taxonomy is a bit dated, still these accounts are thorough, treating such topics as species description, range, varieties, exceptionally old or tall specimens, remarkable trees, and cultivation. Despite being over a century old, they are generally accurate, and are illustrated with some remarkable photographs and lithographs.

Farjon (2005) provides a detailed account, with illustrations.

Baldcypress

March 11, 2016

Taxodium distichum

  • Height: 55’
  • Spread: 35’
  • Site characteristics: Variety of soils; sand to clays to muck and peat as long as moisture is adequate
  • Zone: 5a – 9a
  • Wet/dry: Tolerates wet soils, intermittent flooding and moderate drought once established
  • Native range: Southeast United States Salt: Moderate tolerance
  • pH: 5.0 – 7.4
  • Ornamental characteristics: Feather-like foliage with copper fall color.
  • Shape: Columnar when young; wide spreading, open with age.
  • Other: Late to leaf out Cultivars: ‘Shawnee Brave’ – narrower, reportedly tolerates high pH soils, Zone 5b
  • Additional: Transplant in spring, slow to recover from transplanting
  • Pests: Generally free of problems


Photos: Bert Cregg, MSU


Photo: Jesse Saylor, MSU


Map indicates species’ native range. Source: U.S. Geological Survey.

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Baldcypress

Baldcypress

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Baldcypress foliage

Baldcypress foliage

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Baldcypress

Baldcypress

(Photo courtesy of NetPS Plant Finder)

Height: 70 feet

Spread: 30 feet

Sunlight:

Hardiness Zone: 4

Description:

An interesting tall, pyramidal deciduous conifer characteristic of the South but actually quite hardy; narrow bright green leaves turn golden brown in fall, a broad trunk and odd knee-like protrusions at the base when grown in standing water; adaptable

Ornamental Features

Baldcypress has emerald green foliage throughout the season. The ferny bipinnately compound leaves turn an outstanding orange in the fall. Neither the flowers nor the fruit are ornamentally significant. The shaggy indian red bark adds an interesting dimension to the landscape.

Landscape Attributes

Baldcypress is a deciduous tree with a strong central leader and a distinctive and refined pyramidal form. It lends an extremely fine and delicate texture to the landscape composition which can make it a great accent feature on this basis alone.

This is a relatively low maintenance tree, and is best pruned in late winter once the threat of extreme cold has passed. Deer don’t particularly care for this plant and will usually leave it alone in favor of tastier treats. It has no significant negative characteristics.

Baldcypress is recommended for the following landscape applications;

  • Shade
  • Vertical Accent

Planting & Growing

Baldcypress will grow to be about 70 feet tall at maturity, with a spread of 30 feet. It has a high canopy with a typical clearance of 7 feet from the ground, and should not be planted underneath power lines. As it matures, the lower branches of this tree can be strategically removed to create a high enough canopy to support unobstructed human traffic underneath. It grows at a medium rate, and under ideal conditions can be expected to live for 80 years or more.

This tree should only be grown in full sunlight. It is an amazingly adaptable plant, tolerating both dry conditions and even some standing water. It is not particular as to soil type, but has a definite preference for acidic soils, and is subject to chlorosis (yellowing) of the leaves in alkaline soils. It is somewhat tolerant of urban pollution. Consider applying a thick mulch around the root zone in winter to protect it in exposed locations or colder microclimates. This species is native to parts of North America.

Plant of the Week: Bald Cypress

The University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture does not promote, support or recommend plants featured in “Plant of the Week.” Please consult your local Extension office for plants suitable for your region.

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Bald Cypress
Latin: Taxodium distichum

Looking out my office window every morning I enjoy the majesty of a full-grown bald cypress that demonstrates mature trees, as well as people, spread out as they get older.

Bald cypress, Taxodium distichum, is familiar to all southerners because it grows along waterways and bayous in soft, moist ground throughout the region. Its range is from Virginia into southern Illinois and Indiana, then westward to the southern hill country of Texas. It never gets far from slow moving, shallow rivers.

Bald cypress maintains a tolerance of cold and grows as far north a Maine and Michigan when used in the landscape.

Leaves of bald cypress are small and needle-like and produced in random arrangement along the small branches of the limbs. In late summer, they begin to turn brown but are not shed until after the first frost.

Young trees grow ramrod straight and form narrow pyramids that have the traditional Christmas tree shape of most young conifers. They usually top out at between 90 and 120 feet on moist ground, 60 feet on dry sites.

Bald cypress 800 to 1,200 years old, while certainly rare, are known. Because they were in inaccessible sites in the middle of a swamp, large scale commercial logging did not begin much before 1880. Before that the only trees cut, some with trunks 8 feet through, were along waterways.

But loggers soon learned that 80 percent of the bald cypress logs full of sap were “sinkers,” and they ended up embedded in the mud along the side of the river. Bald cypress wood is incredibly durable and will resist decay for centuries if not exposed to oxygen. This submerged wood is now being reclaimed from southern river beds and being used for fine cabinetry.

David Stahle, a UofA geographer who studies climate change using tree ring dating methods, has used bald cypress cores from standing and submerged trees to look at the climatic record for the past 2,000 years.

In one of his most interesting studies, he demonstrated that the 116 settlers that disappeared without a trace from Roanoke Island in 1587 had the misfortune of trying to establish a new colony in the midst of the worst drought the region had experienced in 800 years.

Standing cypress is one of the best anchored trees in our native woodlands. Hurricanes along the southeastern coast will blow pines down in wide swaths, leaving the fat trunks of bald cypress jutting skyward in a tangle of destruction. This good anchorage, even though embedded in mud, is due to the tangle of roots and “knees” at the base of the trees.

Knees were once thought to be important in oxygen exchange for the roots but this notion has been discredited because researchers have cut away knees and trees have suffered no ill effects. Knees form only in water or in saturated ground, and are not present when trees grow in upland sites.

Looking at the swamps where bald cypress grow, the erroneous conclusion is often reached that they must be planted in wet sites. Bald cypress, while it needs standing water or saturated ground for seed germination, is drought tolerant once established.

Container grown trees or year old seedlings are best used when planting bald cypress in the landscape. They look most at home when planted in irregular groups of five or more such that the length of the planting is greater than the mature height of the trees. Young trees grow rapidly and usually average 2 feet or more of growth a year.

By: Gerald Klingaman, retired
Extension Horticulturist – Ornamentals
Extension News – February 8, 2002

The University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture does not maintain lists of retail outlets where these plants can be purchased. Please check your local nursery or other retail outlets to ask about the availability of these plants for your growing area.

Bald Cypress

The name “Bald cypress” comes from their historical tendency to be among the first trees in the South to lose their leaves in the fall, hence being “bald” before many other trees. They are also the last to bud in the spring, hence being “bald” for longer than many other trees as well! This is particularly unusual when considering that most conifers are evergreen, while bald cypresses are therefore deciduous.

Their other nicknames come from the other characteristics of the tree. The term “Taxodium” is Greek for “yew-like,” a group of trees prized for their hardwood. Cypress is also known colloquially as the “wood eternal,” because its particular kind of hardwood is particularly resistant to decay. Other nicknames include “Gulf Cypress” because of its location along the Gulf Coast, “Red Cypress,” “Yellow Cyprus,” “White Cyprus,” “Swamp Cypress” because of its preferred location in swampy floodplain regions, and “Southern Cypress” because of its distribution across the American south-east.

They are useful for habitat creation for many species. The seeds are eaten by squirrels, wood ducks, evening grosbeaks, and wild turkeys. The characteristic “knees” of the bald cypress, when they begin to rot, as used as nesting cavities by warblers. Bald eagles and osprey nest in their branches, and catfish will spawn beneath the logs when submerged.

For humans, they are most useful in nature as a means of trapping sediment, soaking up floodwaters and slowing their onset, as well as trapping pollutants and preventing them from spreading. This is in part due to their preferred location – in the swampy, wet “floodplain” regions of nearby rivers and lakes.

Outside of their presence in nature, they are used often in construction because of their aforementioned hardwood status and resistance to decay. They were therefore used in modern times in heavy construction that had to withstand the forces of nature – such as bridges, warehouses, docks, and bridges. In previous centuries, the indigenous Seminoles used it for making canoes, houses, and other ceremonial objects; the indigenous Choctaw used the bark of the tree for rope and string.

Despite its historical use in construction, they are no longer harvested for their timber because they are slow-growing and previous logging has drastically reduced their numbers. Their natural locations in wetlands also make logging more difficult.

Fun Fact: The bald cypress is the state tree of Louisiana!

Author Fun Fact: During the childhood of one of the authors of this page, who hails from North Carolina, this tree was synonymous with the northeastern part of the state, known as the Great Dismal Swamp. The pneumatophore knees of the tree give the area a particularly swampy and ethereal look, in part leading to the “Dismal” part of the “Dismal Swamp” name.

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