A bird of paradise

Transplanting Birds Of Paradise – How To Transplant A Bird Of Paradise Plant

Can you move a bird of paradise plant? Yes is the short answer, but you need to take care in doing so. Transplanting a bird of paradise plant is something you may want to do to give your beloved plant better conditions or because it has grown too big for its current location. Whatever the reason is, be prepared for a big job. Set aside a good chunk of time and follow all of these important steps to ensure your bird of paradise will survive the move and thrive in its new home.

Bird of Paradise Relocation Tips

The bird of paradise is a beautiful, showy plant that can grow very large. Avoid transplanting enormous specimens, if possible. They can be difficult to dig up and very heavy to move. Before you start digging, be sure you have a good spot for it.

Bird of paradise likes to be warm and thrives in sun and in soil that is fertile and well-drained. Find your perfect spot and dig a nice large hole before you take the next step.

How to Transplant a Bird of Paradise

Transplanting birds of paradise should be done carefully so as not to damage the plant and to ensure it will recover and thrive in a new location. Start by preparing the plant, then dig it out and move it:

  • Water the roots well to help it cope with the shock of being moved.
  • Dig around the plant, going out about 12 inches (30 cm.) for every inch (2.5 cm.) diameter of the main trunk of the plant.
  • Dig deeply to avoid cutting through roots. You can cut through minor, lateral roots to get it out.
  • Place a tarp near the bird of paradise and when you are able to remove it from the ground, place the entire root ball on the tarp.
  • If the plant is too heavy to lift easily, slide the tarp underneath the roots on one side and carefully tip it over onto the tarp. You can either drag the plant to its new location or use a wheelbarrow.
  • Place the plant in its new hole, which should be no deeper than the root system was in the original location, and water well.

Bird of Paradise Relocation – After Care

Once you have replanted your bird of paradise, you need to take good care of it and keep an eye on the plant for a few months as it recovers. Water regularly for several months, and consider fertilizing it as well to encourage growth and blooms.

In about three months, with the right care, you should have a happy and thriving bird of paradise in its new location.

Blooming time: They may bloom most times of the year depending where you live. The flowers are about 500mm long. The main plant can grow as big as 10-12m high. It will throw out many suckers over the years. The leaf is very large; they are shiny and grey-green in colour, which can grow up to 2m in length. The sepals have blue petals and consist of five purplish blue sheaths. It is recommended that a larger garden is needed. It really comes to life in a Sub-Tropical garden or a Balinese-Thai setting, creating a lush tropical effect. The root system can be aggressive so do not put it too close to fence lines and garden paths. It is also grown in pots for household and office decoration, as the large leaves are spectacular indoors.

Culture: Strelitzia Nicolai are quite fast growers in pots or outside in the open. They will take part shade – full sun. The Nicolai is just about drought tolerant, does not like severe frost, it will take temperatures down to 8c. It tolerates salty coastal winds and salt spray up to a point. Fertilise regularly with a balanced slow release fertiliser for indoor pots. Outside fertilising requires a good well balanced fertiliser.

Humidity: Will cope with lower humidity levels prefers medium humidity.

Propagation: Strelitzia Nicolai are propagated by suckers or by seed. Suckers taken off the main plant grow vigorously, but can harm the main plant and the suckers will not always grow. Seeds are very slow to germinate and may take up to 24 months, commercial growers take a lot less time than this -about 4-6 weeks. They are pollinated by birds (refer to Reginae for explanation on seed propagation) they also have large black seeds with an orange aril. Olive Sunbirds and Grey Sunbirds are attracted to the nectar which germinates the flowers.Vervet and Samango monkeys feed on the soft part of the flowers as well as on the orange aril of the seeds.

See additional notes on the Nicolai in the Alba page for correct identification.

Plant availability: Plenty of stock.

How to Transplant a Giant Bird of Paradise

The giant or white bird of paradise (Strelitzia nicolai) is a member of the family Strelitziaceae. Tropical in nature, giant birds of paradise can grow outdoors in U.S. zones 9 and 10. Reaching a height of 20 to 30 feet at maturity, with a spread of 10 feet, their size can make them difficult to transplant once full grown. If you are deciding to move your giant bird of paradise to a different location in your landscape, it is best to do so while the plant is still young.

Water the soil heavily around the giant bird of paradise before you start the transplanting process. This helps soften the ground and reduces stress to the plant’s roots as you dig around them.

Dig a trench around the root system using a flat-edged shovel. Allow a 10- to 12-inch diameter of root ball for every inch of trunk diameter. Do not dig under the roots, just cut through their sides. Dig down approximately 2 feet to cut the lateral roots. Replace the top soil into the trench and allow the plant to adjust to the root pruning for one month.

Water the area again before the transplant to help soften the ground, making it easier to dig and help keep the bird of paradise’s root ball intact.

Prepare the new planting site by digging a hole that is twice as large as the root ball and as deep as the plant is presently growing in the ground. Water the new planting hole.

Situate a large tarp next to the giant bird of paradise so you can lay the plant on it.

Dig around the trenched area. Dig as deep as the root system is growing to obtain as much of the root system as possible. Dig underneath the plant to include as many of the taproots as possible, until the giant bird of paradise becomes loose in the planting site. Cut any large roots with loppers to release the plant from the hole.

Remove the giant bird of paradise from its hole and allow it to lay on its side on the tarp. Drag the tarp to the plant’s new planting site, being careful not to disrupt the root system.

Situate the plant into its new hole and begin filling the hole with soil. Fill the hole halfway and stomp down on the soil to remove air pockets. Continue filling the hole and stomp down on the area again once filled.

Water the newly planted giant bird of paradise well, making sure the water reaches down into the root system. Continue to water the transplant to keep the soil moist for the first three weeks. Once established, cut back to once or twice per week, depending on your weather conditions.

How Do You Transplant A Giant Bird Of Paradise? – Knowledgebase Question

A Giant Bird of Paradise has the potential to reach 30′ tall and wide, so keeping it in a container might be a real challenge! These plants have a clumping growth habit and can produce 5′-10′ long leaves, arranged fanwise on erect or curving trunks. Now that you know how very large a plant this can be, you may want to reconsider and plant it in the ground.
If you’re still convinced you want to plant it in a pot, choose your container wisely. It’s important that your Giant Bird of Paradise have ample room for root growth, and that the container have adequate drainage holes in the bottom. You may have to transplant into successively larger containers as your plant grows, or you may have to unpot it and divide it into several new plants to keep it smaller than standard size.
When you transplant, remove the plastic container it came in and, if you’re planting in the ground, amend the soil with a generous amount of organic matter. This will help the soil retain moisture and yet drain quickly, which will make your plant happy. If you’re planting in a large pot, fill about half full with potting soil, spread the roots out in a natural fashion, then fill with additional potting soil. Make sure the plant is sitting at the same soil level in the new pot as it was in the old one. Water well, and as often as required. Don’t feed until the roots have become established and new growth begins. Then feed lightly with a general-purpose garden fertilizer, in amounts listed on the label. Enjoy your spectacular new plant!

Bird Paradise Stock Photos

Bird of paradise. Or strelitzia in vibrant colors over black backgroundBird of paradise in flight. Photo of bird of paradise in flightKing bird-of-paradise. On the branchWilson’s bird-of-paradise in West Papua. Male Wilson’s bird-of-paradise preparing his arena and performing his mating display shortly after daybreak

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One Of the most exotic birds in Papua New Guinea Allens Hummingbird resting on a Bird of Paradise flower. Image shows a male Allens Hummingbird (Selasphorus sasin) resting on a Bird of Paradise &#x28 Bird of paradise floral frame. A bird of paradise flower with leaves to create a frame isolated on white Bird of paradise flower isolated on black background. Exotic species bird of paradise flower against dark background Bird of paradise. Bird-of-paradise flowers on white background Bird of Paradise. Flower (Strelitzia reginae) isolated in white background Two Bird of paradise. Two Bird-of-paradise flowers on black background Bird of paradise. Bird-of-paradise flowers on black background Strelitzia reginae, Bird of paradise flower Crane Flower. Orange strelitzia flower, with more flowers Tropical Strelitzia reginae Crane Flower or Bird of Bird of Paradise Flower. Bird of Paradise plants are stunning beautiful flowers and plants. Their colours are soft and beautiful. These flowers are long lasting Bird of paradise flower isolated on white background. Fresh Bird of paradise flower isolated on white background Bird of Paradise detail. A close up shot of the centre of a bird of Paradise plant Bird of paradise. Flower bird of paradise with reflection Red bird of paradise. Dancing on tree in Papua Indonesia. motion Bird of Paradise flower. Indigenous decorative evergreen plant of a Strelitzia Reginae, crane flower or bird of paradise, in a garden backyard in South Africa Beautiful Bird of Paradise Flower. Orange and purple Bird of Paradise flower. Desert landscaping Bird of Paradise. Flower with clear background Bird of Paradise Flower. The Bird of Paradise Flower is a southern African plant related to the banana. It bears an irregular flower with a long projecting Bird of Paradise. A beautiful Bird of Paradise plant in full bloom Bird of Paradise. Flowers thriving in the city Bird Of Paradise. Flowers on a white background Bird Paradise Flower Strelitzia reginae and modern urban buildings. Beautiful and exotic Bird Paradise Flower Strelitzia reginae in an urban context, of tall and Bird of Paradise flower. Orange and purple bird of paradise flower against green leaves Green tree frog on bird of paradise flower. A green tree frog on a bird of paradise flower in cyprus Bird of Paradise Flower. Strelitzia is a genus of five species of perennial plants, native to South Africa. The genus is named after the duchy of Mecklenburg Beautiful Bird of Paradise Flower. Tropical flower Strelitzia reginae on green background. Green tree frog on bird of paradise flower 2. A green tree frog on a bird of paradise flower in cyprus Bird of paradise flowers. Two crane bird of paradise flowers blooming isolated on a white background Hummingbird and bird of paradise flower. Cute little hummingbird lands face to face on bird of paradise Bird of Paradise Garden. Bed of Bird of Paradise flowers in sunlit forest Bird of Paradise. Flower with rain droplets Bird Of Paradise. Flowers on white background sitting on a asian tray Giant Bird of Paradise. A giant Bird of Paradise blows in the wind in its full glory Back and front side of bird of paradise leaves. On white background Bird of Paradise Flower. The Bird of Paradise Flower is a southern African plant related to the banana. It bears an irregular flower with a long projecting Yellow of Bird of paradise flower. Close up of Bird of paradise flower on green leaf background Bird of paradise leaf isolated on white background. Bird of paradise leaf isolated on a white background Heliconia chartacea leaves,Tropical leaf, Bird of paradise foliage isolated on white background, with clipping path. Heliconia chartacea leaves,Tropical leaf Heliconia chartacea leaves,Tropical leaf, Bird of paradise foliage isolated on white background, with clipping path. Heliconia chartacea leaves,Tropical leaf Bird of Paradise. Close-up view of a Bird of Paradise flower. Sharp detail and vibrant colours Bird of Paradise Flower. This is a picture of a colorful bird of paradise flower with morning dew on it Tropical watercolor bird-of-paradise flower and tropical leaves on rough brush strokes background. Colorful watercolor florals on acrylic blots texture. Hand King bird-of-paradise. The king bird-of-paradise Cicinnurus regius is a passerine bird of the Paradisaeidae Bird-of-paradise family Bird of Paradise Flower at Laguna Beach, California. A Bird of Paradise flower with a defocused background photographed in Laguna Beach, California Bird of Paradise Flower. Bird of Paradise tropical flower on colourful background Bird of Paradise flower. Isolated on white background Bird of Paradise. Flower isolated in green Bird of paradise flowers. Yellow bird of paradise flowers on green background Strelitzia reginae flower with leaves, Bird of paradise flower, Tropical flower isolated on white background, with clipping path. Strelitzia reginae flower with Tropical flower, African strelitzia, bird of paradise, Madeira i. Sland in Portugal Bird of Paradise. Maybe the most perfect flower? – Strelitzia reginae Bird of Paradise Flower. A Bird of Paradise flower isolated on a black background Bird of paradise flower. Colorful of Bird of paradise flower blossom isolated on white background Strelitzia aka Bird of Paradise flower, isolated on black. Strelitzia flower, also known as Bird of Paradise flower, opened with its sharp vivid petals, isolated Bird of Paradise flower (Strelitzia reginae). Close-up view of Bird of Paradise flowers (Strelitzia reginae Bird of Paradise. Newly opened Bird of Paradise against texture Hanging lobster claw, bird of paradise. Picture of the flower lobster claw also known as false bird of paradise Bird of Paradise on Colorful Bark. The Bird of Paradise flower rests on a dew laden bark Bird of paradise flowers. Isolated on a white background Bird of Paradise. Closeup shot of a Bird of Paradise plant in a Greenhouse Bird of paradise. The colorful of Bird of paradise Bird of Paradise Flower isolated on white background, clipping p. Ath Bird of Paradise Flower. Strelitzia is a genus of five species of perennial plants, native to South Africa. The genus is named after the duchy of Mecklenburg The bird of paradise street lamp decoration on The second Thai-Myanmar Friendship Bridge. Linking Thailand`s Mae Sot district and Myanmar`s border city of Bird of Paradise Flowers. Setting in studio Bird of paradise. Strelitzia reginae isolated on white background

Flowers

The most famous and noticeable part of bird-of-paradise is its flowers. Set atop long stalks that can reach five feet in height, the flowers have a complex structure with bright colors and copious nectar to entice their bird pollinators. A green, red, or purplish canoe-shaped bract (a modified leaf, also called a spathe) forms on the stalk, and it opens along its top edge to reveal the flower petals, stamens, and prominent stigma that unfold from inside the sheath. The flowers typically bloom from September through May.

Birds seek out the nectar, which is found in the “nectary” at the base of the flower where two petals join together. A bird hops onto the smaller, lower petal, and the bird’s weight exposes the anthers, which brush pollen on the bird’s feet and chest. When the bird flies to another flower, it lands on the prominent and sticky stigma and deposits pollen, before hopping in for another nectar treat. Different birds act as pollinators for the different bird-of-paradise species, but some birds, like sunbirds, have been found to be “nectar robbers,” avoiding the flower’s pollinating parts and just eating the nectar.

Leaves

The leaves on a bird-of-paradise plant are arranged to form a fan-like clump of thick, waxy, and evergreen foliage. The color of the leaves varies from glossy, deep green, to blue-green, to muted gray-green. The leaves are paddle shaped, similar to banana plant leaves, and attached to a long, upright stalk. An exception is the narrow-leaved bird-of-paradise, which has leaves like pointed spikes on mature plants.

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