Are daisies in season?

Common Daisy Leaves Stock Photos and Images

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  • common daisy, lawn daisy, English daisy (Bellis perennis), leaf rosette, Germany
  • Three flowers of the common lawn weed Bellis perennis with floiage grwing in a lawn
  • lovely english daisy fine art photography Jane Ann Butler Photography JABP319
  • common daisy, lawn daisy, English daisy (Bellis perennis), leaf rosette, Germany
  • Agrostemma githago, Corncockle, common
  • Common Daisy, Lawn Daisy or English Daisy leaves (Bellis perennis), medicinal plant
  • Gänseblümchen, Ausdauerndes Gänseblümchen, Mehrjähriges Gänseblümchen, Maßliebchen, Tausendschön, Bellis perennis, English Daisy, common daisy, lawn d
  • Small weed patch of Common Daisy / Bellis perennis on bare ground. Daisy once used as medicinal plant in herbal remedies, and young leaves also eaten.
  • Common Daisy, Lawn Daisy or English Daisy flowers and leaves (Bellis perennis), medicinal plant
  • Gänseblümchen, Ausdauerndes Gänseblümchen, Mehrjähriges Gänseblümchen, Maßliebchen, Tausendschön, Bellis perennis, English Daisy, common daisy, lawn d
  • common daisy growing in autumn. Worksop, Notts, England Bellis perennis
  • Common Daisy, Lawn Daisy or English Daisy flower and leaves (Bellis perennis), medicinal plant
  • Gänseblümchen, Ausdauerndes Gänseblümchen, Mehrjähriges Gänseblümchen, Maßliebchen, Tausendschön, Bellis perennis, English Daisy, common daisy, lawn d
  • common daisy, lawn daisy, English daisy (Bellis perennis), leaf rosette, Germany
  • Common Daisy, Lawn Daisy or English Daisy flowers and leaves (Bellis perennis), medicinal plant
  • Gänseblümchen, Ausdauerndes Gänseblümchen, Mehrjähriges Gänseblümchen, Maßliebchen, Tausendschön, Bellis perennis, English Daisy, common daisy, lawn d
  • common daisy, lawn daisy, English daisy (Bellis perennis), leaf rosettes, Germany
  • Common Daisy, Lawn Daisy or English Daisy flowers and leaves (Bellis perennis), medicinal plant
  • Bellis perennis (common daisy, lawn daisy or English daisy) flowers and buds, green leaves background, soft blurry bokeh, top view
  • Common Daisy growing in early spring, UK
  • Common Daisy, Lawn Daisy or English Daisy (Bellis perennis), medicinal plant
  • Bellis perennis (common daisy, lawn daisy or English daisy) flowers, green leaves background, soft blurry shadows bokeh, top view
  • Common daisy in mown grass in spring sunshine, England.
  • Common Daisy, Lawn Daisy or English Daisy (Bellis perennis), medicinal plant
  • Bellis perennis (common daisy, lawn daisy or English daisy) two flowers and buds, green leaves background, soft blurry shadows bokeh, top view
  • Common daisy in mown grass in spring sunshine, England.
  • Common daisy flower bed.
  • Common Daisy, Bellis perennis, flower, UK
  • Common daisy in mown grass in spring sunshine, England.
  • Common daisy flower bed.
  • Common Daisy, Bellis perennis, flower, UK
  • Common daisy in mown grass in spring sunshine, England.
  • Inflorescence of Common Daisy, Lawn Daisy or English Daisy (Bellis perennis)
  • Common Daisy, Bellis perennis, flower, UK
  • Common daisy in mown grass in spring sunshine, England.
  • Common Daisy, Bellis perennis, flower, UK
  • Little ox-eye daisy, oxeye daisy or dog daisy, in the green grass in autumn with yellow leaves
  • Common daisy in mown grass in spring sunshine, England.
  • Multiple Common daisy or Bellis perennis or English daisy or Meadow daisy or Lawn daisy herbaceous perennial plants with pure white petals
  • Little ox-eye daisy, oxeye daisy or dog daisy, in the green grass in autumn with yellow leaves, vertical
  • Common daisy in mown grass in spring sunshine, England.
  • Small bunch of Common daisy or Bellis perennis or English daisy or Meadow daisy or Lawn daisy herbaceous perennial plants with pink to red flowers
  • Wiesen-Margerite, Wiesen-Wucherblume, Margerite, Margarite, frische, junge Blätter vor der Blüte, Blatt, Blattrosette, Leucanthemum vulgare, syn. Chry
  • Common daisy in mown grass in spring sunshine, England.
  • Daisy flowers blooming, green leaves background, soft blurry bokeh, top view
  • Wiesen-Margerite, Wiesen-Wucherblume, Margerite, Margarite, frische, junge Blätter vor der Blüte, Blatt, Blattrosette, Leucanthemum vulgare, syn. Chry
  • Common daisy in mown grass in spring sunshine, England.
  • Wiesen-Margerite, Wiesen-Wucherblume, Margerite, Margarite, frische, junge Blätter vor der Blüte, Leucanthemum vulgare, syn. Chrysanthemum leucanthemu
  • Bellis perennis (common daisy, lawn daisy or English daisy) flowers and buds, green leaves and gray wooden background, soft blurry shadows bokeh
  • Common daisy in mown grass in spring sunshine, England.
  • Wiesen-Margerite, Wiesen-Wucherblume, Margerite, Margarite, frische, junge Blätter vor der Blüte, Leucanthemum vulgare, syn. Chrysanthemum leucanthemu
  • Bellis perennis (common daisy, lawn daisy or English daisy) two flowers and buds, green leaves background, soft blurry shadows bokeh, top view
  • Three Bellis perennials flowers, also known as a Lawn Daisy, on a grass lawn in a Country garden in Scotland.
  • DAISY Bellis perennis (Asteraceae)
  • Edible fig, Common fig, Figtree (Ficus carica), fig grove with Crown Daisy, Spain, Balearic Islands, Majorca
  • Daisy flower
  • daisy
  • Edible fig, Common fig, Figtree (Ficus carica), fig grove with Crown Daisy, Spain, Balearic Islands, Majorca
  • Daisy flower
  • Plestin les Greves, Daisy 080411
  • Yellow flowers, flower buds, and prickly leaves of Prickly Sow-thistle / Sonchus asper growing in open space.
  • Daisy flower
  • Veldt Purple Daisy with in bloom
  • marguerite daisies
  • A dandelion seed head in its mature state before it’s disturbed and blown away by the wind
  • lovely english daisies Jane Ann Butler Photography JABP978
  • Close-up of bedraggled daisy flower (Bellis perennis) with petals gone, above leaves of plant
  • A dandelion seed head in its mature state before it’s disturbed and blown away by the wind
  • White and yellow orange chamomile daisy flower closeup growing in garden during summer season with leaves pattern
  • Flowering top of Smooth Sow-Thistle / Sonchus oleraceus. Young leaves edible as a foraged food. Common UK / European weed.
  • A dandelion seed head in its mature state before it’s disturbed and blown away by the wind
  • Butterbur, Petasites hybridus, pink flower spike and young leaves on the banks of the Kennet and Avon Canal on Hungerford Common, Berkshire March
  • Flowering top of Smooth Sow-Thistle / Sonchus oleraceus. Young leaves edible as a foraged food. Common UK / European weed.
  • Bellis perennis Daisy
  • Yellow flowers / flowering top of Smooth Sow-Thistle / Sonchus oleraceus. Young leaves edible as a foraged food. Common UK / European weed
  • A Daisy in a local meadow
  • common daisy, lawn daisy, English daisy (Bellis perennis), under autumn leaf, Germany, Saxony
  • Yellow flowers / flowering top of Smooth Sow-Thistle / Sonchus oleraceus. Young leaves edible as a foraged food. Common UK / European weed
  • wicker basket full of hand picked daisies in the grass
  • Bellis perennis flowers in a field
  • Yellow flowers / flowering top of Smooth Sow-Thistle / Sonchus oleraceus. Young leaves edible as a foraged food. Common UK / European weed
  • wicker basket full of hand picked daisies in the grass
  • Yellow-flowered Smooth Sow-thistle / Sonchus oleraceus is a member of the daisy family. Leaves eaten as foraged food . Wrongly called Milk-thistle.
  • Bellis perennis flowers in a field
  • Flannel Flowers busting forth out of the Heathland
  • Yellow-flowered Smooth Sow-thistle / Sonchus oleraceus is a member of the daisy family. Leaves eaten as foraged food . Wrongly called Milk-thistle.
  • Bellis perennis flowers in a field
  • Red poppies and daisies
  • Yellow-flowered Smooth Sow-thistle / Sonchus oleraceus is a member of the daisy family. Leaves eaten as foraged food . Wrongly called Milk-thistle.
  • Bellis perennis flowers in a field
  • daisy underneath
  • Yellow-flowered Smooth Sow-thistle / Sonchus oleraceus is a member of the daisy family. Leaves eaten as foraged food . Wrongly called Milk-thistle.
  • Bellis perennis flowers in a field
  • daisy underneath
  • Bellis perennis flowers in a field
  • Bellis perennis, Common daisy
  • daisy
  • Bellis perennis flowers in a field
  • Bellis perennis is a common European species of daisy, sometimes qualified as common daisy, lawn daisy or English daisy
  • Violet Daisy

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Top 10 facts about daisies

This was classified by Paul Dietrich Giseke, a German botanist and close friend of the Swedish ‘father of modern taxonomy’ Carl Linnaeus.

5 Daisies represents purity and innocence.

The (usually) white petals count as one flower and the cluster of (usually) tiny yellow disc petals that form the ‘eye’ is technically another.


Daisies are technically made up of two flowers Picture: Alamy

7 Daisy leaves are edible

Daisy leaves can make a tasty addition to salads (they’re closely related to artichoke and are high in Vitamin C).

8 Daisies have lots of medicinal properties

Daisies are thought to slow bleeding, relieve indigestion and ease coughs. In homeopathy, the garden daisy is known as the gardener’s friend for its ability to ease an aching back.

9 If not controlled, some daisies can become serious weeds

This is because they thrive in generally inhospitable conditions are are resistant to most bugs and pesticides.

10 Bees love daisy relatives

These include Goldenrod, making them an important friend of honey makers.


Daisies are loved by insects Picture: Alamy

When Are Gerber Daisies in Season?

Thinkstock Images/Comstock/Getty Images

The bright, beautiful blooms of Gerber daisies are a welcome addition to any bouquet or garden. One of the best known members of the sunflower family, Gerber daisies enjoy a particularly long growing and blooming season in the right climate.

Geographic Locations

wonderful pink gerber daisy image by Janet Wall from Fotolia.com

Although found around the globe, Gerber daisies are native to Transvaal, South Africa. There are more than 30 varieties of Gerber daisy, which can be found in areas of Asia, Madagascar and South America as well. With the growing popularity of their bright, happy blooms, Gerber daisies are now planted all around the globe.

Temperature Requirements

Gerber daisies are reasonably hardy plants and are technically considered perennials when grown in the right climate. Gerber daisies like the temperature to be between 59 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit. In areas that remain in roughly this range throughout the year, the flowers will die out over the winter, only to come back in the spring. In climates that are less mild, Gerber daisies can still be perennial, provided that they are brought inside to weather the more extreme temperatures.

Blooming Season

Regardless where you grow Gerber daisies, they enjoy a relatively long blooming season, which typically spans from March until the last frost. Once a plant begins to flower, it will generally continue to produce beautiful blooms for approximately six weeks, so having multiple plants that are at different points in the bloom cycle in your garden is preferable if you want to enjoy flowers for the full season.

Shasta Daisy

Shasta Daisy Leucanthemum superbum For Sale Affordable, Grower Direct Prices Tennessee Wholesale Nursery

Shasta Daisy was named after Mount Shasta, because its petals were the color of the snow. Some daisies are considered weeds, generally because it is easily naturalized, but the Shasta remains a prefered garden plant and groundcover.

Shasta daisy looks similar to the familiar roadside daisy but has larger and more robust blooms. Shasta daisies tend to bloom in clumps from 2 to 3 feet tall and 1 to 2 feet wide. They bear all-white daisy petals, yellow disk florets, and contrasting glossy, dark green leaves.

A commonly grown flowering herbaceous perennial plant, they are very low maintenance, and usually self-seeds – although if you wish to prevent that you should deadhead the daisy. Prefering full sun and well-drained soil, it will tolerate almost any conditions.

Buy Fast Growing Shasta Daisy

When turned into a herb, Shasta Daisy is often used to help with aches and pains, also with liver disorders and can also help with fevers.

Affordable Shasta Daisy For Every Landscape

Shasta daisies bloom over an extended period, from early summer until fall, forming tidy clumps. The bright flowers contrast nicely the dark green foliage, and will liven up any garden bed. Also suitable for cutting!

Shasta Daisy

Shasta Daisy Plant

Charming, elegant, innocent, and versatile describe the effortless beauty of the perfect flower called the Shasta Daisy. They’re easy to spot, too, with their pretty white petals, large yellow centers, and shiny dark leaves. Growing the plant on one’s property is an excellent idea, because these flowers are low maintenance perennials that are simple to handle, and quickly form dense elegant colonies.

Like the sunny essence it imbues, the Shasta Daisy thrives in full sunlight and USDA zones of 4-10. The plant enjoys an average amount of water and is also drought-resistant but should avoid soggy soil. When deadheaded properly, this flower will delight admirers with its hardy blooms in June that extend through September. The plant can reach anywhere from 24 inches to 36 inches in height and attracts butterflies and bumblebees.

Many people find the flower appealing because it looks beautiful in a container as well as gracing a garden bed. The Shasta Daisy is also beautiful as cut flowers whose blooms last about ten days.

The perfect flower makes for an excellent “garden roommate.” Some companion flowers for Shasta Daisy include Daylilies, Salvia, Bee Balm, and Foxgloves.

The Shasta Daisy likes her freedom and should be spaced between two and three feet apart when planted. Following the first frost, recommended cutting the daisies down to three inches above soil level.

Shasta Daisies: Plant Care and Collection of Varieties

Shasta daisies, with their white petals surrounding yellow centers, are similar to the familiar meadow daisy, but have larger and more abundant blooms.

About shasta daisies
Shasta daisies bloom over a long period, from early summer until fall, forming tidy clumps from 2 to 3 feet tall and up to 2 feet across. The bright flowers contrast nicely with the glossy, dark green foliage, livening up any garden bed. The flowers are also suitable for cutting.

Special features of shasta daisies
Easy care/low maintenance
Good for cut flowers
Attracts butterflies

Choosing a site to grow shasta daisies
Select a site with full sun and well-drained soil.

Planting Instructions
Plant in spring, spacing plants 1 to 2 feet apart, depending on the variety. Prepare the garden bed by using a garden fork or tiller to loosen the soil to a depth of 12 to 15 inches, then mix in a 2- to 4-inch layer of compost. Dig a hole twice the diameter of the pot the plant is in. Carefully remove the plant from its container and place it in the hole so the top of the root ball is level with the soil surface. Carefully fill in around the root ball and firm the soil gently. Water thoroughly.

Ongoing Care
Apply a thin layer of compost each spring, followed by a 2-inch layer of mulch to retain moisture and control weeds. Water plants during the summer if rainfall is less than 1 inch per week. Stake tall varieties to keep them upright. After the first killing frost, cut stems back to an inch or two above soil line. Divide plants every 3 to 4 years as new growth begins in the spring, lifting plants and dividing them into clumps.

Shasta Daisy Not Flowering: Reasons Why Shasta Daisies Won’t Bloom

Why won’t my Shasta daisies bloom? Shasta daisy bloom time extends from early spring to late autumn. There are a number of reasons for a Shasta daisy not flowering and most can be rectified with improved care and maintenance. Read on to determine the common causes when Shasta daisies won’t bloom, and learn tips for getting Shasta daisy to bloom.

Getting Shasta Daisy to Bloom

So your Shasta daisies won’t bloom. What should you do? Below are the most common reasons for non-blooming in these plants and steps you can take to ensure a healthy Shasta daisy bloom time.

Regular pruning and deadheading – Regular deadheading of Shastas (removal of wilted blooms) promotes healthy blooming until the end of the season. Otherwise, blooming slows and the plant directs its energy into producing seeds. Additionally, prune the plant to a height of about 3 inches after blooming ends for the season.

Periodic division – Shasta daisies generally benefit from division every three to four years, especially if you notice the plant isn’t blooming or looks tired and overgrown. Discard old, woody plant centers. Replant healthy clumps with two or three shoots and at least four or five roots.

Feed me, but not too much – Too much fertilizer, especially high-nitrogen fertilizer, is definitely too much of a good thing, producing lush, leafy plants with few (or no) blooms. Dig a few shovelfuls of compost or well-rotted manure into the soil around the plant, then feed Shasta daisies every three months throughout the growing season, using a low-nitrogen fertilizer with a NPR number such as 0-20-20. Adding bone meal will help too.

Temperatures – High temperatures can stress the plant and slow blooming until the weather moderates. On the other hand, a late freeze can nip the buds and prevent blooms for the coming season. Unfortunately, there’s not much gardeners can do about temperature fluctuations, but a layer of mulch may help.

Sunlight – Shasta daisies like lots and lots of sun, and without it, they’re likely to object by refusing to bloom. If your plants are long and leggy, this is a good sign they’re stretching to reach available light. You may need to move them to a sunnier location, but it it’s hot, wait until early autumn, about six weeks before the first average frost date in your area.

Water – Shasta daisies are tough, drought-tolerant plants that aren’t happy in soggy soil. Unless the daisies are newly planted, they need water only when rainfall is less than about an inch per week. Water deeply at ground level to keep the foliage and blooms dry, then allow the soil to dry before watering again. Be sure the daisies are planted in loose, well-drained soil.

Caring For Shasta Daisy

The care information provided in this section represents the kind of practical advice is available for all the plants in this web site if you subscribe to the monthly customized newsletter Yardener’s Advisor.
Watering Shasta Daisy
Shasta daisies need regular watering because their roots are so shallow. If they are in thin, poor soil they will dry out very quickly any may need supplemental watering every day or two in the heat of summer. If water deprived, they seem to wilt suddenly and dramatically. If they are planted in healthy soil rich in organic matter, they will manage fine if rainfall is normal. Water with a soaker hose system or dripping garden hose during droughty periods in high summer. Avoid overhead watering to prevent their stems from drooping or developing fungal disease. Keep daisies well mulched to prevent evaporation of moisture from the soil and to absorb maximum water from rains. For information on products see the file on Choosing Watering Equipment
Fertilizing Shasta Daisy
Shasta daisies are heavy feeders because their roots are so near the soil surface. Fertilize in the spring by sprinkling about a tablespoon of a general-purpose slow-acting granular fertilizer on the soil around each plant for the rain to soak in. It will provide steady, consistent nutrition over many weeks as the plants mature. If you have planted daisies in containers with soilless potting mix, either mix slow-acting fertilizer into it when planting or be sure and fertilize with a dilute liquid general purpose fertilizer periodically when you water. For more information see the file for Fertilizers
Consider Plant Growth Activators
There are on the market a growing number of products that will help your plants become healthier, more drought resistant, more disease resistant, and even more insect resistant. These products are generally easy to use and not terribly expensive. If you want to give your plants some oomph, check out New Technology In Plant Growth Activators
Mulching
For shallow- rooted shasta daisies, mulching is essential. Spread a 2 to 3 inch layer of some organic material such as wood chips, shredded bark or chopped leaves from your yard on the soil over their roots. This mulch helps control weeds, conserves soil moisture, and keeps dirt from splashing up on the flowers during the bloom period. Over time it improves the quality of the soil as it gradually decomposes. In winter, after you have cut back dead stems, add another inch or so of mulch or loosely lay evergreen boughs over the dormant plants to buffer the soil against severe winter temperature fluctuations which cause it to heave and disturb plant roots. For more information see the file on Using Mulch
Pruning/Grooming
Shasta daisies are relatively carefree. Pinch back the tips of the stems of young standard types when they grow to about 6 inches to encourage bushiness. Flowers will be a bit smaller, but more numerous. Cutting off dead flowers will extend their bloom period. Cut back dead stems to soil level when they are finished blooming.
Staking
Standard size plants will produce flowers on tall stems that may need staking to support them in rain and wind. Insert stakes in the soil at the perimeter of the clump of daisies equidistant from each other. Then tie string from stake to stake in a supporting ring around the outside of the flowering clump. You may decide to criss-cross string back and forth between the stakes to form a matrix of string to loosely support the individual stems at the center of the clump so the plant looks more natural. For more information see the file Staking Flowers
Propagating Shasta Daisy
The easiest way to get more shasta daisy plants is to divide the established, overlarge ones you already have. Do this every 2 or 3 years, in early spring when they first begin to send up green shoots. Dig up the entire clump, exposing the roots. Carefully separate vigorously growing shoots from the outer portions of the clumps, taking care that they have roots attached. Discard older woody central parts of the clump. Plant the new rooted shoots as directed for new plants.

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