About weeping willow trees

Weeping Willow Planting Instructions

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Weeping willow trees add a graceful element to any landscape design. Weeping willows are fast growing trees with a mature height of between 30 and 40 feet with a 35-foot spread. These deciduous trees are dormant in the late fall and through the winter. Hardy in zones 6 through 8, weeping willow trees grow well when planted adjacent to water. A weeping willow planting site should have full sun and loose, good quality soil that drains well.

Plant a weeping willow tree at least six weeks before the first frost in your area. This will give the tree time to become acclimated to its surroundings before becoming dormant.

Dig a hole twice as wide and twice as deep as the roots on the tree.

Sprinkle a layer of 10-10-10 or 20-20-20 fertilizer in the bottom of the hole. Cover the layer of fertilizer with a layer of potting soil. The root collar of the weeping willow tree should be slightly above ground level. Backfill the hole with loose potting soil in order to elevate the root collar to the desired height.

Center the weeping willow tree in the hole. Cover the roots completely with potting soil. Air pockets around the roots will cause the tree to dry out.

Fill the hole with a mixture of potting soil and the excavated soil. Tamp the soil down around the tree and then add more soil to fill in any depressed area. Make sure the base of the stem is not covered with soil.

Cover the planting area with a 2-inch layer of organic mulch. Do not cover the stem.

Water the weeping willow well after planting. If your area experiences a dry winter, water the tree well once each week.

Fertilizer is not necessary until the spring. Use organic fertilizer that’s high in nitrogen on the soil around the tree.

Keep grass and weeds at least 3 feet away from the tree during the first year.

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Main / Travel / How to fertilize weeping willow

How to fertilize weeping willow

Balanced Fertilizer. A balanced fertilizer with an equal ratio of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium, such as a formula, is appropriate for a weeping willow. The nitrogen supports foliage growth on the tree’s long, weeping branches, while the phosphorus supports the growth of roots, stems and flowers. Place the end of a garden hose inside the berm. Turn the water on a slow-flow setting. The water will slowly fill the berm, soak into the top two holes on the stakes and dilute the granules to apply fertilizer to the root zone of your weeping willow tree. Willow tree form- Pruning, Winter Care and Fertilizing. Willow. These trees should be pruned in fall after the leaves have dropped or in early spring, before the.

The supple branches of the weeping willow (Salix babylonica) sweep gracefully from its open crown to the ground. It grows quickly, needs moist soil and is. Use a Fertilizer with High Nitrogen Content. Be conservative when you fertilize your weeping willow. There are plenty of organic fertilizers available that contain a high ratio of nitrogen. Make sure that you apply the fertilizer to the soil around the tree and not to the tree itself. Weeping willow trees can grow to be 45 feet tall and wide, with long, pendulous Do not add compost, manure or fertilizer to the hole, which will encourage the.

A mature weeping willow doesn’t require fertilizer if it is in rich soil and its leaves are a healthy green or nearby lawns are fertilized regularly. A weeping willow branch from a strong, healthy tree can become a tree in its the branch wound side down into the hole and fill it with a mix of fertilizer and soil. The exceedingly rare ‘Rokakudai’ Weeping Willow is a graceful bonsai that Avoid fertilizing this tree often because a weeping willow doesn’t enjoy much. 20 Apr – 6 min – Uploaded by adygicywoq.ml Best offers for your Gardening & Lawn Care ideas adygicywoq.ml How to. Consequently, when planting weeping willow trees, they need only a bit of compost (in poor soil) and a sprinkling of all-purpose fertilizer.

There are many types of willow trees for the home landscape. Weeping and pussy willows are probably two of the better-known types of at the time of planting and fertilize with an all-purpose plant food in early spring. adygicywoq.mlg Willow Tree – At what size or age do weeping willow branches Q. Fertilizer For Weeping Willow Tree – What type of root fertilizer should I use to. 23 Feb – 3 min – Uploaded by Grow Plants Weeping willow tree care and growing Weeping willow tree for sale https://amzn. to/2JqVwOS. Fertilizer for Weeping Willows. The Best Fertilizer for Weeping Willows Garden Trees, Lawn And Garden, Deciduous Trees, Types of Weeping Willow Trees.

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The Only Good Place For A Weeping Willow

The only site a weeping willow should be suffered to live. Photo: Christina Salwitz. Photo thief: Grumpy

Courtesy of my friend, Seattle garden blogger and garden designer, Christina Salwitz, you are looking at the only kind of place a weeping willow should be planted. On the banks of a pond or lake. Nothing else around. With the owner’s house, driveway, sidewalk, pool, water lines, septic tank, pet cemetery, and all the neighbor’s houses a zip code away. Refusing this advice is to court disaster.

Let me be blunt (I’m known for this) — if you plant a weeping willow in the burbs, the best you can hope for is that it will die quickly.

Fortunately, there’s a good chance of that.

Why Weeping Willow Is Just Plain Awful It grows very fast. On the face of it, that might seem like a good thing, but fast-growing trees — think willows, poplars, silver maple, mulberry — are the products of aggressive, wide-spreading, shallow root systems that crack pavement, damage foundations, protrude above the soil, and invade water lines. Plus the wood of just about any tree that grows lightning-fast is weak. Which means it breaks very easily in storms.

It needs lots of water. This is why weeping willow looks its best near a body of fresh water. It’s also why its roots snake into sewer lines and septic tanks, giving you a wonderful surprise when you flush the first time in the morning. Planted in drier soil, it sulks, looks ratty, and practically dons a sign that reads, “Cut Me Down Now.”

It grows too big for most yards. Weeping willow can grow 50 feet tall and even wider. And its branches sweep the ground. Which means it’s probably gonna swallow your entire yard. And unless you regularly prune the pendulous branches to head-height, forget about lounging under there.

It’s a target for just about every insect and disease pest. The list is too long for me to recount. You can’t control them. You can’t stop them. Which is why you’ll never encounter an ancient, 500-year old weeping willow. It died 485 years earlier.

Therefore, let us resolve to consign this tree to the only place it belongs. Beside a large body of fresh water. With nothing else around.

Plant Care 101: Willow Hybrids

Buckle up. There’s an amazing tree that grows incredibly fast, and you can plant in your garden right now! Willow Hybrids are some of the most popular trees on the market. Learn more about these amazing cultivars:

Buckle up. There’s an amazing tree that grows incredibly fast, and you can plant in your garden right now! Willow Hybrids are some of the most popular trees on the market. Learn more about these amazing cultivars:

Willow Hybrids: Background

OurWillow Hybrid has ‘willow’ in its name, but it certainly doesn’t look like the Weeping Willow trees that we’re used to seeing. Well, there are a lot of different willow varieties, and even the Weeping Willow is a hybrid cross. These hybrids can be manmade but also occur naturally in the wild for willows.

The Willow Hybrid is a cross between the Salix Alba and Salix Matsudana. The Salix Alba is more commonly known as the ‘White Willow’ due to its light green leaves with white undertones. The Salix Alba has upright branches. It’s a deciduous variety native to parts of central Asia and Europe and boasts very strong wood that’s most commonly used in making cricket bats. Tannin is also found in the bark, which is used to tan leather.

The Salix Matsudana is a fast growing willow variety that’s more commonly known as the ‘Chinese Willow’. It’s native to Northern China and is known for its weeping branches, fast growth, and small narrow green leaves. Salix Matsudanas are often used as beautiful ornamental trees.

Uses

The Willow Hybrid is strong and extremely fast growing. They can grow to around six or more feet a year, which means instant privacy for your landscape.

Willow Hybrids also create wind breaks. If your yard has big, cold drafts that come in, you can use a few Willow Hybrids. Also, if your driveway builds up a lot of snow, use a few Willow Hybrids to block it and keep your driveway clear.

Furthermore, this hybrid variety also has an extremely strong root system. It’s extremely adaptable to almost any soil condition: rocky, loamy, or even soil that’s heavy in clay. Combined with its cold tolerance, this tree can survive almost anywhere in the country.

It can survive cold temperatures down to about -20 degrees, and is recommended for growing zones 4 through 9 – that covers Washington to Florida!

Also, the strong root system helps prevent erosion. They’re perfect to plant on the sides of hills and gullies. Also, Willow Hybrids are commonly used in areas that are prone to flooding, helping to control rising water levels.

Aside from those obvious benefits, Willow Hybrids are perfect as ornamental trees. Deep green leaves provide a beautiful backdrop for homes and more colorful plants to pop against.

Willow Hybrid Care

Before planting your trees, consider their size. They can grow between 35 to 45 feet tall in rows and 75 feet tall on their own. Also, they can grow to be about 20 to 30 feet wide.

Unless you plan on pruning to keep them at a certain size, ensure that they aren’t too close to your driveway or home. To create a privacy fence, you can plant them as close as 5 feet apart.

Plus, Willow Hybrids will thrive in full to partial sunlight and tolerate your natural soil. Just be sure that your trees get enough water – they do extremely well planted near rivers and ponds. Make sure they get at least an inch of water each week, and increase watering during times of drought. For a deep watering, hold your hose at the base of each tree and count to 20. Place mulch around the bases of your trees in order to retain moisture and keep weeds at bay.

And you can give your Willow Hybrid Trees an extra boost with fertilizer in the early spring and early summer with a well balanced fertilizer like formula 10-10-10.

Lastly, prune your Willow Hybrid in the early spring. Make your cuts at 45-degree angles, facing upwards, to promote new growth. Cut branches towards the inside to thin your tree. To heavily prune your trees and maintain their size, cut the branches back to abouta third of their original size.

A Perfect Shade of Tree: The Hybrid Willow

Hybrid willow trees have vigorous growth: pushing about 12 feet per year. They reach a mature height around 30-40 feet tall in less than 5 years.

Guest article by Patti Moreno Planting trees is such an important part of being environmentally conscious. With so much of our planet’s tree canopy gone, especially in the last 30 years, it’s important for homeowners to plant trees around their homes.

General Benefits to Planting Trees

  • Trees produce oxygen.
  • Trees filter air pollution and help purify air.
  • Trees help reduce run off and soil erosion.
  • Trees provide shelter and food for wildlife.

There are also many direct benefits for homeowners who plant landscape trees. Landscape trees add value to your home and beautify your yard. Trees can also protect your home from severe winds when planted as a windbreak, helping you save on energy costs in multiple ways. Mature trees also provide shade, which reduces the amount of sunlight absorbed by your home and reduces your energy costs in the summer. You’ll also enjoy your shaded yard more in those hot summer months!

Plant a Windbreak

Hybrid Willow trees work as a fast-growing windbreak when planted in rows. This tree will amaze you with its speedy growth of about 12 feet per year, finally reaching a mature height around 30-40 feet tall (in less than 5 years!). It’s a great windbreak because of its dense foliage in the summer and then its abundance of branches in winter. One of the most popular questions about Hybrid Willow trees is if they are deciduous, because the misconception is that a tree without leaves won’t make a good windbreak. Due to a profusion of branch growth, it certainly doesn’t hinder the Hybrid Willow tree’s ability to act as a windbreak even when it loses its leaves for the winter!The best times of year to plant hybrid willow trees are the spring and the fall.

After you pick your location:

  • Dig a hole that is at least twice as wide as the roots of the tree and as deep as the roots of the tree.
  • Place the tree in the hole.
  • Fill half way with soil and water thoroughly. Watering at this stage of planting will reduce the amount of air pockets in the soil, preventing your roots from drying out.
  • Fill the rest of the hole with soil and create a trough about a foot or two from the trunk of the tree; water again thoroughly.
  • Mulch about 1 to 2 inches thick on top of the soil, keeping the trough and keeping the mulch away from the trunk of the tree to prevent rotting.
  • Water at least twice a week (depending on the rainfall in your area) for about 6-8 weeks. This is the amount of time that your tree needs to acclimate to your environment.

Willows love water and are often found near brooks, streams, and at shorelines in the wild. These hybrid willows will love the water, but will survive on a generous drink once a week (or as necessary in times of drought). Hybrid Willows are deciduous trees, so they will go dormant in the late fall to winter and their leaves will fall off. Hybrid willow trees also make a great fast-growing natural privacy screen – saving you thousands over installing a privacy fence! — Enjoying the fruits of my labor, Patti Moreno, The Garden Girl

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The History, Uses and Folklore of the Willow Tree

There are over 400 species in the genus Salix growing around the world and the impact that they have had on gardens, mythology and medicine is massive. Since this tree survives tough conditions and is easy to root from cuttings, or just a branch stuck in the ground, we see them everywhere.

The iconic weeping willow is native to Asia and features prominently in their folktales and art.The ancient Chinese believed that willow branches would ward off evil spirits and they were often carried or placed over doorways to keep those spirits away.

It is said that the first weeping willow grew in Babylon where the Children of Israel were taken into slavery.

Psalm 137: “By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion.

We hanged our harps upon the willows in the midst thereof.”

When they hung their harps on the willow tree, the branches were forever destined to ‘weep’ and grow downward. Its actual origin was further east in China, but it’s a popular legend.

However other willows are just as popular in Native American and Celtic legends. Many notable sayings and practices were born around the willow. One of the most common traditions today has its roots in an old Celtic custom. If you knock on a willow tree, it is said to send away bad luck and that is where the custom of ‘touch wood’ or ‘knock on wood’ originated. European peoples also believed the wind in the willow leaves were elves who whispered and talked among themselves as people were passing underneath. However, they do plant willows near their homes to ward off bad luck. It is also said that if you confess your secrets to a willow tree, the secret will be forever trapped inside the wood. Native Americans tied willow branches to their boats to protect them from storms and to their lodges for the protection of the Great Spirit.

Willow wood is supposed to be the best choice for divining water, magic harps and some wizards use it for making their spell casting wands. (but Harry Potter fans already know this) Whether you believe in magic or not, willows do possess some powerful characteristics. Willow bark contains salicin, which is a natural form of aspirin. Willow bark has been used for thousands of years as a pain reliever and to reduce inflammation. Willow wood is also able to absorb trauma or shock without splitting and some of the best cricket bats and Dutch wooden shoes are made from willow. Since the wood is pliable, it is popular with basket-makers as well.

North American willows are a host plant for the Mourning Cloak butterfly and the catkins that bloom very early in the spring are one of the first pollen sources for honeybees. Ancient Europeans and the Inuit of the Alaskan peninsula also made a type of porridge from the catkins and used them as food. Many early peoples discovered the catkins also produce a reddish dye.

Willow trees prefer a sunny area where the ground stays moist. The area around a pond or along a stream is perfect. Don’t worry if your tree isn’t completely straight, or develops crooked branches, willows are planted for ‘character’ and the best ones are often bent and twisted. There are many willow species and commercial cultivars that are hardy in a wide range of climates. Here’s a few options that our PlantScout vendors are offering and you can always check with your local nursery to see what grows best in your area.

Weeping Willow Tree Stock Photos and Images

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  • Weeping willow tree beside the lake in snow covered St James’s Park London England UK
  • Weeping willow tree, Home Park, Hampton Wick, Kingston, Surrey, UK
  • Weeping Willow Tree, Eastleach Turville, Gloucestershire, England
  • Weeping willow tree (Salix sp.) at springtime, Quebec, Canada
  • Yellow weeping willow tree on river bank
  • Weeping Willow tree in green field, Carterton, Wairarapa, North Island, New Zealand
  • A weeping Willow tree and cherry blossom in saltaire, Yorkshire, UK.
  • beautiful lake with weeping willow tree behind, summer landscape
  • Winter deadened willow tree at twilight with mountain in background, Barkly East, Eastern Cape, South Africa
  • weeping willow in February showing first yellow shoots
  • Weeping willow tree at Little Venice in London, England
  • Weeping willow tree leaves hanging over a river France, Europe
  • Weeping willow trees on a golf course
  • Yellow Weeping Willow tree in spring in a Toronto park against a blue sky
  • Weeping Willow tree (Salix Babylonica) on the edge of The Pool in Central Park, New York, in Spring.
  • Young newly planted Golden Weeping Willow tree (Salix x Sepulcralis Chrysocoma) by a lake.
  • Weeping willow tree reflected in pond at Roosevelt Park, Edison, New Jersey
  • Weeping willow tree Boston Common
  • Wisconsin Weeping Willow Tree – Salix Pendulina Blanda
  • Weeping Willow Tree Overhanging Small Alley At Night With Street Light
  • Weeping willow tree, Home Park, Hampton Wick, Kingston, Surrey, UK
  • backlit weeping willow tree, Melton Mowbray, Leicestershire, England, Uk
  • Reflection in the water of a weeping willow tree (Salix babylonica), Hesse, Germany
  • Single weeping willow tree on river bank
  • Weeping Willow tree winter
  • Weeping Willow Tree, Salix babylonica, in snow Taken February Lea Valley Park Essex UK
  • A weeping willow tree bends gracefully over a lake at the The Villas at Gervasi Vineyard in Canton, Ohio, USA
  • A large weeping willow tree on a grassy lawn on an early spring day.
  • Scenic view of the River Otter in Spring showing the early green leaves of a Weeping Willow tree hanging over the water at Otterton, East Devon, UK
  • Weeping Willow Tree In Winter, Lincolnshire, UK
  • weeping willow tree and duck pond
  • Looking up from below a yellow weeping willow tree in autumn, England, UK
  • Weeping Willow Tree growing on the banks of Roath Park Lake, Cardiff, South Wales, U.K.
  • Weeping Willow tree (Salix Babylonica) on the edge of The Pool in Central Park, New York, in Spring.
  • Weeping Willow tree growing by the side of a small lake in a park in Summer in the UK.
  • Weeping Willow Tree
  • Salix chrysocoma ‘Golden Weeping Willow’ tree
  • Polish tour boat moored on city lake near weeping willow tree. Spala Central Poland
  • Weeping willow tree branch against blue sky
  • Weeping willow tree
  • Weeping Willow tree, Salix × sepulcralis ‘Chrysocoma’ at dusk in the Public Gardens, Boston, Ma, USA
  • Silhouette Of Bared Weeping Willow Tree
  • Weeping Willow tree in Hanley Park Stoke upon Trent
  • Weeping willow tree, canal, farmhouse, Maasluis, Netherlands
  • Weeping willow tree next to a lake in the springtime.
  • Weeping Willow Tree Salix x chrysocoma, on the edge of Roath Park Lake in Cardiff, Wales
  • A large weeping willow tree on a grassy lawn on an early spring day.
  • Scenic view of the River Otter in Spring showing the early green leaves of a Weeping Willow tree hanging over the water at Otterton, East Devon, UK
  • Glimpse of typical Venetian houses along the river Sile, Riviera Santa Margherita. Weeping willow tree on the water. Treviso, Veneto, Italy, Europe
  • Weeping willow tree leaves backlit hanging over a small river, France, Europe
  • Looking up from underneath a yellow weeping willow tree with ivy on the trunk during autumn, England, UK
  • Weeping Willow Tree growing on the banks of Roath Park Lake, Cardiff, South Wales, U.K.
  • Weeping Willow tree (Salix Babylonica) on the edge of The Pool in Central Park, New York, in Spring.
  • Two elderly women examining a Weeping Willow tree in a garden in Hampshire, UK.
  • Older man sits on a stone bench under a weeping willow tree next to Wade Park lagoon in the University Circle neighborhood in Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
  • A leafless weeping willow tree, Salix babylonica, tree on the banks of the Kennet and Avon Canal in winter, Hungerford
  • Weeping Willow tree
  • The weeping willow tree, Central Park, Peterborough, in December 2010, before it was cut back dramatically to improve stability
  • Weeping willow tree trunk
  • Tree Surgeon Pruned Weeping Willow Tree
  • Weeping Willow Tree By Pier Over Sea Against Sky
  • The snow dusted mountains and a beautiful white Weeping Willow tree in the Tullymore Forest Park add interest to a winter landscape taken on a very du
  • Weeping willow tree or salix babylonica on the bank of the River Avon near Stratford-upon-Avon in Warwickshire in winter
  • Black and white photo of a Weeping Willow tree next to a lake in the springtime.
  • Weeping willow tree with yellow blossom
  • A large weeping willow tree on a grassy lawn on an early spring day.
  • Weeping willow tree by the lake in the park
  • Glimpse of typical Venetian houses along the river Sile, Riviera Santa Margherita. Weeping willow tree on the water. Treviso, Veneto, Italy, Europe
  • River Mole, Cobham, Surrey, England, UK with sunshine through the old Weeping Willow tree and ducks
  • A beautiful weeping willow tree captured by a boathouse on the river Thames, Henley- On- Thames, Oxfordshire, England, UK
  • Weeping Willow Tree
  • Weeping Willow tree (Salix Babylonica) in Central Park, New York City, in Spring.
  • Garden border with (spiraea japonica) gold flame, pink peony, yellow yarrow flowers and weeping willow tree in spring
  • Newly pollarded Weeping Willow tree. January.
  • Weeping Willow Tree, Vertical Banner
  • Weeping willow tree
  • The weeping willow tree, Central Park, Peterborough, in December 2010, before it was cut back dramatically to improve stability
  • Weeping willow tree, Home Park, Hampton Wick, Kingston, Surrey, UK
  • Weeping Willow Tree in Boston Public Gardens
  • Weeping Willow Tree On Field
  • Weeping Willow Tree, Goodnestone Park Gardens, Kent.
  • Weeping willow tree or salix babylonica on the bank of the River Avon near Stratford-upon-Avon in Warwickshire in winter
  • Weeping Willow Tree Salix babylonica In Winter, UK
  • Weeping willow tree with yellow blossom flowers
  • A large weeping willow tree on a grassy lawn on an early spring day.
  • Afternoon light on a Weeping Willow Tree (Salix babylonica)
  • Weeping Willow tree in the sunshine reflected in the water at Beverley Beck, East Yorkshire.
  • Weeping Willow tree in an urban park, France, Europe
  • ducks in lake with reflection of blue sky, weeping willow tree behind, summer landscape
  • Weeping Willow Tree on Riverbank
  • Weeping Willow Tree by the Pond, The Rockery, Rock Garden, Preston Park, Brighton, England UK
  • Weeping Willow Tree Branches in Autumn Colours in Shipton under Wychwood Oxfordshire England United Kingdom UK
  • Weeping willow tree in front of a rustic white barn in the Skagit Valley of the Pacific Nortwest city of Mount Vernon, Washington.
  • Weeping willow tree branches
  • Pollarded Weeping Willow tree
  • Backlit weeping willow tree with shadows by pond
  • Weeping willow tree bark, Home Park, Hampton Wick, Surrey, England, UK
  • barn and weeping willow tree with snow in the fog
  • View Of Weeping Willow Tree In Park
  • Weeping Willow Tree in Winter at Bute Park Cardiff

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